HAMMOND FAMILY

1.    Margaret1 Hammond, born about 1667, was a twenty-two-year-old white servant living in Northampton County, Virginia, on 28 March 1689 when she was deposed in a suit brought against her master John Baron [OW 1683-1689, 422-3]. She was called "Margaret late servant to Mr. John Barons" on 28 May 1690 when she was presented by the court for having an illegitimate child. The same court ordered that she receive thirty-nine lashes for uttering scandalous words against Colonel John Custis and Mr. Thomas Harmonson by information of Joane, the wife of John Brewer [OW&c 1689-98, 35, 45, 53]. She was a servant living in the home of Captain William Kendall on 29 September 1692 when he reported to the churchwardens that she bore a "maletto bastard" child in his house. She was apparently the first white woman in Northampton County charged with having a mixed-race child since the churchwardens asked the court for its opinion about the "late law the year 1691." The court ordered the churchwardens to dispose of  her (sell her for five years) [OW&c 1698-1710, 190-1]. She and her "Mulatto" child Elizabeth were bound to Captain Robins in Northampton County court, and this indenture was transferred to Hill Drummond of Accomack County [Accomack County Orders 1724-31, 30]. Margaret was the mother of

2     i. Elizabeth1, born about 1694.

 

2.    Elizabeth1 Hammon, born about 1694, was called "Betty a mulatto" on 6 July 1714 when her master, Hill Drummond, complained to the Accomack County court that she had run away and been absent from his service for sixty-two days. She was presented by the churchwardens of Accomack County for having a bastard child on 2 May 1721 and testified on 6 June 1721 that the child was "begott ... by one Negro Slave named Robin belonging to Hill Drummond." She was presented for having other children on 6 April 1725, 7 November 1727, 7 May 1728, 8 August 1729, and on 22 December 1731 [Orders 1714-7, 10; 1719-24, 30, 32; 1724-31, 26, 88a, 102, 107; 1731-36, 10, 29, 38]. On 4 February 1724/5 she petitioned the Accomack County court for her freedom from her indenture to Drummond Hill, but the court ruled on 2 June 1725 that

Whereas Elizabeth Hammon a Mullatto woman late Servant to Mr. Hill Drummond petitioned in February Court for her discharge ... Elizabeth was duly bound with her mother, She being an Infant, a Servant for thirty one years by the Churchwardens of Hungar Parish in Northampton County Court ... Mr. Hill Drummond produced to this Court Several Accts for Running Away and fines ... for which she was to Serve for as ye Law in Such Cases Directs. Said Elizabeth hath not fully completed with All.

Elizabeth continued to enter petitions against Hill on 7 December 1726 and 8 March 1726/7 and against Drummond Hill's administrator, George Douglas, on 8 January 1728/9. Finally, on 2 July 1729 she reached agreement with Douglas that she released him from all claims she had against Drummond's estate (her freedom dues?) and on account of her mother Margaret Hammond, deceased, in exchange for her own release. At least one of her children was probably by a white man since on 5 August 1729 Rev. Mr. William Black appeared in Accomack County court and made oath that he was not "concerned with a Certain Mullatoe Woman name Elizabeth Hammond" as he had been "scandalously aspersed." On 7 March 1737/8 a petition by her (or a daughter by the same name) against Thomas Watson was dismissed, and on 2 August 1738 Watson entered a petition against her, a "Mulatto his Servant," in court for running away. Later that year he added himself and Elizabeth to the list of tithables for the county. On 30 November 1742 she was accused of stealing a hog; on 29 November 1744 her complaint against Comfort Jenkinson was dismissed, and her complaint against William Arbuckle dismissed on 30 May 1745 [Orders 1724-31, 20, 31, 68, 131a, 163, 164; 1737-44, 6, 91, 100, 435; 1744-53, 15, 57]. Elizabeth was a "fr. mulato" who was taxable in Bertie County, North Carolina, in 1751 [CCR 190] but not mentioned again in Bertie County records. Her children were

3     i. ?Ann, born say 1720.

ii. James, born say 1721, "Mulatto Bastard Child" of Elizabeth Hammon, bound to Henry Bazwell to the age of thirty-one on 8 December 1725 in Accomack County [Orders 1724-31, 42].

iii. ?Robert, born say 1725, purchased 50 acres on the west side of Bridger's Creek in Northampton County, North Carolina, on 1 December 1750 [DB 1:454]. His Northampton County estate was administered by Elijah Boddie on 100 pounds in November 1760 (Robert Himmons) [NCGSJ XIV:154].

iv. ?John1, born about 1728, a five-year-old bound as an apprentice shoemaker to David Sparrow in Accomack County court on 6 June 1732 (no parent named) [Orders 1731-36, 29].

4     v. ?Jemima, born say 1730.

5     vi. Isaac1, born say 1732.

vii. ?Drummond, born about 1734, probably named for Drummond Hill, his mother's master, twenty-four years old when his two-year apprenticeship agreement with Alexander Brodie was proved in the 15 March 1758 Edgecombe County, North Carolina court (no race stated) [Minutes 1757-59, 19].

6     viii. ?Margaret2/ Peggy, born about March 1735.

7     ix. ?Mary, born say 1737.

x. ?Josiah, born about December 1739, "Orphan aged 4 years next Christmas," bound to Caleb Broadwest in Accomack County on 28 December 1742 [Orders 1737-44, 449].

 

3.    Ann Hammond, born say 1720, acknowledged in Bertie County court in February 1739 that she had two bastard children, race not mentioned, while indentured to John Pratt, the keeper of the ferry across the Roanoke River at Gideon Gibson's landing [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, I:52, 265]. She may have been the same Ann Hammon who was reported to have delivered a bastard child during her service to Mary Wilson, widow, of Chowan County in July 1737 [Chowan Minutes 1735-48, 73]. She was the mother of

i. ?Catherine, born say 1739, the "free Mulatto" wife of James McDaniel [CCR 190]. See the McDaniel history.

8 ii. ?Horatio, born say 1744.

iii. ?Richard, born say 1745, a taxable "Molato" in Bladen County, North Carolina, from 1769 to 1776, head of a household of one white male and seven white females in 1786 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:16, 33, 89, 109; II:66, 81, 183].

9     iv. ?John2, born say 1747.

v. Sarah, born about 1750, the seven-year-old daughter of Nann Hammond, a "Free Mullatoe," bound to Cornelius Campbell of Bertie County on 29 July 1757 [NCGSJ XIII:168]. In 1767 she was in Christopher Clark's household in the list of William Nichols. She may have been the Sally Hammond who was head of a Lenoir County household of 12 "other free" in 1800 [NC:12].

vi. Elizabeth2, born about 1753, ten years old on 23 February 1763, "Daughter of Ann Hammond," bound to Thomas Ashburn in Bertie County [NCGSJ XIV:30]. In 1768 she was a "Free Mullato" Bertie County taxable in Thomas Mason's household in the list of Edward Rasor [CR 10.702.1].

 

4.    Jemima Hammons (Ammons), born say 1730, was living in Accomack County on 27 November 1750 when the court ordered her daughter Sarah bound out. She was the mother of

i. Sarah Ammons, born about 1747, three-year-old orphan of Jemima Ammons, bound to Peter Watson on 27 November 1750 [Orders 1744-53, 450], perhaps the same Sarah Hammond who was an orphan bound to Robert Baley on 26 August 1755 [Orders 1753-63, 105].

ii. ?Anthony, born say 1755, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 7 "other free" in 1790 [NC:66]. He married Isaac Hammond's widow, Dicey, in 1827 and died the same year according to Dicey's application for Isaac's pension.

 

5.    Isaac1 Hammond, born say 1732, was married to Margaret Akin, "free Negroes," between 21 September 1755 and 22 June 1764 when their children were baptized at St. Thomas and St. Dennis Parish, South Carolina [Parochial Register of the Parishes of St. Thomas & St. Denis, n.p. (alphabetical listing under H)]. Margaret Akin was probably related to Carter Akins, head of a Charleston County, South Carolina household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [SC:36]. Isaac and Margaret were the "free Negro" parents of

10    i. Isaac2, baptized 21 September 1755.

ii. Joseph, baptized 15 November 1761.

iii. Abraham, baptized 22 June 1764.

11   iv. Ephraim, born say 1776.

 

6.    Margaret2/ Peggy Hammons, born about March 1735, was "8 years old next March" when she was bound apprentice to Peter Delastations on 28 December 1742 in Accomack County court [Orders 1737-44, 449]. On 29 July 1754 she was found guilty by the Accomack County court of having an unnamed bastard child [Orders 1753-63, 16]. She may have been the mother of

i. Mary Hammond, head of an Octararo, Cecil County, Maryland, household of 9 "other free" in 1790.

ii. Elizabeth, born say 1767, ordered bound out to Samuel Matthews in Accomack County court on 29 August 1769 [Orders 1769-70, 219].

 

7.    Mary Hammons, born say 1737, was living in Edgecombe County in 1779 when the 25 May session of the Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions ordered her "base begotten child" Jordan Hammons bound to Willis Hyatt (no race stated) [Minutes 1772-84, 2nd page of May Minutes]. Her children were

12   i. ?Shadrack, born say 1757.

ii. Jordan, born say 1767, no age or race stated when he was ordered bound out by the May 1779 Session of the Edgecombe County court. He was head of an Edgecombe County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:57], 4 in Chatham County in 1800, and 6 "free colored" in Chatham in 1820 [NC:211].

iii. ?Frederick, born circa 1778, "Mullatto," ordered bound to Dempsey Odam by the Edgecombe County court on 24 July 1787, no parent named. He was removed from Odam's care and ordered bound to James Coker by the 28 May 1793 Edgecombe County court. He married Nancy Pettiford, 19 May 1802 Granville County bond with George Anderson bondsman. He may also have been the Frederick Hammond who married Polly Stewart, 14 August 1807 Mecklenburg County, Virginia bond, Frederick Dyson security. He was head of a Montgomery County, Tennessee household of 9 "free colored" in 1820.

 

8.    Horatio Hammond, born say 1744, purchased 100 acres in Bladen County on the east side of Drowning Creek on Jacobs Swamp on 7 November 1784 (called Rhesa Hammons) [DB 1:262]. He and his wife Patience sold 100 acres on Saddletree Swamp in Robeson County to John Hammons on 6 May 1789 [DB B:142]. His wife was probably the daughter of David Braveboy who named his daughter Patience Hammons in his 20 October 1787 Robeson County will [WB 1:10]. He made a deed of gift to (his son?) James Hammond proved in Cumberland County on 9 October 1792 [Minutes 1791-97; the deed has not survived] and made a quit claim deed for 100 acres on the east side of Jacob Swamp by deed recorded in Robeson in 1793 [DB C:149]. He was living in Robeson County on 12 January 1797 when the Cumberland County court issued an execution against him for twelve pounds [Minutes 1791-7]. He was called Ratia Hammond in 1790, head of a white Cumberland County household of 2 males over 16, 1 under 16, and 4 females [NC:39] and was head of a Robeson County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:384]. He sold 100 acres in Robeson County on the north side of Jacob Swamp to Cannon Cumbo on 17 May 1804 and sold 100 acres on the south side of Drowning Creek by deed recorded in 1808 [DB N:216; P:25]. John Braveboy, a five-year-old "boy of colour," was ordered bound as an apprentice to him by the 5 October 1802 Robeson County court [Minutes I:219]. His children were

i. James, born say 1771, received land in Cumberland County by deed of gift from his father in 1792.

ii. ?Willis, born say 1773, entered 100 acres east of Drowning Creek in Robeson County on 18 January 1794 [Pruitt, Land Grants: Robeson County, no. 1460] and received a grant for this land [DB H:17]. He purchased 80 acres in Robeson west of the Great Swamp in 1811 and sold 100 acres on the west side of the Great Swamp in 1828 [DB P:330; U:168]. He was head of a Robeson County household in 1810 [NC:220]. He left a 12 May 1828 Robeson County will, proved May 1829, by which he left his estate to his wife Martha and then to his children: Jerves(?) Bathsheba, Williamson, Nancy, Susanna, Allison, Elizabeth, Polly, Sarah and Maleachy [WB A:346].

13   iii. ?Elsey, born before 1776.

 

9.    John2 Hammond, born say 1747, was a "free molato" taxable in the 1763 Bertie County list of John Nichols [CR 010.702.1, box 2]. He purchased 100 acres on the north side of Saddle Tree Swamp in Bladen County on 26 February 1768 [DB 23:137] and received a patent for 100 acres northeast of Drowning Creek on Saddle Tree Swamp on 22 December the same year [Hoffman, Land Patents, II:526]. He was a "Molato" taxable in Bladen County from 1770 to 1776, taxable on his wife in 1772 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:45, 70, 80, 124, 135; II:65, 81]. He purchased 100 acres on Saddletree Swamp on 29 October 1774 [DB 23:465], and on 22 January 1793 he entered another 100 acres adjoining this land in what was then Robeson County [Pruitt, Land Entries: Robeson County, I:70]. He sold 100 acres of this land on the west side of the swamp to his son Samuel Hammons on 14 November 1800; made a deed of gift of 100 acres on the east side of the swamp to his grandson Lewis Hammons, son of John, Jr., on 2 October 1804, another 25 acres to Samuel Hammons on 21 December 1805, and 50 acres to his son Elisha Hammons, by a deed recorded in 1811 [DB K:88; N:240; O:254; Q:85]. The 1 January 1798 Robeson County court ordered James Whitley, a white boy about seventeen years old, bound apprentice to him [Minutes I:21]. He was head of a Robeson County household of 9 "other free" in 1790 [NC:48], 4 in 1800 [NC:384], and 7 in 1810 [NC:220 & 241]. His 1 March 1811 will was proved in Robeson County on 25 November 1811 [Minutes II:287]. He named his wife Christian, his children: Enoch, Elijah, Harvey, Arenith Jackson (wife of Thomas Jackson), Samuel, Jacob, John, Christian, Norfleet, Elias, Stradford, and Helen; and his grandchildren: William Hammond (Harvey's son) and Cornelius Jackson (Arenith's son) [WB 1:125]. His first wife was probably the daughter of Elias Stradford since Stradford's 6 August 1800 Robeson County nuncupative will left John Hammon, Sr., his crop and left all the remainder of his estate to sons of John Hammon: Jacob, Samuel, Enoch, John, and Harvey. Ann Hammon and Dicy Hammon (John3 Hammon's wife) were witnesses to the will [WB 1:60]. John Hammond's second wife was Christian Norfleet according to a letter dated about 1900. His children mentioned in his will were

14    i. Jacob, born say 1767.

15    ii. Samuel1, born say 1770.

iii. Enoch, sold 100 acres on the east side of Poplar Pole Branch in Robeson County to Samuel Hammons on 1 July 1797 [DB G:140]. He was counted as white in 1800, head of a Robeson County household of 3 males [NC:384], called Enoch Eammins in 1810, head of a Robeson County household of 2 "other free" [NC:233].

iv. Elijah, who received 100 acres on the west side of Saddle Tree Swamp which he was then in possession of by his father's will. He was head of a Robeson County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:241]. He sold 250 acres on the west side of Drowning Creek in 1795. He purchased 50 acres from John Hammond, Senior, on 21 December 1805 and sold this land by a deed recorded in 1814. He sold 75 acres on Mussels Branch by deed recorded in 1816, and sold two tracts, one for 75 acres and one for 30 acres, on Saddletree Swamp by deeds recorded in 1826 [DB E:244; Q:85, 415; R:195; T:478, 479].

v. Harvey, who received 150 acres which he had in his possession, to pass to his son William at his death. He was head of a Robeson County household of 5 in 1800 [NC:384]. He sold 30 acres on the west side of Saddletree Swamp to Elijah Hammons on 12 March 1813 [DB R:24].

vi. Arenith, who married Thomas Jackson. Their son Cornelius Jackson received 50 acres on the Poplar Pole Branch including Lovec Bunche's old field by the will of her grandfather John2 Hammond.

16   vii. John4, born 1776-94.

viii. Norfleet.

ix. Elias1.

x. Stradford.

xi. Helen.

 

10.    Isaac2 Hammond, baptized 21 September 1755, "a man of color," was a fifer in the 10th North Carolina Regiment for twelve months. He married Dicey ____ in Fayetteville in 1787 [NARA, W.7654, M805, reel 393]. He was found guilty of assault and battery on Lucretia Bass by the 16 March 1809 Cumberland County court and ordered to post bond of 50 pounds to keep the peace with her for twelve months [Minutes 1808-10]. He was head of a Fayetteville, Cumberland County, household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:42]. His widow Dicy, born about 1772, applied for a pension in September 1849 for his service in the Revolution. She stated that he served as a fifer, her husband died in 1822, she married Anthony Hammonds in 1827, and Anthony died the same year. A copy of their Cumberland County marriage bond was included in the pension application: Isaac Hammonds, Cader Bryant and John Toney bond on 20 October 1788 for marriage of Isaac Hammonds and Dicy Peters. A neighbor who testified for the petition stated that it was unclear from the bond whether Dicy's maiden name was Peters or Toney. A copy of their bible included the birth of their son George, born in 1801. Daniel Graham, Register of the Treasury for Fayetteville, stated that Isaac's brother Ephraim was a barber, and that Isaac and Ephraim were "Mulattoes or Mustees having no African blood in them." They voted in elections [NARA, W.7654, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/21891940]. Dicy sold a lot on the south edge of Franklin Street in Fayetteville on 15 May 1841 [DB 44:189]. Dicey's 3 October 1852 Cumberland County will was proved December the same year. She named only her daughter Rachel Lomack, wife of Enoch Lomack [WB C:229]. Their children were

i. ?John3, head of a Cumberland County household of 5 "other free" in 1800.

ii. ?Jerusha, head of a Cumberland County household of 4 "other free" in 1800.

iii. ?Jane, head of a Cumberland County household of 3 "other free" in 1800.

iv. ?Theophilus, head of a Cumberland County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:141]. He married Delila Pettiford, 25 February 1811 Wake County bond, Absalom Locust bondsman.

v. ?Isaac3, head of a Cumberland County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:191].

vi. ?Albert, born say 1790, sold a lot in Fayetteville by deed recorded in 1834 [DB 41:17], took the oath of an insolvent debtor in the 5 September 1842 Cumberland County court and was allowed to keep a shotgun by the 5 June 1843 court [Minutes, 1835-44].

vii. Rachel Lomack, born about 1794, married Enoch Lomack, 17 June 1813 Cumberland County bond. Enoch was the son of William Lomack, another Revolutionary War veteran who was head of a Robeson County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [NCGSJ XIV:45; NC:240]. She applied for her father's pension on 22 July 1854 stating that she was the only living child of Isaac and Dicey [M805, reel 393, frame 0499].

 

11.    Ephraim Hammons, born say 1776, was bound as an apprentice in Cumberland County to Dr. John Sibly and then bound to James Howat for the remaining part of his indenture on 14 April 1796 [Minutes 1791-7]. On Saturday, 14 March 1807, the Cumberland County court ordered James Patterson, a fourteen-year-old "Boy of Colour," bound as an apprentice to him, and the 8 September 1810 Cumberland County court bound William Scott, a five-year-old "boy of Colour" to him [Minutes 1805-08; 1808-10]. He was head of a Cumberland County household of 2 "other free" in 1800, 4 "other free" in 1810 (E. Hammons) [NC:622], and 6 "free colored" and 5 slaves in 1820 (Ephraim Hammons) [NC:191]. He purchased land by deed proved in Cumberland County court on 9 March 1810 [Minutes 1808-10]. He married Rebecca Bell, 26 February 1812 Cumberland County bond with Thomas Sampson bondsman. He was bondsman for the 12 November 1818 Cumberland County marriage of Harry Mitchell and Betsy Jones. Ephraim was called a barber when he purchased a lot in Fayetteville on Cold Spring Street on 3 November 1819 and an additional two lots in Fayetteville by deeds proved in Cumberland County in 1819. The lot on Cold Spring Street was sold by the sheriff for debt by a deed recorded in 1823. On 13 September 1832 he sold 100 acres in Cumberland County on the west side of Black River Swamp [DB 31:521; 32:142-3; 35:56; 40:453]. The 8 June 1837 Cumberland County court bound Elsey Parker, a "free girl of colour," to him [Minutes 1836-38]. Perhaps one of his children was

i. Lydia, married Timothy Bass, 28 May Cumberland County bond.

 

12.    Shadrack Hammond, born say 1757, was "a free Mulatto boy" ordered bound to William Speir by the September 1760 Edgecombe County court (no parent named) [Minutes 1759-64, 6]. He was head of an Edgecombe County household of 8 "other free" in 1790 [NC:57], 9 "other free" and 1 white woman in 1800 [NC:209], 8 "other free" in 1810 [NC:748], and 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:126]. His children may have been

17    i. Burrell, born about 1775.

ii. Willis2, born 1776-94, head of an Edgecombe County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:748] and 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:126].

iii. Elijah, head of an Edgecombe County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:748].

iv. James, head of an Edgecombe County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:748] and 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:148].

v. Oliff, head of an Edgecombe County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:746].

vi. Levy, born 1776-94, perhaps the Levi Hammonds who married Lydia Bass, 3 November 1813 Cumberland County bond, Leven Jones bondsman. He was head of an Edgecombe County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:111].

 

13.  Elsey Hammons, born before 1776, was head of a Cumberland County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:214]. She was called Alsey Hammons on 7 December 1818 when she and John Sampson sold a lot in Fayetteville on the south edge of Mumford Street, 230 feet from Winslow Street, for $750 [DB 31:48]. She left a 13 February 1838 Cumberland County will left her daughter Martha half her lot on Mumford and Winslow Streets, to go to her Martha's son Henry at her death. And she left the other half of the lot to her son James Sampson [WB B:290]. Her children named in the will were

i. Martha, who received half her mother's lot in Fayetteville. Her son George was mentioned in Eliza's will.

ii. James Sampson, who received half the lot in Fayetteville.

 

14.    Jacob Hammon, born say 1767, entered 100 acres in Robeson County on the southwest side of Saddle Tree Swamp on 21 February 1788 [Pruitt, Land Entries: Robeson County, I:14] and sold this land to Samuel Hammons on 8 September 1800. The sheriff sold another 49-1/2 acres of his land on Ten Mile Swamp for debt in 1802 [DB K:46; L:194]. He was head of a Robeson County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:48] and 3 in Anson County in 1800 [NC:198]. He was absent from Robeson County on 5 October 1802 when the court ruled that the indenture of his daughter Phereby was illegal and that she should be returned to her mother [Minutes I:216]. His children were

i. Pheraby, born about 1790, twelve years old when the Robeson County court ordered her bound to Reuben Rozar on 6 July 1802 [Minutes I:207].

ii. ?Sarah, head of a Robeson County household of 1 in 1800 [NC:384].

 

15.    Samuel1 Hammond, born say 1770, entered 100 acres in Robeson County on the east side of Saddletree Swamp bordering his father's land on 21 February 1788 [Pruitt, Land Entries: Robeson County, I:14]. He deeded one acre of land and "Hammons' Meeting house," to be used "to hold Divine Worship," to the trustees of the Methodist Episcopal Church for 10 shillings on 3 October 1792. He purchased 100 acres on the east side of Poplar Pole Branch on 1 July 1797 from Enoch Hammons and sold this land to Nathaniel Revell on 4 May 1801. He purchased 100 acres on Saddletree Swamp from his brother Jacob on 8 September 1800 and 100 acres from his father on 21 December 180_ [DB C:160; K:46; M:355; O:254]. He was head of a Robeson County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [NC:241]. His 28 June 1812 Robeson County will, proved February 1815, named his wife Deborah; his daughters Anna, Dorcas, Delilah, Mary, and Rebecca; and left 225 acres to his three sons: Elias, Samuel, and James [WB 1:158]. His daughters' married names were listed in a 2 May 1829 deed of gift they made to their mother for three tracts of land totaling 225 acres [DB U:317]. Deborah's 9 February 1832 Robeson County will mentioned all their children except Samuel and mentioned her granddaughter Mariah [WB 1:266]. Their children were

i. Elias.2

ii. Sally, married Bryant Bowen.

iii. Nancy, married Guilford Best.

iv. Samuel2.

v. Mary, married James Jacobs.

vi. Rebecca, married James Paul, who was probably the son of George Paul, head of a Robeson County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:409].

vii. James.

viii. Delilah, married Wright Ivey.

ix. Dorcas Hammond.

 

16.    John4 Hammond, born 1776-94, was head of a Robeson County household of 4 in 1810 [NC:220] and 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:325]. His wife was identified as Dicy Hammond in the 23 October 1800 deed of gift of 100 acres from John2 Hammond to his grandson Lewis [DB U:37]. One of John4's children was

i. Lewis, who was given title to 100 acres where his father was living from John Hammons, Sr., on 23 October 1800 and was given another deed of gift from his grandfather of 100 acres on the east side of Saddletree Swamp on 2 October 1804 [DB U:37; N:240]. He was not counted in Robeson County so he may have been the Lewis Hammon who was head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:27].

 

17.    Burrell Hammond, born say 1775, was ordered by the 30 August 1796 Edgecombe County court to pay Nancy Adkins for maintaining her child begotten by him. He married Betsey Jenkins, 11 September 1811 Edgecombe County bond. He was head of an Edgecombe County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [NC:209], 3 in 1810 [NC:745], and 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:128]. His children were

i. Willie Hammons, born say 1796, wrote his 24 September 1814 Nash County will before leaving to serve in the militia as a substitute for Sam Vick. He mentioned his brother John, not yet twenty-one years old, and his father Burwell Hammons. The will was proved in August 1815 [WB 1:308].

ii. John5.

 

Other members of the family were

i. John3, head of a Cumberland County household of 5 "other free" in 1800. He stated that he was about 98 years old on 24 May 1852 when he appeared in Robeson County court to petition for a pension for service in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted in Cheraw District, South Carolina, and resided in Anson County after the war until 1807 and then moved to Robeson County. Levi Locklier and Elias Paul testified for him. He died in October 1858 [NARA, S.8654, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/22603188].

ii. William, a "man of color" who was living in Spring Creek, Buncombe County, in 1840 when white residents petitioned the legislature asking that he be allowed to "pray, exhort, or Preach" in public, he being a respectable black man who "keeps company with no negroes all his association is with white people" [Schweninger, Race, Slavery, and Free Blacks, Series 1, 96].

 

Others who remained in Virginia were

i. Larry Hammons, born about 1785, registered in Norfolk County on 17 July 1810: 5 feet 1/2 Inc, 25 years of age, of a light Complexion, Born free.

ii. Margaret3/ Peggy Hammon, born about 1788, registered in Norfolk County on 17 July 1810: 4 feet 11 1/2 In., twenty two years of age, of a light Complexion, Born free [Registry of Free Negros & Mulattos, nos. 24, 25]. On 21 December 1807 the Norfolk County court ordered her daughter Lucy Hammond bound to John Schoolfield [Orders 1806-8, n.p.].

 

HANDY FAMILY

1.    Samuel Handy, born about 1761, registered in Princess Anne County on 4 April 1794: a dark black Man, five feet eight inches high, thirty three years of age, Liberated by William Boyce of Sussex County on Delaware as appears by sundry papers presented to me and has resided in this County upwards of ten years past. He may have married a free woman since Jenny Handy, born about 1754, registered in Princess Anne County on 4 April 1794: a light Mulatto Woman Five Feet high, Forty years of age, Born free [Handy, Jenny (M, 40: Free Negro Certificate, 1794, [Handy, Samuel (M ,33); Handy, Jenny: Free Negro Certificate, 1794, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. He was taxable in Marshall Anderson's household in 1788 and taxable in his own household in 1795 [PPTL, 1782-1789, frame 714; 1790-1822, frame 109].

 

HANSON/ HENSON FAMILY

1.    Mary Hanson, born say 1686, was presented by the York County court on 24 May 1706 for having a "Mulatto" child on information of her master Robert Read. She appeared in court on 2 July 1706 and declared that the father of her child was "Dick Broo_ a Malatto slave belonging to said Robert Read. Robert Read received Dick by his mother's 10 February 1685/6 York County will: "one Negro woman named Black Betty with her child a Mollatto boy named Dick." Dick was probably the son of Richard Brooks a (white) servant of Madame Reade whose age was adjudged as sixteen years on 26 February 1677/8 when the York County court ordered that he serve her until the age of twenty-four. Robert Read left a York County will by which he gave "a Malatto Man named Dick Brookes" to his son Thomas Reade, gave a servant named James Hanson, "bound by the Churchwardens to serve to ye age of one and thirty," to his daughter Mildred Reade and gave a servant boy named Richard Hanson, "bound by the Churchwardens to serve to ye age of one and thirty," to his son Francis Reade. Mary's children were listed in the 7 April 1713 inventory of Read's estate: "James & Richard Hanson indented Mulattoes" [DOW 6:35; 7:257; 12:414, 424; 14:241, 251-3]. Mary was the mother of

i. James, born say 1706, complained to the York County court against his master John Goodwin on 15 June 1730. The court ordered that he return to Goodwin's service and ordered Goodwin to treat him well and allow him "cloathing and victuals suitable to a servant of his degree [DOW 17:75].

ii. Richard, born say 1707.

 

They may have been the ancestors of

2     i. William Henson, born say 1730.

ii. Rebecca Hanson, born about 1778, registered in Petersburg on 7 July 1818: a free woman of colour, five feet two inches high, forty years old, brown Complection, rather light, born free in Dinwiddie County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 919].

iii. Milley Hanson, born say 1775, mother of three children who obtained certificates of freedom in Prince George's County, Maryland from 14 July 1814 to 18 April 1825 [Provine, Registrations of Free Negroes, 19, 50].

 

2.    William Henson, born say 1730, was the father of "poor children" Elizabeth, Shad, John, and Margaret Henson who were bound out in Bedford County in July 1766 [Orders 1763-71, 262]. He was the father of

3     i. Elizabeth, born say 1754.

ii. Shadrick, born say 1758, head of a Petersburg Town household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:118a].

iii. John, perhaps the John Henson who was bound apprentice to Christopher Slinker in Bedford County on 24 June 1782 [Orders 1774-82, 360].

iv. Margaret.

 

3.    Elizabeth Henson, born say 1754, was the mother of a "Mulattoe" child named Aggy Henson who was ordered bound out in Bedford County in October 1774. She was ordered to serve her master Joseph Akins an additional year for having a bastard child [Orders 1774-82, 81]. She was the mother of

i. Aggy, born say 1774.

 

HARDEN FAMILY

Members of the Harden family of North Carolina were

i. Solomon, , born say 1760, enlisted as a substitute from Duplin County in Lieutenant Wilkinson's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment of Colonel Abraham Sheppard but was listed as a deserter on 19 February 1782 [NARA, M246, roll 79, frame 165 of 323; http://www.ancestry.com]. He was taxable on one poll in the 1784 Sampson County tax list [L.P. 64.1 by N.C. Genealogy XIV:2172]. He was head of a Robeson County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:49], 10 in 1800 [NC:383] and 10 in 1810 [NC:239]. He was called a "yeoman of Richmond County, North Carolina, Husband of Delaney Order (alias Harden), wife of Peter Order, Deceased," on 25 October 1791 when he and his wife gave power of attorney to Robert Webb to receive the final settlement for Revolutionary War service of his wife's deceased husband [NCGSJ XIV:114].

ii. David Harden, enlisted as a substitute from Duplin County in Lieutenant Wilkinson's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment of Colonel Abraham Sheppard but was listed as a deserter on 19 February 1782 [NARA, M246, roll 79, frame 165 of 323; http://www.ancestry.com]. He was head of a Sampson County household of 12 "other free" in 1800 [NC:501].

iii. Benjamin, served in the militia in Wilimington District [DAR, Roster of Soldiers from North Carolina in the American Revolution, 339; N.C. Archives, State Treasurer Record Group, Military Papers, Revolutionary War Army Accounts, Harden, Benja., W-1:50; B:191], one of the freeholders of Sampson County who were ordered to work on the road from the courthouse to Drew's Ford on 15 February 1797 with (his brother?) Sion Harden, Henry Harden, John Manuel, and Larry Manuel [Minutes 1784-1800, 225]. He was head of a Sampson County household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [NC:510] and was counted as head of a household of 5 white males and 5 white females in 1810 [NC:486]. He was probably the Benjamin Hardin who was said to be over 100 years old when he was head of a Cocke County, Tennessee household of 5 "free colored" in 1830.

iv. Sion, head of Sampson County household of 4 white males and 3 white females in 1810 [NC:486] and 11 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:308].

v. Abraham, charged in Sampson County court on 13 August 1799 with begetting a bastard child by Loretta Odum [Minutes 1784-1800, 272]. He was head of a Sampson County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:501] and 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:308].

1     vi. Lucy, born say 1770.

 

1.    Lucy Harden, born say 1770, delivered a bastard child but refused to identify the father in Sampson County court on 14 August 1787 [Minutes 1784-1800, 65]. She was head of an Anson County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 (called Lucy Harding) [NC:12]. She may have been the mother of the members of the Harding family counted as "free colored" in Anson County in 1820:

i. Jacob, head of a household of 3 males and __females [NC:12].

ii. John, head of a household of one "free colored" man and 2 white women [NC:12].

 

HARMAN FAMILY

1.    William1 Harman, born about 1632, was called "William Harman Negro" in the court and tax records before and after he became free. He arrived in Virginia as a slave sometime before 1648 when he was claimed as one of the headrights of planters Lewis Burwell and Thomas Vause [Nugent, Cavaliers & Pioneers, I:171-2]. In 1654 he was called the slave of William Andrews when he recorded his purchase of a calf in Northampton County court. William Andrews died about this time and his widow, Mary, married William Smart [DW 1654-55, 38, 85, fol.85]. In 1660 Smart sold William Harman to William Kendall who, on the same day he purchased Harman, agreed to sell him his freedom if he could provide sufficient security for the payment of 5,000 pounds of tobacco within two years [DW 1657-66, 70, 74, cited by Deal, Race and Class, 398-412]. This was 1,000 pounds more than his purchase price. He was still listed in Kendall's household in 1664 and 1665 [Orders 1657-64, 198; 1664-74, 15].

In March 1666 he sold a colt to Jane Gossall, the twenty-two-year old daughter of Emmanuel Driggers and widow of free "Negro" John Gossall, and stated in the deed that he intended to make her his wife, promising that the colt would be her sole property as long as she lived [DW 1655-68, pt.2, fol.12]. He had married Jane by June 1666 when he submitted the letters of administration on her first husband's estate to the court. He was head of his own household with his wife Jane in the Northampton County list of tithables from 1667 to 1677 [Orders 1664-74, fol. 24, pp.24, 42; 1674-79, 190].

He appeared to have been equally friendly with slaves, free African Americans, and whites. According to the court deposition of a neighbor, he spent New Years Eve of 1672 drinking rum and sugar with the slaves on John Michael's plantation. He was about forty years old when he made a deposition in court about an argument he had witnessed while at the home of John Francisco [Orders 1664-74, ff. 125, 138, 143, 146, 156a-f, 157]. And in the summer of 1683 there was a court hearing about an argument among six of his white neighbors who were gathered at his house to help him harvest his crop [OW 1683-9, 15-16].

In the summer of 1675 he was involved in a dispute with William Gray over the possession of a gun that once belonged to Francis Payne. Payne's widow Amey had delivered the gun to Harman, perhaps as a gift, and her second husband William Gray, white like her, protested and took it back. The court ordered the gun returned to Harman [OW 1674-79, 58-59].

In September 1673 Jane Harman was the wet nurse for the illegitimate child of Nicholas Silvedo, a Portuguese servant, and English maidservant Mary Gale [Deal, Race and Class, 405]. William and Jane were tithables in their own Northampton County household in 1677. He was about fifty years old on 30 December 1686, called "William Harmon Negro," when he made a deposition about a gun said to be a part of the estate of Edward Jessop, "Maletto" [OW 1674-9, 190; OW 1683-9, 258, 262-3]. William was still living in April 1699 when he recorded the livestock mark of his son Manuel Harman [DW 1651-4, 31 at end of volume]. Jane may have been the Jane Harman who bought a "parcel of cloathes" in the 15 June 1700 sale of the estate of Philip Mongon, deceased [Orders 1692-1707, 262]. William and Jane's children were

2     i. Frances, born say 1667.

3    ii. Manuel1, born say 1670.

4     iii. Edward1, born say 1672.

iv. John1, born say 1674.

5     v. William2, born say 1676.

 

2.    Frances Harmon, born say 1667, was the mother of an illegitimate child by a white man, Samuel Johnson, in 1685, another in 1686 by Jarvis Cutler, another before 28 May 1688, and another before 1692 [OW 1683-9, 112, 358, 386; OW 1689-98, 160-1]. In May 1690 Thomas Carter was security for her fine of fornication [OW 1689-98, 35, 58]. She married a slave, Anthony George, by 1693 when she recorded her livestock mark in Northampton County court [DW 1651-4, 26 at end of volume]. She may have been the mother of

6     i. Joseph1, born say 1692.

 

3.    Manuel1 Harman, born say 1670, recorded his livestock mark in Northampton County court with his father in April 1699 [DW 1651-4, 31 at end of volume]. He was a tenant on land in Accomack County on 7 December 1714 [Orders 1714-17, 2]. He was taxable in Matapany Hundred of Somerset County from 1723 to 1738: with John Harmon in his household in 1729, taxable on Simon Collick in 1736 and 1737 [List of Tithables, 1723-38]. He was about "seventy odd years of age and "almost past Labour" on 19 June 1739 when the Somerset County court granted his petition to be discharged from paying taxes [Judicial Record 1738-40, 121]. He may have been the father of

i. John2, born say 1712, taxable in Bogerternorten Hundred, Somerset County, in the household of Emanuel Harman in 1729, in Edward Franklin's household in 1737, taxable in his own household in 1739 and with his unnamed "melotto" wife in 1740 [List of Tithables].

 

4.    Edward1 Harman, born say 1672, was living in Northampton County on 8 November 1702 when he and (his brother?) John Harman, Johnson Driggus, John Driggus, and Samuel George, "Free Negroes," were convicted of stealing a hog and then abusing and threatening several whites "in an insolent manner" [Orders 1698-1710, 102, 106]. He purchased 100 acres in Accomack County a few miles from Chincoteague in the northeastern part of the county in 1711. He and his wife Patience sold this land twenty-five years later [DW 1729-37, fol. 235-p.236; Whitelaw, Virginia's Eastern Shore, 1333]. On 10 August 1719 he admitted in Accomack County court that he owed William Johnson 7-1/2 bushels of Indian corn [Orders 1717-19, 1]. He may have been identical to Edward Harman who was taxable in Bogerternorten Hundred, Somerset County, Maryland, from 1738 to 1740. Edward and Patience may have been the ancestors of some of the family members who were in Maryland and Delaware:

i. Zachariah, taxable in Bogerternorten Hundred, Somerset County, in William Smith's household in 1733, in Ursley Greer's household (with William Harman) in 1734, in Presgrave William's household in 1735, in Edward Franklin's household in 1737, in Edward Harman's household in 1738, and in Edward Franklin's household in 1739.

7     ii. William3, born say 1715.

iii. John2, born say 1718, taxable in Bogerternorten Hundred, Somerset County, in Edward Franklin's household in 1737 and taxable in 1740 in his own household with his unnamed "melotto" wife in Baltimore Hundred, Somerset County.

iv. Edward3, born say 1720, taxable in Bogerternorten Hundred, Somerset County, in the household of (his brother?) William Harman in 1739 and the household of (his father?) Edward Harman in 1740.

v. Jane, born say 1722, living in All Hollow's Parish, Somerset County, in June 1738 when she was indicted for having an illegitimate child. She was found not guilty. Edward Harmon, planter, was her security for the payment of court fees [Judicial Record 1738-40, 43]. She was a taxable "mulato" in the Bogerternorten Hundred household of Robert Warren in 1740 [1740 Tax List]. On 18 November 1740 she was again indicted for having an illegitimate child, but this time confessed that John Jackson was the father. Robert Warren was her security [Judicial Record 1740-2, 59-60, 310].

8     vi. Daniel1, born say 1725.

9     vii. Job, born say 1726.

 

5.    William2 Harman, born say 1676, was a "Negro" tithable head of his own Northampton County household from 1720 to 1725 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 2, 13, 24, 36, 51, 68, 73]. He was called William Harmon "Negro" in December 1721 when he paid Hannah Carter's fine of 500 pounds of tobacco and indemnified the parish from any charge from her illegitimate child [Orders 1719-22, 144, 146]. He died without making a will before 12 January 1725/6 when his children Jane and Edward Harman chose Philip Mongon as their guardian. His estate was valued at 32 pounds [Orders 1722-9, 226; DW 1725-33, 32]. His children were

i. ?Dinah Mongon, wife of Philip Mongon.

10   ii. Jane, born about 1706.

iii. Edward2, born say 1707, a "Negro" tithable in his father's Northampton County household in 1723 and 1724. He was tithable in Philip Mongon's household in 1726, a "negro" tithable in Matthew Welch's household from 1727 to 1731, and tithable in the household of Henry Speakman from 1737 to 1744 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 36, 51, 73, 102, 118, 170, 212, 221, 255, 276, 292, 304, 361]. He sued Philip Mongon for his part of his father's estate on 11 July 1727, and he was sued by Daniel Jacob on 11 October 1727 [Orders 1722-9, 285, 299].

iv. ?Nan, born say 1710, a "negro" taxable in Thomas Moor's Northampton County household from 1726 to 1728 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 107, 132].

v. ?Jeffry, born say 1712, taxable in Abraham Bowker's Northampton County household in 1727 and 1728.

vi. ?George1, born about 1717, a ten-year-old "orphan Mulatto" bound apprentice in Accomack County on 5 March 1727 to Jeptha Perry and then bound instead to Benjamin Salmon on 3 August 1736 when Salmon complained to the court that Perry neither taught him a trade nor "put him to School" [Orders 1724-31, 95a; 1731-36, 190]. On 30 September 1766 the Accomack County court ordered that he be added to the list of tithables [Orders 1765-67, 235].

 

6.   Joseph1 Harmon, born say 1692, was sued by John McKeel in Princess Anne County court on 4 January 1726/7 [Orders 1717-28, 272]. He left a 23 January 1737/8 Princess Anne County, Virginia will, proved 4 April 1739 by which he left a cow, hogs, a gun, sword, bed and furniture to his son Joseph Harman when he came of age; left a cow, calf, hogs, and furniture to his daughter Mary when she came to age sixteen; and made his wife Elizabeth executrix [DB 1735-40, 355/357]. He was the father of

11   i. Joseph2, born say 1725.

ii. Mary, born say 1727.

 

7.    William3 Harman, born say 1715, was taxable in Bogerternorten Hundred, Somerset County in Ursley Greer's household in 1734, in Robert Warren's household in 1737, in his own household from 1738 to 1739 (with his brother? Edward Harman), and taxable in Bogerternorton Hundred with his wife Betty in 1740 "by order of Court" [List of Taxables]. Worcester County was formed from this part of Somerset County in 1742, so his descendants may have been those members of the family counted as "other free" in Worcester County. He and William Butcher owned land adjoining Nathan Brittingham in Broadkill Hundred, 15 miles southwest of Lewes, on 30 April 1759 when Brittingham sold the land to Solomon Parrimore [DB I-9:239]. Jonathan Vaughan sued him and Joshua Bucher in Sussex County court in February 1764 with Daniel Nunez as security for his costs, and Joshua Rocher sued him in August 1764. His death was suggested when the Vaughan's case against him came before the court in May 1768. Perhaps his widow was Tabitha Harmon who was sued by Robert Lacey in May 1770 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1761-71, frame 130, 146, 165, 205, 275, 407, 428, 446, 480, 512, 549, 562, 567, 575]. He may have been the ancestor of

i. Jeremiah, head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [MD:124].

ii. Abel, purchased 50 acres in Worcester County called "Scarborough's Castle" adjoining Samuel and Kendall Scarborough for 50 pounds on 11 February 1791 [DB O:67-8]. On 26 February 1799 he and Edward Scarborough posted bond of thirty pounds to indemnify the county of Worcester against any charges from an illegitimate child Abel had by Jenny Handby free single woman [DB T:140-1]. He was head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [DE:744].

iii. Sophia, head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:830].

iv. Sally, head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:745].

v. Lazarus, born about 1758, served in the 6th Company of the 1st Maryland Regiment from 1 August 1780 to 15 November 1783 [Archives of Maryland 18:356, 539]. He was head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [MD:124], 9 in 1800 [MD:745] and 7 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [MD:623]. He mortgaged two cows, two heifers, two calves, seven sheep and a sow to James B. Robins for $130 by Worcester County deed on 24 October 1803 [DB W:2]. He made a declaration in Worcester County court on 10 April 1818 to obtain a pension for his service in the Revolution. On 28 July 1821 he stated that he was about sixty years old and was living with his wife Betty and their sons John, aged 18 years, and Joseph, aged 12 years [NARA, S.34911, M805, Roll 399; M804, Roll 1192, frame 297 of 1046, ancestry.com].

vi. Jacob, born before 1776, head of a Worcester County household of 7 "free colored" in 1830.

vii. Elizabeth, a 60-year-old woman from Somerset County who emigrated to Liberia in 1832 aboard the Lafayette with (her son?) Nathan G. Harman, a farmer, and his family [https://www.fold3.com/image/46670390].

viii. Levin, born after 1775, head of a Worcester County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [MD:612] and 4 "free colored" in 1830.

ix. Daniel3, head of a Worcester County household 3 "other free" in 1810 [MD:612].

 

8.    Daniel1 Harman, born say 1725, was a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware taxable from 1766 to 1773. He died before 10 May 1774 when his widow Elizabeth was granted administration of his Kent County, Delaware estate. She married Joseph Lantern [de Valinger, Kent County, Delaware Probate Records, 289]. Daniel may have been the father of

i. Daniel2, a "Mulatto" taxable in the Kent County Levy Assessments circa 1820.

ii. Gabriel, born say 1760, married Rhoda Hanser. She assigned her right to the estate of her father, William Handsor, to Gabriel before 24 December 1793 when this part of the account of her father's estate was included in the account of the estate of John Durham [RG 3545, reel 68, frame 621]. Gabriel was a "free Negro" taxable in Murderkill Hundred in 1787 and in Little Creek Hundred in 1798 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1785-97, frame 80, 98, 475, 515], head of a St. Jones Hundred, Kent County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:45] and 3 "free colored" in Dover in 1820 [DE:36].

 

9.    Job Harman, born about 1725, was a twenty-one-year-old born in Sussex County who was listed in the muster of Captain John Shannon's Company of foot solders in King George's War in September 1746 [Montgomery, Pennsylvania Archives, Fifth Series, 142-3]. He had an account with merchant John Shannon for about 12 pounds, 18 shillings for items such as a checked shirt and for cash paid to Mr. Curry in Shannon's account book which is found in the Kent County court dockets [DSA, RG 3505.003, 1735-1779, frame 642]. He was the father of Jemima who was baptized at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River, on 16 April 1750. He was indicted by the Sussex County court for an unspecified offense in February 1759 that was continued through August 1762. John Lockwood sued him in November 1765 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1753-60, frames 496, 516, 534, 555, 594, 622; 1761-1771, 17, 41, 72, 85, 109, 287, 376, 404]. He was probably married to Comfort and they were probably the parents of Shepherd Harmon: "Mulattoes: Shepherd son of Job and Comfort _____ b. 15 Apr 177(2)" at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 95, 101]. They were the parents of

i. Jemima, daughter of Job Harmon baptized same day (16 April 1750) at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 95].

ii. ?Eunice, born say 1752, married Southy Pride, "mulattoes," on 13 May 1772 at Lewes and Coolsprings Presbyterian Church [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 126].

12   iii. ?Edward, born about 1758.

iv. William4, born say 1770, married Mary Hanser "Free mulattoes" on 11 May 1795 at Lewes and Coolspring Presbyterian Church [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 135]. He was a "Negro" taxable in St. Jones Hundred, Kent County in 1798 and head of an Indian River, Sussex County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437], 5 "other free" in Cedar Creek Hundred in 1810 [DE:303], and 9 "free colored" in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County in 1820 [DE:220].

v. Shepherd, born 15 April 177_ (probably 1772), "mulatto" son of Job and Comfort ___. He married Lina Oakey, "free Mulattoes," on 10 October 1802 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 318]. He was head of a Sussex County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [DE:458].

vi. ?Adonijah, married Sarah Jacobs, "free Mulattoes," on 19 January 1795 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 310].

vii. ?Kesiah, married Aron Esaw, "Malattoes," on 25 February 1790 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 305]. Aaron Nezor was head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:438].

 

10.    Jane Harmon, born about 1706, was a "Negro" tithable in Philip Mongon's Northampton County household in 1726 and 1727 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 102, 119]. She was twenty-one years old in February 1727/8 when she petitioned the Northampton County court to allow her to take control of the remaining part of her father's estate which was then in the hands of her guardian Dinah Mongong, widow and executrix of Philip Mongong. The court ordered Dinah to pay Jane her share of her deceased father's estate [L.P Pk#12, February 1727/8; Orders 1722-9, 316, 317]. Jane was tithable in the household of Richard Malavery (Dinah's second husband) from 1728 to 1731 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 135, 148, 169, 221]. She had an illegitimate child before 11 December 1733. She petitioned the court for her estate which was in the hands of Richard Malavery, and on 9 January 1733/4 the court appointed Colonel John Robins and Mr. William Stott to inspect the appraisement of the estate and to be present when Richard Munlavery delivered it to her, "that she may not be wronged" [Orders 1732-42, 87, 88, 89]. She may have been the Jane Harmon who was living in Accomack County on 25 April 1749 when several of her children: Elijah, Harman, Solomon, and Nimrod were bound as apprentice shoemakers [Orders 1744-53, 327]. She was called "Jane Harmon free Negro" in April 1758 when the Northampton County court released her from paying taxes in the future [Minutes 1754-61, 156]. Her children were

13    i. ?John3, born say 1732.

14   ii. ?Emanuel2, born say 1733.

iii. Elijah, born about 1735, a fourteen-year-old bound to Hezekiel Purnoll on 25 April 1749.

iv. Harman, born about 1738, an eleven-year-old bound to Hezekiel Purnoll on 25 April 1749.

v. Solomon, born about 1743, a six-year-old bound out on 25 April 1749.

vi. Nimrod, born about 1747, a two-year-old bound out on in Accomack County on 25 April 1749, head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [MD:124].

vii. ?Jemima, born say 1749, a "free Negro" living in Accomack County on 4 July 1768 when the court presented her for not listing herself as a tithable [Orders 1768-9, 227].

 

11.    Joseph2 Harmon, born say 1725, died before 17 January 1752 when the audit of his Princess Anne County estate was taken. The sale of the estate totaled 36 pounds, 19 shillings [DB 1747-55, 297]. He may have been the father of

15    i. James, born say 1755.

ii. Eleanor, bound to George Chappel to read, sew, and knit in Princess Anne County on 17 July 1759, no age or parent named [Minutes 1753-62, 357].

iii. Craftshoe, head of a Liberty County, South Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [SC:806]. Shoecraft Harmon recorded a plat for 97 acres on the Pee Dee River near Marrs Bluff in Georgetown District, South Carolina, on 1 July 1793 [South Carolina Archives, Series S13190, 30:118].

iv. Jaca, born about 1779, registered in Princess Anne County on 3 October 1836: age 57, 5'4", a mulatto woman, born free in Princess Anne County. She was probably the mother of Sally Harman who registered in Princess Anne County on 3 October 1831: 5'2", age 20, a Bright Mulatto woman, born free in Princess Anne County [Register of Free Negroes, 1830-62, nos. 263, 393].

 

12.    Edward4 Harman, born about 1758, received pay from 1 August 1780 to 4 November 1783 for service in the Delaware Regiment in the Revolution [DHS, MS Delaware Regiment Pay Records, 1778-1783, certificates 54,359; 54,480; 54,860; 54,935; 55,181; Public Archives Commission, Delaware Archives, 196, 607]. He married Agnes Jackson on 27 November 1788 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 302]. He and his wife Agnes registered the 11 January 1792 birth of their son Benjamin at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church in Sussex County. He was head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:438], 8 in 1810 [DE:437] and 5 "free colored" in Lewis and Rehoboth Hundred in 1820 [DE:308]. He was about sixty years old on 20 April 1818 when he appeared in Sussex County court to make a declcaration to apply for a pension for his service in the Revolutionary War. He stated that he enlisted under Captain Kirkwood in the First Company of the Delaware Regiment in 1777. Mitchell Kirkwood, Lieutenant Colonel of the Ninth Delaware Regiment, testified in his favor. Hezekiah Lacey testified that Edward worked for his father when he enlisted. He was about seventy and a resident of Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred on 16 November 1820 when he stated that had a wife named Agnes who was about fifty, a twenty-five-year-old son Benjamin and a twenty-three-year-old son Dirickson who did not live with him, a twenty-one-year-old son Paynter, twelve-year-old son Woolsey and a ten-year-old daughter Eliza [NARA, S.36000, microfilm M805, Roll 399; M804, Roll 1192, frame 514 of 1046 and https://www.fold3.com/image/246/22756535]. Edward and Agnes were the parents of

i. Benjamin, born 11 January 1792, "son of Edward and Agness" [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 110].

ii. Dirickson, born about 1797.

iii. Paynter, born about 1800.

iv. Woolsey, born about 1808.

v. Eliza, born about 1810.

 

13.    John2 Harmon, born say 1727, was taxable in Northampton County, Virginia, in 1743 and 1744 [L.P. 1743, 1744] and head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 4 "other free" and one white man over 16 years of age in 1790 [NC:63] and 9 "other free" in 1800 [NC:316]. On 30 October 1795 he sold 100 acres, tools, furniture, cattle, and hogs in Halifax County to Joseph Lantern, Moses Matthews, and John Kelly [DB 17:920] and sold 100 acres near the road from Halifax Town to Enfield old courthouse to Joseph Lantern on 3 December 1795 [DB 18:130]. (Joseph Lantern was taxable in Dover Hundred, Kent County, Delaware from 1776 to 1785.) John may have been the father of

i. James, born say 1755, a "Mullatto" bound as an apprentice house carpenter to George Chappel until the age of twenty-one in Princess Anne County, Virginia, on 17 July 1759, no age or parent named [Minutes 1753-62, 357]. He and his son James were mentioned in the 30 December 1792 Princess Anne County will of his father-in-law, William Shoecraft [WB 1:210]. He may have been identical to Craftshoe Harmon, head of a Liberty County, South Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [SC:806].

ii. Eleanor, bound to George Chappel to read, sew, and knit in Princess Anne County, Virginia, on 17 July 1759, no age or parent named [Minutes 1753-62, 357].

iii. Thomas, a "Negro" taxable on 130 acres and 5 "Negroes" in Prince Frederick Parish, South Carolina, in 1786 [S.C. Tax Returns 1783-1800, frame 119], head of a Georgetown District, Prince Frederick's Parish, South Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [SC:51].

iv. Abraham, head of a South Orangeburgh District, South Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [SC:101].

 

14.    Emanuel2 Harmon, born say 1733, was sued in Northampton County by John Wilkins, Sr., on 15 May 1754. He was called a "free Negro" on 10 June 1760 when the court ordered him sent to the General Court to be tried for receiving stolen goods from a slave named Will who belonged to the estate of Benjamin Stratton [Orders 1753-8, 100; Minutes 1754-61, 223]. He was head of an Accomack County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:153] and 8 in 1810 [VA:29]. He was the father of

i. George2, born say 1755, taxable in Accomack County from 1782 to 1813: taxable on 2 free males, 2 slaves and 5 horses in 1782; 2 free males in 1798; called a "fn" in 1806 and 1812; called "Geo: Harmon (of Emawell)" in a list of "free Negroes & Mulattoes" in 1813. His son George was called "of George" in 1812 [PPTL, 1782-1814, frames 8, 149, 248, 314, 378, 447, 630, 791, 835]. He was head of an Accomack County household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:153] and 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:29]. He served as a soldier in the Revolution. His only heirs Betsy, Comfort, Leah and Sarah Harmon applied for a pension for his service in Accomack County court on 25 September 1832 [Orders 1832-36, 16]. Leah Harmon (over the age of 45) was head of an Accomack County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820.

 

15.    James Harman, born say 1755, a "Mullatto" bound as an apprentice house carpenter to George Chappel until the age of twenty-one in Princess Anne County on 17 July 1759, no age or parent named [Minutes 1753-62, 357]. He and his son James were mentioned in the 30 December 1792 Princess Anne County will of his father-in-law, William Shoecraft [WB 1:210]. He was taxable in St. Bride's Parish, Norfolk County, from 1783 to 1811: in the list of "free Negroes and Mulattoes" from 1801 to 1811 [PPTL, 1782-91, frames 415, 450, 592; 1791-1812, frames 8, 191, 400, 548, 636, 716]. On 4 December 1809 he purchased land on Tanner's Creek which was land he was then living on from the widow of William Holland for $69.38 [DB 45:4]. On 21 August 1821 Kinner Shewcraft sued James Harman (Jr.) and his wife Lucy and a minor named Andrew Shewcraft in Norfolk County court to force the sale of land formerly belonging to Moses Shewcraft. The court ordered the proceeds divided equally among the plaintiff and defendants [Minutes 17:141]. Lucy was apparently identical to Lucy Herman who registered in Norfolk County on 15 December 1828: age 28, 4 11-/34, a bright mulatto, Born free. James and Lucy Harman's descendants were considered Indians in Norfolk County [Register of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1809-1852, nos. 489, 1230, 1599, 1600].

i. Jaca, born about 1779, registered in Princess Anne County on 3 October 1836: age 57, a mulatto woman, born free, perhaps the mother of Sally Harman who registered on 3 October 1831: 5'2" high, age 20, a Bright Mulatto woman, born free [Register of Free Negroes, nos. 263, 393].

ii. James2, born say, a "F.Blk."/ "free negro" taxable in Princess Anne County from 1807 to 1822 [PPTL, 1790-1822, frames 365, 438, 486, 502, 546, 701, 682, 701]. His wife Lucy Herman registered in Norfolk County on 15 December 1828: age 28, 4 11-/34, a bright mulatto, Born free. James and Lucy Harman's descendants were considered Indians in Norfolk County [Register of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1809-1852, nos. 489, 1230, 1599, 1600].

 

Other members of the Harmon family were

i. Thomas, a "Negro" taxable on 130 acres and 5 "Negroes" in Prince Frederick Parish, South Carolina, in 1786 [S.C. Tax Returns 1783-1800, frame 119], head of a Georgetown District, Prince Frederick's Parish, South Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [SC:51]. He was granted 100 acres in Craven County, South Carolina on 22 October 1768 [South Carolina Archives, Series 213019, 17:39].

ii. Abraham, head of a South Orangeburgh District, South Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [SC:101].

iii. Southey, head of an Accomack County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 1:108].

iv. Stephen, head of an Accomack County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:100]. Scarborough Bloxam, a midshipman aboard the Accomac testified that Stephen Harmon, Tire Harmon and Joshua Perkins enlisted in the war, served on board the vessel during the Revolution and were discharged [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants; Bayly, Robert, Digital Collections, LVA]. (Stephen's wife?) Fanny Harmon received bounty land warrant no. 7251 for his service and no. 7252 for the service of Tire Harmon [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 292]. Fanny Harmon was head of an Accomack County household of 8 "free colored" in 1830..

v. Ann, head of an Accomack County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 1:108].

vi. Scarburgh, head of an Accomack County household of 4 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:101].

vii. Molly/ Mary, head of an Accomack County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 1:157] and 7 in 1810 [VA:102].

viii. Easter, head of an Accomack County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:30].

ix. Emanuel3, born about 1789, registered in Accomack County on 29 September 1807: a light Black, 5 feet 7-1/2 Inches...Born free [Free Negro Register, #5].

 

HARRIS FAMILY

1.    John1 Harris, born say 1635, may have been identical to "my Negro man John" named in Thomas Whitehead's 6 April 1660 York County will by which he set John free, gave him all his wearing apparel and two cows, lent him as much land as he could tend himself, and appointed him guardian of his (Whitehead's) daughter if the court would permit it. On 11 September 1660 the court declared that John was a free man and ordered that the cattle and other things be delivered to him according to the will. On 28 October 1667 "John Harris, Negro" purchased from Robert Jones of Queen's Creek 50 acres in New Kent County adjoining Mr. Baker's and the main swamp by deed recorded in York County on 12 April 1669 [DWO 3:82, 89; 4:237].

 

Members of the Harris family who may have been descendants of John Harris were

2     i. Martha1, born say 1720.

3     ii. Solomon1, born say 1722.

4     iii. James1, born say 1723.

5     iv. Mary1, born say 1729.

6     v. Edward1, born say 1730.

7     vi. Martha2, born say 1730.

8     vii. Eleanor, born say 1732.

9     viii. George1, born say 1740.

ix. Martha3, born say 1733, married Joseph Hawley of Granville County, North Carolina.

10   x. Phebe1, born about 1734.

11   xi. Nathan1, born say 1735.

 

2.    Martha1 Harris, born say 1720, was the mother of "a mulatto boy" named Charles Harris who was bound to Lewellin Eppes in Charles City County, Virginia, in August 1746 [Orders 1737-51, 420]. She was the ancestor of

i. Charles1, born say 1740, bound apprentice in August 1746.

12   ii. ?____, born say 1744.

13   iii. ?Joan, born say 1752.

iv. ?William, born say 1755, listed in the Pay Roll of Captain Thomas Massie's 6th Virginia Regiment for the months of November 1777 and January 1778 [NARA, M246, roll 103, frames 346, 348 of 756]. He was a deserter from Captain Thomas Massie's new recruits for the 6th Virginia Regiment according to the 21 November 1777 issue of the Virginia Gazette which offered a reward for his return, describing him as: a mulatto fellow about five feet eleven inches high, the veins in his leg much broke, appear in knots, he was enlisted in New Kent, but expect he is lurking about Charles City [Virginia Gazette, Purdie's edition, p.3, col. 3].

vi. ?Betty, born about 1760, registered in Petersburg on 13 July 1805: a yellow brown Mulatto woman, five feet and a half inches high, forty five years old, born free in Charles City County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 336].

14   vii. ?Edward3, born say 1760.

viii. ?Richard, born say 1775, taxable on one tithe and a horse in Charles City County in 1800 [1800 PPTL, p.11], head of a Charles City County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:959].

 

3.    Solomon1 Harris, born say 1722, sued Abraham Morris in Charles City County court in July 1744 but failed to prosecute [Orders 1737-51, 311]. He was a tithable in Lunenburg County in the list of Lewis Deloney in the household of Thomas Evans in 1748 [Tax List 1748-52]. He was tithable in his own household in William Howard's list for 1749 and 1750, the 1751 list of Field Jefferson, and the 1764 list of Edmund Taylor [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 109, 142, 169, 252]. He and his wife Sarah and son William were 3 "Black" tithables in the 1765 Granville County, North Carolina list of Wm. Bullock. He was the father of

15   i. ?Mary2, born say 1750.

ii. William, born about 1753, taxable in his parents' household in Wm. Bullock's Granville County list in 1765. He was married to Eady Stewart by 11 September 1780 when the Mecklenburg County court ordered Zachariah Mallett to deliver up the will of her mother Patty Stewart, deceased, on the motion of William Harris and Eady his wife [Orders 1779-84, 76].

16   iii. ?John, born say 1755.

17   iv. ?Phebe2, born say 1755.

 

4.    James1 Harris, born say 1723, a "free Negro," was given fifteen lashes when he confessed in Charles City County court in February 1743/4 that he stole a small quantity of sugar from the store of James Rae. George Minge paid his court fees [Orders 1737-51, 289]. He was taxable in Charles City County from 1784 to 1787, called "James Harris, Sr." in 1787 when he was not tithable on his person [PPTL 1783-7]. He made a 29 July 1784 Charles City County will by which he directed that his stock of sheep should be sold, his crop delivered to Abraham Brown, and the rest of his estate divided among his children, his son John Harris excepted. He named Abraham Brown executor (who died before him). The will was proved on 21 May 1791 by oath of Dixon Brown, a witness (making his mark). James Harris was granted administration on the estate on 50 pounds security [WB 1:55]. James, Sr.'s widow was apparently Frances Harris who was a witness to the 15 December 1791 Charles City County will of Sarah Brown (widow of Abraham). Frances left a 12 November 1803 Charles City County will, proved 19 June 1806. She left a bed and furniture to her grandson George Hunt Harris (son of Haly Harris) left son Chavis Harris and his wife Susanna all the rest of her estate excluding her wearing apparel, left grand daughter Rebecca Brown (daughter of John Brown) a spinning wheel and cards, left her wearing apparel to be divided among her daughter Susanna Brown (wife of Dixon Brown), Susanna's daughter, her granddaughter Celia Harris and Rebecca Brown (wife of Edward Brown). She named her son-in-law John Brown, Abraham Brown and William Brown executors. She made a codicil stipulating that her sons John and James Harris and her daughter Priscilla were to receive no more than one penny each [WB 1:650]. She was the mother of

i. John4, born say 1758, taxable in Charles City County from 1783 to 1814, listed as a "Mulattoe" in 1813 [PPTL 1783-7; 1788-1814] and head of a Charles City County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:958].

18   ii. James2, born say 1760.

iii. Priscilla, born say 1765, wife of John Brown and mother of Rebecca Brown.

iv. Haly, born say 1770, father of George Hunt Harris who was called Hunt Harris when he was a "Mulattoe" taxable in Charles City County in 1813 and 1814 [PPTL 1788-1814].

19   v. Chavis, born say 1780.

vi. Susanna, wife of Dixon Brown.

vii. ?Rebecca, wife of Edward Brown.

 

5.    Mary1 Harris, born say 1729, a "mullato orphan," was living with Willing Wynne on 4 October 1734 when the vestry of St. Andrews Parish in Brunswick County, Virginia, paid him to keep her until she reached the age of twenty-one [Hopkins, St. Andrew Parish Vestry Book, 41]. She may have been the daughter of Katherine Harris, (no race indicated), who was presented by the Prince George County court on 13 November 1739 for having a bastard child [Orders 1737-40, 362], perhaps the Katherine Harris who died before 10 October 1741 when Thomas Neuse was paid by the St. Andrew Parish Vestry of Brunswick County for making her coffin [Hopkins, St. Andrew Parish Vestry Book, 48]. Mary was called a "free Mulatto" on 15 December 1767 when the Mecklenburg County, Virginia court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her sons Nimrod and William to Peter Field Jefferson [Orders 1765-8, 450]. She was the mother of

i. Nimrod, born say 1764, bound apprentice on 15 December 1767. He and William Harris were "free Negro" taxables in Pittsylvania County in 1789, and he was taxable there in 1793 and 1794 [PPTL 1782-97, frames 400, 576, 647].

ii. William, born say 1766, bound apprentice on 15 December 1767.

iii. Catherine2, born say 1767, bound to Peter Field Jefferson in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on 11 November 1771 [Orders 1771-73, 84].

iv. James3, born about 1769, ordered bound apprentice to Benjamin Ferrell in Mecklenburg County on 9 December 1771 [Orders 1771-73, 135]. He received a certificate in Mecklenburg County on 29 June 1812: This is to Certify that James Harris who was born & raised in the County of Mecklenburg & Commonwealth of Virginia, is a free man, he is five feet seven inches high, of a Colour but little removed from black, is about forty years old & has lost his upper fore teeth. The said James Harris was bound to, and Served his apprenticeship with Benjamin Ferrell, late of this County & Commonwealth aforesaid decd. where he has resided ever since, and has uniformly, as far as I recollect ever to have heard, supported a good Character [Register of Free Negroes, 1809-41, no. 4].

 

6.    Edward1 Harris, born say 1730, had two taxables in his Granville County, North Carolina household in the list of Jonathan White in 1750 [CR 44.702.19]. He was called "negro" in the 1752-54 tax lists and in the 8 October 1754 Muster Roll of the Granville County Regiment of Colonel William Eaton [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 716]. In 1753 he was tithable but refused to pay tax for his wife, perhaps claiming she was white. She was the light-skinned daughter of William Chavis who made a deed of gift of 340 acres in Granville on the north side of Tabbs Creek to his "daughter Sarah Harris wife of Edward Harris" on 6 September 1756 [DB C:73]. Edward and Sarah were taxables with their children in all the extant Granville County colonial tax lists [CR 044.701.19]. In 1782 he was taxed on 190 acres, 4 horses, and 6 cattle in Fishing Creek District. His wife Sarah died in January 1785 according to the deeds of her oldest sons Gibson and Sherwood who sold their interest in her dower lands to John Penn, administrator of her estate [DB O:408, 423]. Penn divided the remaining 192 acres among her other two sons Jesse and Solomon on 13 March 1789 [WB 2:233]. In 1785 Edward or his son by that name was a buyer at the sale of an estate in Northampton County [Gammon, Record of Estates, Northampton County, I:50], and he was head of a Northampton County household of 10 "other free" in 1790 [NC:72]. Edward and Sarah's children named in the tax lists and Sarah's 1789 Granville County bequest were

i. Amey, born about 1749, taxable in her parents' Epping Forest District household in 1761.

ii. Lucy, born about 1752, taxable in her parents household in Samuel Benton's list for Epping Forest District in 1764.

iii. Nancy, born about 1752, taxable in her parents household in Samuel Benton's list for Epping Forest District in 1764.

iv. Nelly, born about 1754, taxable in her parents household in the list of Stephen Jett in 1766.

v. Edward2/ Ned, born about 1756, taxable in the list of Jonathan Kittrell in 1768. He died before 14 July 1792 when his brother Gibson, as "Eldest Brother & heir at law to Edward Harris decd.," gave power of attorney to Philemon Hodges to receive his pay for service in the Revolution. His brothers, Sherwood and Solomon Harris, made a similar deposition confirming Gibson's statement on 22 July 1792 [NCGSJ X:111].

vi. Gibson, born about 1760, not mentioned in the tax lists but sold his share of land to John Penn on 5 July 1785, identifying it as the land which "William Chavers gave to his daughter Sarah, wife of Edward Harris" [DB O:408]. In the 1778 Granville County Militia Returns for Captain Abraham Potter's Company he was listed as a seventeen-year-old "black man," occupation: planter [The North Carolinian VI:726 (Mil. TR 4-40)]. J. Craven received his final pay of 41 pounds for his service in the army [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVII:216]. He was head of a Surry County, North Carolina household of 12 "other free" in 1810 [NC:684].

vii. Sherwood, born say 1761, not mentioned in the tax lists but sold his share of his mother's land to John Penn on 24 December 1785 [DB O:423]. He was head of a Wake County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:770] and 10 in Granville County in 1810 [NC:864]. George Pettiford testified for the pension application of his widow Patty Harris that he was acquainted with Sherwood when they both served in the Revolutionary War. Both settled in Granville County, and Sherwood died there. On 23 November 1797 a warrant for 228 acres was issued for Sherwood's 2-1/2 years of service [NARA, W.3984, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/21852568].

viii. Jesse, born say 1762, not taxed in his father's household, but named as Edward and Sarah's son in his brothers' 1785 deeds [DB O:408, 423]. He received half of his mother's land by the 1789 division of her estate [WB 2:233]. He was taxable in Granville County on 50 acres in 1789 and sold his farm animals in Granville County on 10 March 1791 [WB 2:225]. He married Elizabeth Ivey, 29 November 1790 Wake County bond. He was taxable on 100 acres in 1798 and was head of a Granville County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 and 4 in 1810 [NC:864]. He was taxable on 200 acres in Beaverdam District of Granville County in 1805 (called "Jessee Harris of Colour") but was assessed only poll tax in 1808 (called F. Negro) [Tax List, 1803-09, 130, 271]. He may have been the Jesse Harris, about sixty years old on 21 February 1821, who made a declaration in Wake County court to obtain a pension for service in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted for 18 months at Hillsborough in the 10th Regiment commanded by Captain William Lytle, was transferred to Captain Hadley's Company and served until the end of the war. By his first wife he had four children, one named Fennell (seventeen years old) living with him, and by his second wife a child Billy who was also living with him. His second marriage was to Julia Tabon (Taborn), 23 February 1820 Wake County bond, Thomas Roycroft bondsman [NCGSJ XIII:34; NARA, W.1277, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/22991228].

ix. Solomon2, born say 1767, named in his brothers' 1785 Granville County deeds [DB O:408, 423]. He received half his mother's remaining land by the 1789 division of her estate. He was taxable in Fishing Creek District of Granville County in 1796 on 103 acres and one poll and on 73 acres in 1798 [Tax List 1796-1802, 12, 73]. He was head of a Granville County household of 4 "other free" in 1800.

 

7.    Martha2 Harris, born say 1730, was the mother of Isham Harris who was bound by the Lunenburg County court to Amos Tims, Jr. on 13 October 1763. She married John Stewart who died before 14 February 1765 when the Lunenburg County court ordered the churchwardens of St. James Parish to bind his orphan daughter Eleanor Steward to William Taylor [Orders 1763-4, 257; 1764-5, 2, 203]. Mecklenburg County was formed from St. James Parish later that year, and in September 1772 the Mecklenburg County court bound Eleanor to Molly Taylor [Orders 1771-73, 318]. On 27 April 1777 Martha's son Moses Stewart purchased 100 acres from Henry Jackson in Mecklenburg County on the south side of Allen's Creek adjoining Stephen Mallett, with Stephen and Zachariah Mallett as witnesses [DB 5:56]. She apparently purchased this land in his name since he was only ten years old at the time. Her 17 January 1779 Mecklenburg County, Virginia will, witnessed by Zachariah Mallett, was proved 9 October 1780 on motion of her executor, Henry Jackson. By her will she left her land to her son Moses and left livestock and money to her children Isham, Nelly, Edy, Fanny, Moses, Sinai, and Disea [WB 1:341]. She was counted as head of a Mecklenburg County household of 7 persons in 1782, but this was probably the listing for her estate [VA:32]. Her estate included 54 acres of land which was sold for taxes in 1793 [DB 8:407-8]. Martha was the mother of

i. Isham Harris, born about 1759, called "Isham Harris, Son of Patty Stewart" on 13 October 1763 when he was ordered bound to Amos Tims, Jr., by the Lunenburg County court. On 13 April 1769 the court ordered Isham bound instead to John Evans (alias Eppes) [Orders 1763-64, 257; 1766-69, folio 202]. He was taxable in John Evans' Lunenburg County household in 1772 [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 304]. He may have been the Isham Harris, a "Mulatto," who was presented by the Pittsylvania County court on 15 May 1797 for retailing liquor without a license at a cabin on the land of Daniel Molley [Orders 1795-8, 319]. He was a "FN" taxable in Pittsylvania County in 1797 [PPTL 1782-97, frame 768]. He applied for a pension for services in the Revolution at the age of eighty-four years on 8 August 1843 in Rutherford County, North Carolina, stating that he was born in Charlotte County, Virginia, in 1759 and that he was drafted in Lunenburg County. James and Able Harris certified that they had seen his discharge papers. His claim was rejected. His son Isaac Harris applied for his father's pension in January 1852 [NARA, R.4654, M804, roll 1199, frame 197 of 947; ancestry.com].

 

8.    Eleanor Harris, born say 1732, was living in Brunswick County, Virginia, on 23 January 1753 when the court ordered the churchwardens of St. Andrew's Parish to bind her "Mullatto" son Moses to Drury Stith, Gentleman [Orders 1751-3, 366]. She was the mother of

20   i. Moses1, born say 1748.

ii. Drury, born say He may have been the Hardy Harris who was head of a Abbeville District, South Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [SC:82], an over-forty-five-year-old head of a Rutherford County, Tennessee household of 6 "free colored" in 1820, listed near John Rouse who was also in Abbeville in 1810 [SC:82].

 

9.    George1 Harris, born say 1730, was head of a household with his wife Catherine in the Oxford District of Granville County, North Carolina, in 1761. On 6 February 1775 he purchased 144-1/2 acres in Granville County near John Tatom's line for 105 pounds [DB K:249]. In 1782 he was taxable in Granville County on 145 acres, 3 horses, and 12 cattle in Ragland's District. He was head of a Granville County household of 7 persons in the 1786 state census, and he was taxable in Granville on his land for the last time in 1789. His children were

i. Mary, born say 1750, taxable in the Granville County household of her father George Harris in Samuel Benton's list for 1762 and 1764.

21   ii. ?Edward5/ Ned, born say 1760.

iii. ?Claiborn, born about 1766, head of a Wake County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:770], 11 in Stokes County in 1810 [NC:573], and 12 "free colored" in Stokes County in 1820 [NC:346]. He entered the NW:NW part of Section 34, Town 10, Range 5 in Marion Township, Owen County, Indiana, on 10 August 1836 and SW:SE of Section 28 on 8 February 1845 [Land Entry Book #1]. He sold the SW:SE part of Section 28 a month later on 4 March 1845 [DB 8:285]. He was head of an Owen County, Indiana, household of 3 "free colored," one of them a woman over one hundred years of age, in 1830 [IN:22] and 5 "free colored" in 1840 [IN:42]. In 1850 he was in household #167 of Marion Township, Owen County, Indiana. Perhaps one of his children was Hardin Harris, born about 1797, living next door to him in household # 168 in Marion Township.

iv. ?Hardy2, born say 1772, married Polly Evans, 22 October 1793 Wake County bond, John Reighley bondsman. He was head of a Wake County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [NC:767].

 

10.    Phebe1 Harris, born about 1734, registered in Petersburg on 20 August 1794: a brown Mulatto woman, five feet two inches high, supposed sixty years old, born free in County of Prince George [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 75]. She may have been the mother of

22   i. James, born about 1748.

ii. John4, born say 1760, a "Mulatto" taxable in Dinwiddie County in 1790 and 1792 and a "free" taxable from 1794 to 1801 when he was listed as a cooper in the same district (Braddock Goodwyn's) as another "free" John Harris and a "free" Andrew Harris [PPTL 1801 B, p.7]. He was called a "free man of Colour" on 27 April 1818 when he made a declaration in Prince George County to obtain a pension for his services, stating that he enlisted in 1777 in the 15th Virginia Regiment. He was taken from the regiment and made a servant to President Monroe who was then the major of horse and aide-de-camp to Lord Sterling. He was discharged in the Spring of 1779, and re-enlisted in 1780 under Colonel William Davies for abut six months, employed principally in building the barracks at Chesterfield courthouse. He made a second declaration on 18 May 1821 in Petersburg court, stating that he was about sixty-nine years old and residing in Dinwiddie County in the immediate vicinity of Petersburg. He was a cooper by trade and his family consisted of himself and four children: three boys and a girl [NARA, S.37997, M805-401, frame 0640].

iii. Aggy, born about 1769, registered in Petersburg on 20 August 1794: a brown Mulatto woman, five feet two inches high, twenty five years old, born free & raised in Prince George County near Petersburg. Her son Thomas registered on 10 June 1805: a dark brown Negro man, feet inches five high, twenty years old 10 Aug. next, son of Agga Harris a free Negroe woman [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, nos. 76, 291].

iv. Betty, born about 1770, registered in Petersburg on 20 August 1794: a brown Mulatto woman, five feet four inches high, twenty four years old, born free & raised in Prince George County near Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 77].

 

11.    Nathan1 Harris, born say 1735, was taxable in his own household with his wife Amey in the 1758 Granville County, North Carolina list of Nathaniel Harris. He entered 200 acres on the waters of Beaverdam Creek in Granville County on 22 March 1780 and another 350 acres in 1779 [Pruitt, Land Entries, Granville County, 49]. He was assessed tax on 737 pounds in Beaverdam in 1780, but by 1785 he was in Northampton County where he was a buyer at the sale of an estate [Gammon, Record of Estates, Northampton County, I:51]. In 1800 he was head of a Northampton County household of 6 "other free" [NC:449] where he was renting the estate of Edward Capell [Gammon, Record of Estates, Northampton County, I:111] and 7 "other free" in Franklin County in 1810 [NC:826]. Nathan and Amey may have been the parents of

i. Ephraim, head of a Franklin County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [NC:826].

ii. Elizabeth, born say 1762, married Drury Walden in Northampton County in 1780 according to his pension records.

iii. Henry, born before 1776, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:316] and 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:151].

iv. Mary, head of a Northampton County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [NC:451].

v. Hamilton, born 1776-94, head of a Halifax County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:26], and 2 "free colored" in Wilkes County in 1820 [NC:505].

vi. Ary, head of a Halifax County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:26].

vii. Ruthen, head of a Halifax County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:26].

viii. William, head of a Halifax County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:27].

 

12._____ Harris, born say 1743, was the mother of several illegitimate children by Dixon Brown. Dixon made a 24 January 1811 Charles City County will, proved 18 January 1821, by which he left 30 acres to his illegitimate children Polly Harris, Susannah Harris (wife of James Harris), and Peggy Bowman which was the land they were then living on [WB 2:471]. Susannah Harris died intestate without a living child before October 1826 when Polly Harris, Morris Harris and Patsy his wife, Pegg Bowman, James Brown, Jr., (son of Dixon) and his wife Sally (nee Stewart), and Peter Brown and his wife Susan appointed James Brown to sell the 10 acres she received by her father's will. Edward Brown was the highest bidder at $32 [DB 7:371]. ____ was the mother of

i. Polly Harris, born say 1760, died before 26 May 1832 when her estate was sold. Edward Bowman, Abraham Brown and John Bowman were buyers at the sale [WB 4:29-30].

ii. Susannah, died before October 1826 when her heirs appointed James Brown to sell her land [DB 7:371].

iii. Pegg Bowman.

23   iv. ?Morris, born say 1784.

 

13.    Joan Harris, born say 1752, was a "Mulatto" servant who was discharged from the service of Benjamin Abbot by the Halifax County, Virginia court on 17 June 1773 because he had no indentures for her [Orders 1772-3, 155]. On 16 January 1777 the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out Mill Harris, daughter of Johannah Harris to Benjamin Abbott, and on 18 March 1784 the court ordered the churchwardens to bind Jean's "bastard Mulattoe boy" Micajah Harris to Edward Akin but rescinded the order on 17 June that year and ordered him returned to his mother [Pleas 1774-9, 185; 1783-6, 35, 75]. She was the mother of

i. Mill, born say 1776.

ii. Micajah, born say 1780.

 

14.    Edward4 Harris, born about 1760, registered in Chesterfield County on 9 January 1809: color yellow, age 40 years, stature 5 feet 7 inches born free [Jesper, Archer (M, 30): Free Negro Register, 1809, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. He may have been the Edward Harris who was head of a Charles City household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:959] and a "Mulattoe" taxable in Chesterfield County from 1810 to 1827: taxable on 2 tithes and 3 horses in 1810, 1811 and 1813, living on James Scott's land with his 6 children in 1811 [PPTL, 1786-1811, frames 782, 824; 1812-27, 67, 338, 434, 471, 507, 552, 584, 619, 651, 685]. He was about sixty when he appeared in Chesterfield County court on 14 March 1820 to apply for a pension for his service in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted in Amelia County in Colonel Richard Campbell's Regiment in 1780 and was discharged in January 1782. He had a wife, three daughters over twenty-one, and a son about thirteen living with him. He owed Mr. James B. Scott, on whose land he lived, two years rent of 40 pounds [NARA, S.37992, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/23204526].   He was the father of

i. Archer2, born 18 August 1812, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 16 June 1836: son of Ned Harris, mulatto man, twenty three the 18th August last [Minutes 1830-9, 281].

 

15.    Mary Harris, born say 1738, was living in Brunswick County on 24 November 1756 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her "natural child" Isham Harris [Orders 1756-7, 174]. She was apparently identical to "Mary Haris now Stuart" whose son Isham Harris was ordered bound out by the churchwardens of St. James Parish in Mecklenburg County court on 8 November 1766 [Orders 1765-8, 231]. She was married to William Stewart when they sold 200 acres on Little Creek in Mecklenburg County on 11 February 1788 [DB 7:253]. William Stewart was head of a Wake County household of 11 "other free" in 1790 [NC:105] and 11 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1800 [NC:798]. She was the mother of

i. Isham, born say 1756, bound out in Mecklenburg County on 8 November 1766 [Orders 1765-8, 231]. He sued Frederick Collier and Samuel Lark for trespass, assault and battery in Mecklenburg County court on 13 July 1784. Lucy Poole was deposed as his witness. Both suits were dismissed [Orders 1784-7, 95, 141, 169, 261, 263]. He married Mary Dobey (Dolby), 11 January 1792 Wake County bond and was head of a Wake County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [NC:769].

 

16.    John3 Harris, born say 1755, was head of a Warren County, North Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:77]. He was married to the widow of Stephen Walden by May 1791 when he settled Stephen's Warren County estate [Gammon, Records of Estates, Warren County, I:21]. Solomon Harris, John Walden, and Jesse Cunningham were buyers at the sale of the estate [WB:6:82]. John's children may have been

i. Kizee, born before 1776, head of a Warren County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:754] and one "free colored" in 1820 (Casiri Harris) [NC:816].

ii. Phil, born say 1778, head of a Warren County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:808], 3 in 1810 [NC:758] and called Philemon Harris when he was head of an Orange County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:290].

 

17.    Phebe2 Harris, born say 1755, was living in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on 12 June 1780 when the churchwardens were ordered to bind out her daughter Elizabeth, "a poor orphan" [Orders 1779-84, 53]. On 11 February 1782 the churchwardens were ordered to bind her "Bastards" Milley and Jeremiah (no race mentioned) to Edward McDaniel [Orders 1779-84, 119]. Her children were

i. Elizabeth, born say 1772.

ii. Milley, born say 1773.

iii. Jeremiah, born say 1775, married Lydia Chavous, 13 November 1797 Mecklenburg County bond, James Chavis security, perhaps the Jeremiath Harris who was head of a Richland County, South Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [SC:178] and 4 "free colored" in 1830 [SC:411].

iv. ?John, married Rittah Stewart, 27 December 1802 Mecklenburg County bond, Jere Harris security.

 

18.    James2 Harris, born say 1760, was taxable in Charles City County in 1783, called James Harris, Jr. He was taxable on a horse in 1790 and 1800, charged with 2 tithes in 1806, called James, Sr., in 1810, listed as a "Mulattoe" in 1813 [PPTL, 1783-7; 1788-1814] and head of a household of 5 "other free" in 1810 (called James Harris, Sr.) [VA:958]. He was a resident of Charles City County on 17 August 1820 when he appeared in court to apply for a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted in February 1778 in Charles City County, was marched to Valley Forge under Captain Callhill Minnis, entered the company under the command of Colonel Richard Parker of the 1st Virginia Regiment, and was discharged in Middlebrook, New Jersey, He was a farmer with a fifty-eight-year-old wife who was sickly [NARA, S.38006, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/22990334]. His wife Susannah Harris, illegitimate daughter of Dixon Brown, received 10 acres of land by the 24 January 1811 Charles City County will of her father. She died intestate without a living child before October 1826 when (her sister) Polly Harris, Morris Harris and Patsy his wife, (her sister) Pegg Bowman, James Brown, Jr., (son of Dixon) and his wife Sally, and Peter Brown and his wife Susan appointed James Brown to sell the land [DB 7:371]. James Harris died before 15 March 1834 when his estate was sold and divided between James Brown, Peter Brown, Burwell Harris, and James Harris. Peter Brown was executor [WB 4:72]. James and Susannah may have been the parents of

i. James4, Jr., born say 1782, head of a Charles City County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:958]. The inventory of his Charles City County estate, taken on 2 June 1826, included a sheep, a sow and a bedstead and totaled $13.92 [WB 3:181].

 

19.    Chavis Harris, born say 1780, and his wife Susanna were named in the 12 November 1803 Charles City County will of his mother Frances Harris [WB 1:650]. He was head of a Charles City County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:958]. His father-in-law Dixon Brown made a 24 January 1811 Charles City County will, proved 18 January 1821, by which he gave Chavis and his wife Susannah and (her brother) Dixon Brown, Jr., 40 acres where they were then living. He was called Henry C. Harris when he proved Dixon Brown, Sr.'s will on 18 January 1821 [WB 2:471]. On 4 January 1825 he was called Chavis Harris when he purchased 3-1/3 acres in Charles City County known as "Binns" adjoining his land and bounded by Henry Adams [DB 7:41]. But he was called Henry C. Chavis when he purchased 75 acres adjoining his land and bounded by Henry Adams and Morris Harris from David and his wife Lockey Goin on 8 November 1830 [DB 7:476]. His wife Sally Harris (apparently his second, born about 1795) obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 21 June 1832: a woman of color aged thirty seven years (wife of Henry C. Harris), born free in this county [Minutes 1830-7, 109]. He was called Henry C. Harris in his 24 December 1832 Charles City County will, proved 21 February 1833. He gave a bed to his son Benjamin, gave 3-1/3 acres of land which he had purchased from Cornelius and Lockey Brown to his sons Burwell and Benjamin Harris, gave grandchildren Zebedie and Julian Ann Harris a cow, daughter Patsey a bed, sons Thomas, William and Burwell Harris 20 shillings each and divided the remainder between all his children. He named Peter Brown and his son Burwell Harris executors. Francis Bowman dug his grave and James Brown made his coffin [WB 3:513-4; 4:116]. His children were

i. Thomas, born say 1805.

ii. William, born say 1807.

iii. Burwell, born 3 July 1810, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 17 November 1831: son of Henry C. Harris, twenty one years of age 3d July last, born free in this county [Minutes 1830-7, 83].

iv. Benjamin Hampton, born in February 1812, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 17 November 1831: son of Henry C. Harris, a boy of brown complexion, nineteen years in February last, born free in this county [Minutes 1830-7, 83].

 

20.    Moses1 Harris, born say 1748, was the "Mulatto" son of Eleanor Harris who was bound to Drury Stith, Gentleman, by the churchwardens of St. Andrew's Parish in Brunswick County, Virginia, on 23 January 1753 [Orders 1751-3, 366]. He was granted 229 acres in Craven County, South Carolina, on 7 May 1774 based on a plat of 1 March 1773 and received a plat for 400 acres on Griffin's Creek in Richland County, South Carolina, on 12 August 1799 [South Carolina Archives S213019, Vol. 30:229; S213184, Vol. 15:316; S213190, Vol. 6:148; S213192, Vol 37:343]. He was counted in the Richland County, South Carolina census as white in 1790 (as were all mixed-race families in that district), head of a household of 5 males over 16, 2 under 16 and 1 female [SC:136] and head of a Richland County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [SC:180]. He may have been the father of

i. Berry, head of a Richland County, South Carolina household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [SC:180].

ii. Moses2, Jr., born before 1776, head of a Richland County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [SC:180] and 11 "free colored" in 1830 [SC:409].

iii. Griffin, born after 1775, one of the "Free people of Colour" from whom the sheriff of Richland District was unable to collect the discriminatory tax in 1822 [South Carolina Archives, General Assembly Petitions, S165015, N.D. 1796, Roll ST1429, frames 786-92], head of a Columbia, Richland District household of 15 "free colored" in 1820 [SC:90a].

iv. Isham, born about 1800, a "Mulatto" counted in the 1850 census for Richland District with (wife?) Priscilla Harris and twelve-year-old Elizabeth Salmonds [SC:102, family no. 212].

 

21.    Edward5/ Ned Harris, born say 1760, was counted in the Richland County, South Carolina census as white (as were all mixed-race families in that district) in 1790, head of a household of 1 male over 16, 2 under 16 and 1 female [SC:136] and head of a Richland District, South Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [SC:175a]. Female "persons of Colour" who were residents of Richland District in 1806 who petitioned the South Carolina Legislature to be exempted from the discriminatory tax levied on them included Eleanor, Keziah, Lydady, Elizabeth and Clarissa Harris (who was apparently Edward's wife) [S.C. Archives series S.165015, item 01885]. His son Rowland Harris appeared in Richland County court in 1850 to make a declaration to obtain a survivor's pension for Edward's service in the Revolution. He stated that he was about sixty-one years old, was the son and heir of Edward's widow Clarissa Harris, deceased, and that his father's comrades in the service from the same neighborhood were Gideon Griffin, Morgan Griffin, Berry Jeffers, Allen Jeffers, Osborne Jeffers, and Edward's cousin Drury Harris. James Rawlinson testified on 14 May 1850 that Edward served in the Revolution with the same men named by Rowland, that Edward's wife Mrs. Clarissa Wilson remained a widow about twenty years after Edward's death, she died in 1848, their oldest son Jacob had died, and Rowland was then the oldest survivor. Manuscript papers in the possession of the family recorded that Clarissa died on 15 September 1848 and that Rowland Harris, John Harris, Stark Harris, Randall Harris, and Eliza Sneed were their only surviving children. George Griffin swore (signing) on 14 May 1850 that he was a neighbor of and well acquainted with James Rawlinson [National Archives pension application no. R4649, https://www.fold3.com/image/23206759]. Clarissa was head of a Richland District household of 8 "free colored" in 1840. They were the parents of

i. Jacob, born after 1775, one of the "Free people of Colour" from whom the sheriff of Richland District was unable to collect the discriminatory tax in 1821 and 1822 [South Carolina Archives, General Assembly Petitions, S165015, N.D. 1796, Roll ST1429, frames 786-92], head of a Richland District household of 6 "free colored" in 1830 [SC:409], deceased by 1850.

ii. Roland, born about 1795, one of the "Free people of Colour" from whom the sheriff of Richland District was unable to collect the discriminatory tax in 1821 and 1822 [South Carolina Archives, General Assembly Petitions, S165015, N.D. 1796, Roll ST1429, frames 786-92], a "Mulatto" counted in the 1850 census for Richland County in 1850 with (his wife?) Elizabeth aged about sixty [family no. 41].

iii. John, one of the "Free people of Colour" from whom the sheriff of Richland District was unable to collect the discriminatory tax in 1821 [South Carolina Archives, General Assembly S65015, N.D. 1796, Roll ST1429, frames 786-92].

iv. Stark, born about 1800, one of the "Free people of Colour" from whom the sheriff of Richland District was unable to collect the discriminatory tax in 1822 [South Carolina Archives, General Assembly Petitions, S165015, N.D. 1796, Roll ST1429, frames 786-92], a fifty-year-old "Mulatto" planter with $100 real estate, counted in the 1850 census for Richland County with (wife?) Polly Harris [family no. 244].

v. Randall, one of the "Free people of Colour" from whom the sheriff of Richland District was unable to collect the discriminatory tax in 1821 and 1822 [South Carolina Archives, General Assembly Petitions, S165015, N.D. 1796, Roll ST1429, frames 786-92]

vi. Eliza Sneed, born about 1800, one of the "Free people of Colour" from whom the sheriff of Richland District was unable to collect the discriminatory tax in 1822, apparently the wife of Isaac Snead, head of a Richland County household of 3 "free colored" in 1840 [SC:54], the fifty-year-old "Mulatto" Elizabeth Snead in Isaac's Richland County household in 1850 [family no. 323].

 

22.    James Harris, born on 14 January 1748 in Dinwiddie County, was a "free man of Color" residing in Patrick County, Virginia, on 12 February 1835 when he appeared in court there to make a declaration to obtain a pension for service in the Revolution. He stated that he moved from Dinwiddie County to Orange County, North Carolina, in 1775, resided in Orange County until 1781 and then moved to the part of Henry County that later became Patrick County. He was drafted while resident in Hillsborough, Orange County, on 13 July 1780 and was employed in doing various duties about the camp. His widow Keziah was about eighty years old on 10 April 1855 when she appeared in Patrick County court to obtain a widow's pension. She stated that her maiden name was Keziah Minor and that she and James had married in Rockingham County, North Carolina, in April 1801, that her husband died about 1842 or 1843, and that he was a horse-keeper. On 12 February 1860 she appeared before a notary public in Highland County, Ohio, where she had moved with her son, to ask that her pension be moved from Patrick County to Cincinnati [National Archives Pension file no. W11223, https://www.fold3.com/image/1/22990952]. James was a "Mulatto" taxable in Patrick County in 1799, listed with 2 tithes in 1799, 1804 and 1805 [PPTL, 1791-1823, frames 269, 398, 428, 460, 538, 598] and head of a Patrick County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830. His widow Keziah was head of a Patrick County household of 4 "free colored" in 1840 and was an eighty-year-old "Mulatto" woman, born in Virginia, counted in the 1850 census [VA:389]. James was apparently the father of

i. Agnes, daughter of James Harris, married Burbage Goin, 26 July 1810 Patrick County bond. Beveridge Going, born before 1776, was head of a Patrick County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:106].

ii. James, Jr., a "Mulatto" taxable in Patrick County in 1806 [PPTL, 1791-1823, frame 460].

iii. Alexander, a "Mulatto" taxable in Patrick County from 1807 to 1813 [PPTL, 1791-1823, frame 571]. He married Judith Fendley, 1807 Patrick County bond.

iv. Tabitha, married John Rickman, 1805 Patrick County bond.

v. Nancy, married Cam Loggins, 1817 Patrick County bond.

vi. Robert, married Nancy Goins, daughter of James and Nancy, 1816 Patrick County bond.

vii. ?Clinton, born about 1791, registered in Henry County on 17 June 1812: a Negro man free born, five feet nine inches and three quarters high, of a light black compection, stout, strong & well made, twenty one years old the 15th of this Instant and who served his apprenticeship to John Cox of the said County, was this day at the request of said Cox registered [Harriss, Clinton (M, 21): Free Negro Certificate, 1812, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

 

23    Morris Harris, born about 1778, was head of a Charles City County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:939].  In October 1826 he and his wife Patsy appointed James Brown to sell 10 acres which (his aunt?) Susannah Harris, deceased, received by the will of Dixon Brown [DB 7:371]. He was a 73-year-old farmer in the list of free Negroes for Charles City County in 1851 [List of free negroes over 12 years, 1851, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. Morris was the father of

i. Sandy, born 2 July 1808, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 16 December 1830: son of Morris Harris, a bright mulatto man, twenty two years of age 2 July last [Minutes 1830-7, 35].

ii. Mitchel, born 11 September 1811, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 21 February 1833: son of Morris Harris, a bright mulattoe man, aged twenty one years 11 September last [Minutes 1830-7, 142].

iii. Pamelia, born 4 June 1820, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 21 August 1834: daughter of Morris Harris, aged fourteen last June 4, bright mulatto [Minutes 1830-7, 158].

iv. Matthew, born June 1822, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 21 August 1834: son of Morris Harris, aged twelve in June last, a mulatto boy [Minutes 1830-7, 142].

v. Susan, born July 1824, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 21 August 1834: daughter of Morris Harris, aged ten in July last, a mulatto girl [Minutes 1830-7, 142].

vii. Abby, born April 1827, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 21 August 1834: daughter of Morris Harris, aged seven in April last, a mulatto girl [Minutes 1830-7, 142].

viii. Peter, born 20 January 1814, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 18 June 1835: son of Morris Harris, mulatto man, twenty one 20 January last [Minutes 1830-7, 238[.

 

Other members of the Harris family from the Petersburg area were

i. Fanny, born say 1756, a "Mulatto Girl" bound to Miles Thweat (of Prince George County) when he issued a bond for 5 pounds currency for the remainder of her time to Francis Epes, who placed an ad in the Virginia Gazette of 12 March 1767, stating that he would not pay the bond because Thweat had no right to sell her time [Virginia Gazette (Rind); http://www.accesible.com]. She may have been the mother of Nancy Braughton ( Brogdon?) (born about 1775) who registered in Petersburg on 8 July 1805: Nancy Braughton, a very light Mulatto woman, five feet two inches high, thirty years old, long curled hair, holes in her ears, born free and raised in the County of Chesterfield, daughter of Fanny Harris [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 294].

ii. Rebecca, born about 1760, registered in Petersburg on 18 August 1794: a light brown Mulatto woman, five feet one inches high, about thirty four years old, born free in Chesterfield County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 24].

24   iii. John5, born say 1761.

iv. David, born about 1765, registered in Petersburg on 14 June 1810: a brown Mulatto man, five feet six inches high, forty five years old, born free and raised in the County of Chesterfield [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 599].

v. Ruth, born say 1767, mother of Eliza Harris who registered in Chesterfield County on 9 October 1807: daughter of Ruth Harris who I have known for 18 or 20 years back & she was of white parentage, Eliza born 19 September 1788 was bound to Mrs. Elizabeth Moody by order of the County court of Chesterfield. Haley Cole [Harris, Eliza (F, 17): Free Negro Affidavit, 1807, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

vi. Paterson, born about 1774, registered in Petersburg on 7 December 1796: a light brown Mulatto man, five feet ten and a half inches high, twenty two years old, with short bushy hair, his eyes rather dark yellowish grey, born free & raised in the County of Dinwiddie [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 118].

vii. Patsy, born about 1775, registered in Petersburg on 9 June 1810: a light yellow brown Mulatto woman, five feet five inches high, thirty five years old, born free in Dinwiddie County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 579].

viii. William, born about 1783, registered in Petersburg on 24 June 1805: a brown Mulatto man, five feet five inches high, twenty two years old, born free in Chesterfield County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 293]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Chesterfield County from 1806 to 1809 [PPTL, 1786-1811, frames 660, 704, 753].

ix. Archer1, born say 1788, a "Mulatto" taxable in Chesterfield County in 1809 living on Mrs. Hamblin's hire land [PPTL, 1786-1811, frame 738].

 

24.    John5 Harris, born about 1761, was born in Prince George County and residing in Dinwiddie County when he enlisted on 6 June 1782 for 3 years in the Revolution: age 21, 5'4-1/2" high, yellow complexion, hasel eyes [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.103)]. He was a soldier who enlisted in the Revolution in Petersburg and served as a drummer according to the application for a pension by his children who were living in Wilkes County, North Carolina, on 3 July 1852 when they applied. They declared that he and their mother Mary Walker were married by the Episcopal Minister in Dinwiddie County in October or November 1785. They moved to Randolph County, North Carolina, near the old courthouse, called Randolph Cross Roads, and lived there for five or six years, and then moved to Rowan County near Lexington (Davidson County) where their father died on 20 April 1806. John may have been the "free" John Harris who was taxable in Dinwiddie County in Braddock Goodwyn's district adjoining "free" Andrew Harris in 1801 [PPTL 1801 B, p.7]. Their mother married Drury Mitchell, head of a Wilkes County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [NC:867]. Their father had a record of the marriage and the births of his children, but the record was "taken off" by Drury Mitchell [CR 104.923.2 by NCGSJ V:251-2]. Mary purchased 85 acres in Wilkes County from Jordan Chavis in 1829 [DB M:206]. Her 20 August 1833 Wilkes County will, proved February 1834, named her seven children: Nancy, Lucy, Jehu, Isaac, Polly Baley, John, and Ibby [WB 4:169]. Their children were

i. Nancy, born about 1786, married William Ferguson, 27 October 1802 Rowan County bond. She was the oldest child of John and Mary Harris according to William Ferguson's deposition in support of the Harris family pension application. William Ferguson was head of a Wilkes County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:543].

ii. Lucy, born say 1792, married Jordan Chavis as his second wife.

iii. Jehu, born about 1794, married Clarissy Chavis, 1 June 1821 Wilkes County bond. She was fifty-eight years old in 1852.

iv. Isaac, born about 1800, married Icy Wooten 22 September 1832 Wilkes County bond. He was fifty-two years old in 1852.

v. Polly Baley, probably the wife of Jesse Bailey, "free colored" head of a Wilkes County household of 4 in 1820.

vi. John6, deceased by the time his mother made her will.

vii. Iby Anderson, born about 1807, forty-five years old in 1852.

 

Other Harris family members in Virginia were

i. John, born say 1710, a "Mullatto" fined by the Accomack County court on 4 January 1736/7 for swearing six profane oaths [Orders 1731-36, 201].

ii. George2, born say 1752, a "Negroe" tithable in Gloucester County in 1770 [Tax List 1770-7, 199]. He was a "Free Negro" in St. Paul's Parish, Hanover County, where he was tithable from 1807 to 1812 and tithable on a horse in 1815 [Cocke, Hanover County Taxables, St. Paul's Parish, 57].

 

Craven County, North Carolina

1.    Thomas Harris, born about 1747, was a twelve-year-old "Mulatto" orphan ordered bound to Thomas Haline to be a tanner by the 11 May 1759 Craven County court [Minutes 1758-62, 32b]. He was head of a Craven County household of 10 "other free" in 1790 [NC:134]. He was probably the Thomas Harris who was taxed on 100 acres in District 3 of Craven County in 1779 [LP 30.1]. And he may have been the brother of John Harris who was head of a Craven County household of 6 "other free," 3 slaves, and a white woman in 1790 [NC:130]. John was taxable on 335 acres in District 3 of Craven County in 1779 [LP 30.1]. Thomas was probably the father of

i. Isaac, head of a Craven County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:76].

ii. Mary, head of a Craven County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:71].

 

HARRISON FAMILY

1.    Susan Harrison, born say 1690, was the mother of a "Mullatto Bastard Child named John" who was about seven years old on 6 October 1703 when Henry Armitrading testified in Accomack County court that his mother had left the boy with him. The court bound the boy as an apprentice to Armitrading [Orders 1703-9, 13]. She may have been the ancestor of

2     i. Ann, born say 1730.

3     ii. Sarah, born say 1733.

 

2.    Ann Harrison, born say 1730, was sued by the churchwardens in Southampton County on 9 November 1749, but the charges were dismissed when they failed to prosecute. On 13 November 1755 the court presented her for having a bastard child, but on 9 April 1756 the sheriff reported that she was not an inhabitant of the county and the court ordered her "mulatto" daughter Hannah bound out [Orders 1749-54, 26, 31; 1754-9, 149, 170, 221, 230]. Her children were

i. ?James, born say 1750, a taxable "mulatto" in Joseph Gowen's 1764 Granville County household in the list of John Pope, perhaps the James Harrison who was head of a Colleton District, South Carolina household of 5 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [SC:591].

ii. Hannah, born say 1755, ordered bound an apprentice in Southampton County on 8 April 1756, no age or master named.

iii. ?Charles, born say 1770, married Martha Eppes, 3 November 1791 Sussex County bond; and he married second, Rebecca Johnson, 13 September 1792 Southampton County bond. He was a "free Negro" head of an Isle of Wight County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:37].

iv. ?Patience, head of a Free Town, Brunswick County, Virginia household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:770].

v. ?Carter, born before 1776, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:151]. Perhaps his widow was Martha Harrison, head of a Halifax County household of 7 "free colored" in 1830.

vi. ?Nathan, head of a Currituck County, North Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:88].

 

3.    Sarah Harrison, born say 1733, was the mother of Anselum, a "mulatto child who the Southampton County court ordered bound on 9 April 1756 [Orders 1754-9, 221]. She was the mother of

i. Anselm, born say 1755.

 

HARTLESS FAMILY

1.    Henry1 Hartless, born say 1730, a "mulatto," was presented by the Spotsylvania County court on 4 May 1761 for cohabiting with a white woman [Orders 1755-65, 208]. He was head of an Amherst County household of 9 whites (free persons) and a slave in 1783 [VA:48] and 9 "whites" in 1785 [VA:85]. He was taxable in Amherst County from 1783 to 1803: taxable on 2 slaves, 6 horses and 17 cattle in 1783, 4 free tithables and a slave in 1788, 3 tithables, 3 slaves and 5 horses in 1791 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1803, frames 23, 53, 137, 167, 227, 291, 349, 395, 482, 589]. He purchased 215 acres in Amherst County on a branch of the south fork of Buffalo and on Long Mountain on 28 February 1778 and 330 acres in Amherst County on Horsley Creek on 6 January 1797 [DB E:47; H:219]. On 2 April 1782 the Amherst County court ordered that he be paid for providing 20 pounds of bacon and 275 pounds of beef to the Revolution [Orders 1773-82, 281]. He was called Henry Hartlas, Sr., on 16 July 1798 when he received a grant for 72 acres on Swaping Creek [Grants 1797-98, 311]. He proved the will of John Jarvis in Amherst County court on 17 June 1799 [Orders 1799-1801, 1]. He died intestate on 9 July 1802, and on 17 September 1803 his widow Isabella Hartless made a deed appointing four of her sons Henry, James, William, and Richard administrators [DB I:582]. The inventory of his estate, recorded on 19 December 1803, totaled 777 pounds [WB 4:140]. His heirs sold 523 acres on the north fork of the Pedlar River to William Hartless on 8 August 1818 and sold other land to John Clark, Joseph Jarvis, Reuben Peters and Nathaniel Cooper by deed proved in court on 18 October 1819. They were William Hartless and his wife Nancy, Henry Hartless and his wife Jane, Richard Hartless and his wife Mary, William Wilson and his wife Nancy, Mariant Hartless, Annis Hartless, James Graham and his wife Isbell, Joseph Jarvis and his wife Nancy, John Clark and his wife Mary, Reuben Peters and his wife Susannah, and Nathaniel Cooper and his wife Patsy [DB O:293, 295, 331; Orders 1815-20, 434, 438-9]. His children were most likely

2     i. James, born say 1750.

ii. Peter, born about 1752, about eighty years old on 1 November 1832 when he made a declaration in Amherst County court to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution. He was born in Caroline County, enrolled in the militia in 1777 or 1778, drafted in 1781, and returned to Caroline County until 1787 when he moved to Amherst County. Bounty land was issued to Lawrence Mason for his services in the North Carolina Militia during the War of 1812 [NARA, S.5740, M804-1210, frame 0249]. He was one of the freeholders ordered to work on the road from the Blue Ridge at Irish Creek Gap to the three forks of the Pedlar River in Amherst County on 4 November 1789 [Orders 1787-90, 590]. He married Jean Mason, 2 January 1792 Amherst County bond, with the consent of Thomas and Jane Mason. Peter was taxable in Caroline County in 1783 [Fothergill, Virginia Tax Payers, 56], taxable in Lexington Parish, Amherst County, from 1787 to 1821: called a "man of color" in 1811 and 1812, a "Mulatto" in 1813, in a list of "Free Mulattoes & Negroes" in 1814, 1816, and 1818 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1803, frames 101, 167, 227, 349, 395, 452, 510, 588; 1804-23, frames 25, 108, 168, 213, 234, 256, 284, 403, 503, 539, 601]. He was head of an Amherst County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:288]. His 16 March 1828 Amherst County will, proved 17 September 1835 named his wife Jane, Nancy Mason (daughter of Larsons Mason) and Peter Mason [WB 9:124].

3     iii. William1, born about 1754.

iv. Richard1, born say 1771, an infant over the age of fourteen in November 1791 when his guardian Henry Hartless sued Bartholomew Staton for trespass, assault and battery [Orders 1790-4, 303]. He was taxable in Amherst County from 1792 to 1812: taxable on a slave from 1798 to 1811 and listed as a "man of color" in 1811 and 1812 [Personal Property Tax List 1783-1803, frames 259, 327, 349, 395, 421, 482; 1804-23, frames 24, 107, 191, 213, 234]. He was head of an Amherst County household of 5 "other free" and 5 slaves in 1810 [VA:284]. He purchased 180 acres in Amherst County bordering the middle fork of the Pedlar River and the south side of Mount Pleasant on 15 February 1808 [DB L:70].

v. Henry2, born say 1777, married Jane Clark, 25 June 1798 Amherst County bond, William Clark surety. Henry was head of an Amherst County household of 12 "free colored" in 1820.

vi. Nancy, born say 1780, married William Wilson, 8 October 1798 Amherst County bond.

vii. Susanna, born say 1785, "a free mulatto," married Reuben Peters, "a free Negro," in Amherst County on 8 January 1812 [Marriage Register, 229].

viii. Isabel, married James Graham, apparently a white man.

ix. Mariant, in a Rockbridge County list of "Free Negroes and Mulattoes" above the age of sixteen in James McClug's district in 1813 [PPTL, 1811-1821, frame 155].

x. Annis, in a Rockbridge County list of "Free Negroes and Mulattoes" above the age of sixteen in James McClug's district in 1813 [PPTL, 1811-1821, frame 155].

xi. Mary, married John Clark.

xii. Patsy, married Nathaniel Cooper.

 

2.    James Hartless, born say 1750, was one of the freeholders of Amherst County ordered to work on a new road from Irish Creek Gap down the Pedlar River to Campbell Road on 5 January 1778, listed next to Michael Ailstock. He was in a list of men in Amherst County called into militia service in 1781 [William & Mary Digital Archives, Swem Library's Special Collections, Cabell Papers Box 2, Folder11.pdf; https://digitalarchive.wm.edu/handle/10288/16244].   On 4 March 1783 the Amherst County court dismissed his suit against Hugh McCabe [Orders 1773-82, 211-2; 1782-4, 84]. He was taxable in Amherst County on 3 horses and 2 cattle in 1782 but not taxable there again until 1800. His estate was taxable on 3 horses in 1805 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1803, frames 9, 482; 1804-23, 67]. His estate was inventoried on 16 September 1805 for 71 pounds [WB 4:190]. His administrator paid board and schooling for his sons Richard and Henry Hartless [WB 5:64; 6:223, 306]. He was the father of

i. ?Nancy, married Joseph Jarvis (apparently a white man), a taxable in Amherst County in 1804. She was one of the heirs of Henry Hartless who sold land in Amherst County in 1819 [Orders 1815-20, 438-9].

ii. Richard, Jr., born say 1796, taxable in Amherst County in 1817 and 1820 [Personal Property Tax List 1804-23, frames 447, 539, 551].

iii. Henry, Jr., born say 1798, taxable in Amherst County in 1819 and 1820 [Personal Property Tax List 1804-23, frames 539, 551].

 

3.    William1 Hartless, born about 1754, made a declaration in Amherst County court on 17 September 1832 to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he was born in Caroline County, moved to Amherst County when he was twenty-three years old, entered the militia in Albemarle County in 1779, and was drafted from Amherst County in 1781 [NARA, S.5498, M804-1210, frame 0260]. He was taxable in Lexington Parish, Amherst County, from 1782 to 1821: taxable on 3 horses in 1782, 2 tithables in 1803, 3 tithables in 1804, 4 in 1805 and 1807, 3 slaves in 1809, called a "man of color" in 1811 and 1812, a "Mulatto" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1803, frames 9, 54, 101, 137, 197, 259, 327, 372, 421, 482, 555, 588; 1804-23, frames 24, 67, 147, 169, 213, 234, 255, 503, 600]. He was head of an Amherst County household of one white (free) person in 1783 [VA:48] and 1785 [VA:85], 13 "other free" in 1810, and 6 "free colored" and a 26-44 year old white woman in 1820. He married Nancy Staton, 7 February 1785 Amherst County bond, John Jarvis surety, with the consent of her mother Ann Staton [Orders 1784-87, 111]. In February 1811 the Amherst County court appointed him and Peter Hartless as commissioners to view a way for a road through the lands of John Martin [Orders 1811-4]. He purchased 523 acres on the north fork of the Pedlar River from Henry Hartless' heirs on 8 August 1818 [DB O:293, 295, 331]. He was probably the father of

i. William2, Jr., a "M. of C." (man of color) taxable in Amherst County in 1812, a "Mulatto" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1804-23, frame 234, 256].

 

HARVEY FAMILY

1.    Mary Harvey, born say 1740, was living in Cumberland County, Virginia, on 27 July 1761 when the court ordered the churchwardens of King William Parish to bind her "Mulatto" daughter Phebe Harvy to John Bilbo [Orders 1758-62, 372]. Mary was head of a Loudoun County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:396]. She was the mother of

2     i. Phebe, born say 1761.

 

2.    Phebe Harvey, born say 1761, was a "Mulatto" bound out by the Cumberland County, Virginia court on 27 July 1761. She was living in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, (no race indicated) on 11 August 1783 when the court dismissed her complaint against her master John Bilbo for misusage. The court bound her daughter Nelly Harvey to Bennett Sandifer with the consent of her master [Orders 1779-84, 400]. She was the mother of

i. Nelly, born say 1780.

ii. ?Martha, born about 1789, a six-year-old "Mullatto" girl bound to Richard Moss by the Warren County, North Carolina court in August 1795 [Minutes 1793-1800, 71].

iii. ?Nancy, born about 1791, a four-year-old "Mullatto" girl bound to Richard Moss by the Warren County, North Carolina court in August 1795 [Minutes 1793-1800, 71].

iv. ?Thomas, born 1794-1806, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 4 "free colored" in 1830 [NC:314].

 

HATCHER FAMILY

1.    Jack Hatcher, born say 1729, "alias Indian Jack," petitioned John Parish, Sr., in Goochland County, Virginia court on 19 September 1750. Parish died before November court 1751, and Jack sued his widow and administrator Judith Parish for trespass in May 1752. The deposition of Robert Napier, Sr., an "aged and infirm person" of Albemarle County was taken on Jack's behalf. In July 1764 the court found in Jack's favor for 40 shillings damages. In July 1759 Bouth Napier sued him for debt, but Jack delayed the case until September 1762 when judgment was entered against him [Orders 1750-57, 36, 47, 94, 128, 204, 409, 594; 1757-61, 227, 252; 1761-5, 99]. He was taxable in Goochland County in 1757 and 1760, his tax charged to William Rutherford in 1757 [List of Tithables 1756-1766, frames 121]. He may have been the father of

i. David, born about 1762, a sixteen-year-old "half Indian" planter who enlisted in the Granville County, North Carolina Militia during the Revolution [The North Carolinian, 726 (N.C. Archives Troop Returns File TR 4-40)]. He was head of a Chesterfield County, South Carolina household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [SC:103] and 8 in 1810 [SC:550].

ii. William, born say 1770, "Negroe" head of a Cheraw District, South Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [SC:49], and 5 in Chesterfield County in 1800 [SC:103].

iii. Nancy, head of a Fairfield County, South Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [SC:227].

 

HATFIELD/ HATTER FAMILY

1.    Richard1 Hatfield, born say 1680, was an "Indian man" who bound himself as an apprentice to Burr Harrison for seven years by indenture proved in Stafford County on 9 April 1706, "to be dealt with when absent or runaway" the same as an imported servant [WB Liber Z, 1699-1709, 315-6]. He was probably the ancestor of

i. Richard2, born say 1748, a free-born man who was indentured to Samuel Lambuth of Smithtown. He ran away before 18 May 1769 when an ad appeared in the Virginia Gazette describing him as: a Negro man named Richard Hatfield, though he goes by the name of Hatter ... a very yellow Negro ... I imagine he has gone to Norfolk or Hampton, as he has a brother at Col. Cary's, and another at Mr. Balfour's [Virginia Gazette (Purdie & Dixon edition, page 3, column 3].

2    ii. Jacob Hatter, born say 1750.

iii. Patty Hatter, head of a Frederick County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:516].

iii. Peter Hatfield, born 1776-1794, head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:55].

 

 

2.    Jacob Hatter, born say 1750, married Milly Walden, 14 June 1806 Petersburg Hustings Court marriage. He may have been the father of

i. Jack Hatter, born about 1771, registered in Petersburg on 14 June 1806: a dark brown Negro man, five feet six and a half inches high, thirty five years old, born free & brought from raised Maryland by Jas. French late of Dinwiddie County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 382].

 

HAWKINS FAMILY

Members of the Hawkins family born before 1750 were

1     i. Solomon1, born say 1720.

ii. David1, born say 1730, purchased 100 acres on Quankey Creek in North Carolina on June 1755 from Solomon Hawkins for 5 pounds [Edgecombe County DB 2:329].

iii. Stephen, born say 1738, a "free negro" taxable on the north side of Tanners Creek in Norfolk County in 1754 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1751-65, 91].

iv. Hannah, born say 1746, a "free Negro" living in Norfolk County on 18 February 1763 when her son Thomas was bound as an apprentice [Orders 1759-63, 238] and a taxable "negro" in Elizabeth River Parish in 1768 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1766-80, 81].

 

1.    Solomon1 Hawkins, born say 1720, was witness (signing) to the 16 February 1742 Edgecombe County, North Carolina deed of John Inman and Edward Pore [DB 5:21], Gideon Gibson's 15 February 1749 Northampton County, North Carolina deed [DB 1:383], and the 3 January 1758 Halifax County, North Carolina will of William Jones [WB 1:65]. He purchased 220 acres of land in Edgecombe County joining James Carter for 7 pounds on 20 November 1752 and sold it about nine months later on 23 August 1753 for 15 pounds [DB 3:345; 4:491]. He was called Solomon Hawkins, shoemaker, on 21 August 1754 when he purchased for 30 pounds 210 acres on Quankey Creek in the part of Edgecombe County which became Halifax County in 1758. About a year later on 3 June 1755 he sold 100 acres of this land to (his brother?) David1 Hawkins for 5 pounds. He and David were called cordwainers when they jointly sold their land on 10 January 1756 for 40 pounds [DB 2:245, 329, 425]. He may have been the father of

2     i. Solomon2, born say 1742.

3     ii. Joseph1, born say 1755.

 

2.    Solomon2 Hawkins, born say 1742, was a taxable "Free Mulatto" overseer for Solomon Williams in Bertie County in 1768, head of a household of one "mulatto," 3 black males, and one black female tithable in the Bertie County tax list of James Moore in 1769 and 1770 [CR 10.702.1, Box 2]. He purchased 100 acres in Halifax County, North Carolina, on 9 January 1775 [DB 13:277]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 14 "other free" in 1790 [NC:61], 9 "other free" in 1800 [NC:318], and 14 "other free" in 1810 [NC:26]. By his 4 April 1815 will, proved August 1816, he lent 100 acres to his unnamed wife during her lifetime, and named his children [WB 3:589]:

i. Henry, born say 1762, enlisted in Ballard's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment for nine months on 20 July 1778 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1080]. He received a voucher for 7 pounds military service on 1 November 1785 [North Carolina Revolutionary Pay Vouchers, 1779-1782, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2WT-GD56, Hawkins, Henry]. He purchased 60 acres in Halifax County on 26 October 1793 [DB 17:673]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:61], 7 in 1800 [NC:318], 8 in 1810 [NC:23], and 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:151]. He was probably the Henry Hawkins of Halifax County who made a deposition on 23 November 1812 that he was in the service with Nathan Scott and that Scott died in the hospital in Philadelphia [LP 262, by NCGSJ VI:15].

ii. David2, born say 1770, head of a Halifax County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:314].

iii. Hannah Jones.

iv. Betty Rudd, perhaps the wife of John Rudd, head of a Halifax County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:338]. He was probably a son of William Rudd, head of a Halifax County household of 8 "other free" in 1790 [NC:62]. He may have been the William Rudd who purchased 150 acres joining Jumping Run in Halifax County on 2 December 1789 [DB 17:20].

v. Polly Carter.

vi. Betty Scott.

vii. Patty Hawkins.

viii. Prissy Hawkins.

ix. Nancy, married Exum James, 18 January 1826 Halifax County bond.

 

3.    Joseph1 Hawkins, born say 1755, was called a shoemaker when he purchased 70 acres from William Bozeman joining the Marsh Swamp in Halifax County on 11 December 1779 [DB 17:316]. He was saddler hired for twelve months in Halifax by Colonel Nicholas Long, Deputy Quartermaster General for North Carolina in the Revolution according to his return for 23 August 1781 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XV:620]. He was allowed voucher no. 8289, for 12 pounds in Halifax District for military service on 16 June 1783, voucher no. 3149 for 11 pounds on 8 March 1784, and voucher no. 4687 for 11 pounds on 14 July 1781 [North Carolina Revolutionary Pay Vouchers, 1779-1782, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2WT-GD8S, Hawkins, Joseph]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 9 "other free" in 1790 [NC:64], 5 in 1800, and 5 "other free" and 1 slave in 1810 [NC:27]. His 23 April 1817 Halifax County will, proved February 1818, mentioned his children [WB 3:611]:

i. Elizabeth Hawkins.

ii. Mary Hawkins.

iii. Nancy Bozeman, mother of John Bozeman who received $100 for his education by the will of his grandfather Joseph Hawkins.

iv. Samuel, living alone in Halifax County in 1790 [NC:63], head of a household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [NC:314] and 9 "other free" in 1810 [NC:27]. He may have been the Samuel Hawkins who purchased 100 acres on Haw Tree Creek in Halifax County on 12 April 1783 and purchased a further 15 acres on the north side of Little Fishing Creek which he sold on 10 May 1795 [DB 17:383, 673, 677].

v. Joseph2, Jr. (J.J.), executor of his father's will, living alone in Halifax County in 1810 [NC:26] and head of a household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:150].

 

Other members of a Hawkins family were

i. John, born about 1759, enlisted in the Revolution from Frederick County on 7 June 1781 and was sized on 7 December 1781: age 22, 5'4" high, yellow complexion, born in Frederick County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.57)].

ii. James, born about 1763, about fifty-seven years old with no family living with him on 14 October 1820 when he made a declaration in Fluvanna County to obtain a pension for his service in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted for two years in 1779 or 1780 in the regiment commanded by Colonel Harris. "Being a Coloured man," he was taken as a waiter to Major Chrogham. He received a land warrant for three years service and died on 21 January 1824 [NARA, S.37991, M804-1227, frame 0576].

 

HAWLEY FAMILY

1.    Micajah/ Michael Hawley, born say 1700, may have descended from Mary Haley who was presented by the York County court on 20 November 1727 for not listing herself as a tithable [OW 16:489]. On 17 May 1731 he received a patent for 640 acres in Bertie County on the south side of the Meherrin River [Northampton County DB 3:422 & 4:10]. He and his wife Sarah sold 300 acres of this land on 7 August 1738 [Bertie DB E:313]. His 1 March 1752 will was proved in the August 1752 Northampton County court. He gave sons: Joseph, William, and Christopher, only one shilling each and left the bulk of his estate to son Benjamin, who may have been the youngest since he was mentioned last. And he left his grandson William Mitchell 60 acres at the mouth of Flat Branch near Cypress Branch. He also mentioned his three daughters: Ann, Elizabeth, and Mary (no last names) [SS original]. His children were

2     i. Joseph, born say 1725.

3     ii. William, born say 1728.

iii. Christopher, born say 1730, tithable in Granville County in the list of Jonathan White circa 1748.

iv. Ann, born say 1732, perhaps the one who married _____ Mitchell and was the mother of Benjamin's grandchild William Mitchell. He may have been identical to William Shoecraft, son of Ann Mitchell, "a free Mulattoe," who was bound an apprentice by the Bertie County court on 24 October 1758 [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, II:452].

4     v. Benjamin1, born say 1735.

vi. Elizabeth, born say 1737.

vii. Mary, born say 1739.

 

2.    Jacob Hawley, born about 1751, was first listed in his father Joseph Hawley's Granville county household in 1764 in the list of Samuel Benton, but he was probably taxable earlier in 1762 when his father was a delinquent taxpayer on 5 tithes. He was taxable as a married man in Granville County in 1780, and he had 6 persons in his Beaver Dam District household in Granville County in the state census. He enlisted as a private in Captain Lytle's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment in 1781 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1082]. He was the heir of Benjamin Hawley who received military bounty land warrant no. 1389, 640 acres entered 12 November 1784 and issued 20 December 1791, for Benjamin's service in the Continental Line [N.C. Archives S.S. file 96, Thomas Pearson, Assignee of Benjamin Hawley; http://mars.archives.ncdcr.gov]. Benjamin also received voucher no. 1195 in Hillsboro on 4 April 1782 for 8 pounds specie for military services in the Revoloution [North Carolina Revolutionary Pay Vouchers, 1779-1782, https://familysearch.org, Howeley, Benja]. Jacob was taxable on 1 poll in Granville County until 1793 after which he is not listed until 1805 when he was taxable on 1 poll in Oxford District [Tax List 1803-09, 104]. He was head of a Granville County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [NC:893]. He was called Jacob Holley on 11 March 1806 when the Greensville County, Virginia court ordered him to deliver his son Joseph Holley to his son's master Henry Stewart [Orders 1799-1806, 540]. Winnifred Holly was called the widow of Jacob Holly when she appeared in Halifax County, North Carolina court on 21 November 1842 at the age of eighty seven years, to apply for bounty land for his services in the Revolution. She stated that her husband was a private in Captain Little's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment. They were married on 25 July 1778 and her husband died on 4 August 1817. Her application includes a copy of the 1 June 1778 Halifax County marriage bond of Jacob Holly and Winferd Mills with Jacob Holly and Peter Wiggins as sureties [NARA, W.21388, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/29344152]. Winnefred Holley was eighty-eight years old on 20 May 1844 when she made a deposition for the Revolutionary War pension application of Drury Walden. Jacob was the father of

5     i. Sarah, born about 1748.

ii. Mary, born about 1749, first taxed in 1761 in her father's household in Fishing Creek District.

iii. Martha3, born about 1750, first taxable in 1762.

6     iv. Jacob, born about 1751.

v. Nathan, born about 1755, first taxable in 1767. He was taxable on 1 poll in 1788 in Abraham's Plain District. On 26 December 1793 he entered 20 acres on the waters of Grassy Creek and was granted 5 acres in Granville County on 23 September 1802 [N.C. Archives, S.S. 1596, Land Office: Land Warrants, Granville County, Nathan Hawley, 1793, 1802, http://www.archives.ncdcr.gov]. In 1796 he was taxable on 15 acres and 1 poll in Abrams Plains District, and in 1799 he was taxable on 110 acres and 1 poll. In 1805 he was taxable on only 15 acres in Goshen District [Tax List 1796-1802, 41, 188; 1803-09, 118], and in 1808 he entered 400 acres in Granville County on the waters of "Bannets" Creek [Pruitt, Land Entries: Granville County, 81]. He was head of a Granville County household of 7 "other free" in 1800, 10 in 1810 [NC:913] and 6 "free colored" in Caswell County in 1820 [NC:65].

vi. Joan, born about 1755, first taxable in 1767.

7     vii. ?Jesse, born say 1760.

viii. ?Joseph2, born say 1760, enlisted for 3 years as a private in Sharp's Company of the 1st North Carolina Regiment on 9 January 1777 and died on 1 September 1778 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1072]. His heir Joseph Hawley received military bounty land of 640 acres, entered 1 November 1784 and issued 18 March 1794 [N.C. Archives, S.S. file no. 408, Thomas Person, Assignee of Joseph Hawley (Warrant no. 1291) http://mars.archives.ncdcr.gov].

ix. Benjamin3, born say 1765, underage when he enlisted for nine months in the Continental Line according to the deposition of his father Joseph Hawley who was living in Granville County on 7 June 1791 when he gave Thomas Beavan his power of attorney to collect wages due to Benjamin for service in the Revolution [NCGSJ X:112]. He mustered for the war in Lytle's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment in January 1782 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1082]. Benjamin received voucher no 6809 on 4 June 1782 for four pounds specie in Halifax District for military service in the Revolution [North Carolina Revolutionary Pay Vouchers, 1779-1782, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2WT-GXYF, Hawley, Ben].

x. ?Pearson, born about 1770, taxable in Granville County in 1791. In 1793 he was in Fort Creek District in the list of John Pope, taxable on 1 poll. He was head of a Granville County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 and was taxable on 1 poll in Country Line District in 1803 [Tax List 1803-09, 37]. He was bondsman for the 15 February 1804 Granville County marriage of Thomas and Lucy Chavas [N.C. Archives, http://mars.archives.ncdcr.gov].

 

3.    William Hawley, born say 1728, may have been the William Hawly who was taxable on one white poll in Granville County in 1751 and one white tithe in 1762 in Goodwins District, Granville County [CR 44.702.19]. He may have been the husband of Amy Hawley, daughter of John Scott, "free Negro" of Berkeley County, South Carolina, whose complaint was entered in Orange County, North Carolina court on 12 March 1754:

Joseph Deevit Wm. Deevit & Zachariah Martin, entered by force, the house of his daughter, Amy Hawley, and carried her off, by force, with her six children, and he thinks they are taking them north to sell as slaves.

One of the children, "a mulatto boy Busby, alias John Scott," was recovered in Orange County, North Carolina, and on 12 March 1754 the county court appointed Thomas Chavis to return the child to South Carolina [Haun, Orange County Court Minutes, I:70, 71]. William recorded a plat for 250 acres in Craven County, South Carolina, near the Tiger River and Fair Forest Creek on 15 June 1772 [S.C. Archives series S213190, vol. 19:484]. He enlisted in Quinn's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 20 July 1778 [Clark, State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1079]. His heir Milly Hawley received Military Warrant no. 2265 for his service in the Revolution [NC Archives, S.S. Record Group file no. 1523, Land Office Warrants, Tennessee, Davidson County, Joseph Ross, Assignee of the Heirs of Wm Hawley]. The children of Amy (and William?) were

i. Busby, born say 1745-50.

ii. ?Milly Holly, head of an Edgefield District household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [SC:766].

iii. ?Elizabeth Holly, head of a Richland District household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [SC:175a].

iv. ?Sarah Holly, a resident of Richland District in 1806 when she petitioned the South Carolina legislature to be exempted from the tax on free Negro women [S.C. Archives series S.165015, item 01885].

v. ?Isham Holley, a taxable "free negro" in the district between Broad and Catawba River in South Carolina in 1784 [South Carolina Tax List 1783-1800, frame 37].

8    vi. ?Benjamin2 Holley, born 15 February 1752.

vii. ?Charles Holly, head of an Edgefield District household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [SC:813]

 

4.    Benjamin1 Hawley, born say 1735, was the executor and main beneficiary of his father's estate. He voted for Joseph Sikes in the Northampton County election of 1762 [SS 837 by NCGSJ XII:170]. He sold the estate which included 4 slaves, 15 head of cattle, 50 hogs, and his household furniture in Northampton County on 29 March 1766 for 330 pounds. He mortgaged 600 acres of his father's land for 100 pounds on 12 May 1766 and repaid the mortgage on 1 September that same year [DB 3:422, 429; 4:10]. On 4 February 1767 he and his wife Mary sold 580 acres of their land for 325 pounds, and he bought 200 acres on Batty's Delight Swamp in Northampton County on 3 March 1769 [DB 4:36, 204]. He was taxed in Northampton County on an assessment of 667 pounds in 1780 [GA 46.1]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:75]. His 7 July 1797 will was proved in March 1805 [WB 2:276]. He named his children:

i. William, executor of his father's estate, received his father's land, plantation, and carpenter and blacksmith tools. He was head of a Northampton County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [NC:447] and 12 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:236]. He bought land by deed proved in Northampton County court on 6 March 1820 [Minutes 1817-21, 240]. He died before 1 March 1830 when Silas Edwards was appointed administrator of his estate. His widow Tabitha Hawley and William, Dicy and Polly Hawley were buyers at the sale of the estate [North Carolina, Wills and Probate Records, 1665-1998, Northampton: Estate Records, Vol 104, Hart, Nancy-Hayley, Holiday, 1789-1923 (http://www.ancestry.com)].

ii. Eady, married Nathaniel Newsom. Her child Charlotte received 10 pounds by the will of her grandfather Benjamin Hawley.

 

5.    Sarah Hawley, born about 1748, was first taxed in 1761 in her father Joseph Hawley's household in Fishing Creek District. Her bastard children were bound apprentices to William Wilkerson by the Granville County court on 7 August 1786 [Minutes 1786-87, n.p.]. They were

i. Obediah, born about 1776, perhaps the O. Holly who was head of a Greensville District, South Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [SC:528].

ii. Zedekiah, born about 1776.

 

6.    Jacob Hawley, born about 1751, was first listed in his father Joseph Hawley's Granville county household in 1764 in the list of Samuel Benton, but he was probably taxable earlier in 1762 when his father was a delinquent taxpayer on 5 tithes. He was taxable as a married man in Granville County in 1780, and he had 6 persons in his Beaver Dam District household in Granville County in the state census. He enlisted as a private in Captain Lytle's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment in 1781 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1082]. He was the heir of Benjamin Hawley who received military bounty land warrant no. 1389, 640 acres entered 12 November 1784 and issued 20 December 1791, for Benjamin's service in the Continental Line [N.C. Archives S.S. file 96, call no. S.108.388; http://mars.archives.ncdcr.gov]. Benjamin also received voucher no. 1195 in Hillsboro on 4 April 1782 for 8 pounds specie for military services in the Revolution [North Carolina Revolutionary Pay Vouchers, 1779-1782, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2WT-577R, Howeley, Benja]. Jacob was taxable on 1 poll in Granville County until 1793 after which he is not listed until 1805 when he was taxable on 1 poll in Oxford District [Tax List 1803-09, 104]. He was head of a Granville County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [NC:893]. He was called Jacob Holley on 11 March 1806 when the Greensville County, Virginia court ordered him to deliver his son Joseph Holley to his son's master Henry Stewart [Orders 1799-1806, 540]. Winnifred Holly was called the widow of Jacob Holly when she appeared in Halifax County, North Carolina court on 21 November 1842 at the age of eighty seven years, to apply for bounty land for his services in the Revolution. She stated that her husband was a private in Captain Little's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment. They were married on 25 July 1778 and her husband died on 4 August 1817. Her application includes a copy of the 1 June 1778 Halifax County marriage bond of Jacob Holly and Winferd Mills with Jacob Holly and Peter Wiggins as sureties [NARA, W.21388, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/29344152]. Winnefred Holley was eighty-eight years old on 20 May 1844 when she made a deposition for the Revolutionary War pension application of Drury Walden. Jacob was the father of

i. ?Ezekiel Holley, born about 1777, registered in Greensville County, Virginia, on 7 October 1805: born free of a yellowish complexion, aged about 28 years [Register of Free Negroes, no.4].

ii. Joseph3 Holley, born say 1785, charged by the Greensville County, Virginia court on 14 January 1805 with begetting an illegitimate child by Jane Stewart. Henry and Peyton Stewart provided security for the payment of 10 pounds per year for seven years for the maintenance of the child. In exchange Joseph bound himself to serve Henry Stewart for seven years. On 13 January 1806 the court ordered the child Lindsey Stewart bound as an apprentice to Francis Stewart but rescinded the order the following month for reasons appearing to the court. On 10 February 1806 the court summoned Jacob and Joseph Holley to show cause why Joseph did not return to the service of his master Henry Stewart, and the following month on 11 March the court ordered Joseph to return to the service of his master Henry Stewart, serve an additional four months and continue in his service until Jane Stewart's child Lindsey was bound out by the overseers of the poor. Asa Byrd was Henry's witness, and Patsey Jones and Peyton Stewart were witnesses for Jacob and Joseph [Orders 1799-1806, 439, 532, 535, 540, 541].

 

7.    Jesse Hawley, born about 1760, was taxable in Granville County in 1789 and in 1793. He was head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1800 and 2 in 1810 [NC:22]. He was an insolvent taxpayer in Halifax County in 1800 [Minutes 1799-1802, 19 August 1801]. On 19 May 1823 he took the oath of insolvent debtor in Halifax County court. He was over fifty-five years of age with 4 "free colored" in his Halifax County household in 1830. Perhaps his wife was Winnefred Holley who was eighty-eight years old on 20 May 1844 when she made a deposition for the Revolutionary War pension application of Drury Walden. His children were

i. Labon Taborn, born about 1782, Jesse's two-year-old "Free Malater" son, bound to David Bradford by the 3 November 1784 Granville County court [Owen, Granville County Notes, vol. VI].

9     ii. ?Henry, born say 1785.

 

8.     Benjamin2 Holley, born 15 February 1752, was listed in the pay roll of the 3rd South Carolina Regiment commanded by Colonel William Thomson for the month of August 1779 and 1 November 1779, in the same list with Berry, Osborn and Allen Jeffers, Gideon and Morgan Griffin, and Drury Harris [NARA, M246, roll 89, frame 194, 196, 198]. He was a taxable "free negro" in the district between the Broad and Catawba rivers in South Carolina in 1784 [South Carolina Tax List, 1783-1800, frame 37]. His daughter Sarah Holly was 62 when she appeared in Orangeburg District court on 11 November 1844 to apply for his pension. She stated that she was the daughter of Benjamin and Priscilla Holly, that her father entered the war in what was then Orangeburg District near the homestead of Colonel William Thomson and enlisted until the end of the war with his comrades: Allen Jeffers, Osborne Jeffers, Benjamin Jeffers, Drury Harris, Morgan Griffin, Gideon Griffin, Arthur Jackson, and Benjamin Carter, many of whom lived not far from her father. Her father died in the district about December 1819 and her mother died in the same district on 19 January 1842. Her mother had two children before her marriage to her father which took place on 10 January 1782. Their only living children were Sarah Holly, Charlotte Hope, and Jane Holly. Sarah presented a book with the birth dates of her family that was said to have been in the handwriting of Colonel Thomson (which has faded). It included the birth of Mary Wootton on 4 October 1773, so perhaps that was Priscilla's maiden name [NARA, W.8941, M804, roll 1312, frame 54]. Priscilla was head of a St. Matthews Parish, Orangeburg household of 8 "free colored" in 1820. Priscilla was the mother of

i. Mary Wootton, born 4 October 1773, died 16 August 1786.

ii. Elizabeth Dab(?)__y, born 29 November 178_.

iii. Rachel, born January 1782.

iv. Jane, born 15 October ____.

v. Robert, born 7 October 1787.

vi. ____t, born 1789.

vii. Sharlotte, born August 1791.

viii. Sarah(?), born 1791(?).

 

9.    Henry Hawley, born say 1785, was head of a Halifax County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:24]. On 16 August 1841 he was in a list of "free persons of color" who were allowed by the Halifax County court to use their guns in the county. He may have been the father of

i. Washington Haley, born 1806 to 1820, a "free colored" man living alone in Halifax County in 1830.

ii. Ezekiel Holley, registered in Greensville County, Virginia, on 7 October 1805: born free of a yellowish complexion, aged about 28 years [Register of Free Negroes, no.4].

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