EADY FAMILY

Susannah Eady, a widow, left a 20 January 1807 St. John's Parish, Charleston County, South Carolina will, proved 31 May 1815, by which she asked that she be buried at her brother Daniel Eady's place in the same parish; left 5 shillings each to her siblings Daniel, William, George and Mary; left cattle to her nieces Nancy and Peggy; and left a slave, plantation tools, and the remainder of her property to her nephew Jonathan Eady [Will Book E, 1807-18, 509]. Members of the Eady family in South Carolina were

i. James, received a grant for 200 acres in Craven County on one of the branches of Lynches Creek on 8 February 1753 [S.C. Archives Series S213184, volume 6, page 296, item 3]. He was head of a St. John's Parish, Berkeley County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 and 4 "other free" in 1800 [SC:69].

1    ii. Daniel, born say 1750.

iii. George, head of a St. John's Parish, Berkeley County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 and 3 in 1800 [SC:69]. He was sued by the executors of Andrew Kennedy's estate on 16 June 1804 [S.C. Archives series L10018, item 324A].

iv. William, head of a St. John's Parish, Berkeley County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 and 9 in 1800 [SC:69]. His land in St. John's Parish was mentioned in an October 1825 plat [S.C. Archives series L10005, reel 9, plat 4833].

v. Molly, head of a Liberty County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [SC:805].

vi. Jonathan, head of a Charleston County household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [SC:69], taxable on 680 acres, 4 slaves, and 1 "free Black" in St. Stephen's Parish, South Carolina, in 1824 [S.C. Archives series S126061, item 3176].

vii. John, head of a St. John's Parish, Charleston household of 1 "other free" in 1790 and 5 "other free" in 1800 [SC:69]. He paid tax on 1 "free Black" in Prince George Parish, South Carolina, in 1824 [S.C. Archives series S1260661, item 866].

viii. Nancy, head of a Liberty County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [SC:805].

ix. Judy, head of a Liberty County household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [SC:804] and 10 in Georgetown in 1810 [SC:219].

x. Sarah, paid tax on 1 "free Black" in Prince George Parish, South Carolina, in 1825 [S.C. Archives series S126061, item 867].

xi. Thomas, paid tax on 1 "free Black" in Prince George Parish, Georgetown District, South Carolina, in 1824 [S.C. Archives series S126061, item 868].

xii. Ann, living on Wentworth Street in Charleston about 1811-1817 when she paid the "free Negro" capitation tax [Capitation Tax Book, p.5].

 

1.    Daniel Eady1, born say 1750, received a grant for 100 acres in St. John's Parish, Berkeley County, South Carolina, on 31 August 1774 [S.C. Archives series S213019, vol. 32:572]. He was head of a St. John's Parish, Charleston, Berkeley County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 and 3 "other free" in 1800 [SC:69]. He called himself a "free coloured man" on 10 September 1834 when he made his St. John's Parish, Charleston, Berkeley County will, proved 21 December 1834. He left his plantation and four slaves to his daughter Esther Bluit, two slaves to his granddaughter Elizabeth Peigler, and named his nephew Jonathan Eady his executor [WB 40:266]. His daughter was

i. Elizabeth Bluit.

 

EDGAR/ EDGE FAMILY

1.    Mary Edgar, born say 1752, was the mother of a "Mulatto" girl named Betty who was ordered bound out by the churchwardens of Princess Anne County on 12 November 1772 [Orders 1770-3, 369]. Mary was the mother of

i. Betty Edgar, born say 1772.

ii. ?Willis Edge, born before 1776, head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:721] and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:188].

iii. ?Jack Edge, head of a Pasquotank County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:897]. He may have been the John Edge who received pay voucher no. 5635 in Halifax District for 3 pounds specie on 11 February 1782 for military service [North Carolina Revolutionary Pay Vouchers, 1779-1782, https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2WT-PLKB].

 

EDWARDS FAMILY

1.    Edward1 Edwards, born say 1720, was the slave of Merritt Sweney of Elizabeth City County in 1746 when Ann Ellston, a "free Mulatto woman," purchased and married him. They had two children by 1758 when their case came before the Council of Virginia [Hillman, Executive Journals of the Council VI:111]. Their son Elston, "son of Ned Edwards, formerly Major Sweney's slave," was baptized in Bruton Parish, James City County, on 7 August 1748 [Bruton Parish Register, 5]. They were the parents of

i. Elston, born 7 August 1748.

2    ii. ?Edward2, born about 1762.

 

2.    Edward2 Bradby Edwards, born about 1762, of Charles City County, married Mary Scott, daughter of Robert Scott, 14 February 1789 Henrico County bond, John Scott and Edward Bowman of Henrico County sureties. Marian Edwards registered in Chesterfield County on 30 July 1802: Ned Bowman & Anderson Scott hath this day certify before me that Marian Edwards, formerly Marian Scott, daughter of Robert Scott was born free & that she resided in this county until she was married to Edward B. Edwards [Edwards, Edward B (M, 47): Free Negro Certificate, 1807, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. He was taxable in Chesterfield County from 1816 to 1820 and in 1827 [PPTL 1812-27, frames 279, 316, 404, 456, 701]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 13 September 1813: fifty one years old, bright yellow complexion, born free. And Mary Ann Edwards (probably his wife) obtained a certificate of freedom on 13 March 1823: fifty years old, bright yellow complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 192, 482]. He may have been the Edward Edwards who was listed in a manuscript volume bearing on the Revolutionary War [Eckenrode, Virginia Soldiers of the American Revolution, I:151, citing War 4:171 at LVA]. He bought a lot on the south side of Turnpike road in the township of Swansborough by Chesterfield County deed on 15 July 1817 [DB 22:12]. They were probably the parents of

i. Mary Ann, born about 1794, registered in Chesterfield County on 11 July 1814: twenty years old, bright yellow complexion, born free

ii. John Brown, born about 1797, registered in Chesterfield County on 13 April 1818: twenty one years old, mulatto complexion, born free.

iii. Lucy, born about 1800, registered on 14 July 1823: twenty three years old, Mulatto complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, nos. 222, 317, 484, 492, 1174].

 

Other members of the Edwards family were

i. Isaac, born about January 1767, a "Mulatto boy" bound apprentice to Seth Pryor for nineteen years and nine months until the age of twenty one by the New Hanover County, North Carolina court in April 1768 [Minutes 1738-69, 336].

3    ii. Edward3, born say 1768.

iii. Hezekiel, head of a Stafford County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:127].

iv. Lydda, head of a Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:112a].

 

3.    Edward3 Edwards, born say 1768, was taxable in Louisa County on 3 horses from 1810 to 1814: called a "FN" in 1811, taxable on 2 free tithes in 1812, in a list of "free Negroes & Mulattoes" in 1814 [PPTL, 1782-1814]. He left a 1 March 1827 Louisa County will, proved 8 April 1827, by which he left his wife the use of his plantation and lands and left $10 to each of his children that had left his household: John, Anne, Betsy, and Nancy, with the balance to go to his three other children: Edmund, Billy and Dicy. He also named his grandchildren Edmond, Betty & Dicy [WB 7:305-6]. He was the father of and his wife Dicy were the parents of

i. John.

ii. Anne.

iii. Betsy.

iv.Nancy.

v. Edmund, born 3 June 1796, registered in Louisa County on 10 June 1831: son of Edward and Dicy Edwards who was born free, yellow man, about 5'9" high, 35 years old the 3d inst.

vi. William, born 1 July 1801, registered in Louisa County on 12 November 1827 and 4 January 1846: a person of colour, the son of Edward Edwards who was born free, about 5'11" high, light complexion, bushy head of hair ... son of Edward and Dicy Edwards ... will be 45 years old 1st July 1846.

vii. Dicy, born about 1804, registered in Louisa County on 7 September 1833: daughter of Edward and Dicy Edwards who was free born, very bright mulatto woman 28-30 years [Abercrombie, Free Blacks of Louisa County, 29, 37, 45, 66].

 

EDWIN FAMILY

1.    Dorothy Edwin, born say 1730, was the "free Negroe" mother of two children bound out by the court in Frederick County, Virginia, on 3 September 1755 [Orders 1754-5, 378]. She was the mother of

i. Nicholas, born about 1748, seven years old when he was bound to Thomas Hooper on 3 September 1755.

2     ii. ?Lucy, born say 1750.

iii. Sarah, born about 1752, three years old when he was bound to Thomas Hooper on 3 September 1755 until the age of eighteen.

 

2.    Lucy Edwin, born say 1750, was living in Halifax County, Virginia, on 17 July 1777 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her "Mulattoe" son Abraham to Leonard Baker. On 21 August 1777 the court rejected her petition to have her several children placed with Nathaniel Terry, Gentleman, instead of Baker [Pleas 1774-9, 227, 237]. She was apparently the mother of

i. Abraham, born say 1770.

ii. Peter, a "Mulatto" taxable in Pittsylvania County from 1800 to 1812, living with James Johnson in 1803, with Benjamin Terry, Jr., in 1804 [PPTL 1797-1812, frames 224, 374, 400, 471, 497, 594, 659, 708, 734, 803].

 

ELLIOTT FAMILY

1.    Penelope Elliott, born say 1690, was called the mother of Elizabeth Ellet a "Mulato girle begot on the body of Pennelope Ellet" on 18 April 1712 when the churchwardens of Tanners Creek in Norfolk County bound her to Mary Cratch until the age of thirty-one [Orders 1710-17, 27; DB 9:170]. She was the mother of

2    i. Elizabeth, born before 15 February 1711/12.

ii. ?Rachel1 (no last name indicated), a "Negro girle" who had been bound to William Critch on 17 October 1718 when the Norfolk County ordered her bound to someone else because she complained of inhuman usage [Orders 1719, 34b].

 

2.   Elizabeth Elliott, born 16 March 1711/2, was bound by the churchwardens of Tanner's Creek in Norfolk County on 18 April 1712 until the age of thirty-one. She was probably identical to "a Mollato girle called Bess" who Mary Creatch gave to her daughter Margaret Carney by her 10 August 1713 Norfolk County will, proved 18 September 1713 [Orders 1710-17, 27; DB 9:170, 472]. Elizabeth Elliott was a "free Molatto" living in Norfolk County on 17 May 1753 when the court bound her daughter Dinah Ellet to Shadrack Wiat [Orders 1750-3, 153b]. She was taxable in Portsmouth Parish on the west side of Western Branch District of Norfolk County in 1761, adjacent to Rachel Elett in a non-alphabetized list, and a "free negro" taxable in Western Branch District in 1768 and 1769 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables 1751-65, 168; 1766-80, 14, 87]. She was the mother of

3    i. ?Rachel2, born say 1732.

4    ii. ?Ann, born say 1740.

iii. Dinah, born say 1748, ordered bound apprentice to Shadrack Wiat on 17 May 1753.

iv. ?Peter, born say 1751, taxable in Norfolk County in John Woodside's Elizabeth City Parish household in 1767 and 1768, taxable in James Grimes's household in Western Branch Precinct in 1771 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables 1766-80, 36, 83, 152], and a "Black male" living on the north side of the Western Branch in the list of Charles Conner in 1784 [Tithables, 1730-1785, n.p.]. He married Peggy Young ("Free Negroes"), 20 August 1785 Norfolk County bond, Charles Conner surety. He was taxable on a horse in Norfolk County on the north side of the Western Branch in 1786 [PPTL, 1782-90, frame 520].

v. ?David, born say 1760, and a "Black male" living on the north side of the Western Branch in the list of Charles Conner in 1784 [Tithables, 1730-1785, n.p.], taxable in Portsmouth and Elizabeth River Parishes, Norfolk County, from 1794 to 1813: a "M"(ulatto) butcher in Western Branch District in a "List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes" in 1801 [PPTL, 1791-1812, frames 103, 226, 298, 483, 577, 688, 740, 773].

 

3.    Rachel2 Elliott, born say 1732, was a taxable head of a household in Norfolk County in Portsmouth Parish on the west side of Western Branch in 1761 (adjacent to Elizabeth Elet), in 1765, and in 1768 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables 1751-65, 168; 1766-80, 67]. She was called a "free negro" on 20 April 1775 when the Norfolk County court ordered the churchwardens of Portsmouth Parish to bind her sons Samuel and James Elliott to Willis Eastwood to learn the trade of cooper [Orders 1773-5, 71]. She was a labourer in Western Branch District of Norfolk County in 1801 in a "List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes" with William Elliott in her household [PPTL, 1791-1812, frame 383]. She was the mother of

i. ?Betsy, born about 1761, registered (with Keziah Elliott) in Norfolk County on 30 October 1794: a melator woman (who says that she is about thirty three years old) was born free [Elliot, Elizabeth (F, 33): Free Negro Certificate, 1794, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. She was head of a Norfolk County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:815]

5    ii. ?Nancy, born say 1763.

6    iii. Ann2, born say 1764.

7    iv. ?Sarah, born say 1765.

8    v. ?Keziah, born about 1766.

vi. Samuel, born say 1768, bound apprentice to Willis Eastwood in Norfolk County on 20 April 1775.

vii. James1, born say 1770, bound apprentice to Willis Eastwood in Norfolk County on 20 April 1775.

 

4.    Ann1 Elliott, born say 1740, was taxable in Norfolk County in the district from Portsmouth to Western Branch, living on Campbell's land in 1761 and taxable in 1765. She and (her sister?) Rachel were probably identical to "Ann & Rachel, free negroes" who were taxable in Western Branch Precinct in 1759 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables 1751-65, 133, 170, 189]. She was taxable in Portsmouth & Elizabeth River Parish District of Norfolk County on 2 free males from 1796 to 1798, 1 free male and a horse in 1800; she was a labourer in Western Branch District of Norfolk County in a "List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes" with Absalom Elliott in her household in 1801; and was taxable on a horse in 1806 [PPTL, 1791-1812, frames 383, 574]. She was probably the mother of

i. Edmond, born say 1782, a "M"(ulatto) Norfolk County taxable from 1799 to 1806: a labourer in Western Branch District of Norfolk County in a "List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes" in 1801, perhaps identical to Ned Elliott who was taxable in 1815 and 1817 [PPTL, 1791-1812, frames 298, 577; 1813-24, 101, 250].

ii. Absalom, born say 1785, a "N"(egro) Norfolk County taxable from 1802 to 1811 [PPTL 1791-1812, frames 430, 577, 463, 688, 740].

 

5.    Nancy Elliott, born say 1763, registered in Norfolk County on 10 April 1794: appeared Wright Carn__ and made oath that Nathaniel Ash a Black Man and Nancy Elliott, Betsey Elliott, Sarah Elliott, Dinah Elliott, and Rachel Elliott was all born free in this county [Ash, Nathaniel: Free Negro Certificate, 1794, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. She was indicted by the Norfolk County court on 17 August 1801 for having a "black" child [Orders 1799-1801, 37a]. She was a labourer in Western Branch District of Norfolk County in 1801 in a "List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes" with males Jeremiah and Lewis Elliott and females Sally and Charlotte Elliott in her household [PPTL, 1791-1812, frame 383]. She was head of a Norfolk County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:817].   She was probably the mother of

i. ?James2, born about 1782, twenty-eight years old when he registered in Norfolk County on 16 July 1810: 5 feet 3 1/2, of a Dark Complexion [Register of Free Negros & Mulattos, Norfolk County courthouse, no.18].

ii. Lewis, born say 1786, taxable in Portsmouth & Elizabeth River Parish of Norfolk County from 1803 to 1817 [PPTL, 1791-1812, frames 463, 559, 646, 723; 1813-24, frames 101, 250].

iii. Sally.

iv. Charlotte.

v. Jeremiah, taxable in Portsmouth & Elizabeth River Parish of Norfolk County from 1815 to 1817 [PPTL, 1813-24, frames 101, 250].

 

6.    Ann2 Elliott, born say 1764, may have been identical to "Nanny daughter of Rachel a free Negro" (no last name mentioned) who was ordered bound by the churchwardens of Elizabeth River Parish, Norfolk County, to Rev. Thomas Davis on 19 April 1764 [Orders 1763-65, 97]. Nanny Elliott was a labourer in Western Branch District of Norfolk County in a "List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes" with males Lemuel and William Elliott and females Betsey, Patty, Jenny and Fanny Elliott in her household [PPTL, 1791-1812, frames 172, 226, 247, 374, 383]. She was probably the mother of

i. Betsy, perhaps the Betty Elliott who was head of a Norfolk County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:815].

ii. Lemuel.

iii. Patty.

iv. William.

v. Jenny.

vi. Fanny.

 

7.    Sarah Elliott, born say 1765, was head of a Norfolk County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:815]. Her children registered as "free Negros" in Norfolk County. They were

i. James3, born about 1785, registered in Norfolk County on 27 June 1810: son of Sarah Elliott, 5 feet 5 Inches, twenty five years of age, of a Black Complexion [Register of Free Negroes, no.4]. He was a "N"(egro) taxable in Portsmouth & Elizabeth River Parish of Norfolk County in 1805 and 1806 [PPTL, 1791-1812, frames 559, 577] and a "Free Negro" taxable in Nansemond County in 1815 [PPTL, 1815-1837, frame 10].

ii. Israel, born about 1787, registered in Norfolk County on 27 June 1810: son of Sarah Elliott, 5 feet 4 and a half Inches, twenty three years of age, of a light Complexion [Register of Free Negroes, no.5]. He was a "free Negro" taxable in Portsmouth & Elizabeth River Parish of Norfolk County in 1810 and 1811, a "B.M." taxable on a slave over the age of twelve on Western Branch in 1815 [PPTL, 1791-1812, frames 723, 740; 1813-24, frames 101]. And there was an Israel Elliott who was a "Free Negro" taxable on a horse and a head of cattle in Nansemond County in 1815 [PPTL, 1815-1837, frame 10].

 

8.    Keziah Elliott, born about 1766, was forty-five years old when she registered in Norfolk County on 19 August 1811: of a light Complexion & Pitted with the Small Pox, 5 feet 3 In., Born free [Register of Free Negroes, no.60]. Her children may have been

i. Daniel, born about 1782, twenty-eight years old when he registered in Norfolk County on 15 September 1810: 5 feet 8 3/4 Inc., of a yellow complexion, Born free [Register of Free Negroes, no.39]. He was called "a free man of colour" on 13 May 1811 when he leased land from John Hodges for seven years at $32 per year with the proviso that he build a dwelling house 18 feet square with glass windows on each side and a good brick chimney and a meat house 10 feet square and coat them with a good coat of tar [DB 45:144]. He was a "free Negro" or "M"(ulatto) taxable on Western Branch in Norfolk County from 1811 to 1817: taxable on 3 free males and 2 horses in 1812, taxable on 2 slaves over the age of twelve in 1814 and 1815 [PPTL, 1791-1812, frames 740, 773; 1813-24, frames 101, 133, 250].

ii. Jean, born about 1786, registered in Norfolk County on 16 July 1810: 5 feet 2 1/4 In, Twenty four Years of age, of a Yellowish Complexion [Register of Free Negroes, no.19].

iii. Sukey, born about 1788, twenty-three years old when she registered in Norfolk County on 19 August 1811: 5 feet _ In, of a dark Complexion, Born free [Register of Free Negroes, no.62].

iv. James4, born about 1789, twenty-one years old when he registered in Norfolk County on 19 August 1811: 5 feet 4 In., of a dark Complexion, Born free [Register of Free Negroes, no.61]. He was a "B.M." taxable on a slave over the age of twelve on Western Branch in 1815 and 1817 [PPTL, 1813-24, frames 101, 250].

 

Members of the family in nearby Virginia counties were

i. Mary, born about 1775, registered in Petersburg on 9 July 1805: a light Mulatto woman, five feet high, thirty years old, born free & raised in Charles City County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 302].

9    ii. Robert1, born say 1777.

iii. Thomas, born about 1780, registered in Petersburg on 31 December 1808: a light brown free Negro man, five feet seven and half inches high, grey Eyes, blacksmith, born free in the Town of Petersburg, twenty eight years old [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 442]. He was head of a Petersburg Town household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:127a].

iv. Lucy, born say 1780, married Squire Charity, 25 April 1791 Surry County bond, Henry Charity surety, 26 April marriage by Rev. Samuel Butler, Rector of Southwark Parish Episcopal Church [Ministers' Returns, 32].

v. Stephen, "Free Negro" head of an Isle of Wight County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:43].

vi. Becky, head of a Petersburg household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:122a].

vii. Edward, head of a Petersburg Town household of 3 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [V:122b].

 

9.    Robert1 Elliott, born say 1777, married Nancy Debereux (Debrix), 19 September 1798 Surry County bond, John Debereux surety, 20 September marriage by Rev. Samuel Butler [Ministers' Returns, 51]. He was taxable in Surry County from 1787 to 1804: listed as Samuel Cocke's tithe in 1787 and 1788, charged with his own tithe in 1790 [PPTL, 1782-90, frames 449, 471, 599; 1791-1816, 60, 259, 524, 562]. He was the father of

i. ?Harler, born about 1785, registered in Surry County on 24 June 1816: a Mulattoe Man, aged 21 years, is 5'3-7/8" high of light complexion, low forehead, distended nostrils large prominant lips, streight and well made and by profession a Ditcher, was born of Nancy Elliott a free woman.

ii. Samuel G., born about 1797, registered in Surry County on 26 June 1820: a Mulatto Man of a bright Complexion was born free and is the son of Bob Elliott decd: late of this county, aged about 23 years pretty well made is 5'5-1/2" high large Ears.

iii. Henry A.B., born about 1799, registered in Surry County on 26 June 1820: a Mulatto man of a bright Complexion was born free and is the son of Bob Elliott decd: late of this County aged about 21 years pretty well made and inclined to be bowledged is 5'2-3/4" high.

iv. ?Hannah, born about 1804, registered in Surry County on 28 November 1831: daughter of Nancy Elliott, was born free, a bright mulatto woman about 27 years of age, has a broad face large full eyes...and is 5'7-3/4" high.

v. ?John, born about 1806, registered in Surry County on 26 February 1827: a free black Man of this County, Son of Nancy alias Nancy Elliott a free Woman of this County...5'6-1/2" high, has coarse bushy hair [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 57, 72, 83, 104].

 

Members of the family in North Carolina were

i. John, head of a Moore County, North Carolina household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [NC:62].

ii. William, head of a Moore County, North Carolina household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [NC:62].

iii. Cloe, born before 1776, head of Chowan County, North Carolina household of one "free colored" woman over 55 in 1820 [NC:114].

iv. Robert2, head of an Anson County, North Carolina household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:12].

 

ELLIS FAMILY

Essex County

1.    Jane Ellis, born say 1720, was a "Free Negro" woman living in Essex County, Virginia, on 18 April 1749 when the court ordered the churchwardens of South Farnham Parish to bind out her daughter Letty to James Jones until the age of twenty-one. On 21 August 1750 Jane petitioned the court stating that Rachel Young was mistreating her son James who was bound to her deceased husband Henry Young. On 21 March 1750/1 the court dismissed her suit and ordered the churchwardens of South Farnham Parish to bind her sons Will and James, "two free xxx born Indians," to Rachel Young [Orders 1747-9, 297; 1749-51, 150, 207, 292]. She was the mother of

i. James, born say 1740.

ii. Will, born say 1744.

iii. Letty, born say 1748.

 

Their descendants may have been

i. Eliza, head of a Richmond City household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:363].

ii. Lucy, head of a Richmond City household of 2 other free" and 4 slaves in 1810 [VA:379].

iii. Joseph, born before 1776, head of a Surry County, Virginia household of 12 "free colored" in 1830.

iv. Patience, born before 1776, head of a Surry County, Virginia household of 5 "free colored" in 1830.

 

Halifax County, Virginia

1.    Martha Ellis, born say 1735, was living in Halifax County, Virginia, in August 1759 when the churchwardens of Antrim Parish were ordered to bind out her children by "Daniel a Negroe formerly belonging to Peter Overby." Two of her children were bound to Abraham Maury in February 1760 [Pleas 2:478; 3:20]. Her descendants may have been

i. John, born about 1754 in Virginia, moved with his mother to Nutbush District in North Carolina when he was a child and later moved to Wake County where he enlisted in the 10th Regiment of the North Carolina Line on 27 April 1776. He was a "man of Colour" who made a declaration for a pension in Wake County court on 27 July 1820. He resided in Franklin County, Illinois, on 12 September 1837 when he made another declaration to obtain a pension. He died on 21 October 1850, and his only surviving heirs James Ellis, William Ellis, Polly Ellis, Mahalah Ellis and Henry Ellis received survivors' benefits in 1852 [NARA, S.32233, M804-916, frame 0427]. He was head of a Wake County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:103]. He sold the land which was due him for his service to Thomas Henderson, Jr., of Raleigh for $114 [N.C. Archives, Wake County folder #339].

ii. Joanna, head of a Petersburg Town household of 5 "other free" and one slave in 1810 [VA:123b].

iii. Lewis, head of a Petersburg Town household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:118a].

iv. Richard, head of a Campbell County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:880].

v. David, married Lucy Hacket, 12 February 1798 Campbell County bond. He was a "F.N." taxable in the northern district of Campbell County from 1797 to 1813 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 387, 892] and head of a Campbell County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:880].

 

ELMORE FAMILY

1.    Joseph Elmore, born say 1754, was a free "mulatto" taxable in Bertie County, North Carolina, in his own household in the list of Peter Clifton for 1775 and taxable as a married man in 1779 [CR 10.702.1, Box 2]. He was a "Mulatto" head of a Nansemond County, Virginia household with no whites, one dwelling, and one other building in 1784 [VA:74]. He and his wife Rachel registered in Norfolk County, Virginia, on 9 April 1794: to whom it may concern...Joseph Ellmore (a free Negro) and Rachel his wife was both Born free in this said County of Norfolk [Ellmore, Joseph (M): Free Negro Certificate, 1794, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. He may have been the father of

i. Henry, head of a Hanover County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:874], in the list of "free Negroes and Mulattos" in St. Paul's Parish, Hanover County, from 1811 to 1814: taxable on a slave in 1812 and 1813, listed with wife Grace in 1813 [PPTL 1804-24].

 

EPPERSON FAMILY

Members of the Epperson family were

i. Jack Epesom, born say 1737, a "Molatoe fellow" who claimed his freedom from George Brack in Onslow County, North Carolina, in July 1758 [Minutes 1749-65, 43a].

1    ii. Elizabeth, born say 1738.

 

1.    Elizabeth Epperson, born say 1738, was the mother of a bastard child named Rod (no race indicated) who was bound out to Robert Bird by the Prince Edward County court in September 1758 [Orders 1754-8, 161]. She was the mother of

2    i. Rod/ Rhoda, born say 1758.

 

2.    Rhoda Epperson, born say 1758, was living in Prince Edward County on 15 February 1779 when the court ordered the churchwardens of St. Patrick's Parish to bind out her children James and Milly to Isham Chasten. On 16 October 1786 the court ordered her children James and Lidda bound to Tarlton Woods [Orders 1771-81, part 2, 18; 1785-8, 268]. She was taxable on 2 slaves and a horse in the upper district of Prince Edward County in 1820 [PPTL 1809-31, frames 354, 376]. She was the mother of

i. ?Sam, born say 1775. He and his wife Leday were the parents of Sucky Epperson (Colored) who married George Guthrey (Colored), 27 December 1815 Prince Edward County bond, 28 December Halifax County, Virginia marriage. Lydia, born about 1780, registered in Halifax County on 21 December 1810: aged about thirty years, Complection that of a dark mulatto ... which appears from a certificate of the County Court of Prince Edward was born of a free mulatto Woman is hereby duly registered as a free negro [Register of Free Negroes, no. 29]. She consented to the 29 May 1828 Halifax County marriage of Nancy Epperson and Collin Bomar.

ii. James, born say 1776, bound apprentice in Prince Edward County in February 1779, head of a Prince Edward County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:564]. He was a "Molatto" or "of Colr" taxable in the upper district of Prince Edward County from 1797 to 1815: listed with his unnamed wife in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1809, frames 471, 524, 560, 588, 609; 1809-31, frames 17, 39, 82, 111, 160]. He was a carpenter living on John Johnson's land in 1802 and on General Woodson's in Thomas Green's district of Prince Edward County from 1802 to 1811, listed with his wife Patty and children Branch and Fanny in 1809 [A List of Free Negroes & Free People of Colour, 1811, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

iii. Milly, born say 1778, bound apprentice in Prince Edward County in February 1779.

iv. Lidda, bound out on 16 October 1786.

 

EPPS FAMILY

Members of the Epps family born about 1735 were

1    i. John1, born say 1735.

2    ii. Lucy, born say 1738.

 

1.    John1 Epps/ Evans, born say 1735, was apparently the illegitimate son of a member of the Epps and Evans families. He was called John Evans in 1751 and 1752 when he was taxable in the Lunenburg County household of (his half-brother?) Thomas Evans [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 166, 193]. He was called John Epps in September 1752 when he and Margaret Evans were called as witnesses in the trial of Peter, a slave of Edward Epps, but he was called John Evans in January 1753 when he was paid for his attendance at the trial [Orders 1752-3, 249, 456]. He was called John Evans on 6 October 1761 when he purchased 400 acres on Flat Rock Creek jointly with Thomas Biddie for 60 pounds and on 3 August 1762 when he and Biddie allowed Ann Mitchell the use of the plantation to raise stock and grow corn or other grains during her natural life as long as she and her sons Richard and Isaac remained single. He was called John Epps when he and his wife Martha sold 299 acres of this land for 115 pounds on 8 January 1771 [DB 6:473; 7:321; 11:433]. He was called John Evans on 10 December 1767 when the Lunenburg County court ordered the churchwardens of Cumberland Parish to bind Daniel Redcross to him and called "John Evans (alias Eppes)" on 13 April 1769 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind Isham Harris (son of Martha Stewart) to him [Orders 1766-69, fol. 122, 202]. Isham Harris and Daniel Redcross were taxable in his Lunenburg County household in 1772 and 1773. Daniel was called Daniel Evans when he was taxable in his household in 1775 [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 304, 324, 354]. John Epps was executor of the 12 September 1777 Lunenburg County will of Daniel Redcross, proved 10 June 1779 [WB 3:26]. Daniel left him half his estate and the other half to Charles Evans who he called his brother, so perhaps Daniel was John Epps' step-son or nephew. He was taxable in 1782 on 2 slaves, 2 horses and 30 cattle and taxable in 1783 on slaves Cyrus, Susan, James, James, and Mary, 5 horses and 17 cattle [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1806]. On 7 December 1784 he and his wife Martha Epps purchased an additional 200 acres adjoining his land for 70 pounds, and on 11 October 1787 they sold land on Flat Rock Creek adjoining Abraham Cuttillo and James Lowman [DB 14:139; 15:120]. He died before 10 June 1790 when the inventory of his Lunenburg County estate was recorded. The inventory included 20 pounds paid to Thomas Epps and debts owed by Edward, John and Thomas Epps. On 12 June 1800 his children Thomas Eppes, John Eppes, Edward Eppes, Elizabeth Cuttillo the wife of Edward Cuttillo, William Eppes, Sally Eppes, Joel Eppes, and Freeman Eppes, a minor by his guardian, sued the administrator of the estate, James Buford, in chancery for division of the land. On 11 July 1805 the administrator reported that he had sold 145 acres on Flat Rock Creek near Cocke's Road for 182 pounds, divided the money among the eight children, and allotted the widow Patty Eppes the remaining 70 acres [Orders 1799-1801, 82; 1802-5, fol. 209, p.209]. Martha was head of a household in a "List of Free Negroes & Mulattoes" in Lunenburg County in 1802 and 1803 with her children: Sally, Freeman, Betsy Critillow, and Suky Epes [Lunenburg County, Free Negro, Slave Records, 1802-1830, p.1, LVA]. Martha died before 14 September 1809 when an inventory of her estate was returned to court by Thomas Evans [WB 4:106; WB 3:169, 377; WB 6:259]. Their children were

3    i. Thomas1, born say 1757.

4    ii. William1, born say 1762.

5    iii. John2, born 23 December 1763.

iv. Edward1, born say 1767, taxable on 2 horses in Lunenburg County in 1790, granted a license by the Lunenburg County court on 11 April 1805 to keep an ordinary at his house [Orders 1802-5, 194], perhaps the Edward Epes who was head of a Lunenburg County household of a white woman over the age of forty-five, 3 slaves, and 7 "free colored" in 1820.

v. Elizabeth, married Edward Cuttiloe.

vi. Sally, born about 1770, registered as a free Negro in Lunenburg County on 12 September 1836: about 66 years of age, 5 feet 2 Inches high bright Mulatto Complexion, rather freckled & inclined to Corpulent [WB 5, after page 89, no. 82].

vii. Joel, born say 1775, taxable in Lunenburg County from 1797 to 1804 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1806]. He and his wife Tabitha sold land by deed proved in Lunenburg County court on 13 June 1799 [Orders 1796-9, 24]. He purchased 200 acres on Sandy Creek in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, from his father-in-law, Thomas Stewart adjoining William Stewart on 5 November 1799 for 30 pounds [DB 10:177]. He and his wife Tabby were counted in the "List of Free Negroes & Mulattoes" on Bears Element Creek in Lunenburg County in 1802 with their children Rebecca and Wilkerson [Lunenburg County Free Negro & Slave Records, 1802-1803, LVA]. He married second, Polly Bass, 31 December 1804 Granville County bond, John Johnson bondsman. He was head of a Guilford County, North Carolina household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [NC:990] and 7 "free colored" in Abington Township, Wayne County, Indiana in 1840.

6    viii. Freeman, born say 1783.

 

2.    Lucy Epps, born say 1738, was the "Mulatto" servant of Andrew King of Sussex County in April 1758 when her illegitimate child was ordered bound to King [Orders 1757-9, 160]. She may have been the mother of

i. Ephraim, born before 1776, head of a Sussex County household of 7 "free colored" in 1830.

ii. Mary, head of a Prince George County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:538].

 

3.    Thomas1 Epps, born say 1757, was taxable in Lunenburg County on a slave named Phillis from 1783 to 1787 and taxable there from 1794 to 1804: on 2 free tithes and a slave from 1794 to 1797, on 4 free tithes and a slave in 1798, 3 free tithes from 1799 to 1803, and 2 free tithes and 2 slaves in 1804. His widow Elizabeth was tithable on a free tithe and 2 slaves in 1806 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1806]. He was married to Elizabeth Berry by 20 November 1798 when they brought suit in York County court against the administrators of the estate of her brother Edward Berry to recover her share of the estate of her father James Berry. The administrators were Edward's widow Elizabeth and her husband Edward Cuttillo [Orders 1795-1803, 297]. Elizabeth Berry had probably been living in Lunenburg County about 1779 when her father's York County estate was settled. Thomas was counted in the "List of Free Negroes & Mulattoes" on Flatrock Creek in the lower district of Lunenburg County in 1802 and 1803 with his wife Betsy and children James, John, and Ned. The orphans of Abraham Cuttillo were also living with him: Abram, Ned, and Betsy Critillow [Lunenburg County Free Negro & Slave Records, 1802-1803, LVA]. On 8 September 1803 the Lunenburg County court granted him a license to keep an ordinary at his house [Orders 1802-5, 95]. He died before 23 September 1805 when his Lunenburg County estate was inventoried. The account of his estate included seven slaves, called him the guardian of the orphans of Abraham Cuttillo, and found a balance in their favor of 117 pounds [WB 6:138-9]. Elizabeth was head of a Lunenburg County household of 4 "other free" and 4 slaves in 1810 [VA:339]. They were the parents of

i. James, married Nelly Stewart, 28 March 1804 Lunenburg County bond, Buckner Valentine surety.

ii. John3, married Elizabeth Curtillar (Cuttillo), 25 March 1803 Lunenburg County bond, Freeman Epps surety. He was listed as a "free Negro" in Lunenburg County in 1802. He and his wife Betsy and children: Franky, Thomas, Blanchy, and Martha Epes were counted in a list of "Free Negroes & Mulattoes" in Lunenburg County in 1814 [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy 33:267].

iii. Edward2, born about 1780, counted in a list of "Free Negroes & Mulattoes" in Lunenburg County in 1814 with his wife Elizabeth and children Mary and Betsy [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy 33:267], registered as a free Negro in Lunenburg County on 10 March 1835: fifty five years of Age of Yellow Complexion, 5 feet 6 Inches high ... his face wrinkled and his hair somewhat Grey [WB 5, after page 89, no. 79].

 

4.    William1 Epps, born say 1762, enslisted in the Revolution and was in the list of men from Mecklenburg County under the command of Captain Reuben Vaughan who were on a detachment to the Southward under immediate command of Colonel David Mason in 1779 [Edmund W. Hubbard Papers, Southern Historical Collection, UNC Chapel Hill, NC, cited by http://www.ncgenweb.us/ncgranville/rev/guy-wm-rev.htm]. He was taxable on his own tithe in Lunenburg County from 1791 to 1798 and taxable on 2 tithes from 1799 to 1806 [PPTL 1782-1806]. He and Thomas Epps Hobson were sued by the assignee of Jacob Chavis in Lunenburg County court for a debt of 7 pounds on 13 November 1800 [Orders 1799-1801, 112]. He was counted in the "List of free Negroes & Mulattoes" in the lower District of Lunenburg near Flatrock Creek in 1802 and 1803 with his wife Caty and children: George, Priscilla, William, Thomas & James Critillow. He died before 14 September 1809 when the account of his Lunenburg County estate was taken by Thomas Evans [WB 6:260-1]. His widow Catherine was counted as a (26-44)-year-old white woman with 8 "other free" persons in her household in the 1810 census for Lunenburg County. His children were

i. George.

ii. Priscilla.

iii. William3.

iv. Thomas2, counted in a list of "Free Negroes & Mulattoes" in Lunenburg County in 1814 with his wife Sally [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy 33:267].

 

5.    John2 Epps, born 23 December 1763, was taxable on a horse in Lunenburg County from 1786 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1806]. He was described as a "mulatto man about 25 years of age, about 5 feet 10 inches high, had on a light coloured broad cloth coat, corduroy waistcoat, brown linen overalls, and a pair of shoe boots, said he is a free man, and calls his name John Eppes, and that he lives in the county of Lunenburg" when he was taken up as a runaway while riding a dark chestnut sorrel horse near the Spotsylvania County courthouse according to the 3 December 1789 issue of the Virginia Herald and Fredericksburg Advertiser [(Timothy Green and Co.) http://www2.vcdh.virginia.edu/gos/explore.html]. He was counted in the "List of Free Negroes & Mulattoes in the Lower District of Lunenburg County" in March 1802 with his wife Lucy and children: Nancy, Dolly, Allen, Sally, Peter, Patsy, and John [Lunenburg County, Free Negro, Slave Records, 1802-1830, p.1]. He was committed to jail in Lunenburg County on 30 January 1805 for "feloniously beating, maiming and wounding of Thomas Eppes" about two weeks previous but was found not guilty [Orders 1802-5, folio 183]. He may have been identical to Jack Epps who was head of a Wilkes County, North Carolina household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:519]. He was seventy-one years old on 10 October 1834 when he made a declaration in Halifax County, Virginia court to apply for a pension for Revolutionary War service. He stated that he was born in Lunenburg County, enlisted for 12 months, and then drafted there into the militia service in 1781. He was granted a pension while residing in Person County on 8 February 1836 [NARA, S.8423, M805-306]. He was the father of

i. Nancy.

ii. Dolly.

iii. Allen, born 1776-1794, taxable in Halifax County, Virginia, in 1811 and 1812 [PPTL, 1800-12, frames 941, 1026], counted in a list of "Free Negroes & Mulattoes" in Lunenburg County in 1814 [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy 33:267], head of a Person County, North Carolina household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:498]. He was a 54-year-old "Mulatto" farmer counted in the 1850 census for Person County, North Carolina, with his wife Ellen (both born in Virginia) and children.

iv. Sally.

v. Peter, born about 1798, head of a Person County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:498], a 52-year-old "Mulatto," born in Virginia, counted in the 1850 census for Person County, North Carolina.

vi. Patsy/ Martha, married Willis Freeman, 11 December 1833 Person County bond, Thomas Stewart bondsman. Willis and Martha, both born in Virginia, were counted in the 1850 census for Person County, North Carolina.

vii. John, a "Free man of Colour," late of Lunenburg County, died on 29 February 1824 according to a Lunenburg County coroner's inquisition which met at the residence of Isham Epes and determined that John W.G. Hardy of Cumberland Parish, Lunenburg County, at the residence of Jordan Kelly on the 24th February struck John with a wooden hance with an iron ring attached and staple on the left part of the head near the left eye which was a mortal wound from which John lingered and died [Epps, John: Coroner' Inquisition, 1824, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

 

6.    Freeman Epps, born say 1783, was a minor on 12 June 1800 when the children of John Epps, deceased, brought suit in Lunenburg County for division of their father's land [Orders 1799-1801, 82]. He was taxable in Lunenburg County on his own tithe, a slave and 2 horses in 1802 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1806]. He was counted in the "List of Free Negroes & Mulattoes" on Flat Rock Creek in the household of his mother Martha Epps in 1802 and in his own household in 1803 with his wife Rebecca and their daughter Polly. He was head of a Person County household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:498]. He was the father of

i. Polly, born about 1803.

 

Another member of the Epps family was

i. William2, listed as a "free Negro" shoemaker in Lunenburg County in 1802.

 

Endnotes:

1.    The Epps family were probably related to Epes Allen who was also listed in the Lunenburg County "List of Free Negroes & Mulattoes" in 1802 and 1803: in William Norton's household with Betsy Hobson on Bear's Element Creek. On 17 April 1822 a coroner's inquisition was convened in Lunenburg County to determine the death of "Epes Allen a Free man of Colour." They determined that he was found on 14 April 1822 on the lands of the estate of Thomas Buford, deceased, near the house of Jordan Tully with no marks of violence on his body. Peter Epes (signing) was a member of the inquisition [Allen, Epes: Coroner's Inquisition, Lunenburg county, 1822, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

 

EVANS FAMILY

The mixed-race Evans family probably originated in Virginia sometime around the mid-1600s because there were over thirty mixed-race members of the family born before 1750. There was an Eleanor Evans, born say 1660, who was taxable in Surry County, Virginia, in William Hancock's household in 1677, in the household of Robert Caufield in 1678, and in Joseph Rogers' household in 1679 [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy, vol.22, no.3, pp.57, 63, 67]. She may have been an African American woman or a white woman who "worked the ground." Mixed-race members of the Evans family were

1    i. Morris1, born say 1665.

2    ii. Ann1, born say 1710.

3    iii. Thomas1, born say 1710.

4    iv. James1, born say 1720.

5    v. Thomas2, born say 1723.

vi. Ann2, Sr., a "taxable free Female" with Ann Evans, Jr., in Bertie County, North Carolina, in 1751 [CCR 190].

6    vii. John1, born about 1739.

 

1.    Morris1 Evans, born say 1665, was sued in Charles City County court by Joseph Makepeace in May 1738 for 40 shillings, 300 pounds of tobacco, and a hog due by bill. The sheriff reported that Morris had either run away or so absconded that process could not be served on him, so to satisfy the debt he had attached three beds, blankets, eighteen plates, seven dishes, two chests, a table, a mare and some tobacco hanging in the loft which were in the hands of Jane Evans. However, the court ruled that the goods did not belong to Morris [Orders 1737-1751, 3-4]. Jane was his wife and identical to Jane Gibson, the daughter of Jane Gibson, who married Morris Evans in Charles City County according to a suit brought by Thomas Gibson, alias Mingo Jackson, Jane Evans' third great grandson who was held as a slave by David Ross until 1792. Eighty-one-year-old Robert Wills deposed in Charles City County on 25 June 1791 that "about seventy years ago he was well acquainted with Jane and George Gibson, dark mulattoes, who lived in the county of Charles City, and were free persons." Wills was indentured as an apprentice carpenter to Mr. Carter of Shirley Plantation when he was ten years old, about 1721. (Shirley was occupied by John Carter, son of Robert "King" Carter, in October 1723 when he married Elizabeth Hill). Wills stated that Jane, the younger, married an Evans, Morris Evans he believed. She was "not above sixty" in Charles City County about 1721 when Robert Wills knew her. She "practiced midwifery and doctoring" [Lynchburg Chancery file 1821-033]. Wills was asked if he knew any other "free mulattoes or blacks who have descended from a branch of the name Evans," and he stated that he knew a number of them in Charles City: the Scott, Bradby, Smith, Redcross alias Evans, Morris alias Evans and in Henrico the Bowman families, all descended from Jane Evans the daughter of Jane Gibson" [Lynchburg City Chancery file 1821-033]. Morris Evans was living in York County on 15 May 1738 when the court presented him and Beck Hulet (in separate cases) for not listing themselves as tithables. They were exempted from the fine normally imposed for failure to pay their tax but were ordered to pay their tax for the year and future years. By his 18 February 1739/40 York County will he left his son Charles a shilling, left a mare and foal to Elizabeth Hulet, left his bed, furniture, and two cows to his "friend" Rebecca Hulet, and left furniture and three head of cattle to his son Morris. He also left a boat and cart for the use of Rebecca and his son Morris as long as they "live and agree together." He appointed Rebecca and Morris his executors and his friend and neighbor John Washer his trustee. John James Hulet was a witness to the will, and he and James Dunn provided security for the administration of the estate by Rebecca Hulet and Morris Evans (making their marks) on 17 March 1739/40. The inventory and appraisal of the estate was returned to court on 15 November 1742 with Rebecca Hulet (making her mark) as signatory. It was valued at 21 pounds currency and included a boat, cart and wheels, two cows, two heifers, two yearlings, two horses, and two pairs of oyster tongs. The account of the estate included a mare paid to Elizabeth Hulet as her legacy and a payment of 2 shillings, 6 pence to Elizabeth Rollinson [Wills & Inventories, 18:414, 427, 558-9; Wills & Inventories, 19: 134-5]. His children were

7    i. Frances1, born say 1685.

8    ii. Charles1, born say 1696.

9    iii. Morris2, born say 1710.

 

2.    Ann1 Evans, born say 1710, died before 15 February 1748/9 when the Prince George County, Virginia court ordered the churchwardens of Bristol Parish to bind out her "Mulotto" children Philip and Elizabeth. The churchwardens bound them to the Rev. Robert Fergeson on 10 May 1749 [Chamberlayne, Register of Bristol Parish, 134]. She was the ancestor of

10    i. ?Isaac1, born say 1735.

ii. ?John Evans/ Epps, born say 1735. See the Epps family history.

iii. ?Jacob, born say 1737, perhaps one of the unnamed "Molatto" children which Edward Epps asked the Lunenburg County court to bind to him in July 1752. He and Isaac (no last names given) were called the slaves of Edward Epps when the Lunenburg County court ordered Sheriff William Pool to summon them, Margaret Evans and John Epps as witnesses against Peter, a slave of Edward Epps. Jacob and Isaac Evans sued Edward Epps in Lunenburg County court in May 1753 for mistreating them, and the court allowed them to go to Martin Brandon Parish in Prince George County to search the register for proof of their age. The court later ordered them bound instead to Abraham Martin [Orders 1752-3, 69, 249, 456; 1753-4, 111, 165-6, 254].

11   iv. ?Robert1, born say 1740.

12   v. Philip, born say 1745.

vi. Elizabeth, born say 1747.

vii. ?Morris4, born about 1754, taxable in the household of Sally Ellis in Petersburg in 1790 [PPTL 1787-99], registered in Petersburg on 16 August 1794: a light Mulatto man about five feet eight inches high, forty years old, born free, served an apprenticeship with Col. Wm Call. in Prince George County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 8]. He may have been one of two Morris Evanses who were heads of Wake County, North Carolina households in 1800 [NC:761-2], perhaps the Morris Evans who was head of an Anson County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [NC:55].

13    viii. Martha, born say 1756.

ix. ?Thomas7, born about 1756, a wagoner living at the head of "C. Run" in the lower district of Lunenburg County in 1802 and 1803 when he was counted in the "List of free Negroes & Mulattoes" [LVA, Lunenburg County, Free Negro & Slave Records, 1802-1803]. He returned an inventory of the estate of Martha Epps to the Lunenburg County court on 14 September 1809 [WB 6:259]. Sally Epes was living in his household in 1814 when he was counted in the "List of free Negroes and Mulattoes" as a planter on Susanna Moore's land [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy 33:267]. He was a "free man of Colour" about sixty-three years of age on 23 December 1819 when he applied for a pension in Lunenburg County for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted in September 1777 while resident in Mecklenburg County and served until 1780 [23 December 1819 Lunenburg County Legislative Petition, LVA]. He was listed in the payroll of Captain Dudley's 2nd Virginia State Regiment commanded by Colonel Gregory Smith from July to December 1778 [https://www.fold3.com/image/10081826, 10081833, 10081847, 10081851, 10081867, 10081873]. He testified on behalf of Randall Chavis in his petition to obtain money due his father John Chavis and his uncle Anthony Chavis about 1795 but moved to Lunenburg County where the clerk of the court issued a paper certifying that Thomas Evans was a respectable and credible person [Legislative Petitions of the General Assembly, 1776-1865, Accession no. 36121, Box 150, folders 42, 58; LVA Digital Collection: http://www.virginiamemory.com/collections/petitions, accessed 24 November 2015].

x. ?Charles6, born about 1762, enlisted for eighteen months in the Revolution in Mecklenburg County as a substitute on 2 October 1780 and was sized on 18 March 1781: age 19, 5'4-1/4" high, yellow complexion, a farmer, born in Petersburg [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.7)].

xi. ?Polly, born about 1763, registered in Petersburg on 3 November 1803: a light brown Mulatto woman, five feet one and a half inches high, forty years old, short bushy hair & holes in her ears, born free & raised in the County of Prince George [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 264].

xii. ?Robert2, born about 1765, taxable in Thomas Brandom's household in the upper district of Mecklenburg County in 1787 and taxable in his own household from 1797 to 1814, taxable on his son John in 1809, head of a household of a "free Negro" man and woman over the age of 16 in 1813, a "free Negro" taxable in 1814 [PPTL, 1782-1805, frames 158, 635, 657, 1082; 1806-28, frames 7, 109, 211, 307, 418], called Robin Evans when he married Amy Stewart, 13 February 1809 Mecklenburg County bond, James Chavous security. He received a certificate in Mecklenburg County on 7 September 1814: born free and raised in the County of Mecklenburg...of a black complection and good Stature, he is five feet eight inches high, about forty nine years old, his head nearly half grey [Free Person of Colour, # 6, p.4].

xiii. ?Nancy, born about 1767, registered in Petersburg on 26 August 1805: a yellow brown Mulatto woman, five feet one and a half inches high, thirty eight years old, holes in her ears, born free & raised in the County of Prince George [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 355]. She was living in a house owned by Sarah Matthews on 3 May 1791 when the Hustings Court of Petersburg presented Sarah for keeping a wooden chimney in her house occupied by Nancy and Mary Evans. On 5 March 1793 the court awarded her 30 shillings in her suit against Isaac Gilmore for trespass, assault and battery [Orders 1784-91, 365; 1791-7, 69]. She registered again on 13 June 1810: now wife of Louis Dunnary, called Nancy Dunnary. Louis Dennary registered on 12 July 1809: a yellow free Mulatto man, five feet five and a half inches high, fifty years old, said to be a Canadian & descendant of an Indian & free born [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1819, no. 481]. Lewis Denry was living in Hanover County in November 1795 when he and his wife Susanna petitioned the Virginia Legislature, stating that he was by birth of Indian extraction, born in Canada, and had served as a domestic in the family of the Marquis de Lafayette. After the peace, he had married Susanna, the daughter of a Pamunkey Indian and lived in the Pamunkey Town for a year before they expelled him over a private dispute. He asked for public support because his wife was nearly blind [Denry, Lewis & Susanna: Petition, Prince William County, Legislative Petitions Digital Collection, LVA].

ix. ?Nancy, born about 1782, registered in Petersburg on 3 November 1803: a light brown Mulatto woman, five feet four inches high, twenty one years old, short bushy hair, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no.263].

 

3.    Thomas1 Evans, born say 1710, was called "Thomas Evings (otherwise lately called &c)" in Amherst County court on 2 September 1766 when the sheriff attached a fork of his for a debt he owed Samuel Woods. He was added to Henry Bell's road gang on 7 December 1767. In December the court ordered his male laboring tithables to keep the road in repair from Buffaloe River to Stoval's Road and ordered that Thomas be surveyor thereof [Orders 1766-9, 74, 233; 1773-82]. By his 28 June 1774 Amherst County will, proved 5 September 1774, he left to his son Benjamin his land and a horse as well as cattle and hogs for the use of his daughters Mary and Hannah and grandson Thomas as long as they abided together and left a shilling each to sons Charles, Thomas, William and Stanup (Stanhope) and daughter Nelly [WB 1:264-5]. He was the father of

i. Charles4, born say 1751, called son & heir-at-law of Thomas Evans, deceased, when he was summoned by the Amherst County court on 5 September 1774 to contest the will of his father [Orders 1773-82, 107].

ii. Thomas4.

iii. William.

iv. Stanhope, born say 1740, granted 350 acres in Amherst County on both sides of Johns Branch, a north branch of Buffaloe River, on 14 July 1780 [Grants A, 1779-80, 634].

v. Nelly.

14   vi. Benjamin1, born say 1749.

vii. Mary, born say 1751, perhaps the Mary Evans whose illegitimate daughter Sarah Evans was ordered bound by the churchwardens of Lexington Parish on 7 March 1785 [Orders 1784-7, 72], and perhaps identical to Molly Evans who was head of an Amherst County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:286].

15    viii. Hannah, born say 1753.

 

4.    James1 Evans, born say 1720, was living in Surry County, Virginia, on 16 April 1746 when he and Elizabeth Walding (Walden) were presented by the churchwardens for living in adultery [Orders 1744-49, 166]. He may have been the James Evans who was in Captain William West's muster of Edgecombe County, North Carolina Militia in the 1750s, listed next to Francis Scott and near John and Abraham Scott and Benjamin Cheaves (Chavis) [N.C. Archives, Militia Troop Returns, Box 1, folder 12, last page]. He may have been the father of

16    i. James2, born say 1750.

ii. Thomas6, born say 1752, taxable in Warren County as a married man in Smith Creek and Hawtree District in 1779, taxable on an assessment of 341 pounds in 1780, 58 pounds in Captain Shearing's District in 1782, 9 pounds in Hawtree District in 1783, a free poll and 80 acres in Captain Wyatt Hawkins' district in 1784, and taxable on 100 acres and a free poll in Hawtree District in 1785 and 1786 [1779 Assessments, p.13; Tax List 1781-1801, pp. 5, 45, 69, 80, 101, 121]. He was head of a Warren County household of 5 white (free) persons over 60 or less than 21 years of age and 3 white females in the 1785 North Carolina census (called Thomas Ivans), head of a Wake County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:104], 7 in 1800 [NC:762], and 7 in Anson County in 1810 [NC:29]. He and Morris Evans may have gone to Anson County with Micajah Young/ Demery who married Elizabeth Evans.

 

5.    Thomas2 Evans, born say 1723, was head of a household in Lunenburg County, taxable on his own tithe and Solomon Harris in 1748, taxable on his own tithe in 1749 and 1750, taxable on his own tithe and John Evans/ Epps in 1751 and 1752, and taxable on his own tithe in 1764 [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 68-9, 109, 166, 193, 250]. He was called "Thomas Evans (Negro)" on 14 May 1764 when he was sued in Lunenburg County court by Sterling Thornton and Company who attached his effects for a 5 pound debt [Orders 1764-5, 39]. His personal effects were ordered released to Matthew Marable for an 18 pound debt by the same court [Orders 1764-5, 39]. Morris Evans brought a suit against him in Mecklenburg County, Virginia court, but it was dismissed on 11 September 1769 when Morris failed to appear. On 10 May 1773 Thomas acknowledged in Mecklenburg County court that he owed a debt of 63 pounds to John Potter & Company [Orders 1768-71, 254; 1773-9, 2]. He mortgaged 13 cattle, 15 hogs, 2 horses, 2,000 weight of tobacco, and his household goods to Matthew Marable for about 50 pounds in Mecklenburg County on 12 February 1773 [DB 4:156]. Randolph Locklear sued him in Mecklenburg County court on 14 March 1774 for a debt of 2 pounds due by note of hand [Orders 1773-9, 185]. He sold by Mecklenburg County deed (signing) 2 horses, a colt, 9 cattle, 18 hogs, 6 sheep, 20 geese, 3 featherbeds, and other household items to James Anderson for 50 pounds on 15 May 1777, and purchased 50 acres of land on Little Bluestone Creek adjoining Charles Royster's line in Mecklenburg County from James Anderson for 6,000 pounds of tobacco on 11 March 1781 [DB 5:72; 6:123]. On 9 April 1782 the Mecklenburg County, Virginia court allowed his claim for providing 225 pounds of beef for the use of the Continental Army [Orders 1779-84, 134]. He was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 7 persons in 1782 [VA:34] and called Thomas Evans, Sr., when he was taxable in Mecklenburg County on 2 horses from 1782 to 1787: exempt from personal tax in 1783 and taxable on slave Phebe in 1786 [PPTL, 1782-1805, frames 12, 25, 69, 99, 152]. On 10 May 1784 the Mecklenburg County court exempted him from paying taxes due to his old age and infirmity and on 8 October 1787 the court exempted his sixty-year-old slave [Orders 1784-7, 2; 1787-92, 109]. His 22 May 1787 Mecklenburg County will, recorded 14 July 1788, listed his wife (unnamed), son Thomas and grandchildren: Evans Chaves (son of James and Jane Chaves), John Chavous, and Nancy Brannom. John Chaves and Ann Gregory were witnesses. James Anderson of North Carolina was executor [WB 2:250]. A Mecklenburg County suit for debt brought by Scottish merchants James & Robert Donald & Co. on 12 October 1796 and continued until 17 May 1798 named his heirs: Thomas Evans, Jacob Chavous and his wife Elizabeth, James Chavous and his wife Jane, Thomas Brandom and his wife Peggy, and William Caisey (Kersey) and his wife Polly [Orders 1795-8, 160, 470]. His children were

i. Elizabeth, born say 1745, married Jacob Chavis.

ii. Thomas5, born say 1750, called Thomas Evans, Jr., on 6 March 1787 when he purchased 50 acres in the upper district of Mecklenburg County on Little Bluestone Creek adjoining Charles Royster's line from Joshua Ivey of Prince George County. On 12 February 1789 he purchased for 50 pounds 2 horses, a colt, 9 cattle, 18 hogs, 6 sheep, 20 geese, 3 featherbeds, and other household items from James Anderson of Chatham County, North Carolina, the executor of his father's estate, who had purchased the items from Thomas Evans, Sr., in 1777 [DB 7:144; 470]. He was taxable on his land from 1787 to 1812 [Land Tax List 1782-1811A, 1811B-1824A, A lists]. He was taxable in Mecklenburg County from 1782 to 1798 and from 1803 to 1820: taxable on a slave named Harrison in 1785, taxable on a slave named Dick in 1789, taxable on D. Evans in 1792, taxable on slave Gloster in 1797, and head of a household of a "Free Negro" man and woman over the age of 16 in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1805, frames 2, 25, 99, 165, 213, 265, 319, 442, 541, 712, 972, 1082; 1806-28, frames 7, 109, 211, 307, 576, 668, 685]. He was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 10 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:144a].

iii. Margaret/ Peggy, born about 1753, married Thomas Brandom on 3 January 1771. She gave her maiden name as Walden in her application for a survivor's pension in 1840, so she may have been his illegitimate child by a member of the Walden family or perhaps Walden was his wife's maiden name [Dorman, Virginia Revolutionary Pension Applications, 9:74-75]. Their daughter Nancy Brannom was born in 1771.

iv. Jane, born say 1755, married James Chavis.

v. Mary Carsey (Kersey), married William Cazy (Kersey), 23 December 1786 Mecklenburg County bond, Kinchen Chavous surety.

 

6.    John1 Evans, born about 1739, was taxable in the upper district of Prince Edward County from 1787 to 1801: listed with Jethro Ferguson in 1787; taxable on a horse in 1788; charged with Charles Evans' tithe in 1789, with John Evans, Jr.'s tithe in 1790; called a "free Molatto" in 1797 and 1799; exempt from personal tax from 1799 to 1801 [PPTL 1782-1809, frames 199, 211, 254, 299, 325, 359, 413, 471, 485, 524, 548, 560]. He purchased 119 acres on Ruff Creek from William Tyree on 16 June 1794 [DB 10:157]. He was a farmer living with son Philip, daughter Judy and grandson Claiborne near William Bonnet in a list of "Free Negroes" for Prince Edward County in 1801 [LVA, Free Negro List cited by Ameena Hameed]. He was the ancestor of

i. ?Alee, married Benjamin Bartlett in Prince Edward County on 22 August 1782.

ii. ?Charles7, born say 1769, taxable in the upper district of Prince Edward County from 1789 to 1816: called a "free Molatto" or "of Colour" starting in 1797; charged with Philip Evans' tithe in 1802; over the age of forty-five in 1815 and 1816 [PPTL 1782-1809, frames 254, 268, 299, 325, 359, 413, 471, 485, 524, 548, 560, 588, 609, 631, 680, 716, 790; 1809-31, frames 17, 39, 61, 82, 111, 160, 185]. He purchased 118 acres on Ruff Creek from William Tyree for 50 pounds on 16 June 1794 and sold this land back to Tyree for the same price on 20 July 1801 [DB 10:156; 12:201]. On 15 June 1800 Charles, Jonathan and Phil Evans were ordered to work on the road whereof Samuel Watkins was surveyor, and on 21 July 1800 a jury awarded Charles 3 pounds, 15 shillings in his suit against Daniel Tyree and John Arnold for trespass, assault and battery and false imprisonment. Peter Fore, William Tyree, Benjamin Dickinson, Samuel Tyree, Sally Crain and Nancy Evans were his witnesses [Orders 1797-1802, 142, 167, 192, 270, 282-3]. He was listed as a "Free Negro" farmer living near the upper end of Prince Edward County in 1801, living with Philip Evans on William Tyree's land in 1805, 1806 and 1807, living on his own land with his son Benjamin and Philip Evans in 1809 [LVA, Free Negro List]. He was head of a Prince Edward County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:564].

iii. ?John4, born say 1772, taxable in the upper district of Prince Edward County from 1789 to 1797: called "John Evans, Jr.," called a "free Molatto" in 1797 [PPTL 1782-1809, frames 254, 268, 299, 325, 359, 413, 425, 471].

iv. ?Jonathan, a "free Molatto" taxable in the upper district of Prince Edward County from 1796 to 1798 [PPTL 1782-1809, frames 425, 471, 485].

v. Philip, a "Molatto" or "of Colr" taxable in the upper district of Prince Edward County from 1802 to 1816 [PPTL 1782-1809, frames 588, 609, 631, 680, 717, 790; 1809-31, frames 17, 39, 61, 82, 111, 160, 185].

vi. Judy

vii. Claiborne2, a "Mulatto" or "of Colr" taxable in the upper district of Prince Edward County from 1809 to 1820 [PPTL 1782-1809, frame 790; 1809-31, frames 39, 61, 111, 160, 185, 312, 332].

viii. Daniel, a "Mulatto" taxable in the upper district of Prince Edward County in 1809 [PPTL 1782-1809, frame 790].

 

7.    Frances1 Evans, born say 1685, was estimated by Robert Wills (born about 1711) to have been born long before him because she had children bound out before he knew her. She moved from Charles City County to New Kent County some time before 1721 when Robert Wills became a servant to Mr. Carter at Shirley Plantation. She bound her children Tom and Frances Evans as apprentices to a Mr. Lightfoot of New Kent County. Frances was on a visit to Charles City County about 1733 when Robert Wills heard Sarah Redcross "claim" Frances as her mother. Frances died about 1771 [Lynchburg City Chancery file, 1821-033, LVA]. Frances was the mother of

i. Thomas/ Tom, bound to Lightfoot in New Kent County.

17    ii. Frances2, born say 1705.

iii. Sarah Redcross, probably the mother of Daniel Redcross, alias Evans, who left a 12 September 1777 Lunenburg County will , proved 10 June 1779, leaving half his estate to his brother Charles Evans and the remainder to John Evans/ Epps [WB 3:26], and she was probably the mother of William Evans, "alias Redcross," who was taxable in Charles City County from 1789 to 1791 [PPTL, 1788-1814].

 

8.    Charles1 Evans, born say 1696, was sued for debt in Brunswick County court by Littlebury Epes in December 1735 [Orders 1732-37, 68]. He was called "Charles Evans a mulatto" in December 1746 in Lunenburg County when the court dismissed charges brought against him by Andrew Bresslar [Orders 1746-48, 81]. He received a patent on 20 August 1747 for 120 acres on Stith's Creek in the part of Brunswick County which became Lunenburg County in 1748 and Mecklenburg County in 1765 [Patents 28:135]. He was taxable in Lunenburg County in the list of Lewis Deloney in 1748, taxable in the list of Field Jefferson in 1751 with his son Tom [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 68, 166] and taxable with Thomas and Major Evans in 1752 [Tax List 1748-52, 1]. On 24 October 1752 he was living in Cumberland Parish, Lunenburg County, when he made a Brunswick County deed of gift to his sons Charles, Jr., Dick and Erasmus Evans of all his household goods, cattle, hogs, horses, fowl, crops and debts owed to him [DB 4:272]. He petitioned the Lunenburg County court in May 1753 to be exempt from personal taxes, but was rejected "for Reasons appearing to the Court" [Orders 1753-54, 113]. He was granted 38 acres in Lunenburg County in the fork of Miles Creek and Dockery's Creek on 23 July 1753 [Patents 31:337]. He left a 22 March 1760 Brunswick County, Virginia will (signing), proved 27 October 1760, leaving his "mannor" plantation on the south side of Dockery's Creek to his son Major Evans, left an equal quantity to his son Charles Evans and left the residue of his land on the southside of Dockery's Creek to son Dick Evans on condition they give twenty pounds or 100 acres of land to his youngest son Erasmus. He left a bed and furniture to his daughters Sarah and Joice, but left only a shilling to his "undutiful" son Thomas [WB 3:375-6]. He died before June 1760 when a suit against him in Lunenburg County court abated by his death [Orders 1759-61, 136]. On 18 October 1764 Sarah and Richard Evans sold about 39 acres in the fork of Miles and Dockery's Creek in Mecklenburg County which was land they had been given by Charles Evans [DB 1:514]. And on the same date Sarah, Charles and Major Evans sold 120 acres on Stith's Creek in Lunenburg County adjoining Philip Morgan [DB 8:356]. His children were

18    i. Thomas3, born say 1734.

19    ii. Major1, born say 1735.

20    iii. Charles2, born say 1737.

21    iv. Richard1, born say 1740.

v. Sarah.

vi. Joyce.

22    vii. Erasmus, born say 1745.

 

9.    Morris2 Evans, born say 1710, received furniture and three head of cattle by his father Morris Evans's 18 February 1739/40 York County will which was proved 17 March 1739/40. He and Rebecca Hulet also received a boat and cart for their use as long as they "live and agree together." He and Rebecca were executors [Wills & Inventories, 18:414, 427, 558-9]. Morris was in Charles City County in July 1747 when William Gray's suit against him was dismissed at the plaintiff's cost, in May 1748 when Jane Evans (his mother) sued him but did not prosecute, and in June 1749 John Pleasants sued him for 37 shillings due on account [Orders 1737-51, 447, 475, 495]. On 1 June 1750 Edward Eppes sued Morris for a 3 pound debt in Chesterfield County [Orders 1749-54, 53]. He was taxable in Field Jefferson's list for Lunenburg County in 1751 adjacent to Edward Epps and Solomon Harris [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 169]. He was called the father of Richard Evans in a deed by which William Poole gave Richard 50 acres on Flat Creek "for love and affection" on 31 March 1753 [DB 3:227]. Morris died before 3 December 1754 when his widow Amey Wright was named as his executrix. At the same court she obtained a peace bond against her husband John Wright, claiming that she feared he was going to kill her. William Poole presented the inventory of Morris' estate on 2 June 1756. Richard was called the son of Amy Wright when he was bound out by the Lunenburg County court to Richard Rodgers on 12 February 1767. Amy appears to have been a white woman, possibly the daughter of William Poole [Orders 1754-5, 244; 1766-9, 25a; WB 1:155, 219; DB 3:227]. Morris was the father of

22    i. ?Gilbert1, born say 1730.

ii. ?Arthur, born say 1745, bound to his guardian Major Evans of Granville County, North Carolina. He was over sixteen years old when he was taxable in Major's Granville County household in 1764, a taxable in James Doyal's Bladen County, North Carolina household in 1768 ("Mulatoes") [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:6]. He was head of a Richland District, South Carolina household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [SC:171a]. He owned land near Big Crane and Little Crane Creeks in Richland District in 1814 [South Carolina Archives series S213192, 43:552].

23    iii. Richard2, born say 1750.

 

10.    Isaac Evans, born say 1735, was tithable in Edward Epps' Lunenburg County household in 1752: "Peter and Isaac" [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 194]. Isaac was probably one of the unnamed "Molatto Children" Edward Epps asked the Lunenburg County court to bind to him in July 1752 [Orders 1752-3, 69]. He and Jacob Evans were apprentices of Edward Epps in May 1753 when they sued him for mistreating them and holding them illegally. The court allowed them to go to Martin Brandon Parish in Prince George County to search the register for proof of their age. The court ordered them bound instead to Abraham Martin [Orders 1753-4, 111, 165-6, 254]. Isaac was head of a Warren County household of 9 "other free" in 1790 [NC:77] and 5 in Randolph County in 1800 [NC:310]. He may have been the father of

i. Sally, born say 1770, married James Stewart, 2 May 1791 Warren County bond, Eaton Walden bondsman.

ii. Leven, born before 1776, residing in Warren County on 23 November 1797 when he purchased 122 acres in Halifax County, North Carolina, on the waters of Falling Creek. He was taxable in district 12 of Halifax County on 122 acres and a free poll in 1800 [Gammon, Halifax County Tax Lists I:34]. He sold 22 acres of this land to John Richardson on 9 December 1800 with Joel Evans and Joseph Lantern as witnesses [DB 18:269, 916]. He was head of a Warren County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [NC:754] and 3 "free colored" in Halifax County in 1820 [NC:147], perhaps the Leaven Evans who married (second?) Hariot Scott, 18 December 1829 Warren County bond, Thomas Edwards bondsman. Harriet, a "Mulatto" farmer born about 1811, was listed in the 1860 Halifax County census with $85 real estate. She may have been identical to Harriet Richardson, daughter of Hardy Richardson.

iii. Susannah, married Benjamin Stewart, Warren County bond, no date, Eaton Walden bondsman.

iv. Godfrey, married Polly Walden, 3 November 1818 Randolph County bond, Hugh Moffett bondsman.

vi. Pleasant, married Delilah Walden, 21 April 1819 Randolph County bond, Godfrey Evins bondsman.

 

11.    Robert1 Evans, born say 1740, was living in York County on 17 December 1764 when a presentment against him by the grand jury was dismissed [Judgments & Orders 1759-63, 320]. He and his wife Mary, "Both free Mulattas," registered the 16 October 1766 birth of their son Littlebury in Bruton Parish, James City County [Bruton Parish Register, 30]. On 21 July 1766 he and Thomas Maclin were securities for a 55 shilling debt William Roberts owed Lawson Burfoot in York County. On 19 November 1770 he was presented by the court for selling rum without a license and for failing to list himself as a tithable, and he appeared in court the same day in his suit against George Jones for trespass, assault and battery. Francis Peters and Elizabeth Grymes were his witnesses. Peter Gillett sued him for a 4 pound, 18 shilling debt on 17 December 1770. Richard Cumbo sued him for trespass, assault and battery on 17 May 1773 and was awarded 1 shilling damages on testimony of Reuben and Peter Gillett [Orders 1765-68, 91; Judgments & Orders 1770-2, 105, 124, 153, 170, 211, 336, 337; 1772-4, 272, 336]. He was the father of

i. Littleberry, born 16 October 1766, perhaps the Littleberry Evans who was taxable in Charles City County in 1784 and 1786 [PPTL, 1783-7]. He registered in Richmond City on 2 January 1804: born of Free Parents Mary & Robert Evans [Evans, Littleberry (M): Free Negro Certificate, 1804, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

ii. Richard, taxable on a horse in James City County from 1797 to 1814: listed as a "Mulatto" in 1809 when he was taxable on 2 tithes, listed as a "Mulatto" in 1813 with 4 "Free Persons of Colour above the age of 16" in his household (apparently himself and three women), listed as "cold" in 1814 [PPTL 1782-99; 1800-15].

iii. ?Thomas10, born say 1790, a "Mulattoe" taxable in Charles City County in 1813 [PPTL, 1788-1814]. His wife Sarah obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 19 January 1832: Sarah Evans, wife of Thomas Evans, who was Sarah Stewart, daughter of Wm Stewart, a light mulato, twenty four years of age [Minutes 1830-9, 89].

iv. ?Sally, born say 1792, married Elijah Crew, 4 January 1813 Charles City County bond [Wm & Mary Quarterly Historical Papers Vol. 8, No.3, p.195]. Elijah was a "Mulattoe" taxable in Charles City County in 1813 [PPTL, 1788-1814].

 

12.    Philip Evans, born say 1745, the "Mulotto" son of Ann Evans, was bound apprentice to the Rev. Robert Fergeson in Bristol Parish on 10 November 1748 [Chamberlayne, Register of Bristol Parish, 134]. He was a "mulatto" who was listed among seven deserters, drafted out of Prince George County, Virginia, for whom a reward was offered in the 28 November 1777 issue of the Virginia Gazette [Virginia Gazette (Purdie edition), p.3, col. 3; also on http://www.accessible.com]. He was taxable in Prince George County from 1782 to 1793: taxable on a horse and 2 cattle in 1782, 2 slaves in 1783, taxable on his own tithe and a free male tithable 16-21 years of age in 1786, taxable on John Evans and a slave in 1787, taxable on John and Jesse Evans in 1788, and taxable on a slave in 1792 and 1793 [PPTL, 1782-1811, frames 161, 171, 182, 210, 223, 244, 263, 283, 323, 356]. He was probably the "freeman named Phil Evans" who was the father of a "mulatto" slave named Phil, born about 1773, who was about twenty-one or twenty-two years old on 20 May 1795 when Philip W. Jackson of Lunenburg County placed an ad in the Virginia Gazette and General Advertiser (Davis) offering a reward for his return [http://www2.vcdh.virginia.edu/gos/explore.html]. Philip was taxable on 140 acres in Prince George County in 1790. His widow was apparently Agnes Evans who was taxable on 140 acres in 1799 [1790 Land Tax List, p.5; 1799 Land Tax List, p.7]. Aggy was a "Mulatto" taxable on 2 free male tithes in 1804, 1806, 1810 and 1811 [PPTL, 1782-1811, frames 602, 652, 721, 742]. She was head of a Prince George County household of 11 "other free" in 1810 [VA:537].   They were probably the parents of

i. John3, born say 1768, taxable in the household of Philip Evans from 1787 to 1789.

ii. Jesse, born say 1770, taxable in the Prince George County household of Philip Evans in 1788 and 1789, perhaps the Jesse Evans who was head of a Johnston County, North Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1800 and 13 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:274].

iii. Major2, born say 1778, taxable in Prince George County from 1799 to 1806: called "a dark man" in 1800, a "Mulatto" in 1801 and 1802 [PPTL, 1782-1811, frames 487, 508, 533, 576, 627, 651]. Perhaps he was the Major Evans who was a peddler, no race indicated, in Southampton County in 1794 [PPTL 1792-1806, frame 104]. He was head of a Prince George County household of 14 "free colored" in 1830.

iv. Joseph, born say 1779, a "Mulatto" taxable in Prince George County from 1801 to 1806 [PPTL, 1782-1811, frames 532, 553, 576, 627, 651].

v. Mason, head of a Prince George County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:537].

vi. Charles12, born say 1788 a "free" taxable in Prince George County in 1809 [PPTL, 1782-1811, frame 701].

 

13.    Martha Evans, born say 1756, was "a free Mulatto woman" living in Lunenburg County on 14 August 1777 when the court ruled that she was entitled to her freedom from the service of Frizel McTeir. The same court bound out her children Thomas and Mary [Orders 1777-84, fol. 2]. She may have been the Martha Evans who was head of a Granville County household of 3 "other free" in 1800. Her children were

i. ?John2, born say 1769, taxable on a tithe and 4 horses in Mecklenburg County in 1788 [PPTL, 1782-1805, frame 213], taxable in Granville County on one poll in Goshen District in 1791, taxable in Tarr River District in 1800, taxable on 180 acres in Fort Creek District in 1801 and 230 acres in 1802 but taxable on only poll tax from 1803 to 1815 [Tax List 1797-1802, 272, 355; 1803-9, 189, 325]. He married Hannah Anderson, 22 February 1806 Granville County bond, Abel Anderson bondsman, and was head of a Granville County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:879].

ii. Thomas9, born say 1773, purchased land in Granville County, North Carolina, by deed acknowledged by James Chavers in August court 1794 [Minutes 1792-95, 191; DB P:90]. He was head of an Abrams Plains, Granville County household of a "free colored" man over the age of 45 in 1820 [NC:23].

iii. Mary, born say 1775.

iv. ?Daniel, born say 1775, married Phereby Jones 10 September 1800 Granville County bond, Emmanuel Scott Jones bondsman. He was head of a Granville County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 and was taxable in Beaver Dam District of Granville County in 1801 [Tax List, 1796-1802].

vii. ?William, born about 1789, married Franky Anderson, 27 September 1812 Granville County bond, Abel Anderson bondsman. William, born about 1789, married Franky Anderson, 27 September 1812 Granville County bond, Abel Anderson bondsman. William and Frances Evans were counted as "Mulattos" in the 1850 census for Oxford, Granville County with Melithan Anderson (widow of Isaac Anderson), Massy Anderson and 100-year-old Betty Evans (his aunt or mother?), with real estate valued at $1,700.

 

14.    Benjamin1 Evans, born say 1750, received two patents for a total of 153 acres in Amherst County on the north branch of Buffuloe River on 7 December 1774 [Patents 42:791, 808]. He was in the list of men in the Amherst County Militia in 1781 [William & Mary Digital Archives, Swem Library's Special Collections, Cabell Papers Box 2, Folder11.pdf; https://digitalarchive.wm.edu/handle/10288/16244]. He was one of the freeholders of Amherst County ordered to work on Stovall's Road from Buffuloe River to Tye River in May 1783 [Orders 1782-4, 118]. He was head of an Amherst County household of 6 free persons in 1783 [VA:48] and 6 "Mulattoes" in 1785 [VA:84]. He was taxable in Lexington Parish, Amherst County, in 1782, 1786 and 1787 [PPTL 1782-1803, frames 13, 69, 99]. He sold 100 acres where he was then living on the north side of Buffalo Creek, being all the land he owned in Amherst County, on 14 January 1789 [DB F:322]. And he sold property to John Christian by deed proved in Amherst County on 16 April 1792 with endorsement annexed of the claim of Samuel Megginson [Orders 1790-4, 391]. Perhaps his widow or sister-in-law was Jane Evans, head of an Amherst County household of a white woman over forty-five years of age and 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:287] and 6 "free colored" in 1820. He may have been the father of

i. Henry, born say 1775, taxable on a horse in Lexington Parish, Amherst County, in 1791 and from 1804 to 1810, called Henry A. Evans, a "man of color," in 1811 and 1812, a "Mulatto" in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1803, frame 226; 1804-23, frames 23, 64, 189, 211, 232]. He was head of an Amherst County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:302] and 2 "free colored" over forty-five years of age in 1820.

ii. John5, born say 1776, head of an Amherst County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:392] and 5 "free colored" in 1820. He was a "man of color" taxable in Lexington Parish, Amherst County, in 1811 and 1812 [PPTL 1804-23, frames 189, 211, 232].

iii. Charles9, born say 1781, taxable in Amherst County from 1798 to 1813, called a "man of color" in 1813 [PPTL 1783-1803, frame 406; 1804-23, frame 254]. He was head of an Amherst County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:289], probably the C.A. Evans, "a man of color," who a white man named William Howard claimed was sleeping with his wife when he sought a divorce in 1809 [Schweninger, Race, Slavery, and Free Blacks, Series 1, 242].

 

15.    Hannah Evans, born say 1753, was living in Lexington Parish, Amherst County, on 6 July 1789 when the court ordered the overseers of the poor to bind her illegitimate "Molatter" son Thomas Evans to Samuel Brown to learn the trade of blacksmith [Orders 1787-90, 499]. She was the mother of

i. ?Nancy1, born say 1769, married Edward Branham (Brandon), 6 December 1790 Amherst County bond.

ii. Thomas8, born say 1772, named in the Amherst County will of his grandfather Thomas Evans. He, a blacksmith, married Ann Penn, daughter of Rolly (Raleigh) and Sarah Pinn, 2 November 1795 Amherst County bond. Thomas was taxable in Amherst County from 1800 to 1810, called a "man of color" in 1811 [PPTL 1782-1803, frames 481, 553, 587; 1804-23, frames 23, 167, 189, 210] and head of an Amherst County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:268]. He was listed on South River in Rockbridge County in 1813 and 1814, a "Black" male with two "Black" females over the age of sixteen in 1813 [PPTL 1811-21, frames 155, 183].

iii. Levisay, daughter of Hannah Evans, married George Clark, 13 May 1795 Amherst County bond, Leonard Clark security. She was called Loisa Clark, widow, when she married Charles Johns of Bedford County, 10 October 1805 Amherst County bond.

iv. ?Ambrose, taxable in the southern district of Campbell County in 1786, 1787, 1788 and 1792: called Ambrose Evans in 1786, Ambrose alias Evans in 1787, Ambrose in 1788 and 1792 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 20, 36, 64, 207], taxable in Buckingham County in 1790, 1791, 1797 and 1798: called a "Molatto" in 1797 and 1798 [PPTL 1782-97; 1798-1803]. He was taxable in Amherst County from 1803 to 1820: taxable on a horse in 1806 and 1807, 2 horses in 1810, probably identical to Anderson A. Evans, a "man of color" who was taxable on 2 horses in 1811, called "Ambrose A. Evans a M. of C." in 1812, a "Mulatto" in 1813, taxable with his unnamed son in a list of "Free Mulattoes & Negroes" in 1814 [PPTL 1782-1803, frame 587; 1804-23, frames 23, 106, 146, 167, 189, 211, 232, 284, 330, 538, 550]. He was head of an Amherst County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:302].

v. ?Pleasant, taxable in Amherst County from 1800 to 1812: a "man of color" in 1811 and 1812 [PPTL 1782-1803, frames 481, 516, 587; 1804-23, 23, 106, 211, 232].

vi. ?Richard4, taxable in Amherst County from 1803 to 1812: a "man of color" in 1811 and 1812 [PPTL 1782-1803, frame 587; 1804-23, frames 23, 106, 189, 211, 232].

vii. ?Juriah, a "W. of C." (woman of color) who was taxable on a horse in Amherst County in 1812, called a "Mulatto" in 1813 [PPTL 1804-23, frames 232, 254].

viii. ?Anderson, born say 1783, taxable in Lexington Parish, Amherst County, on a horse from 1804 to 1821: taxable on a horse in 1804, a "man of color" in 1811 and 1812, a "Mulatto" in 1813, a "free Negro" taxable in 1815 [PPTL 1804-23, frames 23, 64, 106, 145, 189, 211 230, 254, 300, 537, 599]. He made a deed of trust for land in Amherst County acknowledged on 15 May 1820 to secure a debt he owed [Orders 1815-20, 607].

 

Other members of the Evans family in nearby Buckingham County were

i. Rhoday, taxable on William and Foster Evans' tithes and 2 horses in Buckingham County in 1798 [PPTL 1798-1803].

ii. Henry, born say 1765, a "Mulatto" taxable in Buckingham County from 1788 to 1807 [PPTL 1782-97; 1798-1803; 1804-9].

iii. Forster, a "Molatto" taxable in Buckingham County in 1797 and from 1802 to 1807 [PPTL 1782-97; 1798-1803; 1804-9].

iv. William, a "Molatto" taxable in Buckingham County in 1797 and from 1802 to 1807 [PPTL 1782-97; 1798-1803; 1804-9].

 

16.    James2 Evans, born say 1750, was taxable in Warren County on 40 acres and a free poll in 1784 and taxable on 245 acres and a free poll in 1792 [N.C. Archives L.P. 64.1, p.10; Pittman Papers PC 123.9]. He was counted as white in Warren County for the North Carolina state census in 1785 with a male aged 21-60, 3 males under 21 or over 60, and 3 females, head of a Warren County household of 9 "other free" in 1790 [NC:77], 5 "other free" with a white woman 26-45 years old and a white boy under ten years of age in 1800 [NC:802], and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:10]. He was living in Warren County on 12 February 1787 when he purchased 107 acres in Halifax County, North Carolina. He was granted 100 acres on the south side of Buckskin Creek in Halifax County on 20 December 1791 and was living in Warren County on 20 November 1797 when he purchased 50 acres in Halifax County adjoining Timothy Matthews. He was taxable on 250 acres in district 12 of Halifax County in 1800, but not subject to poll tax [Gammon, Halifax County Tax Lists I:34]. He was living in Halifax County on 25 January 1805 when he sold two tracts, one of 50 acres on Hawtree Branch and the other of 100 acres on Haw Tree Swamp [DB 16:260; 17:567; 20:264, 378]. He may have been the father of

24    i. Mourning, born say 1770.

ii. Benjamin2, born say 1775, head of a Halifax County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:306]. He received a grant for 35 acres in Halifax County on the north side of Falling Creek on 30 June 1797 [DB 18:330]. He was taxable in Halifax County on 2 free polls and 35 acres in 1800 [Gammon, Halifax County Tax Lists I:34]. He died before 16 February 1802 when Joel Evans was granted administration on his Halifax County estate on a bond of 100 pounds with Elijah Richardson security [Minutes 1799-1802, Tuesday session, n.p.].

ii. Joel, born about 1779, head of a Halifax County household of 4 "other free" in 1800, 2 in 1810 [NC:18], and 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:147], seventy one years old in 1850 when he was listed with (wife?) Polly who was the same age. He and Joseph Lantern were witnesses to John Richardson's 7 February 1795 Halifax County deed of sale of 100 acres on the north side of Little Fishing Creek [DB 17:747]. He was taxable in district 12 of Halifax County on 2 free polls in 1800 and 1 in 1802 [Gammon, Halifax County Tax Lists I:34, 46].

iii. Elias, born before 1776, head of a Halifax County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:147].

iv. Moses, born before 1776, head of a Halifax County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:147].

v. Charles11, born say 1785, married Susanna Chavis, Franklin County, North Carolina bond, Nicholas Murphey bondsman, undated but between 12 December 1808 and 5 December 1810. He was head of a Warren County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:738].

vi. Archibald, born about 1790, married Anna Mason, 15 January 1815 Granville County bond, Lewis Anderson bondsman and second, Lucretia Green, daughter of Thomas and Priscilla Green, 29 December 1829 Warren County bond, Mims Guy bondsman. He was head of a Warren County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:796], a sixty-year-old "Mulatto" farmer counted in the 1850 Warren County census with wife Creasy [NC:56].

 

17.    Thomas3 Evans, born say 1734, was taxable in the Lunenburg County household of his father Charles Evans in 1751 [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 166]. He was living in Mecklenburg County on 10 March 1789 when the court described him as "so poor and Idle and dishonest that he cannot make the necessary provisions for his family and ought not to have the governing of them." The court ordered his children Elizabeth Evans, Olive Evans, Delilah Evans, Matthew Stewart, and Charles Evans bound out as apprentices [Orders 1787-92, 363]. Thomas was the father of

25    i. Elizabeth, born say 1769.

ii. Matthew Stewart, born say 1768.

iii. Olive, born say 1772, ordered bound to John Davis, Jr., on 10 March 1789. She married Austin Pettiford, 31 December 1814 Granville County bond.

iv. Delilah, born say 1774, ordered bound apprentice to Charles Evans on 10 March 1789. She married Thomas McLin, 23 December 1794 Mecklenburg County bond.

v. Charles8, born say 1775, ordered bound apprentice to Charles Evans by the Mecklenburg County court on 10 March 1789 [Orders 1787-92, 363]. He married Martha Jeffries, 17 August 1796 Mecklenburg County, Virginia bond, Kinchen Chavous security. He was taxable in Mecklenburg County in 1798 [PPTL, 1782-1805, frame 684] and head of an "other free" Orange County, North Carolina household in 1800 "other free" (number crossed out and counted as zero)"other free" (number crossed out and counted as zero, perhaps living near the Jeffries family) [NC:505].

v. ?Penelope, married William Jeffries, 21 February 1800 Orange County bond, Rept Stewart bondsman.

vii. ?Thomas, married Lucy Jeffers (Jeffries), 26 September 1810 Orange County bond, Henry Shult bondsman.

 

17.    Frances2 Evans, born say 1705, was bound by her mother to Mr. Lightfoot of New Kent County who sold her when she was young as a slave to William Merriwether. She was the mother of

26    i. Sarah Colley, born say 1722.

ii. Tom.

iii. Thompson.

 

18.    Major1 Evans, born say 1733, was taxable in Charles Evans' Lunenburg County household in 1752 [Tax List 1748-52, 1]. He was taxable in St. James Parish, Lunenburg County, in Edmund Taylor's list in 1764 [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 259], and he owned land on the south side of Taylor's Creek in Mecklenburg County on 6 July 1765 [DB 1:72]. In 1764 he was living across the state line in Granville County, North Carolina, taxable with his wife Martha and Arthur Evans in the list of Samuel Benton [CR 44.701.19]. His wife was called Ann in the 1768 list of Jonathan Kittrell. In 1769 he was taxable in Granville County with his unnamed wife on 2 black tithes, and in 1771 he was in the adjoining county of Bute, a taxable head of a household of five persons including his wife but taxed on 4 "Black" tithes:

Majer Eavens Wm Chavers overseer & Gordin & his Son Burrel Evins & wife 0 Whites / 4 Blacks [CR.015.70001, p.12 of pamphlet].

On 16 February 1780 he purchased 100 acres "near the Buffilow Race paths" in Granville County from Philip Chavis, and he purchased 100 acres near his own line on Buckhorn Branch of Newlight Creek in Granville near the Franklin County line on 19 July 1794 [Granville DB O:84; Franklin DB 1:140]. On 9 April 1782 the Mecklenburg County, Virginia court allowed his claim for providing 225 pounds of beef for the use of the Continental Army [Orders 1779-84, 127]. He was taxable in Mecklenburg County on a tithe, a horse, and 8 cattle from 1782 to 1787 and taxable on 101 acres in the upper district of Mecklenburg County in 1782. He sold his Mecklenburg County land to Anthony Chavis in 1787 [PPTL 1782-1805, frames 12, 99, 165; Land Tax List 1782-1811A]. And he was taxable on 2 polls in Granville County in 1785. His children were

i. Burwell, born say 1758, taxable in his father's Bute County household in 1771. He may have been the Burrell Evans who enlisted in Montfort's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 20 July 1778 for nine months [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1053]. He married Mary Mitchell, 22 July 179_ (XXIst year of Independence) Granville County bond with William Roberson bondsman. He was taxable in Epping Forest District of Granville County on a horse and 3 cattle in 1782, taxable in the summary list for Granville County on poll tax from 1785 to 1791 and taxable in Beaver Dam district in 1800 and 1801. He was taxable in District 5 of Halifax County in 1783 [Gammon, Halifax County Tax Lists I:54], head of a Nash County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 [NC:70] and 2 "other free" in Halifax County in 1810 [NC:18]. He died before August term 1820 when the Wake County court appointed William Rea_(d?), Esquire, administrator of his estate. His widow and relict Polly Evans with unstated number of children petitioned for her support and was paid $60 for the year [Wake County Estate file].

ii. ?Charles6, born say 1760, enlisted in Baker's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 20 July 1778 for nine months [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1053]. He received vouchers 101, 102, 177, and 178 for a total of 48 pounds specie in Hillsboro on 1 May 1792 for military services in the Revolution [North Carolina Revolutionary Pay Vouchers, 1779-1782, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2WT-PCTY, Evans, Charles]. He was head of an "other free" (number crossed out and counted as zero) Hillsboro, Orange County, North Carolina household in 1800 [NC:505].

iii. ?Nelly, born say 1762, married William Taborn, 1 January 1778 Northampton County, North Carolina bond [recorded in his pension application].

iv. ?Sarah, married George Anderson, 14 October 1800 Granville County bond, William Pettiford bondsman.

v. ?Elizabeth, had an illegitimate child in Granville County before October 1779 when Major Evins posted the Bastardy bond. She married Isaac Chavis, 6 September 1800 Granville County bond, Peter Chavis bondsman.

vi. ?Thomas, born 1776-1794, married Sally Bass, 20 February 1812 Granville County bond, Moses Bass bondsman. He was head of an Abrams Plains, Granville County household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:23].

 

19.    Charles2 Evans, born say 1737, was taxable in the Lunenburg County list of Edmund Taylor for St. James Parish in 1764, listed with 60 acres [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 248]. On 18 October 1764 he, Sarah Evans (his mother) and Major Evans (his brother) sold 120 acres on Stith's Creek in Lunenburg County adjoining Philip Morgan [DB 8:356]. On 9 April 1782 the Mecklenburg County, Virginia court allowed his claim for providing 275 pounds of beef for the use of the Continental Army [Orders 1779-84, 124]. He was head of a Mecklenburg County, Virginia household of 6 persons in 1782 [VA:34] and was taxable in Mecklenburg County from 1782 to 1794: taxable on slave named Ned, 9 cattle, and 4 horses in 1784 and taxable on slave Jack in 1786 [PPTL, 1782-1805, frames 2, 54, 107, 192, 291, 343, 401, 500], He sent a note to the Mecklenburg County clerk approving the 20 December 1788 marriage bond of his daughter Nanny to Eaton Walden. His daughter was

i. Nanny, born about 1772, married Eaton Walden, 20 December 1788 Mecklenburg County bond.

 

20.    Richard1 Evans, born say 1740, was taxable in Lunenburg County in 1764 [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 250, 304, 333]. On 18 October 1764 he and his mother Sarah sold about 39 acres in the fork of Miles and Dockery's Creek in Mecklenburg County which was land they had been given by Charles Evans [DB 1:514]. On 4 March 1773 he made a Lunenburg County deed of trust for 30 pounds currency which he owed Buchanans Hastie & Company for 100 acres in Lunenburg County with Elijah (making his mark) Hathcock as witness [DB 12:278]. He was called Richard Evans "Mallotto" when Dinwiddie, Crawford & Company sued him in Mecklenburg County court on 14 June 1773 for a debt of 19 pounds. He was called the next friend of Isaac Evans in Mecklenburg County court on 8 May 1780 when they consented to the arbitration of their suit for trespass, assault and battery against Thomas Maclin. Robert Corn was his security when he was sued in Mecklenburg County court on 10 May 1784, and Charles Evans was his security when he was sued on 13 December 1784. His estate was attached for 1,136 pounds of tobacco on 9 January 1786 [Orders 1773-9, 24; 1784-7, 6, 107, 188, 440, 442, 554]. He was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 9 persons in 1782 [VA:34] and taxable in Mecklenburg County on a tithe, 2 horses, and about 8 cattle from 1783 to 1786 [PPTL, 1782-1805, frames 43, 66, 111, 136]. He may have been the father of

i. Godfrey, enslisted as a substitute for Dick Evans and was in the list of men from Mecklenburg County under the command of Captain Reuben Vaughan who were on a detachment to the Southward under immediate command of Colonel David Mason in 1779 [Edmund W. Hubbard Papers, Southern Historical Collection, UNC Chapel Hill, NC, cited by http://www.ncgenweb.us/ncgranville/rev/guy-wm-rev.htm].

ii. Isaac, born say 1766, sued Thomas Maclin for trespass, assault and battery in Mecklenburg County court. He was taxable in his own Mecklenburg County household in 1787 and 1789, taxable with Richard Evans in 1790, and taxable in 1793 and 1798 [PPTL, 1782-1805, frames 192, 291, 343, 481, 685]. He married Dicey Stewart, 24 December 1792 Mecklenburg County bond. On 29 July 1796 he made a Mecklenburg County deed of trust for 75 acres bounded by Samuel Young, Bartlett Cox and Sir Peyton Skipwith to secure a debt of 33 pounds which he owed William Hendrick [DB 9:125].

iii. Richard3, born about 1772, taxable in the Mecklenburg County household of Isaac Evans in 1790, perhaps the D. Evans who was taxable in the household of Thomas Evans in 1792 [PPTL, 1782-1805, frames 343, 442, 684]. He married Lucy Evans, 17 December 1793 Warren County bond, Randolph Rowe bondsman. He was head of a Chatham County household of 6 "other free" in 1800, 8 in 1810 [NC:201], 12 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:211] and a "Mulatto" farmer worth $480 in Chatham County in 1850 with "Mulatto" Lucy Evans who was aged seventy-three [NC:474b]. He purchased land in Chatham County by deeds proved in November 1818 and February 1820 [DB V:307, X:137]. He was a resident of Chatham County, aged about sixty seven, on 21 October 1839 when he testified that he was born in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, and was a neighbor and brother-in-law of Anthony Chavis. He and Anthony moved to North Carolina about the same time, upwards of thirty years past. (His wife?) Lucy Evens also testified in Chatham County on 21 October 1839 that she was raised in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, that Anthony Chavers married her sister Betsy Evens, that they resided in Virginia about thirty-five years previous, and they lived on the same plantation before they moved to North Carolina [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Chavers, Anthony, 1840, Digital Collection, LVA]. His 21 June 1855 Chatham County will lent his land to his wife Lucy and named his children: Fildon (Fielding), Granderson, Ancel, Lucy Byrd, and John Evans [WB C:409].

iv. Joshua, born say 1775, a poor orphan, son of Crecy Dinkins, bound to Benjamin Pennington in Mecklenburg County on 10 April 1780 [Orders 1779-84, 29]. He sued Thomas Epps in Lunenburg County for trespass, assault and battery on 9 March 1797, but the suit was dismissed on agreement of the parties [Orders 1796-9]. He was to marry Judah Stewart, 16 December 1797 Lunenburg County bond. He was taxable in Lunenburg County from 1794 to 1806, called Joshua E. Dinkins in 1795 [PPTL 1782-1806]. He was counted in a list of "free Negroes and Mulattoes" as a "Mulatto" in 1802 with his wife Celia, children Polly and John, and Matthew Holmes, farmers on Flat Rock Creek. He was listed as a ditcher on Cedar Creek in 1803 with his wife Celia and children Matthew, Polly and Sally. He was probably related to William Dinkins who was listed with his wife Lucretia in the lists for 1802 and 1803 and Thomas Dinkins who was listed in 1803 [LVA, Lunenburg County, Free Negro & Slave Records, 1802-1803]. William was taxable in Lunenburg County from 1789 to 1806, and Thomas was taxable from 1792 to 1806. They were called Dickens from 1799 to 1806 [PPTL 1782-1806].

v. Charles10, born say 1783, taxable in Nutbush District of Granville County, North Carolina, in 1801 [Tax List 1796-1802, 307]. He married Frances Hunt, 9 February 1806 Wake County bond, Charles Hunt bondsman. He was one of the freeholders of Chatham County who was ordered by the court to work on the road from Beaver Creek to the Wake County line in February 1806 [Minutes 1805-10, 73]. He was head of a Chatham County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [NC:193].

 

21.    Erasmus Evans, born say 1745, was taxable in Granville County in Benjamin Ragland's household with wife Mary in 1767 [CR 44.701.19]. His orphan Anthony was living in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on 8 August 1774 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind him to John Bozman. On 9 January 1775 the court bound his son Isham to Francis Lightfoot. Erasmus may have been married to a member of the Chavis family since his son Anthony was called Anthony Chavis, orphan of Erasmus Evans, deceased, when the Mecklenburg County court ordered the churchwardens to bind him out [Orders 1773-9, 291, 301; 1779-84, 435]. His children were

i. Anthony, born say 1771, ordered bound apprentice in Mecklenburg County on 8 August 1774, taxable in Thomas Brandom's Mecklenburg County household in 1787 and 1788 and taxable in his own household from 1790 to 1798, called a "Mulatto" in 1790 (adjoining Isaac and Richard Evans) [PPTL, 1782-1805, frames 208, 343, 517, 684]. And there was an Anthony Evans who was a "melatto" taxable in the northern district of Campbell County from 1790 to 1792 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frame 148, 188, 231]. He was taxable in Nutbush District of Granville County, North Carolina, in 1800 and 1801 [Tax List 1796-1802, 249, 307] and head of a Chatham County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:193]. He purchased land in Chatham County by deed proved in August 1819 [DB W:95]. His 10 June 1831 Chatham County will, witnessed by Jarell Walden, was proved in August 1835. He left his plantation and all his other property to Sary Betty Ledbetter, daughter of Noony Dungill. He appointed Stephen Walden executor, but John Dungill was granted administration on the estate since Stephen had left the state when the will was offered for probate [WB p.24].

ii. Isham, born say 1773, bound apprentice to Francis Lightfoot on 9 January 1779. He was a "melatto" taxable in the northern district of Campbell County from 1789 to 1792 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 121, 148, 231].

iii. John, born about 1784, listed with wife Juda and children in the 1833 list of Free Negroes and Mulattos in Campbell County in 1833 [Campbell 1833 Free Negroes and Mulattoes, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

 

22.    Gilbert1 Evans, born say 1730, was taxable in Lunenburg County in 1751 and 1752 [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 166, 1887]. He may have been the father of

27    i. Morris3, born say 1750.

ii. Gilbert2, married Febey Lumbley, 20 June 1780 Wake County, North Carolina bond, John Ross bondsman. He was taxable in Wake County in Henry King's district on 500 acres, 2 horses and 12 cattle about 1782-1784, taxable on 481 acres and 1 poll in 1793, 944 acres and 1 poll in 1799, and taxable on 844 acres and no polls in 1802 [CR 99.701.1, frames 54, 96, 151, 227]. He was head of a Wake County household of 2 white males over 16, 6 under 16 and 3 white females in 1790 [NC:106]. His 9 February 1827 Wake County will, proved in February 1827, left 100 acres where he was then living to his wife Phebe and at her death to Emiline Evans, daughter of Willis Evans; left 100 acres where his son John Evans was then living to his wife Phebe; left property to Henry Bryant Evans, son of Willis Evans; and named his son Daniel Evans executor [North Carolina Archives RB 20:100].

iii. John, born say 1760, died after serving three years in the Revolution. Testimony in Wake County court in August 1820 proved that his immediate heirs and brothers Morris, Gilbert and William Evans (all Sr.) who lived in Wake County, were entitled to 640 acres for John Evans's service [North Carolina Archives SS Military papers, folio 355 cited by Martha Evans in email correspondence].

iv. Reuben1, enlisted in Captain Dixon's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment for 12 months and served from 12 May 1781 to 26 May 1782. He applied for a pension while resident in Wake County on 7 April 1831 at the age of seventy eight. He owned 80 acres of land at the time [NARA, S.41524, M804, roll 941, frame 401 of 798]. He was counted as white in the 1790 census for Wake County, listed near Morris Evans, and white in the 1830 census. He was listed in the tax lists for Wake County in 1799 and 1802 [CR 099.701.1] but not listed in the census for 1800, perhaps living with Morris Evans who was head of an "other free" household in 1800.

v. William, born say 1764, head of a Wake County household of 2 white males over 16, 6 under 16 and 5 white females in 1790 [NC:106]. His son Gilbert was about fifty seven in 1845 when he testified in Wake County court for the pension application of Exum Scott, that he had often heard Exum speaking about the Revolution to his father William Evans who was also in the service [NARA, W.5994, roll 2136, frame 172 of 850; https://www.fold3.com/image/1/14643308].

 

23.    Richard2 Evans, born say 1750, son of Amy Wright, was called the son of Morris Evans when he received 50 acres on Flat Creek in Lunenburg County on 31 March 1753 for "love and affection" from William Poole [DB 3:227]. He was bound by the Lunenburg County court to Richard Rodgers on 12 February 1767. On 13 April 1769 he was security for Mary Wright in John Maclin's Lunenburg County suit against her for a debt of 11 pounds [Orders 1766-9, 25a, 205b]. He was taxable in Lunenburg County in 1772 and 1774 adjoining John Evans/ Epps [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 250, 304, 333]. He purchased 100 acres on White's branch of Flat Rock Creek in Lunenburg County for 10 pounds on 12 November 1772, made a deed of trust (signing) on 4 March 1773 to secure a loan he owed Buchanans Hastie & Company with Elijah Hathcock as witness, and sold the land on 2 November 1775 [DB 12:219, 278, 501]. He may have been the Richard Evans who was head of a Robeson County, North Carolina household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:49] and the Richard Evins who was one of the "free persons of Colour" of present-day Liberty and Marlboro counties, South Carolina, who petitioned the legislature to repeal the discriminatory tax against "free Negroes" on 20 April 1794 [South Carolina Department of Archives and History, General Assessment Petition, 1794, no. 216, frames 370-374, Free People of Color ST 1368, series no. 165015, item 216], and he may have been the ancestor of

i. Nancy, married Wiley Locklear, 25 May 1817 Robeson County bond, Joseph Locklear bondsman.

 

24.    Mourning Evans, born say 1770, was married to a slave named Nat, the property of William West, by whom she had eight children by 1804 when she purchased her husband from West. She petitioned the Warren County court on 23 August 1806 to allow her to set him free [N.C. Archives, Nathaniel Macon Papers, 1804-1848, PC 10.2, cited in email correspondence with Deloris Williams]. Nat was called Matthew Evans when he was head of a Warren County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:755], taxable on 1 poll in Fishing Creek District of Warren County in 1811 [WB 16:152], apparently identical to Nathaniel West who was head of a Warren County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820. Matthew Evans was head of a household of 2 "free colored" and 5 slaves in 1830. His Warren County estate was settled in 1845 and divided his 56 acre tract among his eight heirs who were his children [CR 100.508.17]. Their children were

i. Lucretia/ Crecy (Green), probably identical to Fanny Evans who married Allen Green, 24 December 1809 Warren County bond, Kinchen Toney bondsman. Allen was head of a Warren County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:736a] and 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:798]. Crecy was called C. Green in the 1860 Warren County census. The Green family descended from Crease, Tom (apparently son of Crease) and his wife Priss and their children Allen, Charity, Byrna/ Breny, Willie and Crease Green who were freed by the 1791 Warren County will of Samuel Williams which did not take effect until 1798 when the North Carolina General Assembly passed an act to emancipate them [Byrd, In Full Force, 298]. Thomas Green was head of a Warren County household of 13 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1800 [NC:805], 11 "other free" in 1810 [NC:762], and 10 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:794].

ii. Fanny (Toney), probably wife of Kinchen Toney.

iii. Moses, born about 1790, a "Mulatto" living in the household of Willie Drummond in the 1850 census for Halifax County.

iv. Nancy, born about 1797, married James Green, born about 1778 according to the 1850 and 1860 Warren County census. James was freed by the May 1825 Warren County will of John C. Green [WB 27:261; 39:406; communication with Green descendant Deloris Williams].

v. Isaac, married Winifred Dales, 14 October 1825 Franklin County bond, Lewis C. Bobbit bondsman.

vi. Henry, apparently identical to Henry West, born about 1785, a "Mulatto" listed in William Clark's Warren County household in 1850.

vii. Ceily (Toney), married Matthew Toney, 22 December 1808 Warren County bond, Allen Green bondsman.

viii. Patience (Martial), married David Marshall, 25 June 1823 Warren County bond.

 

25.    Elizabeth Evans, born say 1769, was bound by the Mecklenburg County, Virginia court to John Kindrick on 10 March 1789. She was the mother of Jordan and Reuben Evans who were bound out by the court to John Kendrick on 14 April 1794 [Orders 1787-92, 363; 1792-5, 261]. She was probably the Elizabeth Evans who married Micajah Young, 30 April 1794 Wake County bond, Nathaniel Jones bondsman. She was the mother of

i. Reuben2, born about 1785, a "Mulattoe" taxable in Mecklenburg County from 1812 to 1816 [PPTL, 1806-28, frames 258, 337, 388, 537]. He registered in Petersburg on 8 September 1804: a dark brown Mulatto man, five feet six inches high, nineteen years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 281].

ii. Jordan2, a "Mulattoe" taxable in Mecklenburg County from 1813 to 1816 [PPTL, 1806-28, frames 337, 388, 537]. He was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:153a].

 

26.    Sarah Colley, born say 1722, of Charles City County, was the daughter of Frances Evans by a white servant of Colonel William Meriwether named James Colley. One of the deponents in the freedom suit of her descendants described her as having "strait black hair...complexion...descended from Indians" [Evans, Amey, etc.: Freedom Suit, Brunswick County District Court, 1799, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. She was probably related to George, Charles, Thomas, and George Colley, Jr., "Mulattos" convicted in Charles City County court on 6 September 1758 for failing to list their wives as tithables [Orders 1758-62, 56, 78, 325]. She was the slave of Colonel William Meriwether when he left her and her daughter Amey to his son Richard Meriwether in 1756. She lived on Richard Meriwether's land in Albemarle County until his death (about 1766) when his heir Thomas Meriwether, about to move to Halifax County, sold Sarah to Colonel Edward Carter of Albemarle County because she was the wife of one of Carter's "Negro" slaves. Her descendants were the Evans family members who sued for their freedom [Lynchburg City Chancery file, 1821-033, LVA]. She was the mother of

28    i. Hannah, born say 1740.

ii. Beck, born say 1742, allotted by the estate of William Meriwether to his daughter Jane Hudson who moved to Georgia.

29    iii. Amey, born about 1745.

 

27.    Morris3 Evans, born say 1750, brought suit against Thomas Evans in Mecklenburg County, Virginia court, but the suit was dismissed at his costs when he failed to appear on 11 September 1769 [Orders 1768-71, 254]. He enlisted in Armstrong's Company of the North Carolina Line in 1781 and served until 1 October 1782. He assigned his final pay of 32 pounds to Dan Hunter in Warrenton in 1786 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1054, XVII:209; NSDAR, Roster of Soldiers from North Carolina in the American Revolution, 8, 206]. He received voucher no. 333 for 8 pounds specie in Warrenton on 1 May 1792, being one fourth his pay [North Carolina Revolutionary Pay Vouchers, 1779-1782, https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2WT-5NSX]. He married Liddy Anderson, 8 December 1784 Granville County bond with Burwell Evans bondsman. He was taxable in Granville County on 1 poll in the summary list for 1788-1790 and taxable in Beaverdam District in 1791. He and John Seegar were residents of Wake County on 10 February 1794 when they sold 300 acres on Great Lick Creek [DB F:21]. He was counted as white in 1790, head of a Wake County household of 1 male over 16, 2 under 16, and 8 females [NC:103], 7 "other free" in 1800 [NC:761] and 7 "free colored" in 1830. He was taxable on 180 acres in Henry King's district of Wake County in 1793 [CR 099.701.1, frame 54]. On 24 August 1820 he, Gilbert and William Evans testified in Wake County that they were the brothers of John Evans, a soldier in the Revolution, and entitled to his bounty land [North Carolina Archives SS Military papers, folio 355 cited by Martha Evans and Deloris Williams in email correspondence]. His death on 25 August 1834, supposedly at the age of 105 years, was reported in the Raleigh Star on 4 September 1834 and Hillsborough Recorder of 10 September 1834. He may have been the father of

i. Reuben2, born about 1768, committed to jail in Kent County, Delaware, on 2 July 1791: mulatto man who says he was free born in North Carolina, about 6 feet, 22-23 years of age [Wright, Delaware Newspaper Abstracts, 22].

ii. Nancy2, born say 1772, married Allen Sweat, 7 January 1792 Wake County bond, Reuben Evans bondsman.

iii. Polly, born say 1775, married Hardy Harris, 22 October 1793 Wake County bond, John Reighley bondsman.

iv. William, called son of Morris when he was taxable in Wake County in 1793 [CR 99.701.1, frame 54].

v. Jordan1, born say 1779, married Delilah Reynolds, 21 November 1805 Wake County bond, Curtis Snelling bondsman. He may have been one of two males under the age of sixteen in Morris's household in 1790. He was head of a Wake County household of 3 "free colored" in 1830.

vi. Levina, born say 1790, married Curtis Snelling, 7 February 1811 Wake County bond, Richard Davis bondsman.

vii. Morris5, born about 1790, married Elizabeth House, 1812 Wake County bond, Michael Evans bondsman. He was listed in the 1819 Wake County tax list as "of M." (probably meaning son of Morris). He was head of a Wake County household of 7 "free colored" in 1830.

viii. Elizabeth, married Robert Walden, 15 February 1813 Wake County bond, Andrew Peddy bondsman.

ix. Rody, married John Locklear, 26 December 1822 Wake County bond, Tyre Locklear bondsman.

x. Patsy, married Thomas Copeland, 30 January 1821 Wake County bond, Edmund Pettiford bondsman.

 

28.    Hannah Evans, born say 1740, was allotted as one of the slaves of William Meriwether to Thomas Meriwether by the administrator of the estate in 1756. Thomas sold her to David Ross after he moved to Halifax County. Her children Milly, Mingo, Sally, Harry, Nancy, Amey, Nelly, and Ben Evans as well as Milly's children Archy, Jim, Robert and Milah Evans recovered their freedom in the District Court of Richmond from David Ross: her son Mingo Jackson, alias Thomas Gibson on 5 April 1792 and her other children on 4 April 1795 [Lynchburg City Chancery file 1821-033]. She was the mother of

i. Thomas Gibson, alias Mingo Jackson, born say 1760, was a "FN" taxable in Richmond City in 1794, 1806 and from 1814 to 1816; taxable on a slave over the age of 12 years in 1794 and 1816, and Thomas Gibson (Blacksmith) was a "fn" taxable in Richmond City in 1796, 1797, 1799, and from 1812 to 1814 [PPTL, 1787-99; 1799-18]. The Richmond City case file for his aunt Amey Evans included a deposition from Abraham Dugard that he had met Thomas Gibson, alias Mingo Jackson, in Richmond in December 1803 [Lynchburg City Chancery file 1821-033]. He was called Thomas Gibson alias Mingo Jackson on 4 December 1796 when Duncan McLaughlin sued him in Henrico County for debt. On 8 September 1798 the Henrico County court charged "a free black man by the name of Symon" with stealing several articles of clothing from a trunk that belonged to "a free black man by the name of Thomas Gibson." Charles Evans testified as a witness for the Commonwealth that he and Thomas were staying at the mill house of Colonel Harvie when they invited a former slave named Symon to spend the night with them [Orders 1796-8, 543; 1798-9, 242].

 

29.    Amey Evans, born about 1745, was about thirteen years old when she went to live with Ann Meriwether who taught her to sew (about forty years before Ann's testimony in 1798). Amey then returned to Richard Meriwether's plantation in Albemarle. Before he moved to Halifax County Meriwether sold Amey and her children to David Allen of Mecklenburg County because "one of David Allen's negro men had Amey for a wife." She and her children Charles, Susannah, Sinar, Solomon, Frankey, Sally, Milley, Adam, Hannah and five unnamed children of Susannah and Sinar petitioned for their freedom from David Allen before 14 March 1796 when a warrant for his appearance was issued by the Brunswick County District Court. The case abated in May 1799 by the death of the defendant Allen [Evans, Amey, etc.: Freedom Suit, Brunswick County District Court, 1799, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. Their suit in the District Court of Richmond abated by the death of their attorney Edmund Randolph in 1813 and the suit in Lynchburg abated about 1821 when their attorney had a stroke. Her children remained slaves for life. She was the mother of

i. Charles, born say 1765, apparently ran away from the estate of David Allen, deceased. On 26 January 1809 Lewis Allen deposed in Pittsylvania County, in response to the Evans family suit for freedom, that he did not know any of the petitioners except possibly "a Negro man by the name Charles who ran away some eight or nine years since" [Lynchburg City Chancery file 1821-033]. On 8 September 1798 Charles Evans was a witness for the Commonwealth for (his cousin) "a free black man" by the name Thomas Gibson who charged a slave named Symon in Henrico County court with stealing several articles of clothing from his trunk. Charles testified that he and Thomas were staying at the mill house of Colonel Harvie when they invited a former slave named Symon to spend the night with them [Orders 1798-9, 242]. Charles was taken up by Lewis Allen before 7 May 1805 when Edmund Randolph, the attorney for Amey Evans in her suit for freedom from Lewis Allen, petitioned the court that Charles was "tied up and confined to be sent from Richmond, and probably out of the Country [Lynchburg City Chancery file 1821-033].

 

Members of the Evans family from Southampton County were

30    i. Amy, born say 1755.

ii. Frances3, born about 1761, registered in Southampton County on 4 October 1813: age 52, Blk., 5 feet 7-3/4 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 826].

iii. Moses, born about 1769, registered in Southampton County on 16 December 1819: age 50, Black, 5 feet 8 1/2 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 1197]. He was taxable in St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County, called a "Mulatto" in 1799 and a "Black" in 1800, a "Mulatto" taxable on 2 free male tithables in 1801, called a "free Negro" in 1802, a "Mulatto" from 1803 to 1806, taxable on 2 horses in 1810 and on 2 slaves and 3 horses in 1811, listed with wife Polly in 1813 and 1814 [PPTL 1792-1806, frames 378, 412, 589, 621, 690, 805, 841; 1807-21, frames 49, 71, 168, 191, 417]. He registered in Petersburg on 20 June 1851 at the age of eighty-one [Evans, Moses (M, 81): Free Negro Certificate, 1851, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

iv. Isaac, born say 1771, a "f. Negro" taxable in Nottoway Parish, Southampton County, from 1792 to 1809, taxable on 2 persons over the age of 16 in 1805 and 1806 [PPTL 1792-1806, frames 9, 128, 220, 242, 481, 589, 658, 728, 762, 877; 1807-21, frames 16, 98].

v. Patty, born about 1773, registered in Southampton County on 26 November 1818: age 45, 5 feet 4-1/2 inches high, rather of a bright complection free born. She registered again on 21 March 1827 [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, nos. 1166, 1621]. She purchased her husband, a "black man named Bryant," from William Bryant of Southampton County and freed him on 20 January 1819 [DB 16:221].

vi. Henry, born about 1783, ordered bound out by the overseers of the poor in the lower district of St. Lukes Parish, Southampton County, on 11 September 1789 [Minutes 1786-90, n.p.]. He was listed with his wife Nancy on John Barnes' land from 1812 to 1814 [PPTL 1807-21, frames 296, 316, 416]. He registered in Southampton County on 31 July 1810: age 27, Blk., 5 feet 8-1/2 inches, free born. He registered again on 22 October 1820 and 10 February 1832 [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, nos. 758 1238, 1963].

vii. Matthew, born about 1784, a "f.n." taxable in St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County, from 1805 to 1810 [PPTL 1792-1806, frame 805, 841; 1807-21, frames 49, 71, 168]. He registered in Southampton County on 21 July 1806: age 22, Blk, 5 feet 7-1/2 inches, born of Free parents. He registered again in Southampton County on 12 July 1810 and 8 June 1818 [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, nos. 392, 602, 1141] and registered in Petersburg on 24 June 1818: a free man of Colour, dark near black Complection, five feet seven inches high, thirty four years old, born free p. cert. of Southampton County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 915].

 

30.    Amy Evans, born say 1755, was the mother of illegitimate children Charlotte and Nanny Evans who were bound out by the Southampton County court on 18 June 1782 [Orders 1778-84, 203]. She was the mother of

i. Charlotte, born about 1780, registered in Southampton County on 30 July 1805: age 25, blk, 5 feet 4 3/4 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 332].

ii. Nanny, born say 1777, married Edmund Artis, 23 February 1796 Southampton County bond.

 

Other members of the Evans family were

i. Claiborne1, taxable in the lower district of Henrico County from 1783 to 1811: charged with Ben Scott's tithe in 1791 and 1792, taxable on 2 tithes and 2 horses in 1799, taxable on a slave from 1793 to 1811, called a "free Negro" in 1806 and 1807, a "Mulatto" in 1809, a "F. negro" in 1810 and 1811, taxable on 25 acres from 1799 to 1812 [PPTL 1782-1814, frames 36, 77, 123, 160, 177, 234, 252, 291, 303, 316, 329, 342, 353, 421, 432, 462, 511, 531, 552, 574, 614, 680; Land Tax List 1799-1816]. Robert Scott was his security when Isaac Younghusband sued him in Henrico County court for a 2 pound, 17 shilling debt on 5 May 1790. He was sued by Andrew Scott on 6 December 1790 [Orders 1789-91, 288, 417, 430]. He purchased "a Negro woman named Aggy" who was probably his wife from James Shepherd of Richmond City on 18 December 1797 and emancipated her three days later by Henrico County deed [DB 5:383]. He was head of a Henrico County household of 10 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1810 [VA:999]. He may have been the father of Harry Evans who was head of a Henrico County household of 2 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:979].

ii. Charles3, born say 1750, a "Mulatto man" taken up in Spotsylvania County together with two slaves on suspicion of stealing and killing a cow. He pled guilty on 17 August 1775 and chose to receive thirty-nine lashes rather than be sent for further trial [Orders 1774-82, 38].

iii. John, born about 1764, enlisted in the Revolution from Cumberland County, Virginia, on 12 March 1781 and was sized a year later: age 18, 5'4" high, yellow complexion, a shoemaker, born in Cumberland County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.7)].

iv. Britton, born about 1768, registered in Petersburg on 25 August 1796: a brown Mulatto man, five feet five inches high, short bushy hair, twenty eight years old, born free & raised by Mr. Rowlet in Chesterfield County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 114]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Mecklenburg County from 1813 to 1815, listed with Reuben and Jordan Evans [PPTL, 1782-1805, frames 337, 505].

v. Chloe, born about 1771, obtained a certificate of her freedom in Albemarle County on 3 August 1802: has resided in the said County for many years past and has always been considered a free woman. She is listed by the Commissioner of tax as a free person of Colour. She registered in Albemarle County on 4 August 1807: aged about 36 years of dark Complection, 5 feet 4 inches high [Evans, Cloe (Alias Evins, F): Free Negro Affidavit; Evans, Cloe (F, 36): Free Negro Register, 1807, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. Her children Nancy (16, black complexion), Powhatan (15, yellow complexion), and Maria (9, bright Mulattoe) registered in Albemarle County on 6 June 1814. And her children Harriet (9, bright complexion) and Wilson Miles (7, dark Indian Colour, straight hair) registered on 15 October 1815 [Orders 1813-5, 351, 353; 1815-6, 189, 190].

vi. Charles13, born say 1790, a "FN" taxable in the upper district of Henrico County from 1806 to 1809: in the same list as "FN" John Epps from 1807 to 1809 [PPTL 1782-1814, frames 485, 531, 593, 661].

 

Endnotes:

1.    A number of Evans family members were indicted in Charles City for having illegitimate children, no race indicated. They were Ann Evans (May 1738) and Lucy Evans (November 1741). Mary Evans and Richard Bragby (Bradby) were indicted for failing to take sufficient care of their children, and on 3 March 1757 Mary Evans was indicted for having an illegitimate child. In November 1745 Mary Epps "in the Island" was indicted for an illegitimate child [Orders 1737-51, 39, 41, 185, 194, 224, 399, 400; 1751-7, 464].

 

Northumberland and King George counties

1.    Elizabeth Evans, born say 1706, was living in St. Paul's Parish, King George County, in 1733 when the births and baptisms of her "free Molatto" children were recorded [St. Paul's Parish Register, 54, 57, 70, 78, 86]. Her children were

i. ?Mary, born say 1724, ordered by the King George County court on 3 June 1743 to serve John Tyler for two years over and above her convicted time for having two "Molatto Bastards" [Orders 1735-51, pt.1, 338].

ii. Virgin, a free Molatto born 3 September, baptized 26 September (no year stated).

iii. Katherine, born 12 April 1730.

2    iv. Jemima1, born 2 May, baptized 1 June 1733.

v. Lawrence, born 18 November 1736.

vi. Bathsheba, born 29 September, baptized 19 November 1738.

vii. Evans, born 6 August, baptized 21 September 1740.

viii. Bethia, born 25 May, baptized 17 July 1742.

ix. Lettice, born 25 January 1744.

x. Barbara, born 19 December 1745.

3    xi. ?Mark, born say 1747.

 

2.    Jemima1 Evans, born 2 May, baptized 1 June 1733, was "a Molatto Daughter of Elizabeth Evans." She was the mother of

i. ?Thomas, born about 1766, registered in King George County on 30 March 1805: aged about thirty nine years, five feet seven inches high, with bushy curled hair, dark complexion, tolerably well set...born in the...County of King George of a free woman [Register of Free Persons 1785-1799, no.40].

4    ii. Rachel, born about 1772.

 

3.    Mark Evans, born say 1747, was married to Leanna by 27 August 1774 when the birth of their daughter Sally was recorded in Northumberland County [Fleet, Northumberland County Record of Births, 43]. He was head of a Northumberland County household of 8 "Black" persons in 1782 [VA:37], head of a household with no whites in 1784 [VA:75], and was taxable there from 1787 to 1796: listed with 2 tithes in 1794 and 1795, 3 in 1796. He was a "mulatto man" residing in Northumberland County on 9 May 1796 when the court certified that he was born free [Orders 1796-7, 26]. He was probably deceased when Leanna was taxable on a free male tithable and a horse in 1800 and 1801 [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 320, 328, 349, 364, 379, 393, 423, 437, 445, 506, 517]. He and his wife Leanna were the parents of

i. ?John1, born say 1771, married Fannah Sorrell, 23 November 1792 Northumberland County bond, Thomas Pollard security. He was a "mulatto man" residing in Northumberland County on 12 October 1795 when the court certified that he was born free [Orders 1790-5, 579]. He was taxable in Northumberland County from 1790 to 1802 [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 364, 393, 423, 445, 477, 492, 506, 515, 537, 551].

ii. Salley Evens, born 27 August 1774, "Daughter of Mark & Leanna his wife," married Frank Bee, 21 February 1798 Westmoreland County bond, William Corbell security.

iii. James, born 27 October 1778, "son to Mark Evins" [Fleet, Northumberland County Record of Births, 43]. He was taxable in Northumberland County from 1798 to 1800 [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 477, 492, 506].

iv. ?Mark2, a "free negro" head of a Fairfax County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:253].

v. ?Patty, married Lewis Boyd, 9 February 1802 Northumberland County bond, John Evans security.

vi. ?William, taxable in Northumberland County in 1802, no race indicated [PPTL 1782-1812, frame 537].

vii. ?Fanny, married Moses Blundon, Spencer Thomas security. Moses registered as a free Negro in Northumberland County on 14 September 1807: Moses, Mulatto, about 27 years old, 5 feet 11 Inches high, Emancipated by the will of John Blundon, recorded in Northd District court [Register # 32, Northumberland County Courthouse]. He was called Moses Blundel in 1810, a "free mulatto" head of a Northumberland County household of 6 "other free" [VA:973].

viii. ?Thornton, "mulatto," born say 1797, married Rebecca Hudnall, "mulatto," 27 December 1814 Northumberland County bond, Joseph Peters security. He was a "Blk" taxable in Northumberland County in 1811 [PPTL 1782-1812, frame 669].

ix. ?Elizabeth, born say 1798, married Jesse Spriddle, 11 November 1818 Northumberland County bond, Moses Blundon security.

 

4.    Rachel Evans, born about 1772, registered in King George County on 4 December 1817: a dark mulatto woman about forty five years of age about four feet eleven inches and a half high, stout made...born of Mima Evans a free woman in this County [Register, no.50]. She was the mother of

i. Jemima2/ Mima, born about 1802, registered in King George County on 4 December 1817: a dark Coloured Girl about fifteen years of age, about five feet and an half Inches high...born of Rachel Evans [Register, no.51].

 

Other members of the family in King George County were

i. Moses, born about 1786, registered in King George County on 3 December 1807: a dark mulatto man aged about twenty one or twenty two years, stout made, five feet six and a quarter inches high, was born of a free woman in King George County [Register, no.43].

ii. John2, born about 1787, registered in King George County on 5 February 1812: a dark mulatto man, a resident of King George County, aged about twenty five years & three months, five feet five and a quarter Inches high...was born free [Register, no.45].

 

Go to next family:   Fagan-George

Return to Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina