HAWS FAMILY

1.    Winefred Haws, born say 1700, the servant of John Welsh, confessed to the Anne Arundel County, Maryland Court in March 1720/1 that she had a child by her master's "Negroe" Jack. She was ordered to serve her master seven years, Jack was given twenty-five lashes, and their child was bound to their master until the age of thirty-one [Judgment Record 1720-1, 88-9]. They were probably the ancestors of

2     i. Peter, born say 1750.

ii. William1, born say 1752, a seaman aboard the Dragon according to an affidavit by a fellow seaman aboard the ship, John Davis, who testified for the bounty land claim of James Jennings on 7 February 1834 and named five of the officers and fifty-two members of the crew who served faithfully for three years and were discharged at the Chickahominy Ship Yard [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Jennings, James (p.9), Digital Collection, LVA]. He was listed aboard the ship Gloucester on 5 July 1779 and aboard the Dragon on 2 September 1779. He served three years and was entitled to bounty land [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 8, 14, 68].

iii. Amy Haw, head of a St. Mary's County, Maryland household of 3 "other free" in 1790.

 

2.    Peter Haw(s)/How, born say 1750, and William Hawes were serving aboard the galley Gloucester on 4 November 1777 when the Keeper of the Public Store was ordered to deliver them articles of clothing, "on their paying for the same" [U.S. Government Printing Office, Naval Documents of the American Revolution, 11:160; http://www.ibiblio.org/anrs//docs/E/E3/ndar_v11p05.pdf]. He was head of a Lancaster County, Virginia household of 9 "Blacks" in 1783 [VA:56] and 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:349]. He was taxable on a horse in Lancaster County from 1783 to 1814: not charged on his own tithe after 1785, in the list of "free Negroes & Mulattoes" in 1813 and 1814 [PPTL, 1782-1839, frames 15, 30, 44, 72, 119, 187, 385, 399]. On 1 November 1834 Peter's heirs applied for bounty land for his and his brother William's services in the Revolution. They stated that William Haw entered the State Navy in 1776, was on board the Dragon in 1777 under the command of Captain James Markham, and died in the service. William was from Lancaster County and had only one brother Peter Haw. Their petition included an affidavit that Peter Haws' name was on the army register as receiving 60 pounds, 10 shillings as the balance of his pay as a seaman on 9 March 1787. Peter died many years previous to the petition and left four children: Rachel, Peter, Alice and Betsy. The petition was signed by Rachel Jones, Milly Jones, Peter Haw, Alice Haw, and William Haw [Revolutionary War Rejected Claims, Haw, William, Digital Collection, LVA]. He was listed on 25 November 1834 as a seaman who served three years and was due bounty land [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, Virginia, 216]. He was the father of

i. Rachel Howe, "daughter of Peter Howe," married Daniel Jones, 13 June 1794 Lancaster County bond.

ii. ?Nancy Howe, spinster over 21, married Robert Nickens, 5 March 1793 Lancaster County bond.

iii. ?Charles, granted a certificate of free birth by the Lancaster County court on 21 March 1796 [Orders 1792-9, 261].

iv. ?Jane Haws, married Holland Wood, 15 October 1821 Lancaster County bond.

v. Sally, born about 1771-6, a nineteen-year-old "free light mulatto woman" who ran away with a "Negro man named Syphax" from Lancaster County according to the 30 September 1795 issue of the Virginia Gazette [Headley, 18th Century Newspapers, 156]. She registered as a "free Negro" in Lancaster County on 18 June 1805: Age 34, Color yellow ... born free [Burkett, Lancaster County Register of Free Negroes, 2].

vi. Peter2, born about 1785, called Peter Haw, Jr., when he registered as a "free Negro" in Lancaster County on 16 January 1809: Age 23, Color yellow ... born free [Burkett, Lancaster County Register of Free Negroes, 5].

vii. Alice, born about 1782, called Alice Harrison Haw when she registered as a "free Negro" in Lancaster County on 16 January 1809: Age 27, Color yellow ... born free [Burkett, Lancaster County Register of Free Negroes, 5].

viii. Betsy, born about 1780, registered as a "free Negro" in Lancaster County on 18 June 1805: Age 25, Color yellow ... born free [Burkett, Lancaster County Register of Free Negroes, 2]. She was the mother of William2 and Milley Haw (wife of William Jones). William2 Haw married Fanny Toulson, 8 January 1827 Northumberland County bond, William Toulson security.

 

HAYNES/ HINES FAMILY

1.    Anne Haynes, born say 1682, was living in Middlesex County, Virginia, on 6 March 1703/4 when Lt. Col. John Grymes, churchwarden of Christ Church Parish, informed the court that she had two "Mulatto bastard Children." She did not deny the fact, and the court ordered that she receive forty lashes [Orders 1694-1705, 545]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. William Hines, one of the "Chief Men" of the Nottoway Indians who were living in present-day Southampton County, Virginia, on 6 August 1735 when they sold 400 acres of their land on the north side of the Nottoway River [Surry County DB 8:550].

ii. Solomon, born say 1745, a "Mulatto man" who ran from James Srosby in October 1768 according to an ad placed by his master in the 3 November 1768 issue of the Virginia Gazette [Windley, Runaway Slave Advertisements, 1:66].

iii. Patsy Haynes, married Absalom Bass, 15 January 1794 Granville County bond with Benjamin Bass surety. He was head of a Granville County household of 7 "other free" in 1800.

iv. Melethan Hines, married Isaac Anderson, 28 September 1800 Granville County bond, Peter Chaves bondsman. Isaac was head of a Granville County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:545], 4 in 1810 [NC:904], 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:3], and 3 in 1830 [NC:29]. His wife Melethan was living at the age of seventy-five in the household of William Evans in 1850 [NC:104].

v. Nancy Hines, married Hardy Bass, 23 December 1788 Granville County bond, Reuben Bass bondsman. Hardy was head of a Granville County household of 4 "other free" in 1800.

vi. Polly Hines, married Reuben Bass, 23 December 1788 Granville County bond, Hardy Bass bondsman. Reuben was head of a Wake County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [NC:753].

vii. Daniel Hines, head of a Duplin County, North Carolina household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [NC:644].

viii. Isam Hains, head of a Rowan County, North Carolina household of 1 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1810 [NC:336].

ix. Charles Hines, "free negro" head of a Fairfax County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:263].

 

HAYS FAMILY

Members of the Hays family in North Carolina were

1     i. Isaac, born say 1730.

ii. Jacob, born 17 November 1736 if he was the "Mulatto" boy named Jacob (no last name recorded) who was bound apprentice to John Todd by the Onslow County court on 6 April 1743 [Minutes 1734-49, fol. 38]. He was taxable in Bladen County on 9 head of cattle and 3 horses in 1778 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, II:102] and head of an Onslow County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:197] and 7 in 1800 [NC:14].

iii. Samuel, born say 1740, taxable with his wife Susannah in Constable Daniel Harris' list for Fishing Creek District of Granville County, North Carolina, in 1761 [CR. 044.701.19].

 

1.    Isaac Hayes, born say 1730, was a "Molato" taxable on himself, John Hayes, (his wife?) Eliza Hayes and Hannah Hayes in Bladen County in 1770. In 1771 and 1772 Samuel Freeman was also a taxable in his household. Isaac was a "Free Negro" taxable on two adults, one Boy and two females in 1774; taxable on himself, one Black male and one Black female in 1776; and taxable on 160 acres, four horses and two cows in 1778 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:24, 76, 91, 124; II:51, 81, 102, 105]. He may have been the father of

i. John, born say 1755, taxable in the household of (his father?) Isaac Hayes in Bladen County from 1770 to 1772. Perhaps his wife was Hannah Hayes, another taxable in Isaac's Bladen County household [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:24, 76, 91]. He was head of a Brunswick County household of one white male 16 or over, three under 16, and four white females in 1790 [NC:189], 7 "other free" in 1800 [NC:14] and 7 "other free" and 1 white woman in 1810 [NC:222].

ii. Jacob, taxable in Bladen County on 9 head of cattle and 3 horses in 1778 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, II:102]. He was head of an Onslow County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:197] and 7 in 1800 [NC:14].

iii. William, born before 1776, head of a Sampson County household of 2 "free colored" persons, a man and woman over forty-five years of age in 1820 [NC:282].

iv. Charles, born say 1797, head of a Brunswick County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:236], and 3 "free colored" in Cumberland County in 1820 [NC:168].

v. Peter, head of a Pendleton District, South Carolina household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [SC:43].

vi. Esther, born 1776-1794, head of a New Hanover County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:221].

 

Members of the Hays family in Virginia were

i. Delphia, head of an Essex County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:198].

ii. David, head of a Pendleton County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:1111].

 

HEARN FAMILY

Members of the Hearn family were

1     i. Ephraim, born about 1745.

ii. James Harn, alias Harringham, a "Negro or Mulatto" indentured to the Peachey family of Richmond County in July 1763 when he ran away according to an ad William Peachey placed in the 4 November 1763 issue of the Virginia Gazette [Virginia Gazette (Royle edition)].

iii. Francis, a "Mulatto" bound as an apprentice cabinet maker to James Tyrie in York County on 19 July 1785 [Deeds 1777-91, 274].

 

1.   

Ephraim Hearn, born about 1745, enlisted in the 1st Virginia Regiment in January or February 1778 and served until the regiment was taken prisoner in Charleston in May 1780. They were placed on board prison ships until the general exchange in 1781 according to an affidavit by Colonel Mennis on 22 March 1796 when Ephraim received bounty land [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Hern, Ephraim, Digital Collections, LVA]. He was called a "free mulatto soldier" in an ad in the Virginia Gazette of 15 January 1785. A young slave girl was harbored by the slaves of a Mr. Burwell of Gloucester County. The executor of the estate reported that Ephraim said that she belonged to Benjamin Branch of Chesterfield at whose house he saw her when on his march from Petersburg to Richmond in 1781 [Virginia Gazette or American Advertiser (Hayes); http://www2.vcdh.virginia.edu/gos/explore.html]. He was a "man of colour" about eighty-four years old on 8 August 1829 when he made a declaration in Gloucester County court to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution. He was a weaver living with his wife Molly (more than sixty years old) and a twenty-year-old daughter Betsy [NARA, S.38020, M804-1242, frame 0662]. He was taxable in Gloucester County in 1787, taxable on a horse in 1789, a "mulatto" taxable on 2 tithes in 1806, 1811, and 1812, a "negroe" taxable with his unnamed wife in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1799; 1800-20], and head of a Gloucester County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:657]. He was the father of

i. Peter, born say 1785, "son of Ephraim," a taxable "negroe" in Gloucester County from 1815 to 1820 [Personal Property Tax List 1800-20].

ii. ?Jane, emancipated by Overton Cosby by deed proved in Middlesex County on 22 December 1800 [Orders 1799-1803, 241], a "free negro" taxable on a 2-wheeled chair in Middlesex County in 1810 [PPTL, 1800-20, frames 244, 272].

iii. Betsy, born about 1809, twenty years old in 1829.

 

HEATH FAMILY

1.    Sarah Heath, born say 1715, was a white woman living in Washington Parish, Westmoreland County, Virginia, on 1 April 1741 when the grand jury presented her and William Kayton (Caton), a "Mulatto," for "Cohabiting Together (and having Sundry Children) under pretence of man and wife" [Orders 1739-43, 100, 114a]. They may have been the ancestors of

i. Aggy, head of a Petersburg Town household of 3 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:128a].

ii. Lewis, head of a Petersburg Town household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:122b].

 

HENDERSON FAMILY

1.    Jemima Henderson, born say 1751, was taxable in the Loudoun County household of Nicholas Minor in 1767 [Sparacio, Loudoun County Tithables 1758-1769, 52]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Phillis, born say 1770, mother of Nancy Henderson, born about 1791, who registered in Amelia County on 27 October 1831: a free woman of color, about forty years of age, about five feet one and a half inches high, dark complexion...born free, daughter of Phillis Henderson, a free woman of color [Henderson, Nancy (F, 40): Free Negro Register, 1831, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

ii. Usly, born say 1775, mother of Mary Ann Henderson who registered in Amelia County in February 1831: a free woman of color of dark complexion, aged about 25 years, about five feet 1 inch high, daughter of Usley Henderson a free woman of color. Usley a free woman of color of dark complexion, about 5 feet high [Henderson, Mary Ann (F, 25): Free Negro Register, 1831, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

iii. Jesse, head of a Frederick County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:543].

iv. Milly, head of a Burke County, North Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:316].

 

HEDGEPETH FAMILY

Members of the Hedgepeth family were

1     i. Peter, born say 1755.

ii. Hulin, head of a Wake County, North Carolina household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:768]. He may have been named for the Hulin family.

iii. James, head of a Wake County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:768]. He married Delilah Tabourn, 15 July 1797 Granville County, North Carolina marriage, William Mitchell bondsman.

 

1.    Peter Hedgepeth, born say 1755, enlisted in Yarboro's Company in the 10th North Carolina Regiment as a musician in 1781 for 12 months and was discharged on 7 May 1782 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1083]. He was head of a Wake County, North Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1790. He was living in Wake County on 21 March when he gave William Fearel power of attorney to collect his final settlement for his service in the Revolution [NCGSJ X:235]. He purchased land in Wake County from Thomas Tabourn by deed proved in September 1791 Wake County court [Haun, Wake County Court Minutes, II:535]. He may have been the father of

i. Bythea, married William Mitchell, 11 August 1796 Granville County bond, Darling Bass bondsman.

ii. Patty, married Pomphrey Taborn, 24 December 1801 Wake County bond, Peter Hedspeth bondsman.

iii. Bartlett, born before 1776, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:150] and 12 in 1830 [NC:349]..

iv. Robert, born 1776-1794, head of a Halifax County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:151].

v. Stephen, born 1776-1794, head of a Halifax County household of 7 "free colored" in 1830 [NC:314].

 

HEWLETT FAMILY

1.    Rebecca Hulet, born say 1717, was presented by the York County court in June 1738 for not listing herself as a tithable. She was called the "friend" of Morris Evans in his 18 February 1739/40 York County will by which he left a mare and foal to Elizabeth Hulet, left his bed, furniture, and two cows to Rebecca and left furniture and three head of cattle to his son Morris. He also left a boat and cart for the use of Rebecca and his son Morris as long as they "live and agree together." He appointed Rebecca and Morris his executors. She was living in York County on 15 November 1742 when a suit brought against her by John Sampson was dismissed. Sarah Hopson (Hobson) testified on Rebecca's behalf [W&I 18:414, 427, 558-9; 19:131, 132]. She was probably the ancestor of

i. Elizabeth, who was mentioned in the York County will of Morris Evans.

ii. Miguiel Hewlett, head of a Richmond City household of 2 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:367].

iii. George Hewlett, head of a Chesterfield County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:70/1062].

 

HEWSON/ HUSON FAMILY

1.    William Hewson, born say 1750, and his wife Mary were living in Charles Parish, Elizabeth City County, Virginia, on 6 September 1772 when their son Charles was baptized [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 105]. In March 1777 William was paid by the York County estate of Anthony Robinson for weaving thirteen yards of material [WI 22:482]. He was taxable on a tithe in Elizabeth City in 1782, presented in York County for failing to list himself as a tithable in 1783 [Orders 1774-84, 334] and taxable in York County from 1784 to 1799 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 83, 95, 14, 192, 220, 244]. His widow may have been the Mary Huson who was head of a York County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:876]. William was the father of

i. Charles, born 4 August, baptized 6 September 1772, taxable in York County from 1800 to 1812 and a "free Negro" tithable in 1814 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 256, 265, 297, 307, 354, 365, 390, 407].

ii. Anne, born 17 January, baptized 12 March 1775 in Charles Parish.

iii. John, born 22 August 1777, baptized 8 March 1778 in Charles Parish.

iv. Elizabeth, born say 1780, "daughter of William Hughson," married John Combs, 22 December 1800 York County bond, Charles and John Hughson securities.

v. Mary, born 14 February, baptized 28 April 1782 [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 105], registered in York County on 18 June 1827: a bright Mulatto about 45 years of age 5 feet 2-1/2 inches high she has long straight hair...born of free parents in York County [Guardians' Accounts, 1823-46, end of book, Register of Free Negroes, No. 247].

vi. Sarah, born 10 July, "Mulatto" dau. of William and Mary, baptized 22 August 1784 [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 105].

vii. ?Nancy, head of a Petersburg household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:123a].

 

HICKMAN FAMILY

1.    Cloe Hickman, born about 1752, was living in Cumberland County, Virginia, on 24 October 1774 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Southam Parish to bind her "mulattoe" children Betty, Alce, and Hannah to Robert Biscoe [Orders 1774-8, 288]. On 19 November 1788 the Powhatan County court ordered the churchwardens of Southam Parish to bind out her children Joseph and Jesse Hickman [Orders 1777-84, 70]. Cloe registered in Powhatan County on 10 February 1802: age fifty years, Bright Mulattoe, 5 feet 1 inch high, Free born [Estray Book 1800-5, 89]. She was a "F.B." head of a Powhatan County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:5] and a "Mo" listed in Powhatan County in 1813 [PPTL 1787-1825, frame 440]. She was the mother of

2     i. Betty, born say 1770.

ii. Alce, born say 1770, mother of an orphan child Betty Hickman who was bound out by the Powhatan County court to Elizabeth Biscoe on 19 November 1800 [Orders 1798-1802, 360].

iii. Hannah, born say 1772, mother of an orphan child Chloe Hickman who was bound out by the Powhatan County court to Elizabeth Biscoe on 19 November 1800 [Orders 1798-1802, 360].

iv. Joseph, married Polly Lyon, daughter of Phebe Lyon, 11 June 1800 Powhatan County bond. Polly was a "F. B." listed in Powhatan County in 1813 [PPTL 1787-1825, frame 440]. She registered in Powhatan County on 16 January 1823: Age: 45; Color: Dark Brown; Stature: 5'4-1/2"; Born Free [Register of Free Negroes, no. 100].

v. Jesse, born about 1780, a "Molatto" taxable in Chesterfield County from 1805 to 1810 [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frames 618, 660, 717, 753, 799], security for the 17 December 1812 Powhatan County marriage of "free Negroes" James Henderson and Anna Maria Holt. Jesse registered in Powhatan County on 16 June 1830: Age: 50; Color: yellow; Stature: 5'8-1/3"; Born Free in Powhatan County [Register of Free Negroes, no. 237].

vi. ?Judith, still a minor on 18 April 1798 when Cloah Hickman brought a suit for her in Powhatan County court against Davis and Jacob Jackson for trespass, assault and battery. Judith agreed to dismiss the case on 20 February 1800 [Orders 1798-1802, 67, 201, 205].

 

2.    Betty Hickman, born about 1766, "mulattoe" daughter of Cloe Hickman, was bound to Robert Biscoe of Cumberland County on 24 October 1774. She sued (her brother) Joseph Hickman for 1 pound/ 15 shillings in Powhatan County court on 17 December 1800 [Orders 1798-1802, 371, 440]. She registered in Powhatan County on 10 February 1802: Age Thirty six, Bright Mulattoe, 5 feet 3 inches, Free born [Estray Book 1800-5, 89]. She apparently married Tim Mosby, slave of Littleberry Mosby, who she emancipated on 21 July 1803. He registered in Powhatan County on 7 September 1835: Age: 70; Color: black; Stature: 5'10"; Emancipated by Elizth Hickman by deed dated 21 July 1803 [Powhatan County Free Negro Register, no.369; Orders 1802-4, 330]. They were probably the parents of

i. Charles, born about 1784, registered in Powhatan County on 10 February 1802: age Eighteen years, Dark Mulattoe, 5 feet 9-1/4 inches, Free born [Estray Book 1800-5, 89]. He was taxable in Chesterfield County from 1809 to 1815 [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frames 753, 799; 1812-27, frames 83, 206].

ii. Patty1 Hickman, daughter of Tim Mosby, married Charles Coy, "free Negroes," 4 October 1809 Powhatan County bond.

iii. Nancy, daughter of Elizabeth Hickman, married John Frayser, 11 December 1809 Powhatan County bond.

 

Other members of the family were

i. Winney, mother of Judith Hickman who was bound by the Powhatan County court to Samuel Steger on 21 April 1796 and an illegitimate child Cloe Hickman who was bound to Thomas Gordon on 15 September 1796 [Orders 1794-8, 222, 283].

ii. Narcissa, counted in the list of "free Negroes" for Chesterfield County in 1813 [PPTL 1812-21, frame 83].

iii. Patsy2, born about 1807, a seventeen-year-old "free Girl of Colour" bound to Mrs. Eleanor McIntyre until the age of eighteen by the Cumberland County, North Carolina court on 12 June 1824 [Minutes 1823-35].

 

HICKS FAMILY

Members of the Hicks family were

i. Micajah, born 4 July 1754 according to his 27 May 1829 declaration for a Revolutionary War pension in Orange County, North Carolina. His apprentice indenture was canceled in Sussex County on 18 October 1770, and the court ordered the churchwardens of Albemarle Parish to bind him out to another master (no race or parent indicated) [Orders 1770-76, n.p.]. He may have been the son of Sarah Hicks who was presented by the grand jury of Sussex County on 16 May 1760 for having an illegitimate child [Orders 1757-61, 326]. He married Mary Dines by 15 September 1790 Chatham County bond, Micajah Hicks and J. Smith bondsmen. He was head of a Chatham County household of 4 "other free" in 1800. He was about seventy years old on 29 October 1831 when he appeared in Guilford County court to apply for a pension for his service in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted in Lewisburg, Franklin County, for three years, was placed in the 1st Regiment, sent to South Carolina and taken prisoner. He enlisted again when he returned to North Carolina. He had a wife of about fifty-seven years of age and no children living with him. His widow Mary, aged eighty-six years old, was living in Wilkes County on 12 September 1843 when she made a declaration to obtain his pension. She stated that they were married 10 December 1780 in Chatham County on the Tar River. Her husband died on 30 December 1837. Mary died in 1853 and their son Alfred applied for a survivor's pension on 7 August 1857 [NARA, W.7738, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/22772692]. In 1840 Mary was head of a Martin's District, Wilkes County, North Carolina household of 6 "free colored" and a white man aged 40-50, and Alfred Hicks was head of a Wilkes County household of 4 "free colored."

1     ii. Jemima, born say 1768.

iii. Lewis, born about 1769, received one of the "Certificates Granted to free Negroes & Mulattoes" in Sussex County, Virginia, on 3 November 1824: free born, dark brown complexion, 5'9" tall, aged 55 [Certificates Granted to Free Negroes & Mulattoes 1800-50, no. 494].

2     iv. Winnie, born say 1772.

v. Charlotte, born say 1773, married Shadrack Demery, 8 February 1794 Southampton County bond, Aaron Heathcock (Haithcock) surety.

vi. Lurany, born say 1773, married Charles Haithcock, 13 December 1794 Greensville County bond.

vii. Herbert, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:150] and 3 in 1830. John Toney was ordered bound apprentice to him by the 20 May 1822 Halifax County court.

viii. Sally, a poor child living in Sussex County on 15 June 1786 when the court ordered the overseers of the poor on the southside of the Nottoway River in district 3 to bind her to John Speris [Orders 1786-91, 31].

ix. James, born about 1784, a "FN" taxable in Sussex County from 1809 to 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1812, frames 750, 782, 816, 838]. He registered in Petersburg on 6 January 1818: James Hix a free man of Color, brown Complection, thirty four years old, born free of Indian mother p. cert. from Sussex County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 891].

x. Jesse, born say 1784, head of a Petersburg Town household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:124b].

xi. Amy, born about 1790, registered in Sussex County on 4 March 1820: brown complexion, 5'4", free born, 30 years old [Certificates granted to Free negroes & mulattoes, no.386].

xii. Isham, a "FN" taxable in Sussex County in 1810 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1812, frame 782].

 

1.    Jemima Hicks, born say 1762, was the mother of Littleberry Hicks, a "poor child" (no race indicated) who was bound out in Southampton County on 11 March 1784 [Orders 1778-84, 383]. She was the mother of

i. Littleberry, born say 1782.

ii. ?Phoeby, born about 1783, registered in Southampton County on 30 July 1810: age 27, Dark Mulatto, 5'4", free born in Southampton County. She registered again on 29 October 1824 [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, nos. 750, 1515].

iii. ?Kinchen, born about 1789, registered in Southampton County on 30 July 1810: age 21, Mulatto, 5 feet 7 1/4, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 735]. He was a "free Negro" taxable in Southampton County on Lewis Worrell's land in 1812, listed with his wife Sally on Jesse Holt's land in 1813, living on B. Whitfield, Jr.'s land in 1817, living on Jonas Cosby's land in 1820 [Personal Property Tax List 1807-21, frames 292, 319, 419, 580, 671, 695, 794].

iv. ?Jason, born about 1795, a "free Negro" living in Southampton County on William Cutler's land in 1819 and 1820 [Personal Property Tax List 1807-21, frames 689, 792]. He registered in Southampton County on 14 December 1821: age 26, mulatto man, 5'6" high, free born in Southampton County. He registered again on 19 January 1826 and 13 March 1835 and used the Southampton County certificate to register in Logan County, Ohio, in 1837 [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, nos. 1299, 1552; Turpin, Register of Black, Mulatto, and Poor Persons, 11].

 

2.    Winnie Hicks, born say 1772, was living in Warren County, North Carolina, when the court bound her "mulatto" children as apprentices [Minutes 1787-93, 188; WB 5:208, 6:14, 6:153; Kerr, Abstracts of Warren County Will Books]. Her children were

i. Fathey, born about 1786, four-year-old "base born child of Winney Hicks" apprenticed to George Allen in May 1790 [Minutes 1787-93, 130; WB 5:208].

ii. ?Benjamin, born about 1788, no parent or race given, a three-year-old apprenticed to Ralph Neal on 25 August 1791 to be a planter [Minutes 1787-93, 191; WB 6:14].

iii. Winnie, born in February 1792, nine-month-old "mulatto girl" of Winnie Hicks, apprenticed to William Clark on 30 November 1792 [Minutes 1787-93, 247; WB 6:153].

iv. Lizzie, born in February 1792, nine-month-old "mulatto girl" of Winnie Hicks, apprenticed to William Clark on 30 November 1792 [Minutes 1787-93, 247; WB 6:153].

v. Sterling, born 1794, "base born child of Winnie Hicks," bound apprentice to Tabitha Marshall on 27 February 1804 [WB 12:188].

vi. Lewis, born 1792, "8 year old of Winnie Hicks," bound to Tabitha Marshall on 27 February 1804 [WB 12:189].

vii. Parthena, born about 1800, "base born child of color of Winnifred Hicks," bound to Edmond Kimbell on 27 February 1804 [WB 12:215].

viii. Nancy, born in June 1801, "base born child of colour" of Winniford Hicks, bound to Richard Tinstall on 27 February 1804 [WB 12:207].

 

HILL FAMILY

Two members of the Hill family born before 1750 were

1     i. Hannah, born say 1736.

ii. Joe, born say 1740, a "free mulatto" living in York or Hampton when Samuel Garlick of King William County advertised in the 1 November 1783 issue of the Virginia Gazette and Weekly Advertiser that his son Sam, a "mulatto fullow," had run away [(Nicolson & Prentis), cited by http://www2.vcdh.virginia.edu/gos/explore.html].

2     iii. Susanna, born say 1743.

 

1.    Hannah Hill, born say 1736, a "free mulatto," was living in Culpeper County on 18 May 1758 when her son Zachariah was bound out. She may have been the Hannah Hill who obtained a certificate of freedom for her son Harry on 26 January 1802: Hannah Hill has lived with me between fifteen and twenty years during all which time she has been considered as a free Mulatto...the Mother of Harry Hill who has resided some years about Lynchburg. The said Harry Hill has always been considered as a Freeman. Jas Steptoe [Hill, Hannah (F): Free Negro Certificate, 1802, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. Her children were

3     i. Zachariah1, born about 1753.

ii. Henry , born about 1756, obtained a certificate of freedom in Orange County, Virginia court on 24 May 1802: a Mulatto man forty six years old, about five feet eight or nine inches, is free [Orders 1801-3, 290]. He registered in Lynchburg on 10 October 1809: about 44 years of age, 5 feet 8 inches high of light complexion, born free [Free Negro Register, 1805-1813]. He was a "melatto" taxable in Campbell County from 1792 to 1813 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 233, 268, 332, 892] and head of a Campbell County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:854]. There was a Henry Hill, Jr., who was head of a Lynchburg City household of 6 "other free" in 1820, so Henry, Sr., may have been the Henry Hill, age sixty seven, who was living in Franklin County, Ohio, on 10 May 1818 when he applied for a pension for his service in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted in Captain Spence's 7th Virginia Regiment commanded by Colonel Heath at Orange County courthouse for one year in 1777 or 1778 and enlisted again in 1780 in Captain Craig's Regiment commanded by Colonel Campbell for 18 months. He owned a house on a quarter of a town lot and lived with his fifty-four-year-old wife [NARA, S.41639, M804, roll 1275, frame 831 of 1073].

 

2.    Susanna Hill, born say 1743, was the mother of twin "mulatto" boys, Thomas and James, who came to the house of Joseph Wooling of Albemarle County according to the 29 June 1776 issue of the Virginia Gazette. According to the gazette their mother lived with one Thomas Mitchell, a Scottish merchant, and went away with him to Scotland or Lord Dunmore [Headley, 18th Century Newspapers, 164]. Her children were

i. Thomas, born about 1763. He, born before 1776, and Zachariah Hill were heads of a Sullivan County, Tennessee household of 7 "free colored" in 1830.

ii. James, born about 1763, perhaps the Jimmy Hill who was a "free Black" head of a Nottoway County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:1018].

4     iii. ?Zachariah2, born about 1766.

iv. ?Charles, a "Mulatto" taxable in the upper district of Halifax County, Virginia, from 1793 to 1795 [PPTL 1782-1799, frames 469, 507, 570].

5     v. ?Jemima, born about 1767.

 

3.  Zachariah1 Hill, born about 1753, was bound to John Rossan in Culpeper County on 18 May 1758. He was twenty-four years old in 1777 when he complained to the Halifax County, Virginia court that he had been treated as a slave. The court ordered him released [Pleas 9:194]. He was paid for serving in the militia in Halifax County in 1781 [Eckenrode, Virginia Soldiers of the American Revolution, I: 218, citing Executive Communications, 178 (a series of loose manuscripts a the LVA]. He married Sally Mason, "daughter of Thomas Mason," 20 July 1788 Halifax County, Virginia bond, John Jones surety, 31 July marriage by Rev. James Watkins [Minister's Returns, 14]. David Pinn attached his effects in Halifax County but the attachment was dismissed on 22 September 1788 [Pleas 1788-9, 1]. Zachariah was bondsman for the 3 December 1790 Caswell County marriage bond of Patrick Mason and Patsy Going. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in the southern district of Halifax County, Virginia, from 1806 to 1812 [PPTL, 1800-12, frames 521, 629, 682, 804, 949, 1032]. He and Thomas Hill were heads of a Sullivan County, Tennessee household of 7 "free colored" in 1830. His children may have been

i. William, born 1776-94, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 2 "free colored" males in 1820 [NC:150].

ii. Samuel, born 1794-1806, head of a Caswell County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:62].

 

4.    Zachariah2 Hill, born about 1766, was a "FN" taxable in the northern district of Campbell County in 1814 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frame 928]. He registered in Bedford County on 27 January 1824: aged 58, Dark Mulatto, 5 feet 9 inches high, Born free. Perhaps his wife was Sally Mason who registered the same day: aged 50, Dark Mulatto, 4 feet 11 inches high, Born free [Register of Free Negroes 1820-60, p.6]. He was the father of

i. Nicey, "daughter of Zacker Hill," married Alexander Moss, "people of Colour," 16 November 1814 Campbell County bond with Drury Moss as bondsman [Marriage Bonds & Consents, 1782-1853, M-P, frame 485].

 

5.    Jemima Hill, born about 1767, "free Black" head of a Bedford County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:464]. She registered in Bedford County on 25 August 1812: Mima Hill, aged 45, Dark Mulatto, 5'2", Born free [Register of Free Negroes 1820-60, p.11]. She was the mother of

i. Harry, born about 1796, registered in Bedford County on 28 June 1824: son of Mima, Light Mulatto, 5 feet 7-1/2 inches high, Born free [Register of Free Negroes 1820-60, p.6].

 

Members of a Hill family in Isle of Wight County were

i. Elizabeth, born about 1740, registered in Petersburg on 5 August 1805: a light colourd Mulatto woman, five feet two inches high, supposed sixty to seventy years old, born free in Isle of Wight County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 351]. She may have been the mother of

ii. Charles, Sr., born say 1744, a "free Negro" taxable in Isle of Wight County from 1783 to 1805: taxable on a slave named Cate over the age of sixteen in 1783; taxable on 3 horses and 5 cattle in 1786; exempt from tax on his person in 1804 and 1805 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1810, frames 33, 65, 79, 103, 121, 198, 215, 261, 316, 379, 408, 447, 512, 581, 601, 621, 638, 698] and a "free Negro" head of an Isle of Wight household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:5].

iii. Charles, Jr., a "free Negro" head of an Isle of Wight household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:5].

 

Other members of the family were

i. Elizabeth, an Indian servant freed with her son David by their master Richard Bell in Princess Anne County on 20 March 1748/9 for "good services and the good will I bear my servant" [DB 1747-55, 96-7].

ii. Elizabeth, the mother of an unnamed female child (one year and three months old) who was bound to Samuel Woods by the Rowan County, North Carolina court on 4 August 1774 until the age of thirty-one [Minutes 1773-77, 14].

iii. Caleb, born about 1749, enlisted for 18 months in the Revolution from King William County on 8 September 1780 and was sized about the same time: age 31, 5'7" high, born in King & Queen County, yellow complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.27)]. This was probably his second tour of service since Major Holt Richeson (of King William County) wrote an affidavit for a Caleb Hill that he enlisted in December 1776 in the 15th Regiment and served his time of three years [Hill, Caleb: Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Digital Collection, LVA].

iii. Henry, born about 1756, obtained a certificate of freedom in Orange County, Virginia court on 24 May 1802: a Mulatto man forty six years old, about five feet eight or nine inches, is free [Orders 1801-3, 290]. He registered in Lynchburg on 10 October 1809: about 44 years of age, 5 feet 8 inches high of light complexion, born free [Free Negro Register, 1805-1813]. He was a "melatto" taxable in Campbell County from 1792 to 1813 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 233, 268, 332, 892] and head of a Campbell County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:854].

iv. Jack, born about 1776, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 12 December 1808: thirty two years old, yellow complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, nos. 78, 209, 318].

v. Peter, "free Negro" head of a Sussex County household of 15 "other free" in 1810.

vi. Charles, head of a Loudoun County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:238].

vii. Goodwin, head of a Charles City household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:959].

viii. Thomas, head of a Westmoreland County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:696].

ix. Joseph, head of an Eastern District, Monongalia County household of 10 "free colored" in 1830 [VA:349].

x. William, summoned by the Hampshire County, Virginia court on 17 September 1796 to show cause why his children should not be bound out [Horton, Hampshire County Minute Book Abstracts, 1788-1802, 24].

 

HILLIARD FAMILY

1.    Lydia Hilliard, born say 1685, was the white woman servant of the Reverend St. John Shropshire on 25 April 1705 when she was convicted by the Westmoreland County court of having a "mulatto" child by a "Negro man." She was the servant of William Munro of Washington Parish on 8 March 1706 when he complained to the court that he had maintained her "Mulatto" child for two years and that the Reverend St. John Shropshire refused to release the child to him [Orders 1698-1705, 257; 1705-21, 22, 27a]. Lydia was probably the ancestor of

2     i. Ann, born say 1730.

ii. Sarah, a "mullato" listed in the inventory of the Westmoreland County estate of William Monroe taken on 30 May 1737 [Estate Settlements, Records, Inventories 1723-46, 177].

iii. Daniel, head of a Southampton County, Virginia household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:61].

iv. Jacob, head of a Southampton County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:79].

v. James, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:26], 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:150] and 9 in 1830.

vi. Samuel, head of a Sussex County, Virginia household of 2 "free colored" in 1830.

 

2.    Ann Hilliard, born say 1735, was the servant of Benjamin Ryan on 4 December 1754 when her unnamed son was bound to her master until the age of twenty-one. On 4 March 1756 when the court also bound her son Peter Hilliard to her master until the age of twenty-one [Owen, Granville County Notes]. She was the mother of

i. a son, born before 4 December 1754.

ii. Peter, born 10 December 1755 [Owen, Granville County Notes], a "Malatto" head of a Ninety-Six District, Edgefield County, South Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1790, with his unnamed wife and four children [SC:66]. He recorded a plat for 200 acres on Shaws Creek in Ninety Six District near the South Edisto River on 28 September 1784 [South Carolina Archives, Series S213190, 8:171].

 

HILTON FAMILY

1.    Coffey1 Hilton, born about 1699, was apparently identical to Coffey who was manumitted with his wife Sue by Evan Jones of Kent County, Delaware, in 1720. Jones gave them his farm, an additional 50 acres, a cow, ewe, horse and gun [WB D:50, cited by Williams, Slavery & Freedom in Delaware, 80]. Coffee Hilton purchased 50 acres in Duck Creek Hundred from John Reynolds on 2 December 1725 [DB 9:117]. He sued Robert Butcher, administrator of Robert Butcher, in Kent County court in May 1732, and he was indicted by the court in February 1735 for assault but the person he was supposed to have assaulted was not identified [DSA, RG 3815, dockets 1722-32, frame 604; 3805.003, 1735-79, frame 12]. He was taxable in Duck Creek Hundred from 1729 to 1763, probably considered elderly by 1764 when his name was crossed off the list [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1727-42, frames 351, 357, 362, 368, 379, 395, 405, 419, 468, 483, 513; 1743-67, 22, 56, 85, 140, 169, 184, 198, 228, 244, 261, 291, 314, 344, 353, 381, 395, 426]. On 24 December 1754 he confessed in Kent County court that he owed Thomas Green 60 pounds [RG 3815.031, 1754-7, frame 132]. On 26 August 1755 he sold 50 acres called Coffes Purchase on the north side of Frenchmans Branch of Duck Creek and another 50 acres called Cristiana to Nicholas Lockerman for 70 pounds [DB O:310], and on 19 March 1771 he confessed judgment in Kent County court of 90 pounds to Caesar Rodney, trustee of the Land Office of Kent County [RG 3815.031, 1769-71, frame 423]. The sheriff sold approximately 153 acres of his land on Frenchmans Branch to merchant Vincent Lockerman, Sr., of Dover to satisfy the 90 pound judgment on the property [DB T:97]. He was seventy-two years old on 11 September 1771 when he petitioned (signing) the Kent County court saying that he had raised his grandson John, son of his deceased son John, since the age of five, and now that he was sixteen and able to help his grandfather, he had been bound out as an apprentice to Charles Cahoon. The court dismissed the case [DSA, RG 3805, MS court papers, September 1771 Petition]. He was the father of

2     i. ?Coffee2, born say 1722.

ii. ?Phillis, indicted by the Kent County court in May 1750 for felony but not found by the sheriff in August 1750, reported to be deceased in November 1750 court [DSA, RG 3805.002, frames 189, 191, 193].

iii. ?Elizabeth, indicted by the Kent County court in May 1750 for felony, case dismissed in November 1752 when she was said to have runaway [DSA, RG 3805.002, frames 189, 193, 196, 198, 204, 208, 212].

iv. ?George1, born say 1727, a "labourer" of Duck Creek Hundred who confessed in Kent County court in February 1748 to being the father of an illegitimate female child by Elizabeth Butcher. Cuffee Hilton was his security to support the child. He had an illegitimate male child by Elizabeth in 1752 for which Thomas Green was his security to support the child [DSA, RG 3805, MS case papers, November 1748 indictments; RG 3805.002, frames 213, 214, 219, 224]. He was taxable in Duck Creek Hundred from 1748 to 1777 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1743-67, frames 56, 85; 1768-84, frames 23, 26, 66, 220, 256, 269, 299]. He was head of a Kent County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:17] and 9 in New Castle County in 1810 [DE:301].

v. ?Emanuel, taxable in Duck Creek Hundred from 1748 to 1774, a "Free Negroe" in Dover Hundred from 1781 to 1783 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1743-67, frames 56, 85, 140, 354, 381, 395, 427, 490, 518, 532, 534, 566; 1768-84, frames 23, 26, 66, 74, 107, 119, 180, 220, 500, 540, 580].

vi. John, born say 1733, died about 1760 when his son John was five years old.

 

2.    Coffee2 Hilton, born say 1722, was taxable in Duck Creek Hundred from 1762 to 1781, called "Coffee Hilton, Jr." until 1771, a "N." taxable in 1781 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1743-67, frame 345, 354, 381, 395, 426, 436, 490, 518, 550, 565; 1768-84, frames 23, 26, 66, 74, 107, 119, 180, 220, 299, 371, 523]. He was head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:40]. He may have been the father of

3     i. George2, Jr., born say 1755.

ii. John, born say 1757, in the list of taxables in Duck Creek Hundred in 1778 with his tax crossed off [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1767-84, frame 337], probably identical to John Hilton who was head of a New Castle County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:282].

iii. Charles, a "Free Negro" taxable in Dover Hundred in 1785 [RG 3535, Levy List 1727-1850, reel 4, frame no. 108], a "man of Colour" taxable in Harrison County, Virginia, from 1813 to 1818 [PPTL 1809-18, frames 193, 219, 292, 384, 407].

iv. James, head of a New Castle County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:207] and 7 in 1810 [DE:178].

v. William1, taxable in Harrison County, Virginia, from 1805 to 1818: taxable on 3 tithes in 1805 and 1806, 2 tithes and a horse in 1807, a tithe and 2 horses in 1809, called a "man of Colour" starting in 1813 [PPTL 1785-1808, frames 425, 494, 517; 1809-18, frames 28, 69, 84, 407].

 

3.    George2 Hilton, born say 1755, was taxable in Duck Creek Hundred from 1774 to 1777 and a "N." taxable in Duck Creek Hundred in 1781, a "Free Negro" in Dover Hundred from 1786 to 1788 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1768-84, frames 220, 256, 269, 299, 523; 1785-97, frames 46, 108 111]. He was taxable in Harrison County, Virginia (now West Virginia), from 1803 to 1818: taxable on 1 tithe and 3 horses in 1803, 2 tithes in 1805, 3 tithes and 2 horses in 1806, called a "man of Colour" starting in 1813 [PPTL 1785-1808, frames 366, 425, 494, 517; 1809-1818, frames 28, 69, 84, 123, 193, 219, 292, 317, 384, 407]. He may have been the father of

i. Mark, taxable in Harrison County, Virginia, from 1811 to 1818: taxable on a horse in 1812, called a "man of Colour" starting in 1813 [PPTL 1809-18, frames 84, 123, 193, 219, 292, 384, 407].

ii. William2, Jr., a "man of Colour" taxable on a horse in Harrison County, Virginia, from 1813 to 1818 [PPTL 1809-18, frames 193, 219, 292, 384, 407].

 

HITCHENS FAMILY

1.    Major1 Hitchens, born say 1700, was head of a Northampton County, Virginia household of four tithables in 1733 and 1744 and head of a household of four free tithables and two slaves, Nan and Sue, from 1737 to 1744 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 232, 237, 262, 274, 280, 312, 325, 330, 362]:

Master of family tithable names nubr.

Major Hitchens : Tamar, Edward and Anne Hutchins nann & Sue negros 6

Major may have been the son of Mary Hitchens, "Mr. Robinson's wench," who was presented by the churchwardens in Accomack County for having a bastard child about 1700 [Orders 1697-1703, 96]. On 12 May 1747 the Northampton County court presented him for intermarrying or cohabiting with a "mulatoe" woman and presented Siner Bennett alias Hitchens for cohabiting with Major Hitchens, a "mulatoe man." The King's attorney discontinued the suit against Major on 10 June 1747 and discontinued the suit against Siner on 9 September 1747 [Orders 1742-8, 402-3, 422, 429, 445, 457]. He was probably the father of

i. Edward, born say 1716, tithable in Major's household in 1737. He married Tamer Smith, a white woman, before 10 October 1738 when the sheriff was ordered to take her into custody, keep her in the county jail for six months without bail, and to discharge after she paid a fine of ten pounds currency as punishment for marrying Edward Hitchens, a "Mulatto man" [Orders 1732-42, 334; Deal, Race and Class, 216].

ii. Anne, born say 1720, tithable in Major's household from 1737 to 1744, presented on 8 November 1737 for bastard bearing. Major Hitchens paid her fine [Orders 1732-42, 284, 291].

iii. James, born say 1722, tithable in Major's household in 1738 and 1743.

iv. Major2, Jr., born say 1724, tithable in Major's household in 1740 and 1741 and in Edward Hitchen's household in 1743.

v. Jared, born say 1726, tithable in Major's household in 1743 and 1744. He was called Garret Hitchens, a "mulato," on 12 May 1747 when the court presented Mary Filby for intermarrying and cohabiting with him. The case was dismissed by the King's attorney on 12 August 1747 [Orders 1742-8, 402-3, 429, 444].

 

Northumberland County

1.    Sarah Hutchins, born say 1690, was the servant of Madam Elizabeth Rawls on 21 June 1710 when she was presented by the Northumberland County court for having a "Molatto" child who was called a "Negro bastard" on 18 August 1710 when she failed to appear in court [Orders 1699-1713, pt. 2, 703]. She may have been the ancestor of

2     i. Nancy, born about 1769.

 

2.    Nancy Hitchens, born about 1769, was called Nancy Hickings on 13 June 1805 when the Lunenburg County court ordered that her children Nancy, Betty and Polly be bound to John H. Craddock. The court rescinded the order the following month [Orders 1802-5, fol. 200, 206]. She was called Nancy Hitchens when she registered as a free Negro in Lunenburg County on 9 June 1823: about 54 years, bright Mulatto Complexion, about five feet high ... tolerable straight hair, rather grey, born free. Her children were

i. Nancy Kelly, born about 1796, registered in Lunenburg County on 9 June 1823: daughter of Nancy Hitchens about 27 years of Age, about five feet three inches high, dark complexion.

ii. Betsy Holmes, born about 1797, registered on 9 June 1823: daughter of Nancy Hitchens, about 26 years of age, about 5 feet 3 inches high, dark Complexion.

iii. Colley Thomas, born about 1798, registered on 9 June 1823: daughter of Nancy Hitchens, about twenty five years old, light brown Complexion, about five feet 3 inches high.

iv. Jesse, born about 1801, called son of Nancy Hickings on 11 February 1802 when the Lunenburg County court ordered the overseers of the poor to bind him to John Robertson [Orders 1802-5, fol. 6]. He registered in Lunenburg County on 11 November 1822: about 21 years of age, 5 feet 7 inches high, dark brown Complexion.

v. Rebecca Lawson Hitchings, born about 1808, registered on 14 August 1827: a daughter of Nancy Hitchings, about 5 feet high, about 19 years of age, brown complexion, bushy head [WB 5, after page 89, nos. 20-23, 51].

 

HITER FAMILY

1.    Thomas Hiter/ Hoyter, born say 1700, was one of the "Chief men of the Chowan Indians" who sold thousands of acres in Chowan County by a total of thirteen deeds signed between 9 January 1733 and 22 November 1734 [Chowan DB W-1, 215-216, 237-239, 247-253]. Another member of the tribe, James Bennett, petitioned the General Assembly on 14 March 1745 complaining that Thomas Hoyter and John Robin sold land they had no right to sell [Saunders, Colonial Records of North Carolina, IV:802]. Thomas Hiter's descendants, perhaps grandchildren were

i. Elizabeth, head of a Currituck County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:21] and 4 in 1810 [NC:89].

ii. Abraham, head of a Currituck County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:149] and 3 in 1810 [NC:89]. He leased 15 acres in Currituck County from John Lindsey for one ear of corn per year on 13 February 1796 [Deed Book 8].

iii. John, head of a Currituck County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:84].

iv. Asa, head of a Pasquotank County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [NC:902].

v. John, called "John Haul Hiters" in December 1780 when the Pasquotank County court allowed him to be bound as an apprentice to Robert Pendleton to learn the trade of shoemaker. He was probably related to Hezekiah Haul who was bound out the same day and Elisha Hawll who was bound out in March 1781 [Minutes 1777-81, fol. 52b, 54b]. He was head of a Pasquotank County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:902].

vi. Thomas, born before 1776, head of a Pasquotank County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:902] and 4 "free colored" in Camden County in 1820 [NC:38].

 

HOBSON FAMILY

1.    Ann Hobson, born say 1670, was living in Elizabeth City County, Virginia, when she registered the 9 August 1688 birth of her daughter Mary in Charles Parish, York County. Her son William Hobson was called "son of Ann a mulatto" when his birth was registered in Charles Parish in 1696. She was probably related to Richard Hobson whose son Charles Hobson was born in Charles Parish in 1684 and Robert Hobson whose son Armager was born there in 1696 [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 105]. Ann was the mother of

i. Mary, born 9 August 1688, "daughter of Ann of Elizabeth City County."

2     ii. William1, born about 1696.

 

2.    William1 Hobson, born about 1696, was called the son of Ann a "mullatto" when his birth was registered in Charles Parish [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 106; no date but the entry occurs between one dated 18 May 1696 and 13 August 1696]. He may have been the father of

3     i. Charles1, born say 1722.

ii. John1, born say 1740, called "John Hobson, Mulatto," when Jonathan Patteson sued him for a debt of 29 pounds, 8 shillings due from 13 June 1763 in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on 10 June 1765. The sheriff returned on 9 February 1767 that John was not found in the county [Orders 1765, 45, 266, 284].

 

3.    Charles1 Hobson, born say 1722, may have been the Charles Hobson who sued William Teemer in Elizabeth City County court in 1743. His suit against William Smelt for trespass, assault, and battery was dismissed by the court with the agreement of both parties on 20 February 1744/5. On 21 November 1744 he was presented by the court for being a "common Drunkard" [Orders 1731-47, 341, 403, 414, 419, 422]. Perhaps his wife was the Sarah Hobson who was sued in York County for trespass upon the case by John Sampson in a suit which was dismissed on 16 August 1742 when the parties reached agreement. She testified for Rebecca Hulet in John Sampson's case against Rebecca [W&I 19:121, 132]. Charles was the owner of a bag of meal, valued at 15 shillings, which was stolen from the mill house of John Howard in Charles Parish by a slave belonging to Miles Cary, Gentleman. The trial was held in York County on 29 August 1763 [Judgments & Orders 1763-5, 69]. He was living in James Berry's household on 16 November 1772 when the York County court presented James for not listing him as a tithable [Judgments & Orders 1772-4, 151]. He leased land from John Hay by deed acknowledged in York County court on 18 September 1780. On 19 May 1783 the court presented him for not listing himself and his son Amicher (Armager) as tithables and presented him and John Hay for having barbecues and selling liquor. He paid Amicher's tax but was not required to pay tax on himself, probably because he was elderly. And on 17 May 1784 the court presented him and Charles Hopson, Jr., for failing to list their taxable property [Orders 1774-84, 287, 324-5, 334; 1784-7, 1]. Elizabeth Brodie, executor of John Brodie, sued him in Elizabeth City County court on 25 May 1787 for non-payment of a 6 pound, 9 shillings debt from a court judgment against Charles on 24 August 1769. Edward Cuttillo became security for Charles in this case on 24 August 1787. The case abated by the death of the plaintiff [Orders 1784-8, 396, 452, 521]. He was taxable in York County on 3 horses and a slave in 1789 and 2 horses in 1790 but not subject to personal tax [PPTL, 1782-1841, frames 152, 162]. He was the father of

4     i. ?Charles2, born say 1755.

5     ii. ?John2, born say 1761.

6     iii. Armager, born say 1763.

 

4.    Charles2 Hobson, born say 1755, and his wife Sarah were the parents of five children baptized in Charles Parish, York County: John, Mary, Martha, Edward and Charles [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 106, 109]. He was called Charles Hopson, Jr., on 17 May 1784 when the York County court presented him and Charles Hopson, Sr., for failing to list their taxable property [Orders 1774-84; 1784-7, 1]. He was taxable in York County from 1785 to 1813: taxable on a slave in 1788, on 2 free male tithes in 1796, 2 from 1801 to 1804, 2 in 1811 and 1812, and 4 "free Negroes & mulattoes over 16" in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1841, frames 95, 141, 152, 265, 297, 365, 390]. Elizabeth Berry, orphan of Edward Berry chose him as her guardian on 20 June 1808 in York County court. He died before 15 December 1817 when the York County court granted Abram Hopson, John B. Bohannon and Charles Hopson administration of his estate on $600 security [Orders 1803-14, 277; 1815-20, 231]. His children were

i. John3, born 23 September 1777, baptized 25 January 1778, "son of Charles Junr. and Sarah." He was taxable in York County in 1799, called John Hopson, Jr. [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frame 244].

ii. Mary, born 4 November 1779, baptized 5 March 1780, "dau. of Charles Junr., and Sarah."

iii. Martha, born 4 November 1779, "twin with Mary," baptized 5 March 1780, "dau. of Charles Junr. and Sarah." She married Thomas Epps Hobson.

iv. ?Abraham, born say 1782, taxable in York County from 1803 to 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 287, 307, 327, 340, 365, 390] and head of a York County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:876].

v. Edward, born 20 November 1783, baptized 28 March 1784, "son of Charles and Sarah." He was taxable in York County from 1805 to 1807 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 307, 316, 328].

vi. Charles3, born 4 November 1785, baptized 12 March 1786, "Mulatto son of Charles and Sally." He married Betsy Berry, 20 June 1808 York County bond, Abraham Hopson, bondsman. He was head of a York County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:876]. His wife was probably the Elizabeth Hobson, born about 1789, who registered in York County on 21 September 1835: a light mulatto about forty Six Years of age, five feet one & half Inches high, has long black hair, dark Eyes [Free Negro Register, no.391].

 

5.    John2 Hobson, born say 1761, was a soldier who served three years in the 2nd State Regiment and received a discharge on 27 February 1780 which was certified by Captain Augustine Tabb and Lieutenant J. Hardyman on 2 July 1783 [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Hopson, John, Digital Collection, LVA]. He was taxable in York County from 1784 to 1799: taxable on a slave named Sarah in 1785, taxable on a slave in 1788 and 1789, called John Hopson, Sr., in 1799 [PPTL, 1782-1841, frames 89, 141, 172, 192, 220, 244]. He and his wife Mary were living in Charles Parish, York County, when their children James, Nancy and Polly were baptized. Mary was probably the Mary Hopson who was taxable on 1-2 horses in York County from 1800 to 1805 and taxable on a free male tithable in 1803 and 1804 [PPTL, 1782-1841, frames 256, 287, 297, 307].  Their children were

i. James, born 1 August 1783, baptized 14 September 1783, "son of John and Mary" [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 106]. He registered as a "free Negro" in York County on 21 October 1805: a bright Mulatto about 22 years of age 5 feet 7-3/4 Inches high, long curly black Hair, Hazle eyes, thick Eye brows [York County Register, no. 32]. He was head of a York County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:876] and a James Hopson was head of an Elizabeth City County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:185]. He married Elizabeth, the widow of Edward Berry, before 1852 [LVA, York County chancery file 1852-004].

ii. Nancy, born 24 March 1785, baptized 8 May 1785 "Mulatto daughter of John and Mary" [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 106].

iii. Polly, born 10 April 1787, baptized 20 May 1787 in Charles Parish, "Mulatto daughter of John and Mary" [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 106].

 

6.    Armager Hobson, born say 1763, was taxable in John Sclater's York County household in 1785 and taxable in his own household from 1789 to 1792 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 97, 152, 162, 182]. He was married to Mary on 14 November 1785 when their "mulatto" daughter Anne Hopson was born in Charles Parish [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 109]. They were the parents of

i. Anne, born 14 November 1785, baptized 12 March 1786.

 

7.    Thomas Epps Hobson, born about 1768, married Martha Hobson, 20 December 1799 York County bond, Edward Cuttillo bondsman. He and William Epps were sued by the assignee of Jacob Chavis in Lunenburg County court for a debt of 7 pounds on 13 November 1800 [Orders 1799-1801, 112]. In 1802 he was listed as a ditcher with his wife Patsy in a "List of Free Negroes & Mulattoes" on Flat Rock Creek in Lunenburg County [Lunenburg County Free Negro & Slave Records, 1802-1803, LVA]. He was taxable in York County from 1804 to 1812: taxable on a slave in 1811 [PPTL, 1782-1841, frames 297, 307, 327, 340, 354, 365] and head of a York County household of 5 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:890] and 7 "free colored" in Elizabeth City County in 1830. He registered in York County on 19 September 1831: a bright mulatto about 63 years of age 5 feet 7 inches high, black straight hair, very little grey considering his age...a little freckled, his teeth decayed, he is very loquacious and fond of ardent liquors. Born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1831-50, no.301]. Their children were

i. Thomas, born about 1807, registered in York County on 19 September 1831: (son of Thos. Eppes Hopson) bright mulatto 24 years old, 5 feet 10-3/4 inches high, wide face, black eyes, straight hair, large eye-brows, very small beard and walks a little lame [Register, no.303].

ii. John4, born about 1808, registered in York County on 19 September 1831: (son of Thos. Eppes Hopson) a bright mulatto 5 feet 9-1/2 inches high twenty three years old, has long curly hair [Register, no.302].

 

Their descendants in North Carolina were

i. Ginny Hopston, born say 1790, head of a Jones County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:262].

ii. William2 Hopston, born say 1785, head of a Jones County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:261].

 

HODGES FAMILY

1.    Mary Hodges, born say 1725, was living in Henrico County, Virginia, in March 1743/4 when the churchwardens of Henrico Parish were ordered to bind out her "Mulatto" child Aggy. She was the mother of

i. Aggy, bound apprentice in March 1743/4. She was discharged from further servitude to Thomas Baker by the Chesterfield County court in August 1767 [Orders 1767-71, 90].

 

Other members of the Hodges family were

i. Sam, head of a Norfolk County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:793].

ii. Charles, born about 1776, head of a Princess Ann County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:458]. He registered in Princess Anne County on 1 August 1831: 5'8", bright mulatto man, born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1830-62, no. 195].

iii. Airz/ Isaiah(?), head of a Beaufort County, North Carolina household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:9] and 10 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [NC:118].

iv. Peter, head of a Beaufort County, North Carolina household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:118].

v. Edy, head of a Beaufort County, North Carolina household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [NC:118].

 

HOGG FAMILY

1.    Hannah Hogg, born say 1750, the servant of Stephen Phillips, was the mother of "Mulatto" children: Tom, Cary, Bill, and Leah who were ordered brought to court in April 1775 so they could be bound apprentice in Cumberland County, North Carolina [Minutes 1772-76, 41; 1777-82, 79]. Her children were

i. Thomas, born 27 April 1766, head of a Cumberland County household of 4 "other free" in 1800, and 11 in 1810 [NC:607]. He purchased land by deed proved in Cumberland County on 12 April 1805 [Minutes 1805-08]. On 18 June 1808 the court bound Elizabeth Campbell, a two-year-old "orphan of Colour," to him as an apprentice. His heir was probably Lam(?) Hogg, head of a Cumberland County household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:155].

ii. Cary, 23 September 1769.

iii. ?Cader, born say 1772, a "mulatto man" who was released from Angus and William Philips' service in Cumberland County on 16 January 1794 when he proved that the was born free of a white woman [Minutes 1791-97].

iv. Chloe, born say 1773, "daughter to Hannah Hogg," bound to Flora Phillips on 27 July 1786 until October 1791 [Minutes 1784-87], head of a Robeson County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [NC:384]. The 8 October 1799 Robeson County court bound Elizabeth Hogg, a three-year-old girl, to her. She purchased land by deed proved in Robeson County court on 6 October 1802 [Minutes 1797-1806, 84, 221].

v. William, born 15 July 1776.

vi. Leah, born 20 February 1779, mistakenly called daughter of Chloe Hogg on 16 October 1794 when she was set free from her indenture [Minutes 1791-97].

vii. Betsy, born say 1781, head of a Cumberland County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:202]. Her property at 1 Ramsey Street, Fayetteville was ordered to be sold for taxes in 1837 [Minutes 1836-8].

 

HOLLINGER FAMILY

Members of the Hollinger family were

1    i. Barbara, born say 1748.

2    ii. Sally1, born say 1750.

 

1.    Barbara Hollinger, born say 1748, was living in the town of Fredericksburg on 11 February 1783 when her son Edmund bound himself as an apprentice to John Ferneyhough. She was living in Tappahannock in 1800 when her daughter Sarah left the Fredericksburg home of Sarah's brother Edmund to live with her in Essex County. Barbara was deceased by 28 April 1806 when her daughter Sarah returned to Fredericksburg [Fredericksburg City Certificates and Registry of Free Negroes, 1790-1862, 107, 109]. She was the mother of

i. Edmund, probably born about 1767, "son of Barbara Hollinger," bound himself as an apprentice to John Ferneyhough of Fredericksburg to learn coachmaking from 11 February 1783 to 15 December 1788 and received a pass from him on 17 December 1788: Permit the bearer Edmund Hollinger to pass.... 17 December 1788. He registered in Fredericksburg on 10 April 1806: John Hall came before me this day and made oath that Edmund Hollinger served his time with Mr. John Ferneyhough as a free born person and that his mother was for more than thirty years ago considered a free woman. April 10th 1806 [Fredericksburg City Certificates and Registry of Free Negroes, 1790-1862, 109-110]. He was head of a Spotsylvania County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:113b]. He was granted administration of the Fredericksburg estate of Moses Berry on 11 May 1815 [Hustings Court Orders 1812-19, 154].

ii. Henry, born 16 November 1786, "son of Barbary Hollinger," bound to Doctor Mace Clements in Essex County on 21 January 1799 [Orders 1796-9, 483], registered in Fredericksburg on 24 June 1808: Edmund Hollinger made oath that Henry Holinger a Mulatto a brother of his was born free age twenty one years the 16 last November 1807 [Fredericksburg City Certificates and Registry of Free Negroes, 1790-1862, 126].

iii. Sarah2, born about 1787, registered in Fredericksburg on 28 April 1806: Edmund Hollinger made oath that Sarah Hollinger a yellow woman aged about nineteen years is his sister and that their mother was free born to the best of his knowledge and that his sister Sarah lived with him from an infant until six years ago when she went to reside with her mother in Tappanhanhock. After the death of her mother she returned to this town where she has resided until this time [Fredericksburg City Certificates and Registry of Free Negroes, 1790-1862, 107].

iv. Usley, called the sister of Edmund on 28 April 1806 when she testified for the Fredericksburg certificate of freedom of Sarah Hollinger [Fredericksburg City Certificates and Registry of Free Negroes, 1790-1862, 107].

v. James, born 15 September 1789, called the brother of Sally Hollinger when she testified for his certificate in Fredericksburg on 8 May 1811: Fredg. Sally Hollinger of lawful age and a free woman of colour made oath that James Hollinger her brother was born of a free woman and was twenty one years old 15 September 1810 [Fredericksburg City Certificates and Registry of Free Negroes, 1790-1862, 145].

 

2.    Sally1 Hollinger, born about 1750, registered as a free Negro in Essex County on 8 December 1810: born free by certificate of her enrollment by the Comr of the Revenue, dark Mulattoe, about sixty years of age, five feet two and one quarter inch [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.5, no.9]. She was head of an Essex County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:208]. She, Susan, and Judy Hollinger were listed as "free Negroes" in South Farnham Parish, Essex County, in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1819, frame 522]. She may have been the mother of

3    i. Judy, born about 1766.

4    ii. Suckey, born about 1775.

 

3.    Judy Hollinger, born about 1766, registered as a free Negro in Essex County on 8 December 1810: born free by certificate of her enrollment by the Commissioner of Revenue, a bright Mulattoe, about 44 years of age, five feet two and one quarter Inches [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.6, no. 10]. She was head of an Essex County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:208]. She was the mother of

i. Sally, Jr., registered on 8 December 1810: daughter of Judy Hollinger, by affidavit of Sally Hollinger to be born free, dark Mulattoe, 9 years of age, four feet five & 1/4 inches [Register p.6, no.11].

 

4.    Suckey Hollinger, born about 1775, registered as a free Negro in Essex County on 8 December 1810: free born by statement of Thos. Brockenbrough, always passed as a free person, dark Mulattoe, 35 years of age, five feet 5 & 1/2 inches [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.12, no.26]. She was head of an Essex County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:208]. She was the mother of

i. William, born about 1797, registered in Essex County on 8 December 1810: born free, Sucky Hollinger his mother has always passed as a free person, bright Mulattoe, 13 years of age, four feet 3 & 1/2 inches [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.12].

ii. Smith, born about 1800, registered in Essex County on 8 December 1810: born free...son of Sucky Hollinger, dark Mulattoe, ten years of age [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.13, no. 28].

iii. Henry, born about 1802, registered on 8 September 1810: son of Sucky Hollinger, bright Mulatto, 8 years of age, four feet high [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.13, no.28].

iv. Mary, born about 1805, registered on 8 September 1810: daughter of Sucky Hollinger, bright Mulatto, 5 years, 3 feet 3 & 1/4 inches [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p. 13, no. 29].

 

Another member of the family was

i. Janney, born 1777, apparently the daughter of a male member of the family by a slave, registered in Stafford County on 10 September 1807: Stafford County. Janney Hollinger a bright mulatto woman about five feet six inches high and thirty years old was emancipated by the will of Thornton Fitzhugh [Fredericksburg City Certificates and Registry of Free Negroes, 1790-1862, 126].

 

HOLMAN FAMILY

1.    John1 Holman, born say 1740, an Englishman, established himself as a slave trader and merchant on the Rio Pongo River in present-day Guinea about 1764. He had an African mistress named Elizabeth by whom he had five children: John, Samuel, Esther, Elizabeth, and Margaret. He sent his son John, Jr., to school in Liverpool. John, Sr., left West Africa with his family and slaves for Charleston, South Carolina, in January 1790 but had to stay in Georgia until February 1791 until the legislature approved the importation of his slaves into the state. He established a plantation in St. Thomas & St. Dennis Parish in Charleston District where he made his will, proved in July 1792. He freed his mistress Elizabeth and their children and also freed John Cameron and Richard and William Holman who were his children by another African woman. He divided his estate which included fifty-seven slaves, among his children and charged his sons John and Samuel with supporting their mother [Koger, Black Slaveowners, 110-115]. He was the father of

2     i. John2, born about 1768.

ii. Samuel, born say 1770, perhaps the Samuel Holman who married Agnes Mitchel, "free persons of color," on 25 September 1805 in St. Philip's and Michael's Parish, Charleston.

iii. Esther, married James Anderson.

iv. Elizabeth, married Elias Collins.

v. Margaret, married Robert Collins.

vi. William, remained in West Africa where he continued his slave trading operations.

vii. Richard.

viii. John Cameron.

 

2.    John2 Holman, born about 1768, was about sixteen years old in 1784 when he began assisting his father as a slave trader. Within a few years he owned thirteen slaves who he used in his slave-trading operations on the Dambia River. He moved with his father to South Carolina in 1790 and received thirty-seven slaves by his father's will. He operated his father's plantation on the Cooper River in Charleston District until 1798 when he moved to Georgetown District. He rented a plantation in Georgetown District on the Santee River until 1804 when he purchased it for $15,000. He returned to his homeland in Rio Pongo, West Africa in May 1805, leaving his brother Samuel in charge of his plantation which by then consisted of 128 slaves. Samuel mismanaged his brother's estate as well as his own, and they were lost to creditors by 1819 when Samuel joined his brother John in Rio Pongo. John left a will in 1821, calling himself "a Native of Africa" in which he divided his estate between his wife Sally and his nephew Samuel, "both of whom are Natives of Africa" [Koger, Black Slaveowners, 111-118].

 

HOLMES/ HOMES/ HOOMES FAMILY

Members of the Holmes/ Homes/ Hoomes family were

i. William1 Holmes, born about 1710, a "Mulatto" living in Henrico County in August 1744 when he complained to the court that he had not received payment for taking up a runaway Negro slave who belonged to Nicholas Davies of Goochland County [Orders 1737-46, 277]. On 28 February 1755 he was listed as a soldier from King William County in the French and Indian War who had deserted: a mulatto, age 45 years, 5'11" [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy 31:93].

ii. John1 Holmes, born say 1714, a "free Negro" wheelwright and carpenter who indentured himself to Judge Nicholas Trott in South Carolina. Trott sold John Holmes' services to a resident of Savannah Town, but Holmes ran away from him according to the 13 November 1736 edition of the South Carolina Gazette [Wood, Black Majority, 101].

1     iii. Elizabeth Homes/ Hoomes, born say 1717.

iv. Moses Hoomes, a "Negro" who still had time to serve when Patrick Belsches gave the remaining time to his wife Judy Belsches by his 29 December 1763 Louisa County will, proved 10 April 1764 [WB 1:59-62].

v. Duncan, born say 1750, taxable in Louisa County from 1782 to 1806: taxable on 2 horses and 3 cattle in 1782, 2 free males from 1797 to 1799, 2 slaves in 1801, a slave in 1805 and 1806, deceased by 1807 when his estate was taxable on 7 horses [PPTL, 1782-1814]. The Louisa County court granted him administration on the estate of James Chavis on 8 November 1790 [Orders 1790-3, 180]. He sued Joseph Ailstock in Albemarle County court for trespass, assault and battery on 7 May 1799. The suit was dismissed on agreement of the parties on 6 August 1800 [Orders 1798-1800, 215; 1800-1, 116]. He and his wife Sally were counted in a list of free "Mulattoes" in Louisa County about 1802 [Abercrombie, Free Blacks of Louisa County, 20].

2     vi. Milley Homes/ Hoomes, born say 1752.

vii. Polley Homes, head of a Richmond City household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:350].

viii. Amos Hoomes, head of a New Kent County household of 1 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:757].

ix. Sarah Hoomez, head of a Henrico County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:1015].

x. Betsy Hoomez, head of a Henrico County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:1015].

xi. John3, born say 1770, head of a Buckingham County, Virginia household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:804].

xii. Polley, born say 1785, head of a Richmond City household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:350].

 

1.    Elizabeth Homes/ Hoomes, born say 1717, was a "Molatto" presented by the York County court for not listing herself as a tithable on 15 November 1735 and 15 May 1738 [W&I 18:237, 245, 414, 434]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. William2, born about 1740, enlisted in the Revolution for 1-1/2 years while residing in King William County on 2 September 1780: age 40, 5'10-1/2" high, a planter, born in King William County, yellow complexion. He was probably identical to the William Holms who was sized about a year later: age 43, 5'10" high, Negro complexion, farmer, residing in King William County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (pp. 13, 34)].

3     ii. Stephen, born say 1745.

iii. Richard, born say 1751, taxable in King William County on his own tithe and a horse in 1794 (called Richard Hoomes, adjoining Stephen and William Hoomes) [Land Tax List 1782-1832]. He was taxable in Charles City County from 1797 to 1814: taxable on his own tithe and a horse in 1797, on two tithes in 1809, exempt from personal tax in 1811, a "Mulattoe" taxable in 1813 and 1814 [PPTL, 1788-1814], perhaps the Richard Holmes who was head of a Charles City County household of 4 "free colored" in 1830.

iv. Bartholomew, born about 1755, enlisted in the Revolution from King William County in 1778 and was sized  in 1781: age 23, 5'7-1/4" high, yellow complexion, a farmer, born in James City, served in the 15th V.R. [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.79)]. He received an affidavit from Lieutenant Giles Raines of the 15th Regiment that he enlisted on 21 December 1776 and served for three years and a certificate from Captain Samuel Jones of the 11th Regiment that he enlisted on 23 December 1778 and served for the war [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Holmes, Bartlett, Digital Collection, LVA]. He was about sixty four years old on 1 August 1820 when he applied for a pension in Washington County, Maryland, stating that he enlisted in December 1776 and served for a time under Lieutenant Samuel Jones [NARA, S.34926, M804, roll 1313, frame 102 of 947; https://www.fold3.com/image/23390996].

v. William3, born about 1777, taxable in King William County on his own tithe and a horse in 1794 and taxable on his own tithe from 1800 to 1812, listed as a "mulatto" in 1813 [Land Tax List 1782-1832; PPTL 1812-50]. He was a fifty-six-year-old farmer listed with Moses (29) and Peter Hooms (32) in a list of "Free Negroes and Mulattoes" in St. John's Parish, King William County in 1833 [LVA, Auditor of Public Accounts inventory entry no. 757, Reports of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, 1833; transcribed by Selma Stewart].

 

2.    Milley Holmes, born say 1752, was the mother of Tempie Homes who was bound to George Walton by the Prince Edward County court on 18 May 1778. She was probably identical to ____ Hoomes who complained to the court against Walton on 18 March 1781. On 16 December 1782 the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her daughter Suckey Hoomes [Orders 1771-81, part 2, 528, 94; 1782-5, 24]. She was living in Charlotte County on 6 September 1786 when she complained to the court that Thomas Tombs was holding her "Mulatto" child Sally in servitude [Orders 1784-86, 138]. She was a "Black Woman" in the list of "Free Negroes and Mulattoes" in the lower district of Prince Edward County in 1801, with Sukey and Lucy Holms (Black Women) and Archer Holms (a Black boy) at Leonard Sibley's, a laborer in the fields [A List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes in the Lower District Pr. Edward County, in the year Eighteen hu, 1801, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA], head of a Prince Edward County, Virginia household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:572] and a "free Negro" taxable on a horse in the lower district of Prince Edward County from 1809 to 1820 [PPTL 1809-31, frames 4, 28, 50, 72, 126, 296, 356]. Her children were

i. Tempy, born say 1772, a "Black woman" who did washing, spinning and laboring in the field for Elizabeth Ligon with her children Milly, Sally, Mima and Davy Holms in Prince Edward County in 1801 [A List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes in the Lower District Pr. Edward County, in the year Eighteen hu, 1801, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. It was apparently her daughter Milly that was ordered bound to Elizabeth Ligon in Prince Edward County on 15 June 1795 [Orders 1793-7, 255].

4     ii. Sally1, born about 1777.

iii. Suckey, born about 1779, registered in Prince Edward County August 1825: age 46, free born on oath of Daniel Wade [Orders 1824-8, 240].

iv. ?Archer, a "free Negro" taxable in the lower district of Prince Edward County from 1810 to 1814 [PPTL 1782-1809, frames; 1809-31, frames 28, 50, 72, 126].

 

3.    Stephen Hoomes/ Homes, born say 1745, was taxable on his own tithe and a horse in King William County in 1794 (called Stephen Hoomes, adjoining Richard and William Hoomes) [Land Tax List 1782-1832]. He was taxable in Charles City County from 1797 to 1814: exempted from personal tax in 1805 and thereafter, taxable on 2 free tithes and a horse in 1809, and taxable on a horse in 1810 [PPTL, 1788-1814]. He was the father of

i. ?Burnett, born say 1790, taxable in Charles City County in 1811 and a "Mulattoe" taxable there in 1813 and 1814 [PPTL, 1788-1814].

ii. Mary, born about 1809, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 18 May 1826: daughter of the late Stephen Homes, bright mulatto girl, about 17 years of age, 5 feet 2-1/4 inches high, born free in this county [Minutes 1823-9, 167].

iii. Susanna, born about 1812, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 19 July 1827: daughter of Stephen Homes, brown mulatto girl 15 years of age [Minutes 1823-9, 239].

 

4.    Sally1 Holmes, born about 1777, registered as a free Negro in Lunenburg County on 8 September 1828: about 51 years of age, black complexion, flat nose, large lips...five feet 8 inches high. She was probably the mother of

i. William4, born about 1793, registered in Lunenburg County on 14 August 1823: aged about 30 years, dark Complexion, about 5 feet 3 inches.

ii. Sally2, born about 1795, registered in Lunenburg County on 8 September 1828: black Complexion, thick lips, 5 feet 8 inches high [WB 5, after page 89, nos. 28, 56, 57].

iii. George, apprenticed to Jesse Moore in 1802 and 1803 when he was counted in the "List of free Negroes & Mulattoes" in the lower district of Lunenburg County [LVA, Lunenburg County, Free Negro & Slave Records, 1802-1803].

iv. Matthew, living in the household of Joshua and Celia Evans in 1802 and 1803 when he was counted in the "List of free Negroes & Mulattoes" in the lower district of Lunenburg County [LVA, Lunenburg County, Free Negro & Slave Records, 1802-1803].

 

Members of the Holmes family in North Carolina were

i. John2, born say 1760, head of a Beaufort County, North Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:126] and 7 in 1800 [NC:9].

ii. Edward, born say 1765, head of a Beaufort County household of one "other free" in 1790 [NC:126].

iii. David, born say 1772, head of a Pasquotank County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:275].

iv. James , born before 1776, a "Mulatto" boy bound as an apprentice shoemaker to Baker Bowden in New Hanover County, North Carolina, on 8 July 1783 [Minutes 1779-92, 100]. He was head of a Wilmington, New Hanover County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 and 15 in New Hanover County in 1830, living in Long Creek, New Hanover County, in 1840. On 13 December 1832 Josiah Sykes appeared in New Hanover County court to apply for a pension for serving in the militia in New Hanover County and stated that the one person then living who knew he served in the Revolution was a "colored man by the name of Holmes living on Long Creek in New Hanover County [NARA, S.7673, M804, roll 2334, frame 152 of 1171].

v. Zack, head of a Wilmington, New Hanover County household of 5 "free colored" and a white woman in 1820 and 10 "free colored" in New Hanover County in 1830.

 

HOLT FAMILY

1.    Mary Holt, born 10 January 1698, was the daughter "of a white woman and a mulatto man" born at Captain Alexander Walker's according to a certificate attested by the clerk of Wilmington Parish, New Kent County. She died on 24 December 1718, called "a mulatto belonging to Mr. Allin" [Chamberlayne, Vestry Book and Parish Register of St. Peter's, 362, 420]. She was probably the mother of

2     i. Ann1, born say 1716.

 

2.    Ann Holt, born say 1716, was the "free Mulatto" mother of Delph, Mary, and George Holt whose births and baptisms were registered in St. Peter's Parish, New Kent County [Chamberlayne, Vestry Book and Parish Register of St. Peter's, 505-6, 522, 545]. Her children were

i. Delph, born 20 January 1731/2, daughter of "Mullatto" woman Ann Holt, bound by the churchwardens of St. Peter's Parish to John Lightfoot until the age of twenty-one on 7 April 1738 [Chamberlayne, Vestry Book and Parish Register of St. Peter's, 505-6].

ii. Mary, born 20 December 1734, "Daughter of Ann Holt a free Mulatto woman," born December 1734, baptized 29 June 1735 [Chamberlayne, Vestry Book and Parish Register of St. Peter's, 522].

3     ii. George, born 20 October 1737.

 

3.    George Holt, born 20 October 1737, the "Bastard Son of Ann Holt a free mulatto woman," was baptized 23 July 1738 in St. Peter's Parish, New Kent County [Chamberlayne, Vestry Book and Parish Register of St. Peter's, 545]. He was taxable on a horse and 3 cattle in the Pamunkey Indian town in King William County in 1787 [PPTL 1782-1811]. He was probably the father of

i. Richard, born say 1771, taxable in New Kent County from 1792 to 1797: a "Negroe" taxable in 1791 and 1792, a "F.N." in 1795, taxable on a horse from 1795 to 1797 [PPTL 1791-1828, frames 229, 240, 296, 307]. He was taxable in the Pamunkey Indian town of King William County on his own tithe and a horse in 1798, and he was taxable on his own tithe in King William County from 1803 until 1813, the year he was listed as a "Mulatto" taxable on a horse [PPTL 1782-1811; 1812-50]. He was probably the husband of Polly Holt, born about 1770, who was about sixty eight on 10 April 1838 when she testified for the pension application of Jane Collins, widow of John Collins, that she was well acquainted with them since she was a small girl [NARA, W.6736, M804, roll 613, frame 703 of 761; also https://www.fold3.com/image/12861980]. Molly Holt was said to have been over eighty years of age in the early 1840s when Reverend Edwin Dalrymple of St. Peter's Parish, New Kent County, interviewed her on the Pamunkey reservation. He stated that she was one of the last members of her tribe who could still remember a few words of their language. Richard and Molly were probably the parents of Anderson and Ben Holt who were adult men of the Pamunkey Indians who signed a letter to the governor in February 1836 in which they asked the governor's advice about complaints from King William County residents that there were non-Pamunkeys on the reservation [Executive Papers, letter of 18 February 1836, Box 5, folder 5, LVA; cited by Rountree, Pocahontas's People, 344].

ii. William, born about 1783, a "Mulatto" farmer with his wife Kate counted in the King William County census in 1850.

 

HONESTY FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Honest, born say 1725, was a servant woman valued at 1 pound currency in the 24 January 1749/50 inventory of the Westmoreland County, Virginia estate of Presley Neale with (her children?) a "Malatto Boy" named John Honest, valued at 2 pounds, and a "Malatto Girl" named Jane Honest who was valued at 5 pounds [Records & Inventories 1746-52, 101b]. She was probably the ancestor of

i. Jane, born say 1745, a "mulattor girl" given by Margaret Neale to her daughter Jemima Neale "forever" by her 11 October 1753 Westmoreland County will, proved 27 May 1755 [Deeds & Wills 1753-6, 234].

ii. John, born say 1747, a "mullattor boy" given by Margaret Neale to her son Richard Neale "forever" by her 11 October 1753 Westmoreland County will, proved 27 May 1755 [Deeds & Wills 1753-6, 234], perhaps the John Honesty who was head of a Fairfax County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:267].

2     iii. Hannah, born say 1771.

 

2.    Hannah Honesty, born say 1771, was head of a Fairfax County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:267]. She was the mother of

i. Jane, born about 1791, registered in Fairfax County on 18 August 1834: a woman of Color about forty three, 5'2", from certificate of William Gunnell born free, daughter of Hannah Honesty a free woman of Color [Register of Free Negroes, 1822-61, no. 253].

ii. Adam, born about 1795, registered in Fairfax County on 16 June 1834: a man of Colour, aged about 39 years, 5'7-1/4", dark Complexion, stout made, testimony of George W. Hunter, Jr., born free and the son of Hannah Honesty a free woman of Colour [Register of Free Negroes, 1822-61, no. 249].

iii. ?Henry, born about 1801, registered in Fairfax County on 17 March 1733: a black man about 32 years old, 5 feet 7 inches high...a free man of Colour as appears by affidavit of William Gunnell [Register of Free Negroes, 1822-61, no. 38].

 

HOOD FAMILY

1.    Mary Hood, born say 1740, was living in Charles City County, Virginia, in July 1758 when her "mulatto" son William was ordered bound out by the churchwardens of Westover Parish [Orders 1758-62, 24]. She was the mother of

i. William, born about 1753, a "remarkably smart" sixteen-year-old "Mulatto boy" who had been on two voyages to sea, ran away from Henry Minson of Charles City County on 23 September 1769 and was taken up in Halifax County, North Carolina, according to the 21 December 1769 issue of the Virginia Gazette [Windley, Runaway Slave Advertisements, 1:301; Headley, 18th Century Newspapers, 169]. He was a "Mulatto" counted in the 1786 North Carolina State Census for the Caswell District of Caswell Count adjacent to "Mulattoes" Arthur Toney and John Wright and head of a Rockingham County, North Carolina household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [NC:491]. He was about sixty-five years old in 1818 and living in Jefferson County, Indiana, when he applied for a pension. His children residing with him were Hannibal, Jesse, Sally, and Eleanor. He died on 8 April 1829, and his wife Catherine Frances or Kitty Dephens, was awarded a survivor's pension at age seventy in July 1855 [NARA, W.25781, M804-1320, frames 644-672].

ii. ?Charles, born about 1755, married Patsey Johnston, 26 July 1805 Orange County, North Carolina bond, a sixty-five-year-old "Man of Colour" living with his forty-year-old wife when he made a declaration in Orange County court to obtain a pension on 27 May 1820 [NARA, S.41659, M804-1320, frames 70-78].

iii. ?Jesse, an "orphan" bound out in Caswell County in March 1783. He married Polly Sawyer, 18 May 1807 Caswell County bond, Henry Curtis bondsman. He was head of a Caswell County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [NC:481]. He purchased 120 acres in Caswell County in 1816 [DB R:354]. His 30 April 1818 Caswell County will, proved July 1818, left all his property to his wife Mary. Polly was head of a Caswell County household of 11 "other free" in 1820 [NC:65].

 

HORN FAMILY

1.    Mary Horn, born say 1735, was the mother of a "base born mulatto" child named Charity who was bound by the Granville County, North Carolina Court to Thomas Bradford on 18 January 1769 [Owens, Granville County Notes]. She was the mother of

i. Charity, born about 1754, about fourteen or fifteen years old when she was bound as an apprentice in Granville County on 18 January 1769. She may have been the ancestor of James Horn, an eight-year-old "boy of colour" who was bound apprentice to James Anderson by the Cumberland County, North Carolina Court on 5 December 1810 [Minutes 1808-10, n.p.].

ii. ?William, a taxable "Molato" in the Bladen County household of John Carsey/ Kersey in 1771 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:61], head of a Beaufort County, North Carolina household of 1 "other free" in 1790 [NC:127].

iii. ?Meshack, head of a Wayne County, North Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:827].

 

HOWARD FAMILY

1.    Frances Haward, born say 1672, was the servant of Captain William Taylor on 5 October 1692 when she confessed to the Richmond County, Virginia court that she had committed the sin of "fornication with a Negro." Her master paid her fine of 1,000 pounds of tobacco and she agreed to serve him an additional year after the completion of her service [Orders 1692-4, 40]. She may have been the mother of

i. Barbara, born say 1718, (no race indicated) the mother of a five-year-old "Mulatto" child named Sarah Howard who was bound by the Anne Arundel County, Maryland Court in June 1737 to serve Robert Perry until the age of thirty-one [Judgment Record 1736-8, 171].

2     ii. Ann, born say 1720.

 

2.    Ann Howard, born say 1720, was a "free Mulatto" living in Spotsylvania County on 6 December 1758 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her children Benjamin, Simon, Rebecca, Peter, Alexander, Eliza, William, John and Rachel Howard (all "born in her freedom") to serve Richard Tutt, Gent. About twelve years later on 24 May 1771 Peter and Betty sued James Tutt for detaining them in servitude [Orders 1755-65, 129; 1768-74, 165]. She was the mother of

i. Benjamin, born say 1743.

ii. Simon, born say 1745.

3     iii. Rebecca, born say 1747.

iv. Peter, born say 1749, sued James Tutt on 24 May 1771 for detaining him as a servant.

v. Alexander.

4     vi. Eliza, born say 1753.

vii. William.

viii. John.

ix. Rachel, "free" head of a Botetourt County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:628].

 

3.    Rebecca Howard, born say 1747, was probably identical to Becky Hoard, head of a Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:107b]. She was the mother of

i. William2, registered in Fredericksburg County on 6 August 1812: Rebeckah Howard the Mother of William Howard was sister to Ann Howard whose indenture I send you to look at she served her time with Wm Alexander Stafford County at the same time that Ann was serveing with me. W. Gregory. 6 August 1812. [Fredericksburg City Certificates and Registry of Free Negroes, 1790-1862, 160].

 

4.    Elizabeth1 Howard, born say 1753, sued James Tutt in Spotsylvania County on 24 May 1771 for detaining her as a servant [Orders 1768-74, 165]. She died before 19 August 1801 when her daughter Lucy registered in Fredericksburg. She was the mother of

i. Lucy, born about 1774, registered in Fredericksburg on 19 August 1801: daughter of Elizabeth Howard, decd., served her time with me to the age of eighteen years old and now she is about twenty seven years of age. William Alexander [Fredericksburg City Certificates and Registry of Free Negroes, 1790-1862, 51].

ii. Elizabeth2, born about 1775 or 1785, registered in Fredericksburg on 19 June 1809: daughter of Elizabeth Howard a Free Mulatto woman was bound to me by an order of Stafford Court & served me until she was eighteen years of age & has been free sixteen years. Walter Gregory. Elizabeth Howard the mother of Lucy Howard is a free Mulatto woman bound to me in the year 1789 being then 4 years old & served me until she was eighteen years of age & soon after the expiration of her time she had this child called Lucy Howard & was bound to me by the churchwardens of Brunswick Parish, Stafford County. I know the family upwards of 30 years & they have always been free Mulattoes. 5 August 1812. W. Gregory. [Fredericksburg City Certificates and Registry of Free Negroes, 1790-1862, 143, 154]. She may have been the Elizabeth Howard, born about 1775, who registered in Middlesex County on 24 May 1832: born free; 57 years of age; 5'2"; Mulatto complexion [Register of Free Negroes 1827-60, p.5].

 

Their descendants in Virginia were

i. Elizabeth, born about 1775, registered in Middlesex County on 24 May 1832: born free; 57 years of age; 5'2"; Mulatto complexion [Register of Free Negroes 1827-60, p.5].

ii. Jane, head Stafford County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:136].

iii. Mary, head of a Stafford County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:128].

iv. Polly, head of a Stafford County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:127].

v. Reuben, head of a Campbell County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:852, 853].

 

Members of a Howard family in North Carolina were

i. William, born say 1784, married Tabitha Carter, 9 June 1807 Craven County bond, James Godett bondsman. He was head of a Craven County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:65].

ii. Joseph, head of a Craven County household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:67].

 

Members of a Howard family in South Carolina were

i. David, head of a Beaufort District household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [SC:11] and 4 in 1800 [SC:122].

ii. James, head of a Beaufort District household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [SC:11].

 

HOWELL FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Owell, born say 1678, was the servant of Mrs. Mary Timson in York County in 1695 when she admitted to having a bastard child by a "Negro" for which she had to serve her mistress an additional two years. She also agreed to serve her mistress an additional two and one-half years for paying her fine [DOW 10:107, 121, 152]. She was probably the ancestor of

2     i. Dorothy, born say 1707.

ii. John1, born say 1740, presented by the York County court on 15 November 1762 for failing to list his wife as a tithable. The case was dismissed after he paid her taxes and court costs. He was presented on 20 May 1765 for not attending Charles Parish Church [Judgments & Orders 1759-63, 437, 453, 480; 1763-5, 374, 448].

iii. Charles1, born say 1735, said to be living in Gloucester County and the father of a "Mulatto Boy" of the same name who was about twelve or fourteen years old on 24 February 1774 when he was taken up in Chesterfield County. The boy told the jailer that he had been stolen three years previous by some sailors who took him to Warwick County where they sold him to a Mr. John Scott of Albemarle [Virginia Gazette (Purdie & Dixon)].

3     iv. Mary, born say 1740.

v. Elizabeth, born say 1744, (no race indicated) presented by the York County court on 20 May 1765 for having a bastard child [Judgments & Orders 1763-5, 374, 447].

vi. ____, husband of Susanna Howell, nee Banks, who was a widow by 22 February 1796 when she was named as one of the heirs of Matthew Banks who left her one fourth of 75 acres in Surry County, Virginia [Deeds 1792-99, 344].

 

2.    Dorothy Howell, born say 1707, a "mulatto Servt to Mr. Sherwood Lightfoot, was living in St. Peter's Parish, New Kent and James City counties, in 1725 when the birth of her daughter Judith was recorded [NSCDA, Parish Register of St. Peter's, 91]. She was the mother of

4     i. Lucy, born about 1723.

5     ii. Judith1, born in 1725.

iii. Robin, born 18 March 1730/1, "Mulatto Son of Dorothy Howel" [Chamberlayne, Vestry Book and Register of St. Peter's Parish, 468].

iv. ?Samuel1, born about 1732, 5 feet 10 inches tall, a twenty-five year old "mulatto" sawyer from Charles City County, Virginia, listed in the 1757 size roll of Captain Robert Spotswood's Company in Fort Young [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 570].

 

3.    Mary Howell, born say 1740, was presented by the York County court on 17 May 1762 for having a bastard child. She was called a "Poor Mulatto" on 19 March 1764 when the York County court ordered the churchwardens of Charles Parish to bind out her son John Howell to Starkey Robinson. Six months later on 27 September the court ordered the churchwardens of Charles Parish to bind her unnamed daughter to Starkey Robinson [Judgments & Orders 1759-63, 358; 1763-5, 166, 284]. She was the mother of

i. John2, born say 1762, son of Mary Howell ordered bound to Starkey Robinson on 19 March 1764.

ii. an unnamed daughter who the York County court ordered the churchwardens of Charles Parish to bind to Starkey Robinson on 27 September 1764 [Judgments & Orders 1763-5, 166, 284], perhaps identical to Mary Howell, daughter of Mary Howell, who was bound to Abram Allen by the Elizabeth City County court on 3 April 1764 [Orders 1760-9, 206].

 

4.    Lucy Howell, born about 1723, was a "free Mulattoe" living in Goochland County on 7 March 1756 when her daughter Elizabeth was baptized [Jones, The Douglas Register, 348]. She was called a "Mulatto...bound until the age of thirty one years" on 28 February 1757 when the Cumberland County, Virginia court bound her sons Sam and Simon, "Born during her Servitude," to Wade Netherland, and on 28 March 1757 the court bound her children Charles, Betty and Isaac to John Fleming [Orders 1752-8, 447, 462]. On 27 August 1770 the court ordered the churchwardens of Southam Parish to bind her "mulattoe" children Robin, Doll, and Matthew Howell to Thomas and William Fleming, executors of John Fleming, deceased. She complained to the court about the treatment of her son Isaac Howell, and on 28 April 1772 his masters Thomas and William Fleming agreed to teach him the trade of blacksmith and carpenter. And the court ordered that her other children be removed from their care unless they agreed to teach her other children a trade [Orders 1770-2, 77, 429, 481]. Lucy was head of a Henrico County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:1015]. Her children were

6     i. Samuel2, born about 1742.

ii. Simon, born say 1744, described as "5 feet 8 or 9 inches high, thin visage, and sharp chin" in the August 1770 issue of the Virginia Gazette which also identified him as the brother of Samuel Howell [Purdie & Dixon's edition, p. 3, col. 3]. Simeon was a "Mulatto" taxable in the lower district of Henrico County in 1811 [PPTL 1782-1814, frame 684].

iii. Elizabeth, born October 1748.

7     iv. Charles2, born say 1753.

v. Judith2 (Judah), born 10 June 1755, daughter of Lucy Howell, baptized 7 March 1756 in Goochland County [Jones, The Douglas Register, 348]. She registered there as a free Negro on 17 September 1804: a free born Black person aged about fifty three years, about five feet seven inches high [Register of Free Negroes, p.1, no.2]. She was a "Mulatto" taxable on a horse, doing housework and living on William M. Richardson's land in the upper district of Goochland County from 1805 to 1807 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 743, 782, 826].

8     vi. Isaac, born say 1757.

9     vii. ?David, born about 1763.

viii. ?Jacob, born about 1769, registered in Petersburg on 22 September 1806: a brown free Negro man, five feet nine inches high, born free in Powhatan County & raised in the Town of Petersburg, by trade a saddler & harness maker, thirty seven years old [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 396]. He was head of a Petersburg Town household of 3 "other free" and a white woman in 1810 [VA:122a].

 

5.    Judith1 Howell, born in 1725 in St. Peter's Parish, New Kent and James City counties, complained to the Amelia County court on 26 March 1752 that she was "kept and detained as a slave" by John Thomas. On 25 May 1753 the court ordered the churchwardens of Nottoway Parish to bind out her son Matthew Howell. She was taxable that year in the Nottoway Parish, Amelia County household of Abraham Cocke [Orders 1751-55, 29, 47; 95-96, 98; List of Tithables, 1753] and was taxable on a horse in Nottoway County in 1791 and 1801 [PPTL, 1791, p.13; 1801, p.10]. She was the mother of

10    i. ?Robert1, born say 1748.

11    ii. Matthew1, born say 1752.

12   iii. ?Thomas, born say 1760.

 

6.    Samuel2 Howell, born about 1742, and his brother Simon (no surnames) were bound as apprentices to Wade Netherland in Goochland County on 18 October 1748 [Orders 1744-49, 496]. They were bound again to Netherland in Cumberland County in February 1757 [Orders 1752-8, 447]. Samuel ran away in October 1765 according to an ad placed by Netherland in the 2 May 1766 issue of the Virginia Gazette: a likely young Mulatto man named SAM HOWEL, 23 years old, about 5 feet 9 inches high...He was bound for 31 years, according to the condition of his mother, who was to serve until that time; his pretence for going away was to apply to some lawyer at Williamsburg to try to get his freedom, though he had a trial in the county court, and was adjudged to serve his full time [Windley, Runaway Slave Advertisements, 1:39]. He appeared in Cumberland County court on 27 October 1766 and agreed to serve Netherland an additional year for absenting himself from his master's service for six months [Orders 1764-7, 351]. In the August 1770 edition of the Virginia Gazette he was called Samuel Howell, a "mulatto servant man," who had run away from Wade Netherland of Cumberland County, the master to whom he was indentured until the age of thirty-one. He was described as twenty-eight years old, well set, 5 feet 8 or 9 inches high, and his brother Simon Howell, who ran away with him, was described as 5 feet 8 or 9 inches high, thin visage, and sharp chin. Samuel had brought an unsuccessful suit in the General Court for his freedom just prior to running away [Virginia Gazette (Purdie & Dixon's edition), p. 3, col. 3]. In this case held in April 1770 he had claimed that his grandmother was a "mulatto begotten on a white woman by a negro man after the year 1705." His mother was born in 1723, and he was born in 1742. Thomas Jefferson was his lawyer [Catterall, Judicial Cases Concerning American Slavery, I:90-91]. He deposed in Vaughan's Tavern in Richmond on 25 February 1791 that he recalled that Drury Farrar lived for two years on a plantation of Robert Pleasants in Powhatan County (in 1785 and 1786) [LVA, Goochland County chancery case 1792-001]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Chesterfield County from 1796 to 1798 [PPTL, 1786-1811, frames 283, 357] and a "Mo" taxable in Powhatan County in 1798 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frame 163].

 

7.    Charles2 Howell, born say 1753, was bound to John Fleming in Cumberland County on 28 March 1757 [Orders 1752-8, 462]. He was taxable in Goochland County in 1774, 1776 and 1777: listed with Isaac Howel in 1774 [List of Tithables 1767-1780, frames 319, 360, 414]. He sued Benjamin Russell in Cumberland County court for a 4 pound, 10 shilling debt on 28 September 1773. On 28 November 1774 Frank Couzens was presented by the Cumberland County court for not listing him as a tithable [Orders 1772-4, 403; 1774-8, 300]. He married Abbie Scott, "Mulattoes both," on 18 June 1775 in Goochland County [Jones, The Douglas Register, 347]. He was paid 3 pounds, 4 shillings by the Goochland County estate of Colonel Tarlton Fleming for shoemaking on 22 February 1783 [DB 15:428]. On 18 September 1783 he brought suit in Powhatan County court as assignee of James Howl who was assignee of John Johns. The suit was dismissed at his costs. He was assignee of James Howl on 22 July 1785 when the court awarded him 4 pounds, 3 shillings with interest from 1779 in his suit for debt against William Johns. He was awarded 8 pounds, 7 shillings on 15 March 1788 in his suit against David Cosby. On 15 October 1789 the court ordered him to post bond of 20 pounds security for a breach of the peace against Thomas Clay, Gent. [Orders 1777-84, 312, 344; 1784-6, 190; 1786-91, 85, 470]. He was taxable in Powhatan County from 1787 to 1805: taxable on 2 horses and 10 cattle in 1787, called a "Mo" from 1790 to 1805, taxable on John Howell's tithe in 1793 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frames 7, 19, 34, 47, 61, 78, 93, 106, 119, 132, 186, 224, 259, 296]. He and his wife Abigail and daughter Lucy were living on Samuel Pleasant's land in 1801: farming, shoemaking, and oyster selling in 1801 [List of Mulattoes and Free Negroes in Powhatan County in the year 1801, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Goochland County from 1806 to 1815: taxable on a free tithe aged 16-21 in 1806; taxable on Bennett Howell from 1807 to 1809; taxable on a free tithe aged 16-21 in 1810 and 1812; listed with his wife Abba and children Billy & Polly who were over 16 & under 21 years old in 1813; taxable on Wilson and Bennett Howell in 1815 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 762, 806, 847; 1810-32, frames 35, 54, 141, 241]. He was the father of

i. Sally, born say 1780, daughter of Charles Howell, married Francis James of Buckingham County, 26 March 1799 Powhatan County bond, Charles Scott security. Francis James may have been the son or grandson of "Mrs. Lucy James, a "Mulatto" taxable on a free male tithe, 2 horses and 5 cattle in Buckingham County in 1784 and 1785. Francis may have been the son or brother of James James a "Mulatto" taxable in Buckingham County from 1786 to 1806: called "Cannon's" to differentiate him from another "Mulatto" James James who was called "Ayre's." Cannon's James was taxable on a slave, 3 horses and 9 cattle in 1786; 2 horses and 12 cattle in 1787, taxable on 3 tithables in 1795, and taxable on Francis and James James, Jr.'s tithe in 1796 and 1797. James James, a "free negro," sued Isaac Bates for trespass, assault and battery in Cumberland County on 27 May 1793. The emancipation of "James a free negro" by Nathan Ayres was recorded in Buckingham County on 8 March 1784 and acknowledged in Cumberland County on 23 March 1795 [Orders 1792-7, 90, 302].

ii. Betsy Ann, "daughter of Charles Howell," married Martin Banks, 11 March 1812 Goochland County bond, William Howell surety.

iii. ?Bennett, born say 1790, taxable in Charles Howell's household in 1807, a "F.B." taxable in Powhatan County in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1825, frame 440].

iv. Polly, born 1791-1795, 16-21 years old in 1813.

v. Wilson, born say 1796, taxable in Charles Howell's household in 1813 and 1815.

vi. Lucy, listed with Charles and Abigail in Powhatan County in 1801.

 

8.  Isaac Howell, born about 1761, a black complexioned soldier, 5'5-1/4" high, born in Powhatan County, entered the service on 24 March 1781 for 1-1/2 years, and had previously served as a waiter for a year in the 7th Virginia Regiment when he was sized at the Powhatan County court house on 27 April 1781 [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p. 41)]. Captain Pryor received his final pay of 19 pounds on 11 February 1783 [NARA, M881, Roll 1092, frame 2053 of 2281]. He was taxable in Goochland County in 1774 [List of Tithables 1767-1780, frame 319] and taxable in the upper district of Goochland County from 1786 to 1802: taxable on John Howell's tithe in 1795, taxable on Junior Howell's tithe from 1798 to 1802 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 129, 152, 221, 238, 282, 342, 483, 619]. He was head of a Buckingham County household 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:810] and a "M"(Mulatto) taxable with his unnamed son in Buckingham County in 1813 [PPTL 1810-1826]. His children were

i. ?John3, born about 1779, registered in Goochland County on 15 August 1808: about 29 years of age...yellow complexion [Register of Free Negroes, p.22, no.47]. He was head of a Goochland County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:694].

ii. Junior, born about 1781, registered in Goochland County on 15 August 1808: about twenty seven years old, light complexion...free born [Register of Free Negroes, p.22, no.46].

iii. Betsy, born say 1782, "daughter of Isaac Howell," married Charles Scott, 3 June 1800 Goochland County bond, consent for Betsy by (her aunt?) Judith Howell, Junior Howell surety.

iv. Judith3, born say 1784, "daughter of Aise (Isaac) Howell," 6 November 1800 Goochland County bond, Junior Howell surety, 7 November marriage [Ministers Returns, 76].

 

9.    David Howell, born about 1763, enlisted in the Revolution on 3 January 1777 for three years, but he was discharged after serving two years and eight months "on account of his inability's" according to his 6 October 177_ discharge from Captain Robert Woodson of the 9th Virginia Regiment [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Howel, David, Digital Collection, LVA]. He married Nancy Moss, 24 April 1786 Powhatan County bond, John Moss surety; and second, Patsy Moss, daughter of Richard Moss, 30 May 1793 Powhatan County bond. He was taxable in Powhatan County from 1788 to 1817: called a "Mo" from 1790 to 1810, a "F.B." taxable on 2 tithes in 1811 [PPTL, 1782-1825, frames 19, 46, 78, 106, 133, 186, 224, 259, 296, 342, 381, 422, 459, 535]. He and his wife Patty were living on S. Pleasant's land in 1801, he was a carpenter on Horatio Turpin's land with wife Patty, a weaver, and their 6 children in 1812, he was a carpenter near Fine Creek Mills with Patty and their 7 children in 1813, and he and his wife had 11 children in 1822 [List of Mulattoes and Free Negroes in Powhatan County in the year 1801; A List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes in Powhatan County, 1812; List of Free Negroes and Mulatoes, 1812; A List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes in Powhatan, 1822, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. He registered in Powhatan County on 19 December 1822: Age: 59; Color: Dark Brown; Stature: 5'6-1/2"; Born Free. (His wife) Patsy Howell registered the same day: Age: 47; Color: Yellow; Stature: 5'6"; Born Free [Register of Free Negroes, nos. 64, 65]. He may have been the father of

i. Charles3, born about 1785, a "F.B." taxable in Powhatan County from 1811 to 1815 [PPTL, 1782-1825, frames 400, 440, 460, 484]. He was a waterman living near Fine Creek with his wife Kate and 2 children in 1811 [A List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes with the County of Powhatan, 1811, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. He registered in Powhatan County on 20 February 1833: Age: 48; Color: dark; Stature: 5'9-1/2"; Born Free [Register of Free Negroes, no. 302].

ii. Samuel3, born say 1796, a "F.B." taxable in Powhatan County from 1813 to 1815 [PPTL, 1782-1825, frames 440, 460, 484]. He was a boatman on Horatio Turpins land with his wife Winny Howell, a weaver, and 1 child [A List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes in Powhatan County, 1812, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

 

10.    Robert1 Howell, born say 1748, and his wife Mary were the parents of several "Free Mulatto" children baptized in St. Peter's Parish. He was a "Freeman of Colour" who enlisted in New Kent County under Captain Peter Wright in the artillery and died in the service a year or two afterwards according to testimony by Henry Maderias on 8 February 1809. Benjamin Crump testified that Thomas Howell was Robert's heir at law and that his parents were lawfully married [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Howel, Robert, Digital Collections, LVA]. His children were

i. John Godfrey, born 12 July, baptized 21 August 1768, "Mollo." of Robert Howel & Mary his wife [NSCDA, Parish Register of St. Peter's, 162]. John Howell was taxable in New Kent County from 1790 to 1809: listed as a "M"(ulatto) in 1806, 1807 and 1809 [PPTL 1782-1800, frame 147; 1791-1828, frames 229, 240, 268, 330, 344, 357, 370, 382, 407, 420, 431, 443].

ii. Sarah, born 22 March 1771, "Free Mulatto" twin daughter of Robert and Mary Howel, baptized 28 April [NSCDA, Parish Register of St. Peter's, 162].

iii. Betsey, born 22 March 1771, baptized 28 April [NSCDA, Parish Register of St. Peter's, 162].

 

11.    Matthew1 Howell, born say 1752, son of Judith Howell, was bound an apprentice by the Amelia County court in 1753 and was bound out by the court again on 25 February 1762 [Orders 3:29, 95-96, 98; 1760-3, 223]. He may have been the Matthew Howell, no age, race or parent named, who complained to the Mecklenburg County, Virginia court on 13 May 1765 against his master Robert Rowland for misusage. Matthew was ordered to continue with Richard Epperson, to whom he was hired, until the next court on 10 June 1765 when he was ordered bound instead to Abram Martin [Orders 1765-68, 21, 34]. He may have been the widower of Peggy Howell whose son Zachariah was called "son of Matt Howell and Peggy his wife" when he registered in Charlotte County on 18 June 1814 [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 20]. Peggy Howell was taxable in Charlotte County on 2 free male tithables and a horse in 1793 [PPTL 1782-1813, frame 266]. On 3 June 1793 the Charlotte County court bound her "Mulatto" children Freeman, John and Peggy Howell to William Flood and ordered the churchwardens to bind out her children Charles and Edmund. She was called a "Mulatto" on 7 April 1794 when the court ordered her daughter Peggy Howell bound to William Childrey [Orders 1792-94, 92a; 179; 1794-6, 10b] and called a "free mulatto of Charlotte County" on 16 July 1794 when she reported in the Virginia Gazette and General Advertiser that two of her children Peter Toney and Edmund Booker, both about four to five years old, had been kidnapped on 20 June [Headley, 18th Century Newspapers, 171].On 26 July 1794 the court examined Thomas Stewart of Person County, North Carolina, on the charge of stealing her children Peter Toney and Edmund Booker on the night of 20 June 1794. James Moore testified that he apprehended Thomas Stewart in Halifax County, Virginia, and that Stewart confessed that he and James Stewart went at night by horse to the house where the children lived and purchased them outside the house from a man named John Ravens with the intention of selling them. Stewart was sent for further trial at the district court in Prince Edward County [Orders 1792-94, 175a, 211-2]. Peggy was a midwife counted in a list of "free Negroes and Mulattos" in Stephen Bedford's district of Charlotte County in 1802 with her children Peggy, Betty, Zachariah and Drewry, counted with Betsy and Peggy Howell in 1803, listed with 3 male children and 4 female children in 1805, 5 males and 7 females (including herself) in 1806, 3 males and 6 females in 1809 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 542, 607, 641, 648, 674, 682, 751, 814, 876, 886] and a "Free Negro" head of a Charlotte County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:1002]. She was the mother of

i. ?Freeman, born say 1777, taxable in Charlotte County from 1794 to 1797 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 291, 317, 369], a "FN" taxable in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, from 1806 to 1820 [PPTL 1806-28, frames 11, 89, 190, 310, 420, 561, 687], head of a Mecklenburg County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:164b].

13   ii. Peggy, born about 1781.

iii. John4, born say 1782, a "free Negroe" taxable in Charlotte County from 1798 to 1807: taxable on a horse in 1801, listed in Peggy Howell's household in 1803 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 401, 504, 573, 580, 607, 642, 711].

14   iv. Elizabeth, born say 1783.

v. Matthew2, born about 1784, married Mildred Byrd, 25 December 1808 Charlotte County marriage by Rev. Joseph Jenkins [Minsters' Returns p.37]. He was taxable in Charlotte County in the same household as John Howell in 1803, a "fm" ditcher taxable in 1809 and 1810, living with "fm" planter Rose and family of 4 males and 2 females in 1811, listed with a female above the age of 16 and a horse in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 573, 744, 777, 814, 876]. He registered in Charlotte County on 30 August 1815: a mullatto man son of Peggy Howell a free woman, five feet ten inches high, 31 years of age, was born in the County of Charlotte where he has resided ever since [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 30]. He registered in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on 19 June 1820: a Man of dark Complexion, five feet Eleven and 3/4 Inches high about thirty six Years old, a ditcher by trade [Free Person of Colour, no.7, p.16] and was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 12 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:164b]. He registered in Halifax County, Virginia, on 20 June 1831: Matthew B. Howell, a dark mulatto, aged 49 years the 15 December next, six feet high...born free [Registers of Free Negroes, 1802-1831, no. 194].

vi. ?Charles4, born say 1790, a "fm" ditcher taxable in Charlotte County from 1807 to 1813: listed with a woman in his household from 1811 to 1813 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 710, 744, 777, 807, 814, 839, 846, 875].

vii. Zachariah, born about 1791, listed in Peggy Howell's household in 1802, registered in Charlotte County on 18 June 1814: a dark Mulato man, five feet six inches and half high, 23 years old January 1815. Son of Mat Howell and wife Peggy Howell free Mulatos born free and lived in the County of Nottoway & Amelia. The said Mat is now dead and Peggy Howell now lives in the County of Charlotte, and the sd Zachariah Howell was born in the County of Charlotte and now lives in the said County, and is a Bricklayer by trade & served his apprenticeship with William Phariss [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 20].

viii. Peter Toney, about four to five years old on 16 July

ix. Drury, born about 1799, registered in Charlotte County on 7 June 1831: of bright complexion the son of Peggy Howell a free woman, is about thirty two years of age [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 90].

 

12.    Thomas Howell, born say 1760, and his wife Lucy Howell were the parents of several children whose births were recorded in St. Peter's Parish, New Kent County, Virginia [NSCDA, Parish Register of St. Peter's, 163]. He was taxable in New Kent County from 1790 to 1807: taxable on 2 tithes from 1803 to 1805, listed as a "M"(ulatto) in 1806 and 1807 [PPTL 1782-1800, frame 146; 1791-1828, frames 229, 268, 307, 344, 370, 395, 420, 431]. He was a "free Negro" taxable in the upper district of Henrico County from 1811 to 1814: listed with his unnamed wife in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1814, frames 664, 758, 823]. He was head of a Richmond City household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:345]. Thomas and Lucy were the parents of

i. Robert2, born 20 February 1785, son to Thomas and Lucy Howel. He was a "M"(ulatto) taxable in New Kent County in 1809 [PPTL 1791-1828, frame 443] and head of a Henrico County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:1013].

ii. Susannah, born 17 April 1787, daughter of Thomas and Lucy Howel.

iii. Rebecca, born 27 April 1790, daughter of Thomas and Lucy Howel. She was listed as a "Black" person over the age of sixteen in Henrico County in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1814, frame 758].

iv. Elizabeth, born 12 March 1794, daughter of Thomas and Lucy Howel [NSCDA, Parish Register of St. Peter's, 163].

 

13.    Peggy Howell, born about 1781, was taxable in Charlotte County from 1807 to 1813, called Peggy Howell, the younger: a "fm." planter listed with a male child in her household in 1807, a "fm." spinner with 2 males in 1810 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 717, 751, 783, 876]. She registered in Charlotte County on 7 November 1831: a free woman of colour of bright complexion about fifty years of age was born free, five feet two and a half inches high [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 122]. She was the mother of

i. Matthew3, born about 1798, registered in Charlotte County on 21 December 1819: a mullatto man son of Peggy Howell a free woman, five feet ten inches high, 21 years of age, was born in the County of Charlotte where he has resided ever since [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 30].

ii. ?Charles5, born about 1802, registered in Charlotte County on 9 May 1833: of bright Complexion was born free in this County, was bound apprentice to James Eudailey, is now 31 years of age, 5 feet 9 inches high [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 145].

iii. Peter, born about 1808, registered in Charlotte County on 2 May 1831: of dark complexion the son of Peggy Howell a free woman was bound apprentice to the Revd Edward Almond five feet four inches high about twenty three years of age [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 81].

 

14.    Elizabeth Howell, born say 1784, was counted in the Charlotte County household of her mother Peggy Howell in a list of "free Negroes and Mulattoes" in 1802, a weaver with 4 female children in her family in 1807 and 1809, a "fn" taxable on a horse in 1812 and 1813 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 542, 717, 751, 876]. She was the mother of

i. Polly, born about 1804, registered in Charlotte County on 6 June 1831: of bright complexion was born free in the County of Charlotte is the daughter of Betsey Howell a free woman about twenty seven years of age...is five feet two and a quarter inches high [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 88].

ii. Nancy, born about 1805, registered in Charlotte County on 6 June 1831: of bright complexion was born free in the County of Charlotte is the daughter of Betsey Howell a free woman about twenty six years of age...is five feet five inches high [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 87].

iii. John5, born about 1807, registered in Charlotte County on 2 May 1831: of dark complexion who was born free in the County of Charlotte the son of Betsey Howell was bound apprentice to Joseph Friend five feet nine inches high...about twenty four years of age [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 80].

iv. Lizzy, born about 1811, registered in Charlotte County on 6 June 1831: of bright complexion was born free in the County of Charlotte is the daughter of Betsey Howell a free woman about twenty years of age [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 86].

 

Princess Anne County

1.    Martha Howell, born say 1680, confessed to the Princess Anne County court on 2 November 1699 that she had a "Molatto" child. She received twenty-five lashes and was ordered to serve her master Robert Thorowgood an additional year [Minutes 1691-1709, 225]. She was probably the ancestor of

i. Robert Owls, born about 1738, a "free man of colour," about 80 years old (according to information he obtained from his parents) on 27 May 1818 when he appeared in Opelousas, St. Landry Parish, Louisiana, on 27 May 1818 to apply for a pension for his service in the Revolution. He stated that he was drafted to serve in the militia of Princess Anne County, Virginia, and then enlisted in Essex County in Captain Andrew Wallace's Regiment commanded by Colonel Abram Buford. He presented an affidavit from A. Buford in Frankfurt, Kentucky, on 7 November 1802 that Robert Owls, a yellow man, then a resident of Jefferson County, Kentucky, had served in his regiment in 1779 and 1780 and was said to be freeborn [NARA, S.36713, M804, roll 1856, frame 1011 of 1331; https://www.fold3.com/image/25873976]. He may have been identical to Robert Old, a fifteen-year-old "free Malatto" bound by the churchwardens of Princess Anne county to Edward Cannon to serve until the age of twenty one in 1770 [Orders 1770-3, 15].

 

Other members of the Howell family in North Carolina and Virginia were

1    i. Aaron, born say 1749.

ii. Nancy, born about 1772, registered in Petersburg on 7 June 1810: a light yellow brown Mulatto woman, five feet one inches high, thirty eight years old, born free and raised in the County of Chesterfield [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 517(?)].

 

1.    Aaron Howell, born say 1749, purchased 100 acres in Northampton County, North Carolina, near the "old Line" and a spring branch on 6 March 1770 from Hopkin Howell and his wife Elizabeth [DB 5:11]. Later that year on 21 September, his mother Elizabeth Howell made a deed of gift to him of 100 acres near the Spring Branch of Cypress Swamp [DB 5:58]. He was taxable in Northampton County on an assessment of 877 pounds in 1780 [GA 46.1]. He received voucher no 5961 for 9 pounds specie in Halifax District in February 1782 for military service in the Revolution [North Carolina Revolutionary Pay Vouchers, 1779-1782, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2WT-P66S, Howell, Jaron]. On 1 December 1785 Aaron and his wife Martha sold 85 acres of the land he purchased from Hopkin Howell and sold the remaining 15 acres on 26 February 1798 without a dower release. On 31 May 1787 Sarah Howell, perhaps Aaron's aunt, gave to "Martha wife of Aaron Howell" furniture and to Aaron a cow and yearling. On 2 June 1792 Aaron and Martha mortgaged 50 acres of the land he received from his mother and sold the remainder to John Boykin for 50 pounds without a dower release on 24 December 1794. He repaid the mortgage a year later on 1 January 1796 and sold 15 acres on 26 February 1798 [DB 7:356; 9:175; 10:237, 238, 360]. Aaron was head of a Northampton County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:75] and 6 in 1800 [NC:449]. He died before 3 December 1810 when John Howell was granted administration on his estate on 200 pounds security. Wiley Artist, James and Joel Newsom and Wily Byrd were a buyers at the sale of the estate [Ancestry.com. North Carolina, Wills and Probate Records, 1665-1998 (database on-line), Northampton, Estate Records, Vol. 110, Holt, A.C.-Howell, Dilly, 1788-1939: Aaron Howell]. He may have been the father of

i. Joseph, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [NC:316].

 

HUBBARD FAMILY

1.    Jane Hubbard/ Hubbart, born say 1675, was the white servant of John Jordan on 6 February 1693 when he left her nine pounds sterling by his Westmoreland County will to be delivered to her on the day of her marriage [DW 1707-9, 86a]. She was the servant of Charles Ashton, Gent., on 25 July 1705 when the Westmoreland County court convicted her of having a "mulatto" child. The court ordered the churchwardens of Washington Parish to sell her for five years. She was the mother of a "Mulatto" daughter named Elizabeth who was bound out by the churchwardens of Washington Parish until the age of thirty years on 26 September 1705 [Orders 1698-1705, 257, 262, 268; 1705-21, 3; DW 3:370-1]. They were probably the ancestors of

i. Ruth, born about 1722, a fifty-four-year-old "mulato" head of Broad Creek Hundred, Harford County, Maryland household with (her children?) Belt (thirteen years old), Joe (ten), and Hanna (six) in 1776 [Carothers, 1776 Census of Maryland, 88].

2     ii. William, born say 1750.

iii. Abram, counted with his wife Dorcas and four children in a "List of Free Mullatoes and Negroes" living in Westmoreland County in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:41]. He was head of a Westmoreland County household of 11 "other free" 1810 (called Abram Herbert) and 12 "free colored" in 1830, perhaps the father of Talbert Hubbard, head of a Westmoreland household of 3 "free colored" in 1830.

 

2.    William Hubbard/ Hubert, born say 1750, was mentioned in a 30 April 1795 entry in the account book of Benjamin Banneker [Bedini, The Life of Benjamin Banneker, 249]. He was head of a Patapsco Upper Hundred, Baltimore County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:639]. He married a daughter of Robert and Molly Banneker. He and his wife were the parents of

i. Henry, born say 1770, obtained a certificate of freedom in Loudoun County, Virginia, on 24 December 1795 on testimony of Henry Jarvis that: he was the son of a free woman and grandson of Robert Banneker, whose wife was also a free woman. Robert Banneker lived in Baltimore County about two and a half miles from Ellicott's Mills.

ii. Charles, born say 1772, called brother of Henry Hubbard on 24 December 1795 when he obtained a certificate of freedom in Loudoun County [Certificates of Freedom in Loudoun County courthouse, cited by Journal of the AAHGS 11:123]. He (called Charles Hubbert) was head of a Loudoun County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:288].

 

Other likely descendants were

i. Isaac Hubbert, "negro" head of a Caroline County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:165].

ii. Isaac, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:26].

iii. ?Anthony Herbert, head of a New Kent County, Virginia household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:755].

iv. Nancy Herbert, head of a Norfolk County, Virginia household of 3 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1810 [VA:832].

v. Mary, married John Butler, 13 February 1802 Bertie County, North Carolina bond, Buffin Harrison bondsman.

 

HUGHES FAMILY

1.    Rosamond Hughes, born say 1720, was the servant of William McMachen, Gentleman, on 3 October 1745 when the Frederick County, Virginia court ordered the churchwardens of Frederick Parish to bind her "Mulatto" daughter Elizabeth to her master [Orders 1743-5, 467; 1745-8, 3]. She was the mother of

2     i. ?Luke, born about 1740.

ii. Elizabeth, born say 1745.

iii. ?William, born about 1748, enlisted in the Revolution from Caroline County on 26 March 1781 and was sized about a month later: age 33, 5'7" high, yellow complexion, a shoemaker, born in Caroline County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p. 57)]. He was head of a Spotsylvania County household of 2 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:113b].

 

2.   Luke Hughes, born about 1740, was listed among the slaves in Cadwelder Dade's estate inventory which was proved in Stafford County on 14 July 1761 "Luke...to serve till 31" [Wills, Liber O, 1748-63, 400]. He married Behethland Kennedy, 10 July 1779 at St. Paul's Parish, King George County [St. Paul's Parish Register, 223]. He was listed in the pay roll of Captain Robert Powell and Captain Reubin Briscoe in the 3rd Virginia Regiment in August 1778 [NARA, M246, https://www.fold3.com/image/9680894]. He registered in King George County on 27 October 1800: a dark molatto man with long grey hair, about sixty years, was born in this County, served Cadwellder Dade untill he was thirty one years of age [Register of Free Persons, no.16]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Culpeper County from 1798 to 1802 [PPTL 1782-1802, frames 687, 781, 820, 865] and a "free Mulatto" head of a Culpeper County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:40].  His children were most likely

i. William, born say 1760, a "yellow" complexioned man who enlisted in the Revolution in Caroline County [NSDAR, African American Patriots, 150]. He was head of a Spotsylvania County household of 2 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:113b].

ii. Luke, Jr., "free Mulatto" head of a Culpeper County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:40] and 2 "free colored" in Shenandoah County in 1830.

iii. John, head of a Spotsylvania County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:112b].

iv. Samuel, head of a Rockingham County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:13].

v. Philip, born about 1779, registered in Fauquier County on 17 June 1820: age 41, 6'1/4", a bright Mulatto, born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1817-65, no. 19].

vi. Margaret, born about 1784, registered in Fauquier County on 17 June 1820: age 36, black eyes, 5'2", a Bright Mulatto, born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1817-65, no. 18].

 

HULIN FAMILY

Members of the Hulin family born about 1720 were

1     i. Thomas, born say 1720.

2     ii. John1, born say 1722.

3     iii. Edward, born say 1725.

 

1.    Thomas1 Huelin, born say 1720, purchased 200 acres on Corduroy Swamp in Northampton County, North Carolina, on 13 February 1742. He sold this land while resident in Granville County on 6 February 1748 [Northampton County DB 1:25, 396]. He was taxable in Aquilla Snelling's Granville County household in 1764. He purchased 100 acres on the south side of Cedar Creek in St. John's Parish, Granville County, on 16 February 1759 and a further 613 acres adjoining this on 28 November 1760 [DB C:596; F:35]. He was taxable in Granville County in 1762 in John Pope's list for St. John's Parish [CR 044.702.19]. He sold 200 acres of his land to William Bass on 19 November 1762 [DB F:441]. He was listed among the "Black" members of the undated colonial muster roll of Captain James Fason's Northampton County Militia [Mil. T.R. 1-3]. His children may have been

i. William, born before 1750, taxable in the Granville County list of John Pope in 1761.

4    ii. Thomas2, born say 1745.

 

2.    John1 Huelin, born say 1722, may have been identical to John Huins a "black" taxable in William Chavis' Granville County household in 1755 and called John Hewens when he was taxable in Chavis' household in 1762. On 6 March 1753 his "orphan" five-year-old son John was bound to James Paine of Granville County [CR 044.101.2]. His children were

i. ?Sarah, born 1742, no parent or race indicated, bound an apprentice to Sarah Sims on 4 December 1751 [CR 044.101.2].

ii. John2, born about 1748.

 

3.    Edward Huelin/ Huling, born say 1725, and his wife Mary sold for 30 pounds 200 acres in Brunswick County, Virginia, on the Meherrin River on 30 May 1758, being part of a patent granted to him for 404 acres dated 24 April 1758 [DB 6:310]. He and his wife Mary were "Mulattoe" taxables in John Pope's Granville County list of 1759. He purchased 318 acres in Granville on both sides of Brandy Creek on 18 November 1760. He sold this land in two parcels while a resident of Brunswick County, Virginia, on 28 December 1763 and 14 March 1764 [DB D:133; F:490, 509]. He later moved to Northampton County, North Carolina, where he was listed as a "Black" member of Fason's Muster [Mil. T.R. 1-3]. He may have been the ancestor of

i. Peggy, born before 1776, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:150].

ii. Nancy, born say 1770, bound her daughter Peggy Hewlin (born 28 January 1789) to Samuel Taylor in Warren County on 25 May 1790 [WB 6:165].

 

4.    Thomas2 Huelin, born say 1745, was head of a Georgetown District, Prince George's Parish, South Carolina household of 8 "other free" in 1790, 9 in Liberty County in 1800 [SC:806], and 5 in Marion District in 1810 [SC:83]. (Other "black" families in Fason's Northampton County Company who went to South Carolina were the Demerys, the Shoemakers, and the Sweats). He recorded a plat for 100 acres on Catfish Swamp near the Pee Dee River in Georgetown District on 26 October 1791 [South Carolina Archives, series 213190, 28:17]. He was one of the "free persons of Colour" of present-day Liberty and Marlborough counties, South Carolina, who petitioned the legislature to repeal the discriminatory tax against "free Negroes" on 20 April 1794. Others who petitioned included the Evans, Gibson, Shoemaker, Turner and Sweat families. Stephen Gibson, Levi Gibson, James Ivey, Joseph Bass and a member of the Driggers family were considered white when they supported the petition [South Carolina Department of Archives and History, General Assessment Petition, 1794, no. 216, frames 370-374, Free People of Color ST 1368, series no. 165015, item 216]. He may have been the father of

i. James, born before 1776, head of a Wilmington, New Hanover County, North Carolina household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:214].

ii. Zachariah, born before 1776, head of a Wilmington household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:214].

iii. Elias, one of the "free persons of Colour" of present-day Liberty and Marlborough counties, South Carolina, who petitioned the legislature to repeal the discriminatory tax against "free Negroes" on 20 April 1794 [South Carolina Department of Archives and History, General Assessment Petition, 1794, no. 216, frames 370-374, Free People of Color ST 1368, series no. 165015, item 216].

 

HULL FAMILY

1.    Judith Hull, born say 1735, was deceased before 8 September 1756 when the Granville County, North Carolina court bound her "Mulatto natural daughter" Anne Hull as an apprentice to Robert Jones [Owens, Granville County Notes, vol. I]. She was the mother of

i. Anne, born say 1751.

ii. Jackson, born say 1755, enlisted for 3 years in the 3rd North Carolina Regiment in 1777 and was deceased by January 1778 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1073]. He may have married a member of the Chavis family because Bartholomew Chavis was one of the heirs of Jackson Hull, a Continental soldier who died at Valley Forge [NCGSJ I:160].

 

(H)UMBLES FAMILY

The Humbles family was probably related to Richard Humbles who successfully petitioned his master Charles Christian for his freedom dues in Charles City County court in April 1746 and to Eliza Humbles whose children Jesse and Obediah were bound out by the court in April 1748 [Orders 1737-51, 405, 471].

 

Members of the Humbles family were

1     i. Jeremiah1, born say 1740.

2     ii. Richard1, born say 1748.

3     iii. Martha, born say 1750.

4     iv. Amy, born say 1752.

v. Sally, born say 1780, mother of Magdalene Humbles who registered in Rockbridge County on 31 December 1859: a free woman of Colour, aged fifty seven years, five feet three and a half inches high, very dark mulatto colour, curly hair, free born in this county and daughter of Sally Humbles a free woman of colour [Humbles, Magdalene (F, 57): Free Negro Register, 1859, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

 

1.    Jeremiah1 Humbles, born say 1740, was taxable in Charles City County in 1785 and an exempt taxable who was tithable on a horse in 1800 and 1801 [Personal Property Tax List, 1783-7; 1788-1814]. He may have been the father of

i. Isaac, born say 1778, taxable in Charles City County in 1801 [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814].

5     ii. Jeremiah2, born say 1780.

iii. David, born say 1783, taxable in Charles City County in 1807 [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814].

iv. John, born say 1786, taxable in Charles City County in 1807 [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814].

 

2.    Richard1 Humbles, born say 1748, was a "black man" taxable in Amherst County in 1803 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1803, frame 589] and head of a Buckingham County household of 19 "other free" in 1810 [VA:715a]. He may have been the father of

i. Richard2, head of Buckingham County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:821].

ii. Samuel, head of a Buckingham County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:821].

 

3.    Martha Humbles, born say 1750, was head of an Amherst County household of 3 "whites" (free persons) in 1783 [VA:49]. She may have been the mother of

i. Joyce, born about 1783, married Turner Pinn, 13 August 1807 Amherst County bond, William Solle security. She registered in Amherst County on 20 October 1828: wife of Turner Pinn a free woman of color, rather light complexion, about five feet in hight, stout built, about forty five, was born free [McLeRoy, Strangers in Their Midst, 56].

ii. Susanna Thomas, alias Humbles, born about 1790, married John Redactors, 13 February 1807 Amherst County bond, William Bryant security.

iii. Tabai, born about 1796, registered in Amherst County on 22 June 1841: dark complexion - about 45 years of age - 5 feet & 3 Inches high ... born free [McLeRoy, Strangers in Their Midst, 63].

iv. Joe, a "man of color" taxable in Amherst County in 1817 [Personal Property Tax List 1804-20, frames 418, 436].

 

4.    Amy Humbles, born say 1752, gave her consent for the 13 August 1793 Amherst County marriage bond of her daughter Betsy. She was the mother of

i. Betsy, born say 1775, married Abraham Camp, 13 August 1793 Amherst County bond with the consent of Amy Humbles. Abraham Camp was head of a Rockbridge County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:298].

 

5.    Jeremiah Humbles, born say 1780, was taxable on one tithe in Charles City County in 1807 and 1809 [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814]. He was the father of

i. Parley Miles, registered in Charles City County on 17 November 1831: daughter of the late Jeremiah UMBLES, a bright mulatto woman, about 5 feet 5 inches, born free in this county [Minutes 1830-9, 83].

 

HUNT FAMILY

Members of the Hunt family born before 1750 were

1     i. Joshua, born say 1730.

ii. William, born say 1733, a "mulatto servant" who ran away from John Hardyman of Charles City County according to the 24 May 1751 issue of the Virginia Gazette.

iii. Ann, born say 1735, a taxable "Mollatto" in John Miller's Norfolk County household in the Borough of Norfolk and the south side of Tanner's Creek to Sprat's Bridge in 1753 [Wing, Norfolk County Tithables, 1751-65, 68].

iv. David, born about 1738, "a black man" listed in the Militia Returns of Captain Samuel Walker of Granville County in 1778 [The North Carolinian VI:726 (N.C. Archives Military, Troop Returns 4-40)], enlisted in Baker's Company for 9 months on 20 July 1778 [Clark, State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1080]. His heir Samuel Hunt received military warrant no. 1619 for 640 acres for his service in the Revolution [N.C. Archives, SS file 208, John Marshall, Assignee of Heirs of David Hunt].

2     v. Charles, born say 1745.

vi. Harry, born about 1765, registered in Petersburg on 29 June 1795: a brown Mulatto man, five feet eight inches high, thirty years old, born free in Chesterfield County & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 101].

vii. Elizabeth, born free according to the testimony of Edward Hill, Jr., in Chesterfield County on 15 November 1800 [Hunt, Elisabeth: Free Negro Affidavit, 1805, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

 

1.    Joshua Hunt, born say 1730, was living in Southampton County on 11 March 1763 when he and John Byrd were sued for a 2 pound debt they owed Sarah Croatia by note dated 4 May 1762 (he making his mark and Byrd signing). In November 1762 he sued Moses Byrd for 2 pounds currency which he had paid to Joseph Pope for Moses on 28 September 1761 [Judgment Papers 1763-4, frames 97, 175, 179, 227-232; Orders 1759-63, 290]. He received a cow and a calf by the undated Southampton County will of (his father-in-law?) John Byrd, proved on 12 April 1781 [WB 3:322]. He was taxable in St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County, on 2 horses and 2 cattle in 1782, taxable on John Hunt in 1787, taxable on Will Hunt in 1789, on Will Hunt and Drury Hunt in 1791 [PPTL 1782-92, frames 508, 661, 711, 761, 817]. He may have been the ancestor of

i. Elijah, born say 1755, sued in Southampton County by Aaron Haithcock for a debt of 16 pounds, 4 shillings. The sheriff returned a list of his property to the court on 14 October 1784: a feather bed bolster, a sheet, a saddle, a pepper box, two brushes, 12 hogs, two waistcoats, a coat, and a shirt [Orders 1778-84, 505]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [NC:449].

ii. Hardy1, born about 1764, enlisted from Southampton County on 3 September 1780 for the duration of the war and was sized about the same time: age 16, 5'3-1/4" high, planter, born in Southampton, Negro complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.27)]. He appeared in Southampton County court on 18 September 1792 and petitioned for pay for his services in the Revolution. John Haithcock testified that he served together with him, and Samuel Tinselly testified that he remembered a "Mulatto man by the name of Hardy Hunt" who served with him [Hunt, Hardy, 1795-11-19, Legislative Petitions Digital Collection, LVA]. He was taxable in Southampton County in 1787, taxable in the household of Sheriff Howell Edmund from 1788 to 1790, taxable in Nathaniel Edwards' household in 1792, in William Turner's household from 1793 to 1795, taxable in his own household from 1799 to 1805, called a "F.N." in 1803, a "M"(ulatto) in 1806 [PPTL 1782-92, frames 639, 658, 710, 758, 873; 1792-1806, frames 63, 91, 171, 382, 415, 518, 625, 694, 809, 844]. He was a witness to the 23 August 1790 Southampton County will of John Reed [WB 1:395].

iii. John2, taxable in Southampton County in the household of Mary Gizzard in 1788 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92, frame 660], head of a Hereford County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 in Captain Lewis' District and head of a Northampton County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:727].

iv. Patt, head of a Southampton County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:87].

v. Drury, born about 1766, taxable in St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County, in Joshua Hunt's household in 1791, taxable in William Davis's household in 1793 [PPTL 1782-92, frame 817; 1792-1806, frame 50], head of a Hertford County, North Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1800 in Captain Lewis' district, and head of a Northampton County household of 11 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:236]. He was listed in the 1850 Northampton County census in the household of (his son?) John, age 59 and Lucy (Newsom) Hunt, age 51, and their children.

vi. Miles, born say 1773, taxable in St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County, in Randolph Newsum's household in 1790, taxable on 2 horses in 1794, no race indicated [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92, frame 765; 1792-1806, frames 83].

vii. Charlotte, born about 1773, registered in Southampton County on 24 June 1810: age 35, Mulatto, 5 feet 2 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 427]. She registered in Petersburg 3 July 1810: a light brown Mulatto woman, five feet two inches high, thirty seven years old, born free & raised in Southampton County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 644]. She was head of a Petersburg Town household of 3 [VA:124b].

viii. William, born say 1781, a "F.N." taxable in St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County, from 1802 to 1811, called a "M"(ulatto) in 1805 and 1806 [Personal Property Tax List 1792-1806, frames 554, 693, 808, 843; 1807-21, frames 50, 73, 169, 193].

ix. Solomon, born about 1781, registered in Southampton County on 3 July 1802: age 21, Black, 6 feet 2 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 230].

 

2.    Charles Hunt, born say 1745, was taxable on 4 pounds, 2 shillings in the 1779 Currituck County tax list. He was head of a Currituck County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:20] and 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:149]. He was also counted in Pasquotank County in 1790, head of a household of 5 "other free" [NC:28]. His 11 January 1804 Currituck County will was proved 22 September the same year. He left his estate to his wife Lucy and "three small daughters" Lena, Susanna, and Deby [WB 2:247]. His children were

i. Lena.

ii. Susanna.

iii. Deby.

 

Other members of the family in Virginia were

i. Harry, born about 1765, registered in Petersburg on 29 June 1795: a brown Mulatto man, five feet eight inches high, thirty years old, born free in Chesterfield County & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 101].

ii. Jemima, a "free woman of color" residing in Southampton County in 1811 when she petitioned the legislature to allow her to set her husband Stephen free and remain in Virginia. She had entered into a contract to purchase him from Benjamin Barrett in November 1805 for ten pounds annually for ten years. They had a numerous family of children who depended on them for support [Hunt, Jemima: Petition, Southampton County, 1811-12-09, Legislative Petitions of the General Assembly, Digital Collections, LVA]. She freed her husband Stephen by March 1812 Southampton County deed [DB 13:10].

 

Other members of the Hunt family in North Carolina were

i. James, head of a Robeson County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:49], 7 in 1800 [NC:382], and 10 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:125].

ii. Lewis, head of a Robeson County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:49] and 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:382].

iii. Elisha, a "Coloured Man" who lost his right arm at the siege of Charleston and was awarded a pension of $5 on 4 March 1789 while a resident of Lenoir County, North Carolina. On 5 October 1821 he applied for a pension in Cumberland County, North Carolina [NARA, S.13486, M804-1370, frame 0091; https://www.fold3.com/image/1/24189015].

iv. John1, a "Molatto" head of New Hanover County household of 1 male 21-60 years of age, and 2 female "Molattos" in 1786 in John Erwin's list for the North Carolina state census.

v. Isum, head of a Currituck County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:88].

vi. Dempsey, head of a Currituck County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:21] and 1 in 1800 [NC:141].

vii. Hyram, head of a Currituck County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:21].

viii. Service(?), head of a Currituck County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:88].

ix. Curria, born before 1776, head of a Pasquotank County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:249].

x. Patience, head of a Northampton County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [NC:728].

 

Members of the family in South Carolina were

i. Fanny, head of a Marlboro County household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [SC:60].

ii. James, born about 1764, a "Molatto Boy" about eighteen years old on 3 August 1782 when the vestry of Saint David's Parish ordered him bound to William Lankford.

iii. Lewis, born about 1768, a "Molatto Boy" about thirteen years old on 3 August 1782 when the vestry of Saint David's Parish ordered him bound to William Lankford.

iv. Saul, born about 1771, about eleven years old on 3 August 1782 when the vestry of Saint David's Parish ordered him bound to William Lankford [Holcomb, Saint David's Parish, South Carolina, Minutes of the Vestry 1768-1832, 24]. He was head of a Lancaster District household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [SC:8].

v. Samuel, head of a Sumter District household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [SC:8].

 

HUNTER FAMILY

1.    Penelope Hunter, born say 1765, was a "free Negro" bound to Thomas Thompson by the churchwardens of Elizabeth River Parish by order of the Norfolk County court on 20 June 1771 [Orders 1771-3, 1]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Sally, head of a Norfolk County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:904].

ii. Thomas, born 1776-1794, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 4 "free colored" in 1830.

iii. Peter, a boy of color bound to Jesse H. Simmons by the Halifax County, North Carolins court on 16 February 1824 [Minutes 1822-4].

 

HURLEY FAMILY

1.    Hannah Hurley, born about 1750, was called the three-year-old daughter of a white woman on 23 March 1753 when the churchwardens of Augusta Parish in Augusta County ordered her bound to William Bithel until the age of thirty-one [Augusta Parish Vestry Book, 1746-1780, 118]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Henry1, head of a Charles County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1790.

ii. Mary, a "Mulatto" taxable on 2 horses in Culpeper County in 1802 [PPTL 1782-1802, frame 864] and "Mo." head of a Culpeper County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:41].

iii. Ruth, "Mo." head of a Culpeper County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:41].

iv. Henry2/ Harry, born about 1779, registered in Culpeper County on 20 October 1800: a dark Mulatto, 21 years of age, 5 feet 10 Inches high...born free [Minutes 1798-1800, 254]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Culpeper County in 1802 [PPTL 1782-1802, frame 864], a "free Negro" taxable in the eastern district of Rockingham County from 1806 to 1813: taxable on 4 horses in 1806, living at J. Moyers and taxable on 2 horses in 1812 and 1813 [PPTL 1795-1813, frame 514, 550, 649, 717, 733] and head of a Rockingham County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:33].

v. John, head of a Bohemia, Cecil County, Maryland household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

vi. Elizabeth, bound by the churchwardens of Hamilton Parish in Fauquier County court to Joseph Henry on 24 May 1784, no race indicated [Minutes 1781-4, 291].

vii. John, born about 1798, a "Mo" taxable in Culpeper County in 1813 [PPTL, 1803-1823, frame 203], registered in Fauquier County on 29 August 1820: age 22, 5'8", very dark Mulatto [Register of Free Negroes, 1817-65, no. 32].

 

HURST FAMILY

The Hurst family may have descended from Richard Hurst, an eight-month-old "Mulatto" valued at 4 pounds on 2 September 1724 when he was listed in the inventory of the York County estate of Joseph Walker, Esq. [DOW 16, pt. 2, 329]. Members of the Hurst family were

1     i. Faithy, born about 1757.

ii. Angey, born say 1762, married Burwell Artis, 21 August 1783 Southampton County bond.

iii. Robert, born say 1765, taxable in St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County, from 1790 to 1805: taxable on 2 horses in 1790, called a "free Negro" in 1801, a "FN" in 1803 and 1804, a "M" taxable with Henry Hix (Hicks) in 1805 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92, frame 762; 1792-1806, frames 55, 82, 163, 192, 517, 555, 624, 694, 808].

iv. Mima, head of a Southampton County household of 9 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:54].

v. Hannah, a "M" taxable on a horse in Southampton County in 1806, 1807 and 1809, taxable on 2 free males and 2 horses in 1810 [Personal Property Tax List 1792-1806, frame 844; 1807-21, frames 73, 170]. She was head of a Southampton County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:75].

vi. Isabel, born about 1780, registered in Southampton County on 30 July 1810: age 30, Blk., 5 feet 3 inches, free born. She registered again on 12 March 1828 [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, nos. 733, 1694].

vii. Milly, born about 1785, registered in Southampton County on 30 July 1810: age 25, Mulatto, 5 feet 3-1/2 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, nos. 738, 1689]

viii. Drury, born about 1786, registered in Southampton County on 28 July 1810: age 24, 5 feet 11 inches, Blk., free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, nos. 705, 1690]. He was head of a Southampton County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:54].

 

1.    Faithy Hurst, born about 1757, was a "Mulatto" taxable in St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County, from 1802 to 1804: taxable on a free male tithable, a slave 12-16 and a horse in 1802; on 2 free males, a slave 12-16, and 2 horses in [Personal Property Tax List 1792-1806, frames 554, 623, 693]. She registered in Southampton County on 28 July 1810: age 53, blk., 5 feet 4-3/4 inches high, free born. She registered again on 12 March 1828: age 71, Black, 5 feet 4-1/2 inches high, born free. She emancipated (her husband?) London Williams by deed acknowledged in Southampton County court on 21 April 1806 [Minutes 1804-7, 158]. He registered in Southampton County on 15 September 1806: age 50, Blk., 5 feet 6-1/4 inches high, emancipated by Faithy Hurst deed [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, nos. 398, 707, 1691]. They may have been the parents of

i. Solomon, born about 1781, required to post bond on 19 March 1804 for maintenance of an illegitimate child he had by Amey Artis [Minutes 1803-4, unpaged]. He registered in Southampton County on 23 May 1805: age 35, 6 feet 1 inch high, blk., born free. He registered again on 24 May 1817: age 35, 6 feet 1-1/2 inches, blk., free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, nos. 325, 1090]. He was head of a Southampton County household of 6 "other free" in 1810, and there were two other Solomon Hursts who were heads of Southampton County households with 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:54, 70, 74]. He was listed with his wife Milly in 1812 and 1814 [Personal Property Tax List 1807-21, frames 291, 419].

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