JOINER FAMILY

1.    Sally Joiner, born say 1740, was a "free Woman of Colour" whose daughter Betty Joiner was bound to Peter Rowlett as an apprentice in Chesterfield County some time after her birth about 1767. She was the mother of

2    i. ?Amy, born about 1758.Law

ii. John1, a "free negro" charged by the Richmond City court on 24 November 1789 with stealing a cow yearling the property of James Housling. He was found guilty and chose to receive thirty-nine lashes rather than be tried at the capitol [Hustings Court Orders 1787-92, 441]. He was a "free Negro" taxable in Henrico County on a slave over the age of 16 in 1790 [PPTL 1782-1814, frame 219].

iii. Betty, born about 1767, registered in Petersburg on 20 May 1802: born free bound to my mother and then served me until the age of twenty one years, is now about thirty five years old, of an olive colour or complexion, was raised in the neighborhood as a free person being born of a free woman of Colour by the name of Sally Joiner. Peter Rowlett [Joiner, Betty (F, 35): Free Negro Certificate, 1802, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. She registered again on 3 August 1805: a dark brown Mulatto woman, five feet high, thirty eight years old, born free and raised in the County of Chesterfield according to a register of that County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 348].

iv. ?Polly, born about 1769, registered in Petersburg on 18 August 1794: a stout well made dark brown Mulatto woman, five feet four inches high, twenty five years old, born free in Chesterfield County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 36]. She was head of a Petersburg household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:122a].

v. ?Anna, born about 1772, registered in Petersburg on 14 August 1800: a dark brown Mulatto girl, five feet two inches high, eighteen years old, short bushy hair, well made and born free & raised by William Alvis in Chesterfield County. Renewed 9 July 1805: 5'3" has holes in ears [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 158].

vi. ?Dolly, born about 1775, registered in Petersburg on 15 August 1800: a dark brown Mulatto woman, four feet ten inches high, twenty five years old, short bushy hair & holes in her ears for rings, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 179]. She was head of an "other free" Petersburg Town household in 1810 [VA:123b].

 

1.    Amy Joiner, born about 1758, registered in Petersburg on 18 August 1794: a dark brown Mulatto woman, five feet two inches high, about thirty six years old, born free in Chesterfield County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 35]. She was taxable on (her son?) John Joiner in Dinwiddie County in 1800 [PPTL 1800-9, B, p.8]. She may have been the mother of

i. John2, born about 1780, registered in Petersburg on 8 December 1801: a dark brown Mulatto man, twenty one years old, five feet four and a half inches high, short wooly hair, born free in Chesterfield County & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 219]. He was head of a Dinwiddie County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:150].

ii. Eliza, born about 1782, registered in Petersburg on 15 August 1800: a brown Mulatto woman, four feet eleven inches, eighteen years old, short bushy hair, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 180].

iii. Thomas, born about 1783, registered in Petersburg on 10 July 1805: a dark brown Mulatto man, five feet five inches high, twenty two years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 322]. He was head of a Petersburg Town household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:126a].

iv. Nancy, born in November 1785, registered in Petersburg on 10 July 1805: a dark brown Negro woman, four feet and a half inches high, twenty years old Nov. next, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 323]. She was head of a Petersburg Town household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:117a].

v. Billy, born about 1786, registered in Petersburg on 22 June 1807: a dark brown Negro man, five feet four and a half inches high, twenty one years old Oct. last. a Blacksmith, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 410].

 

JONES FAMILY

Members of the Jones family who were free during the colonial period were

1     i. Margaret, born say 1715.

ii. James1, born say 1716, a soldier who enlisted in the expedition against the Spaniards at Carthagena and died in Jamaica. His "Mulatto" widow Rebecca Jones petitioned the Virginia House of Burgesses for a pension and was granted an allowance of five pounds on 26 May 1742 [McIlwaine, Journals of the House of Burgesses, 21, 37].

iii. Peter, born say 1723, a "negro" head of household with his wife Elizabeth and James Weaver in John Campbell's 1758 list for Bertie County and in John Brickell's 1759 list [CR 10.702.1]. Hertford County was formed from this part of Bertie County in 1759.

2     iv. Mary1, born say 1725.

3     v. John1, born say 1731.

4     vi. Richard, born say 1732.

5     vii. Abraham1, born about 1734.

6     viii. Abraham2, born say 1735.

7      ix. Samuel1, born say 1738.

8     x. Philip, born say 1740.

xi. Richard, born say 1742, taxable with his wife ("Mulatoes") in Bladen County from 1768 to 1770 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:8, 16, 45]. On 9 September 1783 he sold 100 acres in Bladen County on the south side of Drowning Creek, south of Ashpole Swamp, which was land he had been granted on 11 November 1779. Ishmael Chavis witnessed the deed [DB 1:29]. He was head of a Robeson County household of 3 "other free," one white woman and one white male under sixteen years of age in 1790 [NC:49], head of a Beaufort District, South Carolina household of 8 "other free" in 1790 and 11 in 1800 [SC:120]. He may have been the father of Dick Jones, head of a Beaufort County, South Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [SC:104].

xii. Francis1, born say 1750, a "Black" member of Captain James Fason's colonial Northampton County, North Carolina Militia [N.C. Archives Troop Returns, 1-3].

xiii. William, born say 1760, a seaman aboard the ship Tartar on 2 March 1780 when he received a warrant for 14 pounds [Creel, Selected Virginia Revolutionary War Records, III:256, citing Auditors' Accounts III:322]. He was a free Negro taxable in Fredericksburg from 1794 to 1815: taxable on 3 horses in 1803, 2 slaves and 3 horses in 1804 [PPTL 1787-1815, frames 348, 453, 466, 477, 559], head of a Spotsylvania County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:100] and 4 "free colored" in Fredericksburg in 1820. On 6 September 1827 he received a pension for his services in the Revolution [Revolutionary War Virginia State Pensions, Jones, William, Digital Collections, LVA]. His heir Staunton Jones received 100 acres, bounty land warrant no. 10,311 [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 312, 348].

ix. Francis2, born about 1765, enlisted in Sharp's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 1 August 1782 and was transferred on 27 December 1782 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1094]. He was about 50-60 years old when he appeared in Wake County court on 13 May 1818 to apply for a pension for his service in the Revolution. He stated that he volunteered for 18 months under Captain Sharp in the 10th North Carolina Regiment until the end of the war. And he was said to be between 65-70 years old on 12 January 1821 when he appeared in Caswell County court to make the same declaration, adding that he had a son John, age 14, daughter Betsy, age 9, son Nathaniel age 7, and wife about 51. He moved to Wayne County, Indiana, by 7 March 1839 to be with his children [NARA, S.36653, M804-1438, https://www.fold3.com/image/24155584]. He was head of a Wake County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:103] and 8 "free colored" in Caswell County in 1820 [NC:66] and a 75-year-old veteran in the household of Lemuel Reed, head of a household of 6 "free colored". On 6 June 1818 he testified on behalf of Allen Sweat in Wake County court that he had served with him in the Revolutionary War [NARA, W.16, M804-2332].

 

1.    Margaret Jones, born say 1715, was head of a Beaufort County household of 5 "black" taxables in 1755 [SS 837]. In 1769 she was living alone in the adjacent county of Craven [SS 837]. She sold 320 acres in Craven County on the south side of Neuse River near Chinquapin Creek to Joseph McKennie on 11 March 1775 with the proviso that she have a lifetime right to live on one hundred acres of this land [DB 21:240]. This part of Craven County became Jones County in 1779. Her descendants may have been

9    i. James2, born say 1738.

ii. Hardy, born about 1760, was head of a Jones County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:144], 7 "other free" and a white woman over the age of 45 in Lenoir County in 1810 [NC:300] and 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:295]. He was about fifty eight and residing in Lenoir County when he appeared in the county court on 16 October 1818 to apply for a pension. He stated that he enlisted in Jones County in 1778 in Captain John Taylor's Company of the 3rd North Carolina Regiment and served until 1783. He was in the Battle of Stono Creek and was taken prisoner in the Siege of Charleston. The records of the War Department confirmed that he had served five years [NARA, S.41699, M804, roll 1439, frame 351 of 1122].

iii. Bazzilla, born before 1776, a "free colored" woman who was head of a Jones County household of 7 in 1830 [NC:132].

iv. William, head of a Jones County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 (J___, ___iam) [NC:265] and 8 "free colored" in 1830 [NC:132]. On 23 December 1826 he and Bazel Jones purchased land on both sides of Chinquapin Creek from Elijah Jones which was land he had received by his father's will [DB 16:359].

 

2.    Mary1 Jones, born say 1725, was a taxable head of a household of herself and Thomas and Mary Jones in the 1761 Cross Roads District of Granville County in the tax list of James Price as "mulattos &c" [CR 44.701.19]. In 1763 Mary had 4 taxables in her household in a list of Granville County insolvent taxpayers. Her children may have been

i. Thomas1, born say 1743.

ii. Mary2, born say 1745, taxable in Mary Jones' Cross Roads District household in 1761.

 

3.    John1 Jones, born say 1731, was a "Mulatto" who lost his right to 200 acres in Brunswick County, Virginia, in a case heard before the Council of Virginia on 13 June 1753 [McIlwaine, Executive Journals of the Council, V:433]. He may have been the John Jones who was head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:62]. Perhaps his widow was Margaret Jones, head of a household of 2 "other free" in the neighboring county of Northampton in 1800 [NC:453]. He may have been the father of

10   i. Thomas2, born say 1750.

11   ii. Tempy, born say 1765.

 

4.    Richard Jones, born say 1732, and his wife Barshaba were taxable as two black tithes in the 1764 Granville County list of Samuel Benton. In 1768 his wife was called Mary when he was taxed with her and his son Ephraim in John Pope's list. He was still in Granville County in 1780 where he had no property but was taxable as a "married man" in Goshen District, and taxable on one poll in 1785. He may have been the Richard Jones who was head of a Martin County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:68]. His child was

i. Ephraim, born about 1755, taxed in his father's household in 1768. His estate was sold in Granville County on 16 November 1781 [WB 1:326].

 

5.    Abraham1 Jones, born about 1734, was head of a household of one Black male and one Black female in the 1767 Granville County tax list of John Pope adjacent to Richard Jones. In 1768 he was listed in Pope's list with his wife Charity. In the 1778 Militia Returns for Granville County he was listed in Captain John Rust's Company as a "mulatto," about forty-four years old [The North Carolinian VI:726 (Mil TR 4-40)]. He bought 8-1/2 head of cattle at the estate sale of Ephraim Jones on 16 November 1781 [WB 1:326]. He was taxable in Granville County in 1782 on 3 horses and 5 cattle and taxable on one poll in 1785 through 1788. Perhaps one of his children was

i. Jonathan, born about 1761, a seventeen-year-old "mulatto" listed in Captain Rust's Granville County Militia Returns adjacent to Abraham Jones [The North Carolinian VI:726]. His final pay of 94 pounds was received by Selby Harney [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVII:222], probably the Jonathan Jones who was taxable on one poll in Nash District of Person County in 1793 [N.C. Genealogy XVII:2673], head of a Person County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [NC:597] and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:498].

 

6.    Abraham2 Jones, born say 1735, was a man of mixed blood from Anson County who petitioned the North Carolina General Assembly in 1797 stating that he had purchased his wife Lydia about 1757 and had six grown children Isaac, Jacob, Thomas, Abraham, Lewis and one other. He was concerned that once he died his wife and children would revert to slavery, having not been formally freed. His petition was rejected [http://library.uncg.edu/slavery/petitions/details.aspx?pdi=695 PAR# 11279701]. He was head of an Anson County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [NC:225] and 7 in Hertford County in 1810 [NC:98]. He was the father of

12   i. Isaac, born say 1760.

ii. Jacob, head of an Anson County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [NC:225].

iii. Thomas, head of an Anson County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:48] and head of a Mill Creek, Anson County household of 8 "free colored" and 2 white women in 1820 [NC:12].

iv. Abraham.

v. Lewis.

 

7.    Samuel1 Jones, born say 1738, was taxable in Granville County on 150 acres, 2 horses, and 7 cattle in Fishing Creek District in 1782. He may have been the Samuel Jones who married Ann Harris, 24 November 1780 Granville County bond with Edward Harris bondsman. In 1786 he was head of an Epping Forest District household of 5 males and 3 females for the state census, and he was taxable in Granville County on 50 acres and 2 free polls in 1786. In 1788 he was taxable on 200 acres but was not subject to poll tax so he was probably over fifty years old. He was head of a Granville County household of 5 "other free" in 1800. He was taxable on 80 acres in Beaver Dam District for the last time in 1805 [Tax List 1803-09, 110]. One of his children was most likely

i. Emmanuel, born say 1768, called "Manuel Scot Jones" on 7 February 1788 when he purchased cattle and tools from (his father?) Samuel Jones in Granville County [WB 2:153]. He entered 100 acres in Granville County on Buckhorn Creek on 17 March 1795 [Pruitt, Granville County Land Entries, 61]. He was taxable on one poll in Granville County in 1789, was taxed on 97-1/2 acres in Beaverdam District in 1797 and was charged with Samuel Jones's tax in the Beaverdam District of Granville County in 1802 [Tax List 1796-1802, 67, 326]. He was head of a Granville County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:864]. In 1815 he was taxed on 79 acres in Beaver Dam District, and he and a woman over forty-five years of age were counted as "free colored" in the 1820 Granville County census for Beaver Dam District [NC:16].

ii. Samuel2, born say 1778, head of a Granville County household of 2 "other free" in 1800.

iii. Lyford, born say 1779, head of a Granville County household of 3 "other free" in 1800.

iv. Phereby, born say 1782, married Daniel Evans, 10 September 1800 Granville County bond, Emanuel Scott Jones bondsman. Daniel was head of a Granville County household of 2 "other free" in 1800.

v. Major, born say 1786, head of a Beaver Dam District household of 4 "other free" in 1810 and 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:16]. He married Honor Bass, 25 August 1814 Granville County bond, Elijah Valentine bondsman.

 

8.    Philip Jones, born say 1740, was head of a Halifax County household of 7 "other free" in 1790 [NC:65] and 2 in 1800 (called Philip, Senr.) [NC:322]. He made a deposition in Northampton County court on 26 March 1791 that he enlisted and served as a soldier in the Continental Army [NCGSJ XI:118]. He may have been the Philip Jones who sometime before 7 September 1787 sold bounty land in Davidson County, Tennessee, which he received for his services in the War [Franklin County DB 6:89]. He sold 10 acres in Halifax County on Hog Pen Branch on 11 July 1795 [DB 17:831]. The Halifax branch of the family may have been related to Barshaba Jones of Granville County since a child named Barshaby Jones (no race mentioned) was ordered bound an apprentice by the 16 February 1836 Halifax County court. Philip's children may have been

i. James3, born about 1761, head of a Halifax County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:65], 12 in 1810 [NC:29] and 10 "free colored" in 1820. He appeared in Halifax County court on 22 November 1821 to apply for a pension for his service in the Revolution. He enlisted in 1781 for a year in Captain Yarborough's Company of Colonel Blount's North Carolina Regiment and was in the Battle of Eutaw Springs. He was living on 18 acres of rented land with his forty-seven-year-old wife and five children aged 6 to 15 years of age. Isham Scott testified that they were both under the command of Colonel Hardy Murfree for a part of their time in the service [NARA, S.41701, M804, roll 1440, frame 314 of 991]. On 19 May 1823 he testified for Isham Scott in Halifax County court that he was in the service with him in Colonel Ashe's regiment.

ii. Philip, Jr., born before 1776, head of a Halifax County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [NC:322], 2 in Hertford County in 1810 [NC:100], and 9 "free colored" in Hertford County in 1820 [NC:182]. He was one of the "Sundry persons of Colour of Hertford County" who petitioned the General Assembly in 1822 to repeal the act which declared slaves to be competent witnesses against free African Americans [NCGSJ XI:252].

 

9.    James2 Jones, born say 1738, may have been one of the "black" tithables in the Beaufort County household of (his mother?) Margaret Jones in 1755. He was a "black" taxable in Craven County in 1769 [SS 837]. On 26 April 1780 he purchased 67 acres adjoining his land on Chinqapin Creek in Jones County from Jacob Jones, being the land where Jacob Jones, deceased, formerly lived, for 18 pounds [DB 3:90]. He was called James Jones of Jones County when he received voucher no. 426 for serving in the militia under Captain Fred Hargess [North Carolina Revolutionary Pay Vouchers, 1779-1782, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2WT-5VT9, Jones, James]. He was counted as white in the North Carolina state census for Jones County, recorded on 30 September 1786: head of a household of 1 male, 5 males and 5 free females, listed next to William Morgan, John Conner, and Mark Conner who were also counted as white [Governor's Office Census of 1784-7, Jones County family nos. 181-5]. He was head of a Jones County household of 11 "other free" in 1790 [NC:144]. By his 15 January 1790 Jones County will, proved February 1802, he left his wife his house and a third of his lands which were to be divided between his sons James and Bazel at her death or marriage. He divided the remainder of his land amongst his sons James, Frederick, Ezekiel, Elijah, and Jacob and left furniture and livestock to his daughters Elizabeth, Sarah, and Mary. His wife Sarah and son James were executors. James was the father of

i. Elizabeth, received a bed, furniture and two cows by her father's will.

ii. James4, executor of his father's will, head of a Jones County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:265].

iii. Frederick, received a bed and furniture, the bed he made use of, and the seventeen head of hogs he had raised, two cows, a mare, and a gun by his father's will.

iv. Sarah, received a mare and two cows by her father's will.

v. Ezekiah/ Ezekiel, head of a Jones County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:264].

vi. Mary4, received two cows, eighteen hogs, and a chest by her father's will.

vii. Elijah, head of a Jones County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:265] and 5 "free colored" in 1830 [NC:132]. On 23 December 1826 he sold to Bazel and William Jones all the land on both sides of Chinquapin Creek which he had received by his father's will [DB 16:359].

viii. Bazel, received a young horse by his father's will. He was head of a Jones County household of one "other free" in 1810 [NC:265].

ix. Jacob, head of a Jones County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:144] and one "free colored" man 55-100 years old in 1830 [NC:132].

 

10.    Thomas1 Jones, born say 1743, was head of a Greensville County, Virginia household of 6 persons in 1783 [VA:55]. He was taxable in Greensville County from 1783 to 1797 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 13, 84, 138, 162, 180, 189, 203, 219]. He and his wife Rebecca were named in the 10 February 1796 Greensville County marriage bond of their daughter Nancy. Their children were

13   i. ?Britton, born about 1763.

ii. ?Elizabeth, born say 1768, married Meshack Haithcock, 26 December 1789 Greensville County bond.

iii. ?Mary3, born say 1770, married Reuben Haithcock, 30 January 1788 Greensville County bond, Braxton Robinson surety [Marriage Bonds, 28].

iv. ?Jesse, born say 1772, taxable in Greensville County from 1789 to 1801: taxable on two 16-21 year-old tithables and a horse in 1795; charged with Nathaniel Jones's tithe in 1800 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 92, 180, 189, 219, 245, 260, 275]. He purchased land in Greensville County near Hick's Ford and Caton's Ferry from John and Agnes Day for 25 pounds on 8 February 1797 [DB 4:283]. The inventory of his Greensville County estate totaled about 35 pounds on 2 February 1805 [WB 1:535, 543; 2:5]. On 20 December 1804 Nancy Jones sold to Henry Stewart all her rights to the Greensville County estate of Jesse Jones, with Rebecca Stewart as witness [DB 3:412]. Aaron Newsom and his wife Christian of Brunswick County, Virginia, sold their part of the Greensville County estate of Jesse Jones to Henry Stewart on 13 October 1806 [Greensville County DB 3:507].

v. Sarah, born say 1776, married Thomas Going, 24 July 1794, Greensville County bond, William Dungill surety, and on 29 September 1794, called "Daughter of Thomas Jones" when she married Mark Going, 29 September 1794 Greensville County bond, Robert Brooks Corn bondsman.

vi. ?Bryant, born 24 December 1777, registered in Greensville County on 12 December 1807: born free of Yellowish Complexion ... Aged twenty nine years the 24th day of December last, 5 feet Nine & 3/4 Inches high [Register of Free Negroes, 1805-32, no.12]. He was taxable in Greensville County from 1800 to 1807 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 260, 275, 303, 322, 337, 354, 372], head of a Caswell County, North Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:483] and

vii. Nancy, born say 1780, daughter of Thomas and Rebecca Jones, married Robert Watkins, 10 February 1796 Greensville County bond, Abraham Artis surety [Marriage Bonds, 34].

viii. ?James6, born about 1784, registered in Greensville County on 27 February 1807: born free of a yellowish Complexion, freckled ... Aged 23 years, five feet six Inches high [Register of Free Negroes, 1805-32, no.9].

ix. ?Surrel/ Cyril, born say 1772, taxable in Greensville County on the south side of the Meherrin River from 1789 to 1812: called Surrell Jones Jeffries when he was taxable in Simon Jeffries' household in 1789 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 84, 138, 162, 179, 189, 203, 219, 232, 245, 275, 354, 372, 402, 416, 433]. He was head of an Orange County, North Carolina household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:410].

x. ?Nathaniel, born before 1776, taxable in Greensville from 1796 to 1806: his tax charged to Jesse Jones in 1800 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 203, 245, 260, 275, 337, 354]. He was head of a Caswell County, North Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1810 and 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:66].

xi. ?Sally, born about 1782, registered in Greensville County on 7 April 1825: free born of black Complexion, between forty & forty five years old, 5 feet 8-1/8 Inches high in Shoes ... and her Daughter Jacky Viney between three and four years old [Register, no.145].

xii. ?Elizabeth/ Lizzy, born about 1780-1785, registered in Greensville County on 2 February 1830: free born, dark yellow complexion, between forty five and fifty years of age, four feet 10-1/4 inches high...by occupation a weaver [Register of Free Negroes, 1805-1832, no.175].

 

11.    Tempy Jones, born say 1765, was probably the mother of Willie, Sterling, and Montfort Jones, "base born children" who were bound by the Halifax County, North Carolina court to Ephraim Knight on 25 August 1797 [Minutes 1796-8, Friday]. She died before 25 March 1814 when her son Mumford Jones received a certificate of freedom in Halifax County: Mumford Jones, the son of Tempy Jones, decd., the grandson of Margarett Jones all of the county of Halifax in the state of North Carolina, was born free, that his grand father and mother were likewise a free color'd people and their freedom never disputed as I ever new and I have them and his mother lived in my fathers family Twenty or Thirty years past & the said Molatoe Boy Mumford has lived with me for near fourteen years past & that he is now something above twenty one years of age. A. Knight [Randolph County, Illinois, Servitude and Emancipation Register, vol. 1, 120]. She was the mother of

i. ?Willie, born about 1783, fourteen years old on 25 August 1797 when he was bound by the Halifax County court to Ephraim Knight to learn carpentry [Minutes 1796-8, Friday]. He was probably the William Jones, Sr., who was head of a Halifax County household of 8 "free colored" in 1830.

ii. ?Sterling, born about 1785, twelve years old on 25 August 1797 when he was bound by the Halifax County court to Ephraim Knight to learn carpentry [Minutes 1796-8, Friday]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 13 "free colored" in 1830.

iii. Mumford, born about 1788, nine years old on 25 August 1797 when he was bound by the Halifax County court to Ephraim Knight to learn carpentry [Minutes 1796-8, Friday]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Halifax County signed by A. Knight on 25 March 1814 which he registered in Pendleton District, South Carolina, on 8 November 1819 and later recorded in Randolph County, Illinois [Randolph County Servitude and Emancipation Register, vol. 1, 120]. A. Knight was apparently identical to Abner Knight, son of Ephraim Knight whose Halifax County will was proved in November 1800 [Halifax County Minutes 1799-1802, 145].

iv. ?Grizza, born about February 1795, two years and five months old on 25 August 1797 when she was bound by the Halifax County court to Ephraim Knight [Minutes 1796-8, Friday].

v. Peggy, born about November 1796, nine months old on 25 August 1797 when she was bound by the Halifax County court to Ephraim Knight [Minutes 1796-8, Friday]. She was head of a Halifax County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830.

 

12.    Isaac Jones, born say 1760, was head of a Robeson County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:386]. Perhaps his widow was Priscilla Jones, born before 1776, head of a Robeson County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:302]. Isaac may have been the father of

i. Nathan, born 1776-94, head of a Robeson County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820.

ii. Willey, head of a Robeson County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:293].

iii. Abraham, born 1786-1804, head of a Robeson County household of 5 "free colored" in 1840, a "free man of Colour," granted a permit to carry a gun in Robeson County by the 22 November 1841 court [Minutes 1839-43, 240].

 

13.    Britton Jones, born about 1763, was head of a Greensville County household of 2 persons in 1783 [VA:55], and 4 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:262]. He petitioned the legislature on 26 October 1793 that he was drafted in the militia in Greensville County in 1782, performed a tour of duty for six months, and received a discharge in Portsmouth from his commanding officer Captain Armstead which he was able to produce [Jones, Britton: Petition, 1793-10-26, Southampton County, Legislative Petitions Digital Collections, LVA]. He was taxable in Greensville County from 1792 to 1818: taxable on Willie Jones's tithe in 1803 and taxable on Willie and Bryant Jones's tithe in 1804, a "Mulatto" listed with his wife Lucy and their unnamed daughter in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1850, frames 137, 179, 189, 203, 232, 245, 260, 304, 322, 337, 345, 372, 387, 402, 416, 426, 433, 447, 463, 483, 557]. He registered as a "Free Negro" in Greensville County on 1 April 1825: free born of a Yellowish Complexion about Sixty-two years old, 5 feet 10-1/4 inches high...a planter [Register of Free Negroes, 1805-32, no. 140]. He was the father of

i. ?Sarah, born 15 August 1787, registered on 12 December 1807: born free of yellowish Complexion aged Nineteen years the 15th last August, five feet two & 1/2 Inches high [Register of Free Negroes, no. 13].

ii. ?Benjamin, born about 1788, taxable in Greensville County from 1807 to 1827: listed with his wife Winifred, "Mulattos," in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 372, 416, 447, 484, 679, 830]. He registered there on 7 April 1825: free born of yellowish Complexion between 35 & 40 years old, 5 feet 9-1/8 inches high in Shoes ... a planter [Register of Free Negroes, 1805-32, no. 143].

iii. Edmund, born about 1791, registered in Greensville County on 3 January 1826: (Son of Britton Jones) free born of a Yellowish Complexion, about 35 years of age, Six feet, two inches high (in Shoes) ... freckled face ... a farmer [Register of Free Negroes, no. 151].

iv. ?Winney, born about 1792, registered in Greensville County on 7 April 1825: free born of yellowish Complexion between thirty and thirty five years Old, 5 feet 4-1/2 Inches high ... a weaver & her 6 Children, viz., Lucinda about 14 years old ... Eliza Jane, 9 years old ... Sally Ann nearly 3 years old, and Britton Anderson 12 years Old next December, Peterson Douglas 7 years old next month, and Jack Anderson 5 years Old in June next [Register of Free Negroes, 1805-32, no. 142].

v. ?Peggy, born about 1797, registered in Greensville County on 15 April 1825: born free of a yellow complexion, about 28 years old, 5 feet 4-1/2 inches high in shoes ... a weaver [Register of Free Negroes, 1805-32, no. 146].

vi. Willie, born say 1786, taxable in Greensville County from 1803 to 1814: his tax charged to Britton Jones from 1803 to 1805, listed as a "Mulatto" in 1814 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 304, 322, 337, 354, 382, 402, 416, 463]. He was head of a Caswell County, North Carolina household of 10 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:67].

 

York County

1.    Sarah Jones, born say 1700, was presented by the York County court on 15 May 1738 for not listing herself as a tithable. The court excused her from paying the fine but ordered that she and Nanny Jones pay their levies for that year and the future [OW 18:414, 427]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Nanny, born say 1719, presented by the York County court on 19 June 1738 for not listing herself as a tithable [OW 18:427], perhaps the Nanny Jones who was a "free" head of a Williamsburg City household of 3 "black" persons in 1782 [VA:45].

ii. Humphrey, sued a number of people for debt in York County court between 1748 and 1754. In a suit which he brought in chancery against John Rollison (Rawlinson) on 17 August 1752 the parties by their counsel agreed that the plaintiff and a witness named Thomas Carter were "Mulattos." The court ruled that the lease involved in the suit was obtained fraudulently and was, therefore, cancelled. Rawlinson appealed to the General Court. Humphrey sued Rawlinson for a 93 pound, 16 shillings debt on 19 November 1753 [Judgments & Orders 1746-52, 101, 112, 153, 163, 182; 1752-4, 119, 153, 166, 168, 170-1, 178, 196, 285, 343-4, 353, 495].

2     iii. George, born say 1725.

iv. John1, born say 1725, living in York County on 20 November 1749 when his wife Mary was presented for not listing herself as a tithable. The charges were dismissed when John paid her tax and costs of the suit. Mary was presented again on 19 November 1750 for not listing herself [Judgment & Orders 1746-52, 256, 277, 364, 384].

3     v. Barshaba, born say 1727.

vi. William, a "free Negro," who died before 7 November 1769 when the vestry of Elizabeth City paid for his coffin. The vestry also paid Jane Allen for maintaining him for four weeks during his sickness [von Doenhoff, Vestry Book of Elizabeth City Parish 1751-1784, 101].

vii. Edward, presented by the York County court on 19 November 1750 for not listing his wife Betty and "Will a Negro" (a slave). The court fined him 1,000 pounds of tobacco [Judgment & Orders 1746-52, 364, 384].

4     viii. James, born say 1745.

ix. Disey, born about 1749, registered in York County on 18 December 1809: a woman of yellowish complexion supposed to be about 60 years of age ... thin visage & has fierce black Eyes for one of her age. Born of free parents in the parish of Bruton & county of York [Free Negro Register 1798-1831, no. 39].

x. Mary, born say 1755, a "free Negro" attending the "Negro School" in Williamsburg in September 1762.

xi. Elisha, born say 1757, a "free Negro" attending the "Negro School" in Williamsburg in September 1762 [Stephenson, Notes on the Negro School in Williamsburg, 1760-1774, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation (1963), Appendix no. 1, iii, citing Manuscripts of Dr. Bray's Associates, American Papers, 1735-1774, S.P.G. Archives, London].

xii. Anny, sister of Sally Delaney who married John Comboe (Cumbo), 10 August 1797 York County bond.

xiii. Susanna, married Henry Ashby, 23 January 1796 York County bond. He was taxable in James City County from 1795 to 1801. Susanna Ashby was taxable there on a horse in 1807 and head of a household of one "Free Person of Colour above 16 years" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-99; 1800-15].

 

2.    George Jones, born say 1725, sued Joseph Kennedy (Cannady) for trespass, assault and battery in a case which was dismissed by the York County court on 19 May 1746 when neither party appeared [W&I 19:429]. On 19 September 1763 he sued Peter Gillett for 35 shillings due by account with John Poe as his witness [Judgments & Orders 1759-63, 325; 1763-5, 79]. The court ordered George to pay Sarah Freeman 40 shillings on 15 January 1770 in her suit against him for trespass, assault and battery. Peter and Sarah Gillett were witnesses against him [Orders 1768-70, 407]. He was living in Halifax County, Virginia, on 20 April 1775 when he appeared in court to answer the complaint of his servant Mary Scandling. The court released her from his service because he was a "free Mulatto" and had purchased her indenture. However, two years later on 20 February 1777 the court ordered the churchwardens to bind Mary's son Macklin Scandling to George. Mary died before 19 November 1778 when Lucretia Macklin (who was also from York County) was charged with her murder. At Lucretia's hearing, George deposed that

he was riding on the road with Mary Scandling the deceased person behind him and met the prisoner Lucretia Macklin who insulted him with opprobrious language and pick'd up a stick about the size of his arm and offer'd to strike which this deponent endeavour'd to fend off with his arm, but doth not know whether she struck the deceas'd on which the stick broke, on which this deponent got off his horse and went to the prisoner, in which time the deceas'd was off the horse and walk'd about thirty yards and sat down and call'd to this deponent to come to her for she was dying. And this deponent went to the deceas'd and took hold of her and she appear'd to be fainting. This deponent ask'd her to go, she reply'd she was not able, and lay there until she dy'd [Pleas 1774-79, 109, 193, 379].

Lucretia Maclin was counted in the 1782 census for Richmond City [VA:111]. George was taxable in Halifax County from 1783 to 1793: listed with two 16-21-year-old tithables in 1787, listed with 2 unnamed sons in 1788 and 1789, listed with 2 tithables in 1791, called a "FN" in 1789 and 1792, an exempt "Mulo" in 1793 [PPTL, 1782-1799, frames 22, 49, 137, 197, 270, 305, 374, 419]. On 27 May 1789 he complained to the Halifax County court against George Fitch for a breach of the peace, and he sold property by deed proved in Halifax County on 28 June 1789. In September 1793 the Halifax County court ordered the overseers of the poor of the upper Southern District to bind out his son Martin Jones to John Irwin, and he sold land to Jonathan Maclin by deed proved in December 1793 [Pleas 1789-90, 251, 258; 1792-5, 250, 300]. He was the father of

i. ?Jonathan, born say 1771, a "FN" taxable in Halifax County from 1792 to 1812: listed next to George Jones in 1792, called a "Mulo" from 1793 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1799, frames 419, 444, 540, 606, 822; 1800-12, frames 62, 630, 810, 856, 1033].

ii. ?Chesley, a "Mulatto" taxable in Halifax County in 1804 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1800-12, frame 377]. An undated Granville County, North Carolina civil action case stated that free men of color Jno A. Jones and Chesley Jones had moved from the state of Virginia to Granville County and settled on land of William Marshall in the fork of Island Creek and had not complied with the law in such cases [North Carolina Archives file CR 044.289.19].

iii. Martin.

 

3.    Barshaba Jones, born say 1727, had a daughter Eleanor whose birth on 26 November 1748 was recorded in Bruton Parish, James City County [Bruton Parish Register, 8]. He was called Bash Jones on 19 December 1748 when he sued Thomas Smith for debt in York County court in a suit which was dismissed by agreement of both parties [Judgments & Orders 1746-52, 150]. He was called "Barshaba Jones Negro" in Lunenburg County, Virginia, in the 1750 and 1752 tax list of Hugh Lawson [Tax List 1748-52, Virginia State Library Accession no.20094, p.2]. By 19 September 1759 he had moved to Granville County, North Carolina, where he pleaded guilty to trespass [Minutes 1754-70, 57]. An undated Granville County court affidavit by Henry Edwards requested

news of Whereabouts of free Negro runaway who is in his debt Barshaba Jones 9pds. he was sometime ago in Granville? ... [CR 44.928.25].

In 1761 he and his wife Ann were 2 black tithables in the Baptist District, Granville County tax list of David Harris [CR 44.701.19]. He was taxable in the 1763 Granville County tax list of insolvents with 5 taxables. The Baptist District of Granville County became Bute County in 1764. Barsheba sold 206 acres in Bute County on the north side of Fishing Creek on 6 January 1765, 80 acres between Fishing Creek and Reedy Creek on 8 January 1765, and 200 acres on Reedy Creek on 5 February 1765 [Warren County DB 1:8; 2:135; A:324]. He was sued for 2 pounds, 19 shillings debt by Zachariah Bullock in Granville County court on 11 August 1765 [Minutes 1754-70, 138]. He was in Bladen County on 12 September 1783 when he was witness to the deed of Braswell Hunt to John Cade for land on Ashpole Swamp [DB 1:28] and was head of a Robeson County household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [NC:387]. His children were

i. Eleanor, born 26 November 1748 [Bruton Parish Register, 8].

ii. William, born circa 1750, first taxed in his father's Granville County household in 1762. He was a taxable "Mulato" in Bladen County in James Lowry's household from 1768 to 1771 and a "Molato" head of his own household in 1776 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:5, 17, 45, 60; II:65]. He was head of a Beaufort District, South Carolina household of 8 "other free" in 1790 and 12 in 1800 [SC:106].

iii. John2, born circa 1750, first taxed in his father's Granville County household in 1762.

iv. ?Lucy, born say 1753, mother of a "Negro" boy, Dick Jones, born 15 June 1771, ordered bound to Joseph Norris in Bute County in February 1772 [Minutes 1767-76, 194]. He may have been the Richard Jones who was head of a Cumberland County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:619].

v. ?Burwell, born say 1760, a "man of colour" hired by Daniel McKie of Lunenburg County to take his place in the Revolution. Burwell went together with McKie to Brunswick County court house where Colonel Davie accepted him as a substitute. McKie was later informed that Burwell died in the service [National Archives pension file R6750, M804, roll 1690, frame 420 of 891 and https://www.fold3.com/image/246/24220878].

vi. ?Martin, taxable on one poll in Person County in 1793 in Nash District, head of a Person County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [NC:597].

 

4.    James3 Jones, born say 1745, and his wife Margaret, "free mulattoes," registered the birth of their son John in Bruton Parish, James City County on 28 March 1767. Their son was

5    i. John3, born 28 March 1767 [Bruton Parish Register, 31].

 

5.    John3 Jones, born 28 March 1767, may have been the John Jones who died before 19 September 1803 when his widow Nancy Jones was granted administration on his York County estate with Charles Carter and John W. De Rozario as securities [Orders 1795-1803, 606]. Nancy was married to John W. Derosario by 15 October 1804 when they were summoned by the court to give security to Charles Carter for the administration of the estate [Orders 1804-14, 46-7]. John Jones (grandson of John3 Jones?) sued his brothers and sisters in chancery to sell the house and lots which belonged to (his grandfather?) and divide the proceeds among William Debrix and Mary More Debrix (children of Howell Debrix), John Jones Jarvis, son of William Jarvis, Samuel Evans, son of Anna Rollison (Rawlinson), and William Jones who was represented by David Debrix. Howell Debrix purchased the property for $201. After deducting for costs, each party received $31 [Orders 1815-20, 250, 497-8]. John's children were

i. a daughter, born say 1783, married Howell Debrix. They were the parents of William (born about 1799) and Mary More Debrix who received one sixth of the estate of John Jones

ii. the father of John Jones who sued for the division of the estate.

iii. a daughter, married William Jarvis.

iv. Ann Rawlinson, mother of Samuel Evans.

v. the father of William Jones.

 

Sussex County

1.    Thomas Jones, born say 1748, a "Mulatto," and his wife Mary had their daughter Rebecca baptized in Albemarle Parish, Surry and Sussex counties, Virginia, in February 1774 [Richards, Albemarle Parish Register, no. 243]. He was head of a Sussex County household of 8 "other free" in 1810. He was called Thomas Jones of Sussex "mulatto" when he left a 17 November 1817 Sussex County will, proved 2 July 1818, giving his son Peter Jones 100 acres, his grandson John Jones $20, his granddaughter Loiza Jones $20 and the remainder to his unnamed wife [WB H:449]. He was the father of

i. Rebecca, born 12 July 1773, baptized 13 February 1774 [Richards, Albemarle Parish Register, no. 243].

ii. Peter, received 100 acres by his father's will.

 

Isle of Wight County

1.    Thomas Jones, born say 1740, was head of an Isle of Wight County household of 7 "white" (free) persons in 1782 [VA:30], taxable there from 1783 to 1809: taxable on a slave over the age of sixteen in 1783; taxable on Robin, "a freed Negroe," in 1786; taxable on 2 horses in 1788; taxable on a slave and 2 horses in 1789; listed as a "F.N." in 1790 and thereafter; taxable on a free male tithable aged 16-21 in 1792; a slave and 3 horses in 1797, 2 tithes and 5 horses in 1800; 3 free tithes and 5 horses in 1801; 2 free tithes and 3 horses in 1803 when he was called Thomas Jones, F.N., Sr., in 1802 and 1803; taxable on his unnamed son's tithe in 1804; 2 tithes in 1805, 1806 and 1809 [PPTL 1782-1810, frames 40, 79, 121, 167, 199, 216, 263, 365, 409, 447, 512, 545, 563, 622, 639, 698, 739, 815]. In 1807 he was called a "Fn" when a "Fn" eight-year-old orphan named Mitchell Brasiell was bound as an apprentice farmer to him by the Isle of Wight County court [Brasiel, Mitchel (M, 8): Indenture of Apprenticeship, 1807, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. He was a "free man of colour" who left a 16 March 1809 Isle of Wight County will, proved 1 January 1810. He left land and household items to his heirs: his wife Martha, daughter Polly (wife of Edwin Roberts) and named daughters Martha (wife of Randall Allmond), Mary and Elizabeth [WB 13:72].  He was the father of

2     i. ?William, born say 1763.

ii. ?Willis, born say 1769, taxable in Isle of Wight County from 1788 to 1803: a "Molato" taxable on a horse in 1788; listed as a "F.N." in 1789 and thereafter; taxable on a slave and a horse in 1792 and 1796; taxable on 2 free males and a horse in 1800; called Willis Jones F.N. Senr. in 1803 [PPTL 1782-1810, frames 122, 167, 199, 216, 262, 318, 365, 380, 409, 447, 512, 545, 563, 622, 639] and head of a Surry County household of 3 "other free" and a slave in 1810.

iii. ?John2, a "F.N." taxable in Isle of Wight County in 1800 and 1801 [PPTL 1782-1810, frames 512, 563], head of a Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1810. He married Sacky Cypress on 12 February 1807 in Sussex County.

iv. Polly, married Edwin Roberts, 7 January 1796 Isle of Wight County bond, Thomas Jones surety.

v. Betsy Andrews, "daughter of Thomas Jones," married Joseph Byrd, 23 December 1816 Surry County bond, John Charity surety.

vi. ?Davis, born say 1776, called David Jones when he was taxable in the Isle of Wight County household of (his father?) Thomas Jones. He was a "F.N." taxable in Isle of Wight County from 1798 to 1805 [PPTL 1782-1810, frames 447, 464, 512, 563, 639, 699]. He married Clara Banks, 5 June 1795 Isle of Wight County bond, Francis Young surety, 6 June marriage. He was head of a Petersburg Town household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:119a].

vii. ?Thomas, Jr., born say 1783, a "F.N." taxable in Isle of Wight County from 1802 to 1810 [PPTL 1782-1810, frames 563, 622, 698, 729, 776, 797, 852].

 

2.    William Jones, born say 1763, was taxable in Isle of Wight County from 1786 to 1810: taxable on a horse and 4 cattle in 1786; called a "M." in 1789; a "F.N." in 1791; taxable on a slave and a horse in 1797; taxable on 2 free tithes and a horse in 1801; called William Jones, F.N., Senr., in 1804; taxable on 2 tithes and a horse in 1809 [PPTL 1782-1810, frames 79, 166, 216, 262, 365, 380, 409, 447, 563, 622, 639, 739, 757, 815, 833] and a "Free Negro" head of an Isle of Wight County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:34]. He was the father of

i. John, born say 1785, a "F.N." taxable in Isle of Wight County from 1803 to 1810: called "son of Wm" from 1803 to 1806; taxable on a slave and a horse in 1810 [PPTL 1782-1810, frames 622, 639, 699, 739, 757, 815, 834].

 

Richmond, Essex and Orange counties, Virginia

1.    Margaret Jones, born say 1680, was the mother of Ann Jones who was indentured to Anne Fenner (daughter of John Fenner) for eleven years by the Richmond County court on 2 May 1705. She may have been identical to "Margaret, late Servant to Joseph Belfield, now living at John Fenner's" who was presented by the Richmond County court on 4 October 1705 for bearing a "Molatto bastard." She was called Margaret Chiswick in court on 5 December 1705 when she acknowledged that she had a "mulato ... begott by a Negro" [Orders 1704-8, 57, 61, 93, 97, 101]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. William1, born say 1715, a "mulatto," who owned a white servant woman named Margaret Irwin. William sold her to Isaac Arnold before 27 March 1755 when the Orange County, Virginia court ruled that she was a free woman because William had no right to keep or dispose of her [Orders 1754-63, 80].

ii. William2, born say 1730, a "Mulatto" runaway servant man belonging to Moore Fauntleroy of Richmond County in August 1754 when he was taken up in Essex County [Essex County Orders 1753-4, 226].

2     iii. Mary, born about 1750.

 

2.    Mary Jones, born about 1750, registered as a free Negro in Essex County on 7 December 1810: born free, dark Mulattoe, about sixty years of age, five feet two inches high [Register of Free Negroes, 1810-43, no.3, p.2]. She was the mother of

i. ?Chaney, born about 1777, registered on 7 December 1810: born free by affirmation of Richard Banks, dark Mulattoe, about 33 years of age, five feet three inches and three quarters [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, no.4, p.3].

ii. Milly, born about 1785, registered in Essex County on 8 December 1810: daughter of Mary Jones, appearing by statement of Thomas Brockenbrough in person that she has always passed as a free born person, 25 years of age, a light black [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, no.25, p.12].

 

Lancaster County, Virginia

1.    Elizabeth Jones, born say 1688, was the servant of Randolph Miller when she confessed to the Lancaster County court that had an illegitimate "mulatoe" child in April 1716. She was ordered to pay 15 pounds currency or be sold for five years. On 10 March 1719/20 she confessed to having another "Mullatto" child in Saint Mary's Whitechapel Parish. She was the servant of John Mott when she confessed to having a third "Molotto" child about 1 May 1721 [Orders 1713-21, 140, 311, 346, 354; 1721-9, 2]. She was apparently the ancestor of

i. Robin, born say 1755, parent of William Jones who was granted a certificate in Lancaster County on 18 February 1799 that he was born free [Orders 1792-9, 491].

ii. James, born about 1763, registered in Lancaster County on 18 October 1803: age 40, dark, 5'5" [Burkett, Lancaster County Register of Free Negroes, 1].

iii. David, born about 1771, married Rhoda Jones, 8 August 1795 Lancaster County bond. He registered in Lancaster County on 19 September 1808: age 37, dark, 5'5-1/4", born free [Burkett, Lancaster County Register of Free Negroes, 4]. Rhoda Jones was counted in the list of "free Negroes" in Lancaster County in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1839, 385].

iv. Daniel, born about 1773, married Rachel Howe (Haw), "daughter of Peter Howe," 13 June 1794 Lancaster County bond. He registered in Lancaster County on 18 June 1805: age 32, dark, 5'11-1/4", born free. Rachel registered on 19 January 1807: age 37, yellow, 5'1-1/4" [Burkett, Lancaster County Register of Free Negroes, 2, 3].

v. Eva, granted a certificate in Lancaster County on 19 June 1797 that she was a free woman [Orders 1792-9, 353]

vi. Winnifred, granted a certificate in Lancaster County on 17 April 1798 that she was free born [Orders 1792-9, 424].

vii. Rhoda, born say 1770, granted a certificate in Lancaster County on 22 January 1799 that she and her son Thomas Chowning Syndnor Jones were born free [Orders 1792-9, 489].

viii. Thomas, born about 1782, married Judith Sorrell, 1 January 1802 Lancaster County bond. He registered in Lancaster County on 18 March 1807: age 25, dark, 5'9", born free. Judith registered on 18 March 1807: wf/o Tho, age 26, yellow, 5'5-1/2" [Burkett, Lancaster County Register of Free Negroes, 3].

 

Northumberland County

1.    Elizabeth Jones, born say 1720, was convicted by the Northumberland County court on 8 May 1738 of having a "Mulatto" child within the previous six months in St. Stephen's Parish [Orders 1737-43, 39]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Hannah, "free mulatto" head of a Northumberland County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:986].

 

Princess Anne/ Norfolk County

Members of the Jones family in Princess Anne and Norfolk counties born about 1750 were

i. Nanny, born say 1743, a taxable "free negro" in Norfolk County on the north side of Tanners Creek in Elizabeth Grant's household in 1765 and taxable in her own household in 1768 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1751-65, 209; 1766-80, 49].

1     ii. Judy, born say 1745.

2    iii. Sarah, born about 1745.

 

1.    Judy1 Jones, born say 1745, was the mother of seven children who were bound as apprentices by the Princess Anne County court in 1778 and 1779: James, Caleb, Elijah, Betty, Nat, Dick and Tom [Minutes 1773-82, 275, 293, 445]. She may have been the mother of Judah and Tom Jones, "free Negroes," who were living in adjoining Norfolk County on 15 February 1770 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind them out [Orders 1768-71, 150]. Her children were

i. ?Judah2, born say 1764, a "free Negro" living in Norfolk County on 15 February 1770 when the court ordered her bound to Nanny Grant [Orders 1768-71, 150].

ii. Tom, born say 1766, a "free Negro" living in Norfolk County on 15 February 1770 when the court ordered him bound to James McCoy [Orders 1768-71, 150], perhaps identical to Tom Jones, son of Judy Jones, who was bound to William Wishert in Princess Anne County on 11 November 1779 [Minutes 1773-82, 445].

iii. James, born say 1768, son of Judy Jones, bound apprentice by the Princess Anne County court to William Wishart, Gent., to be a planter on 9 July 1778 [Minutes 1773-82, 275].

iv. Caleb, born say 1770, bound by the Princess Anne County court to William ____ to be a planter on 10 July 1778 [Minutes 1773-82, 293].

v. Elijah, born say 1771, son of Judy Jones, bound by the Princess Anne County court as an apprentice planter to William Wishart on 10 July 1778, a "Free Mulatto" bound to William Russell to be a cooper on 8 April 1784 [Minutes 1773-82, 293; 1782-4, 193].

vi. Betty, born say 1773, daughter of Judy Jones, bound apprentice by the Princess Anne County court on 10 July 1778 [Minutes 1773-82, 293].

vii. Nat, born say 1775, "free Negro" son of Judy Jones bound to William Wishert by the Princess Anne County court on 11 November 1779 [Minutes 1773-82, 445].

viii. Dick, born say 1776, "free Negro" son of Judy Jones bound to William Wishert on 11 November 1779. He and Tom Jones were called "Free born Mulattoes" on 10 June 1784 when the Princess Anne County court bound them to Jonathan Park to be tanners [Minutes 1773-82, 445; 1782-4, 212].

 

2.    Sarah Jones, born about 1745, was the mother of four children who were bound as apprentices by the Princess Anne County court. She registered in Princess Anne County on 26 March 1794: a dark black Woman about Forty nine years old, five feet three inches high, born Free [Jones, Sally (F, 49): Free Negro Certificate, 1794, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. Her children were

i. Argyle, born say 1772, son of Sarah Jones, bound by the Princess Anne County court to Hillary ____ to be a blacksmith on 13 April 1775 and bound to be a mariner on 10 July 1778 [Minutes 1773-82, 94, 293]. He registered in Princess Anne County on 17 September 1799: a tall black man follows the sea for a livelyhood...was an apprentice to Capt. David Kilgore late of this county [Jones, Argyle (M): Free Negro Certificate, 1799, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. He was head of a Norfolk County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:927

ii. Mary, born about 1773, daughter of Sarah Jones, bound to Mary ___ on 10 July 1778 [Minutes 1773-82, 293]. She registered in Princess Anne County on 26 March 1794: a dark black Woman, about Five feet high, Twenty one years old, born Free [Jones, Mary (F, 21): Free Negro Certificate, 1794, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. She was a "free Black" head of a Princess Anne County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:459].

iii. Robert, born say 1774, son of Sarah Jones, bound to ___ Martin to be a shoemaker on 10 July 1778 [Minutes 1773-82, 293].

iv. Dinah, born say 1775, daughter of Sarah Jones, bound to ___ Kilgore on 10 July 1778 [Minutes 1773-82, 293].

 

JORDAN FAMILY

1.    Francis Jordan, born about 1731, was a "negro" shoemaker about forty years of age in 1771 when his master Edmund Jordan, a Quaker from Nansemond County, successfully petitioned the governor and council of Virginia for permission to manumit him [Executive Journals, VI:408]. He presented his manumission, written by the clerk of the Council of Virginia, to the Norfolk County court on 20 June 1771 [Orders 1771-3, 4]. He was taxable in the household of Joshua Miers in Portsmouth Parish, Norfolk County, in 1767 and taxable in his own household in the Borough of Norfolk on Thomas Teemar and "negro Hester" in 1772 and taxable on "negroes" Hester and Thomas in 1773 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1766-1780, 18, 162, 215]. Thomas Teamer "free negro" was bound to him by the Norfolk County court on 21 May 1772, Lemuel Bailey was bound to him on 19 March 1774 and "free negro" Samuel Anderson of Elizabeth River Parish was bound to him by the court on 15 December 1774 [Orders 1771-3, 68; 1773-5, 33, 65]. He married Sarah Boyles, 24 February 1792 Norfolk County bond. He may have been the father of

i. Hester, married Isaac Anderson, 11 December 1781 Princess Anne County bond, Marshall Anderson surety.

ii. Moses, head of a Norfolk County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:801].

 

JUMPER FAMILY

        The Jumper family was apparently related to Tom Jumper, one of six Tuscarora Indians accused by five other Tuscarora Indians of murdering Jeremiah Pate of New Kent County on 14 October 1707. Tom and another of the Indians poisoned themselves before they were brought to trial [McIlwaine, Journals of the Council, II:158, 173].

 

1.    Hagar Jumper, born about 1750, obtained her freedom from Stephen Dance of Dinwiddie County in a court case based on her descent from an Indian woman. She registered in Petersburg on 14 August 1800: a dark brown Mulatto or Indian woman, five feet two inches high, fifty years old, short bushy hair, obtained her freedom from Stephen Dance of the County of Dinwiddie as being a descendant of an Indian. Renewed 1805, 1810, 1813, 1817 [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 159]. She was probably the mother of

2     i. Altha, born say 1762.

ii. Rochester, born about 1764, registered in Petersburg on 4 August 1803: a dark brown Mulatto man, five feet seven and a half inches high, thirty nine years old, born free & raised in Dinwiddie County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 257]. He was a "free Negro" taxable who lived with Daniel Pegram and kept his still in Dinwiddie County in 1802 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-9, list B, p.20].

iii. Samuel, born say 1766, taxable in Dinwiddie County in 1787, 1788, 1790, 1795 and 1797, listed as a "free Negro" who followed "cropping" and lived near Joseph Thweatt in 1801 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90 (1787 B, p.7), (1788 A, p.8), (1790 B, p.17), (1795 B, p.10), (1797 B, p.10); 1800-9, list B, p.25].

iv. Philip, born say 1774, taxable in Dinwiddie County in 1795 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90 (1795 B, p.10)].

v. Rachel, head of a Petersburg household of 3 "free colored" in 1830.

 

2.    Altha Jumper, born say 1767, was called Otha Jumper on 26 April 1785 when her suit against Isham Lawrence and his wife for trespass, assault and battery was dismissed by the Brunswick County, Virginia court at the defendants' costs [Orders 1784-8, 78, 125]. She was apparently identical to Altha Rouse, a "free negroe" planter counted with her children William, Priscilla and Jency and taxable on a horse in Stephen Bedford's Charlotte County tax list for 1802. She was called Altha Jumper in his list from 1803 to 1813: a "fm" weaver with a male and 2 female children and taxable on 2 horses in 1803, taxable on a free male tithable in 1809, listed as a planter from 1807 to 1810, a spinner from 1811 to 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1813, frames 539, 542, 574, 580, 608, 642, 648, 675, 682, 711, 717, 751, 783, 808, 841, 841, 846, 877, 886]. She was a "F.N." head of a Charlotte County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:54]. She may have been identical to Alfa Jumper who was in the list of free people of colour for Prince Edward County in 1820 [List of free people of colour, within the upper district of Prince Edward Count February 1st 1820, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. She was the mother of

i. Hannah, born about 1778, "daughter of Altha (or Oltha?) Jumper," married Littleberry Lawrence, 7 March 1796 Charlotte County bond, John Williamson surety. She and her husband Berry registered in Pittsylvania County in 1816: a fifty-year-old black man with "mulatto" wife Hannah (aged thirty-five) and four daughters.

ii. Priscilla, born say 1791.

iii. William, born say 1793, a "fm" taxable in Charlotte County with a male and female in his household in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1813, frame 877].

iv. Jency, born say 1795.

 

KEE/ KEYS FAMILY

1.    ____ Kee, born say 1700, was a soldier who was slain in the expedition against the Spaniards at Carthagena. His widow Elizabeth Kee, a "Mulatto," petitioned the Virginia House of Burgesses for a pension and was granted an allowance of five pounds on 26 May 1742 [McIlwaine, Journals of the House of Burgesses, 20, 37]. They were probably the ancestors of

2     i. Andrew, born say 1760.

3     ii. John, born about 1763.

4     iii. Betty, born say 1785.

 

2.    Andrew Kee, born say 1760, was living in Essex County on 17 May 1784 when he was presented for failing to list himself as a tithable. On 20 December 1785 he and Humphrey Fortune were sued in Essex County for a debt of 2,500 pounds of tobacco with interest from 15 October 1782 [Orders 1784-7, 9, 174]. He may have been the father of

i. Robert, born about 1780, taxable in St. Ann's Parish, Essex County, in 1802 and 1810, listed as a "free Negro" in 1813 and 1814 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1819, frames 347, 441, 510, 543]. He registered as a free Negro in Essex County on 17 August 1829: born free by certificate of John Micon, Sr., bright Mulattoe, 49 years of age, 5 feet 5-1/8 inches [Essex County Register 1810-43, p.98, no.216].

ii. Walker Key, born about 1789, registered as a free Negro in Essex County on 17 August 1829: born free by certificate of John Micon, Sr., dark Mulattoe, 40 years of age, 5 feet 7-3/4 inches [Essex County Register 1810-43, p.95, no.209]. He was a "free Negro" counted in St. Ann's Parish, Essex County, with a female over the age of sixteen in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1819, frame 510].

iii. Judith, married Thomas Fortune, 23 December 1813 Essex County bond.

iv. Delphia, a "free Negro" over the age of sixteen who was counted in St. Ann's Parish, Essex County, in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1819, frame 510].

 

3.    John1 Key, born about 1760, was about 65 years old on 16 November 1825 when he appeared in Lunenburg County, Virginia court to petition for a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he entered the 1st Virginia Regiment as a substitute for Christopher Carlton. He had a wife and three children. On 29 February 1856 his widow Faithy Key testified that her maiden name was Faithy Lester, they were married in 1808 or 1809, and he had died on 10 February 1837 [NARA, W.10163, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/1/24200551]. They may have been the parents of

i. John2, born about 1809, registered in Amherst County on 20 January 1851: a free man of Colour born in the County of King and Queen, bright Mulatto 5 feet 6-3/4 Inches high ... age 42 years ... derives his freedom from ancestors free prior to the 1st of May 1806 [McLeroy, Strangers in their Midst, 75]. Esix Key, a 95 year-old "Mulatto," was counted in his household in the 1850 census for Amherst County.

 

4.    Betty Key, born say 1785, was the mother of at least two persons who registered as free Negroes in Amherst county:

i. Frances, born about 1809, registered in Amherst County on 21 May 1851: a free woman of Colour daughter of Betsey Key a dark mulatto about forty two years of age, long strait black hair, five feet four and 1/2 Inches high born in Nelson County of parents free prior to the 1st of May 1806.

ii. Sally, born about 1816, registered in Amherst County on 17 February 1851: daughter of Betsey Key bright mulatto 5 feet 3-1/2 Inches high ... about 35 years of age, born in Nelson County [McLeroy, Strangers in their Midst, 82].

iii. ?William, born about 1821, registered in Amherst County on 17 February 1851: about thirty years of age a dark mulatto ... born of ancestors free prior to the 1st of May 1806 [McLeroy, Strangers in their Midst, 75-6, 82].

 

Other members of the family were

i. Milly Keys, head of a Petersburg Town household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:334a].

ii. Polly Keys, head of a Spotsylvania County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:113a].

iii. Brener Keys, head of a Spotsylvania County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:112a].

iv. Betty Key, a "free Negro" living in Middlesex County, Virginia, in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frame 272].

v. William1, born about 1783, a fifty-year-old farmer living with (wife?) Polly Key in King William County in 1833 [LVA, Auditor of Public Accounts inventory entry no. 757, Reports of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, 1833; transcribed by Selma Stewart].

 

Beaufort County, North Carolina

1.    Milly Keys, born say 1765, was head of a Beaufort County, North Carolina household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:126] and 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:23]. She may have been the mother of

i. Clary, head of a Beaufort County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:114].

ii. Silvy, head of a Beaufort County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:127].

iii. Amy, head of a Beaufort County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:114].

iv. Mary, born 1776-1794, head of a Beaufort County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:23].

v. Nancy, born 1776-1794, head of a Beaufort County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:24].

vi. Sally, born 1776-1794, head of a Beaufort County household in 1810 [NC:127] and 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:23].

vii. Penny, born 1776-1794, head of a Beaufort County household of "free colored" in 1820 [NC:23].

 

KEEMER FAMILY

    Elizabeth Young left a 9 April 1746 Calvert County, Maryland will by which she left her son William Williams, Sr., her 2 "mollatto boys Thomas Keemer and Basil Keemer" and gave her "mollatto man Thomas" his freedom [Prerogative Court (Wills), Liber 24, folio 399].

1.   James1 Keemer, born say 1740, was presented by the York County court on 15 November 1762 for failing to list himself as a tithable. The case was dismissed when he paid his tax. On 20 May 1765 the court presented him for not attending Charles Parish Church [Judgments & Orders 1759-63, 437, 453, 480; 1763-5, 374, 448]. He was in Captain Benjamin C. Spillar's Company of the 2nd Virginia State Regiment at White Plains on 8 September 1778 [NARA, M246, roll 96, frame 324 of 736; U.S., Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783 on ancestry.com]. He received clothing in 1780 [Gwathmey, Historical Register of Virginians in the Revolution, 434]. He was taxable in York County in 1784 [PPTL, 1782-1841, frame 89] and taxable in Southampton County from 1782 to 1794: taxable on a horse and 4 cattle in 1783 and 1784, taxable in Nottoway Parish on 2 horses and 2 cattle in 1787, taxable on a horse from 1790 to 1794 [PPTL 1782-92, frames 522, 587, 689, 849; 1792-1806, frames 34, 107]. He married Rachel Ash, both of Southampton County, on 16 August 1781, David Barrow minister [Judgment Papers 1777-83, frame 781]. He was a buyer at the sale of the Northampton County, North Carolina estate of Jesse Goodson which was recorded in September court 1798 [Gammon, Record of Estates Northampton County, I:96] and was head of a Northampton County household of 11 "other free" in 1800 [NC:466] and 6 in 1810 [NC:731].   His descendants were probably:

i. Edward, born say 1761, the son of a "free Negro" who the York County court ordered bound by the churchwardens of Yorkhampton Parish to Elizabeth Crandall to learn the trade of weaver on 21 July 1766 [Orders 1765-8, 76].

ii. William, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:31], 2 "free colored" in Halifax in 1830, and 2 in Ripley Township, Indiana, in 1840.

iii. John, head of a Halifax County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 and 3 "free colored" in 1830. He was bondsman for the 28 March 1832 Halifax County marriage of Tempy James and Squire Walden. Perhaps Patsey Keemer was his widow. She applied to the Halifax court and was granted a year's provisions from an unnamed estate on 20 November 1835 [Minutes 1832-46].

iv. Jeremiah, married Sally Archer, 27 March 1820 Halifax County bond, John Scaff bondsman. He was head of a Halifax County household of 5 "free colored" in 1830.

v. James2, married Keziah James, 21 November 1817 Halifax County bond, Jeremiah Keemer bondsman.

vi. Eli, married Keziah Plumly, 6 July 1815 Northampton County, North Carolina bond, Jesse Ash bondsman.

 

KELLY FAMILY

1.    ____ Kelly, born say 1705, was the mother of Mary Kelly, a "Mulatto born of a white woman," in Northumberland County. On 9 June 1740 the court ordered the churchwardens of Wiccocomoco Parish to sell her to the highest bidder for thirty-one years [Orders 1737-43, 144]. She may have been the ancestor of

2      i. Allen, born say 1723.

ii. Mary, born say 1738, a "Mulatto born of a white woman," bound by the Northumberland County court until the age of thirty-one on 9 June 1740 [Orders 1737-43, 144].

iii. John1, born say 1750.

3     iv. Milley, born say 1754.

v. Jesse, born say 1760, born say 1760, bound to serve Lewis lee as an apprentice for thirty one years when John Crittendon and Luke Cannon, officers of the 15th Virginia Regiment, recruited Jesse Kelly to serve in the Revolution. Lee brought a suit against them in King William County court that lasted almost nine years and awarded him 35 pounds for the loss of his servant. Crittendon and Cannon's King William County petition to the General Assembly of Virginia for reimbursement was rejected [Crittendon, John & Cannon, Luke: Petition, 1791-10-26, Legislative Petitions, Digital Collections, LVA]. Jesse was taxable in Surry County, Virginia, from 1784 to 1801: taxable on a slave named Charlotte in 1788; listed as James Kee's tithable in 1794 [PPTL, 1782-90, frames 379, 477; 1791-1816, frames 112, 164, 298, 455]. He registered in Surry County as a free Negro on 11 April 1799: a free born - mulatto man of a bright complexion...has a bushy head of hair [Hudgins, Register of Free Negroes, 6].

4     vi. Joseph1, born say 1768.

vii. Henry, born about 1770, a seventeen-year-old "mulatto" who ran away from someone in Hanover County, Virginia, according to the 22 March 1787 issue of the Virginia Gazette [Headley, 18th Century Newspapers, 191].

 

2.    Allen Kelly, born say 1723, was married to Ann Weaver, a "Mulatto," on 24 May 1755 when they bound themselves and her "Mulatto" son Elijah Weaver to serve Benjamin Waddy of Lancaster County for three years to pay a debt they owed John Heath. Waddy sold Elijah's indenture to William Pullen who sued Waddy, testifying on 17 December 1762 that Elijah, the son of "Nanny Weaver a free mullattoe," had served only two years because he reached the age of twenty-one after the second year [LVA, chancery suit 1765-001, digitized]. Francis Timberlake sued Allen Kelly in Lancaster County for a debt of 600 pounds of tobacco in September 1757 [Judgments 1756-1758]. Ann Weaver was married to Thomas Nickens on 22 April 1778 when he mentioned his wife's granddaughter Ann Weaver Kelly in his Northumberland County will [Orders 1773-83, 362, 371, 374]. Allen Kelly may have been the father of

i. Ann Weaver Kelly, born say 1773, mentioned in the 22 April 1778 Northumberland County will of her grandfather Thomas Nickens [RB 10:375], perhaps identical to Ann Kelly Weaver who married Aaron Pinn, 3 March 1794 Lancaster County bond.

 

3.    Milly Kelly, born say 1754, was living in Brunswick County, Virginia, on 27 May 1776 when the court ordered the churchwardens of St. Andrew's Parish to bind out her "Mulattoe" child John Kelly as an apprentice. She was probably the mother of a "Mulatto girl" named Judith Kelly who the court ordered the churchwardens of St. Andrew's Parish to bind out on 28 March 1774 [Orders 1774-82, 115; 1772-4, 512]. She was head of a Dinwiddie County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:152], perhaps identical to the Milly Kelly who was head of a Petersburg Town household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:126a]. She was the mother of

i. ?Judith, a "Mulatto" girl ordered bound out by the churchwardens of St. Andrew's Parish, Brunswick County, on 28 March 1774. Her complaint against (her master?) Moses Quarles was dismissed by the same court [Orders 1772-4, 512, 513].

ii. John2, born before 27 May 1776, perhaps identical to John Kelly who purchased 100 acres, tools, furniture, cattle and hogs in Halifax County, North Carolina, jointly with John Lantern and Moses Matthews on 30 October 1795 from John Harmon [DB 17:920].

iii. ?Edward, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:31].

 

4.    Joseph1 Kelly, was head of a Craven County, North Carolina household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:130]. He may have been the father of

i. Sarah, married Makey Driggers, 24 December 1809 Craven County bond, Joshua Lindsey bondsman, perhaps the same Sarah Kelly who married George2 Carter, 8 September 1818 Craven County bond, Peter George bondsman.

 

Other members of the family in Virginia were

i. Elisa, head of a Westmoreland County household of 4 "other free" in 1810.

ii. James, head of a Stafford County household of 2 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1810 [VA:126].

iii. ?Joseph2, married Nancy Day, 18 December 1812 Northumberland County bond, Stephen Day security.

iv. Mary Ann, married Willis Banks (persons of colour) 28 May 1821 Norfolk County bond.

 

KENDALL FAMILY

Members of the Kendall family in Virginia were

i. James, head of a Stafford County household of 11 "other free" in 1810 [VA:134], a "BM" listed with "Molatto" wife Rhoda, daughter Sally and son Joe in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1813, frame 854].

ii. George, born about 1741, taxable in Prince William County from 1796 to 1810: called a "Free Molatto" in 1799, a "yellow" man in 1806 and 1809, taxable on 3 tithes in 1809 and 1810 [PPTL, 1782-1810, frames 313, 402, 462, 643, 707, 736]. He appeared in Prince William County court on 3 November 1834 at the age of ninety three and stated that he entered the service in Captain Drew's Company of Colonel Charles Porterfield's Light Infantry Regiment and was at the battles of Guilford and York Town where he was under Colonel Dabney. He was born in King George County, had his indentures showing his age, and enlisted in the town of Falmouth about three years before the termination of the war. George died in 1847, leaving children Robert Kendall, Catherine Steward and Mary M. Hickerson (married Ransome F. Hickerson in 1820) who applied for his bounty land in Stafford County court on 3 May 1854 [NARA, R.5859, roll 1470, frame 469 of 1069]. He received a discharge stating that he enlisted for the war on 5 January 1780 and served his time [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Kendall, George, Digital Collections, LVA].

iii.John, born about 1772, head of a King George County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:206]. He was a "Molatto" taxable in Stafford County in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1813, frame 854]. He registered as a free Negro in Washington, D.C., on 10 June 1830: a bright mulatto man about fifty-eight years old...Kendall's mother was born free...his father was also free...Elizabeth Kendall, John's wife...was born free [Provine, District of Columbia Free Negro Registers, 178].

iv. Anthony, taxable in Prince William County in 1800 and 1801 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1810, frames 441, 462], head of a King George County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:206].

v. Rachel, head of a Stafford County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:137].

 

KENT FAMILY

1.    Priscilla Kent, born say 1740, was a white servant woman living in Carteret County in March 1759 when her "Molato Child" David was bound apprentice to James Williams until the age of thirty-one years [Minutes 1747-64, 244]. She had five illegitimate children for which she was made to serve her master a total of five additional years [Minutes 1764-77, 373, 388, 391]. Her children "born of her body by a Negro" were

i. David, born say 1758 [Minutes 1747-64, 244].

ii. Shadrack, born about 1760, Priscilla's four-year-old son bound to James White to be a ship carpenter in May 1764 [Minutes 1747-64, 302].

iii. Abraham, born in October 1766, a three-year-old child of Priscilla's bound to Caleb Bell in September 1770 until the age of thirty-one years [Minutes 1764-77, 388].

iv. Anthony, born say 1770, bound an apprentice cooper to Andrew Bell in March 1775 [Minutes 1764-77, 443].

v. Rachel, born say 1772, bound to Robert Read in March 1775 [Minutes 1764-77, 447].

 

KERSEY FAMILY

Two members of the Kersey family, perhaps brother and sister, were called "Negroes" in seventeenth-century Virginia county court records. They were

1     i. Susannah, born say 1640.

2     ii. Peter, born say 1648.

 

1.    Susannah Carsey, born say 1640, was called "Susannah a free Negro woman" in Charles City County court on 15 September 1677 when the court rejected her petition to be exempt from paying taxes. And she was called "Negro Sue" in December 1687 when the court confirmed the indenture of her orphan-son John to Daniel Massingal. Captain Richard Nyatt certified that she had approved the indenture. In August 1689 she was called "Susan Carsey" when Massingal's executor, John Harrison, agreed in Charles City County court to assume the remainder of the indenture that she had agreed to on behalf of her son John [Orders 1677-79, 216; 1687-95, 90, 223]. Her son was

i. John2, born say 1670.

 

2.    Peter1 Kersey, born say 1645, was apparently the husband of Ann Kersey (a white woman?) who bound her son John Kersey as an apprentice to Richard Parker, brassier, in Surry County, Virginia, until the age of twenty-one on 26 January 1675/6 with her son's approval. Ann was about 30 years old on 15 June 1677 when she made a deposition in Surry County court regarding what she had heard Robert Austin say while she had been at Mr. Tompson's house [Deeds, Wills, Etc. 2, 1671-84, 102, 129]. Peter was "a Negroe" living in Surry County, Virginia, on 4 March 1678 when the court ordered him to return his son John Kersy to the estate of Judith Parker, deceased. The following year on 5 May 1679 his son John was apprenticed to William Hunt who was ordered by the court to find John Kersy sufficient apparel or return him to his father Peter Kersy [Haun, Surry County Court Records, III:240, 250]. He was called "Peter a Negro" when he was taxable in Thomas Sidway's household in 1683, called Peter Kersey in 1684 and 1685 when he was a taxable in Mrs. Sidway's household in Upper Sunken Marsh, and called Peter Kersey in 1686 when his son John was a taxable with him in Mrs. Sidway's household [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy, vol.22, no.1, 40, 46-7; vol. 23, no.2, 60]. He owed 16 pounds of tobacco to the 30 June 1694 Surry County estate of Thomas Jordan, deceased [DW 5:11]. His children were

3     i. ?Thomas1, born about 1665.

4     ii. John1, born say 1668.

iii. ?Peter2, born about 1685, about seven years old in 1692 when he was bound an apprentice to William Hunt [Haun, Surry County Court Records, V:55]. In 1703 he was a "Negroe" tithable in William Hunt's household in the Upper Southwark Parish [DW 5:288]. He and "Betty a Malatto" were ordered to be added to the list of tithables by the petition of Jones Williams in the May 1712 session of the Surry County court [Orders 1701-13, 398]. He may have been the Peter Hersey, "an ancient free Negro," who successfully petitioned the 5 December 1753 Granville County court that he be recommended to the General Assembly as a person to be exempt from taxes [Owen, Granville County Notes, vol. I].

 

3.    Thomas1 Kersey, born say 1665, was a taxable in Benjamin Harrison's Surry County household in 1681 [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy, vol.22, 4:50] and appeared in Surry County court in March 1700/1 on the suit of Nathaniel Harrison who failed to appear [Haun, Surry County Court Records, VI:4]. He was a Chowan County taxable in 1720 in Captain Patterson's Company from Meherrin Creek to Meherrin River in the northeast corner of present-day Northampton County, North Carolina. On 2 May 1726 he purchased 200 acres on the south side of the river in what was then Bertie County [DB B:171]. His 28 October 1730 Bertie County will, proved August court 1731 by Arthur Williams, named his wife and executrix, Susanna; children; and grandchildren William Kersey and James Reynolds [SS Wills 1730-33, Thomas Ceorsie, North Carolina Archives]. His children were

5     i. John4, born say 1705.

ii. Mary Pohagon.

iii. Margaret Reynolds, born say 1710, bound her "bastard Mulatto" son, James Reynolds, to her father, but after the death of her father the court ordered him bound to John Boude on 16 November 1732 [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, I:79].

6     iv. Thomas2, born say 1712.

v. William1, born say 1715, who was to receive 100 acres by his father's will after his mother's death.

vi. James1, born say 1715-20, received a young mare by his father's will.

7     vii. Peter3, born say 1720.

 

4.   John1 Kersey, born say 1668, was an apprentice to William Hunt in 1679 and was a taxable in Mrs. Sidway's Surry County household with his father Peter Kersey in Sunken Marsh in 1686. He was head of his own household in 1694 [DW 5:59, 108a, 137b, 209b; Magazine of Virginia Genealogy, vol.23, 1:60; 4:69]. He and Howell Edmunds proved George Briggs' will in March 1698/9 court [Haun, Surry County Court Records, V:217]. He purchased 70 acres in Surry County in Southwarke Parish adjoining Richard Washington and Abraham Evans on 6 March 1693/4, and he and his wife Mary Kersey were residents of the adjoining county of Prince George on 25 April 1718 when they sold this land for 1 shilling to Richard Shock by deeds acknowledged by John Kersey in Surry County court [DW 4:353; DW&c 7:120; Orders 1713-18, 139]. John may have been the ancestor of

i. John3 Carsey, born say 1696, purchased 80 acres in Surry County on 6 August 1750 [DB 6:116]. He was exempted from paying taxes in Surry County on 16 March 1756 (most likely because of old age) [Orders 1753-57, 367].

ii. Hannah, whose Surry County will was recorded November 1761. She named her sister Mary Kersey executor. The estate was settled by William Kersey on 19 October 1762 [WB 10:286, 306].

iii. George1, born say 1720, a defendant in a 20 October 1743 Surry County suit for debt [Orders 1741-44, 83] and an insolvent Sussex County taxpayer in 1754 [County Court Papers, 1754-1755, frame 245, LVA microfilm no. 35]. He, John, and Thomas Kersey were sued by the administrator of Thomas Eldridge's estate for a debt of 11 pounds, 17 shillings in Sussex County in May 1756 [Haun, Sussex County Court Records, I:248, 264, 309, 462, 500, 528; Court Papers, 1757, 144-151]. He was listed in Captain Hardy Cone's Company of Edgecombe County Militia in the 1750s adjacent to Thomas Kersey [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 667], perhaps the George Kersey who died before 17 November 1760 when James Ridley, the coroner of Southampton County, was credited with 133 pounds of tobacco for the inquisition on his dead body [Judgment Papers, 1768-9, frames 916-9].

8     iv. Thomas3, born say 1735.

v. William2, born say 1740, presented by the Southampton County court in 1766 for failing to list himself as a tithable. He sued Drury Lundy for trespass, assault and battery in February 1767 and was awarded 1 pound, 10 shillings damages. Daniel Fisher sued him in November 1769 for 3 pounds on his promissory note of 11 February 1767. John Ivey was William's security [Judgment Papers 1765-6, frame 1026; 1766-7, frames 506-9; 1768-9, frames 88-91]. He may have been the William Kersey who was head of a Robeson County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:50]. He entered 50 acres on the west side of Peter's Swamp in Robeson County on 28 October 1789 [Pruitt, Land Entries: Robeson County, I:29] and purchased land in Robeson by deed proved on 6 January 1806 [Minutes I:348].

 

5.    John4 Kersey, born say 1705, was sued for trespass by Richard Sanderson in the March 1729 General Court of North Carolina [Saunders, Colonial Records of North Carolina VI:563]. He received 100 acres near Cashie Swamp in Bertie County by his father's 28 October 1730 will. He entered 100 acres including his improvements on Bear Swamp in Bladen County on 20 February 1754, entered 100 acres on the east side of Drowning Creek on Bear Swamp on 3 May 1760 [Philbeck, Bladen County Land Entries, nos. 976, 1159], and received a patent for 100 acres on the east side of Bear Swamp in Bladen County on 18 November 1760 [Hoffman, Land Patents, I:395]. He purchased another 200 acres in Bladen County on the south side of Drowning Creek on 9 November 1773 [DB 23:444]. He was taxable on one white poll and one black poll in Bladen County in 1763 and a "Mulato" taxable with his son Jacob and a slave named Brunswick in 1776 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, II:62, 95; Bladen County Tax List (1763)]. He was the father of

i. Jacob, taxable in his father's Bladen County household in 1776. He was apparently a loyalist since all the land which he owned in Bladen County before 4 July 1776 was confiscated [DB 1:424, 433, 436].

 

6.   Thomas2 Kersey, born say 1712, received a patent for 400 acres in Edgecombe County on 1 March 1743/4 [Saunders, Colonial Records of North Carolina, IV:677]. He sold the 100 acres of land which he inherited from his father on the south side of the Meherrin River in Northampton County on 29 December 1748 [DB 1:392]. He was in Captain Hardy Cone's Edgecombe County militia in the 1750's [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 667]. He may have been the Thomas Kersey who was sued for a 56 shillings debt by David Wiggins in Sussex County, Virginia court on 11 August 1755 [Orders 1754-6, 219]. He received a patent for 104 acres in Sussex County on the southside of the Nottoway River and the fork of Ploughman Swamp on 16 August 1756 (Thomas Kersie) [Patents, 33:302] and was called a resident of Sussex County when he sold this land to William Longbottom on 6 January 1759 [DB A:349]. He purchased 120 acres in Edgecombe County on Sapony Creek adjacent to Samuel Cannady on 12 February 1755 and an additional 307 acres near the Sapony Creek on 4 August 1761 [DB OO:95, 354]. On 9 November 1764 he received a patent for 100 acres in Bladen County on the east side of Drowning Creek, and while a resident of Bladen on 16 January 1765 he sold 400 acres of his land in Edgecombe which he received by patent on 1 March 1743/4 [Hoffman, Land Patents, II:521; DB C:318]. By 25 July 1774 he had acquired a total of 900 acres of land in Bladen near Drowning Creek by patents of 26 October 1767 and 25 July 1774 [Hoffman, Land Patents, II:167, 450, 599, 600, 666] and deed of 22 March 1770 [DB 23:67]. While a resident of Bladen on 5 October 1774 he sold the 120 acres of his land in Edgecombe County adjoining Samuel Cannady to Samuel Longbottoms for 30 pounds [DB 2:181]. He was witness to a 1769 Bladen County deed from James Oberry for land which was part of 640 acres that had belonged to Henry Oberry [DB 23:503]. He was a "Molato" taxable with Jesse Moss in Bladen County in 1768 and a white taxable with slaves Dick and Quac(?) in 1772. He was taxable on two "Molatoes" (himself and William Horn) and two slaves (Dick and Quash) in 1776 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:9, 71, 83, 124, 135; II:66, 76]. He died before May court 1778 when administration on his Bladen County estate was granted William Truman and Benjamin Odom [NCGSJ XIII:224]. Perhaps his wife was Mary Kersey who received a Bladen County grant for 200 acres on the west side of Drowning Creek south of Ash Pole Swamp on 12 November 1779 [DB 37:287] and was taxable on 400 acres in Bladen County in 1784. She sold 200 acres of this land to America Kersey on 10 May 1788 [DB C:370]. She was head of a Bladen County household of one white male under 21 or over 60 and two white females in 1786 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, II:184]. Administration on her estate was granted David Braswell in Robeson County court on 3 July 1799 on a bond of 100 pounds [Minutes I:78]. Thomas' children may have been

i. Ester Cairsey who was listed as a harborer of the "free Negors and Mullatus" who were living in what was then Bladen County on 13 October 1773 [G.A. 1773, Box 7].

ii. Sarah/Sally, born say 1750, supposed to have married James Lowry in Franklin County before 1769 when Lowry moved to Robeson County. She was said to have been a "half-breed Tuscarora Indian woman" [Norment, The Lowrie History, 5].

iii. Thomas4, a taxable "Molato" in Bladen County from 1768 to 1774 (called Thomas Cairsey, Junr.) [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:4, 61, 81, 135].

iv. George2, born before 1776, head of a Robeson County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:310]. He was about 77 years old on 5 May 1834 when he appeared in Cumberland County, North Carolina court to petition for a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he was born in Bladen County where he enlisted under Captain Baker and Colonel Culp for 11 months in August 1777. His colonel was killed by the Tories commanded by Mike Gowen and Thomas Gibson. They found Mike Gowen in Robeson County. He lived for about five years in Marion District, South Carolina, the balance in Robeson County and Cumberland County where he then lived. James Kersey testified in Robeson County court on 24 November 1834 that both he and George served under General Francis Marion. James Hunt testified in Cumberland County court on 13 March 1834 that George served under General Marion [NARA, R.5801, M804; https://www.fold3.com/image/1/24631742].

v. Elizabeth, head of a Robeson County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:50] and 3 in 1800 [NC:388].

vi. James2, born about 1764 according to the 1782 Militia Returns for Bladen County [The North Carolinian VI:751]. He entered 100 acres in Robeson County including his spring on 20 April 1787 [Pruitt, Land Entries: Robeson County, I:3]. On 11 September 1792 while a resident of Robeson County he sold 200 acres of land on the south side of Sapony Creek which had been owned by Thomas Kersey [Nash DB 6:118]. He was living alone in Robeson County, counted as white in 1790 [NC:48] and "other free" in 1800 [NC:388]. He purchased land in Robeson by deed proved 8 January 1799 and 26 February 1810 [Minutes I:58, 192]. He sold 108 acres in Robeson on the southeast side of the head of Jacob Swamp to Ninty Kersey on 21 August 1818 [DB S:38]. On 24 February 1834 he made a declaration in Robeson County court to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he was born in 1762, volunteered in a company of militia on 1 August 1782 in what was then Bladen County in the town of Elizabeth. He marched to Charleston, South Carolina, to James Island, and received his discharge in Wilmington on 1 August 1783. He was never in any engagement "but once which was with a body of negroes above Charleston at a place called as he thinks the Quarter House." He was inscribed in the Roll of North Carolina on 4 March 1831 [M804-1477, S-8788].

vii. Solomon, who purchased 200 acres in Bladen County adjoining John Rowland on 29 March 1785 [DB 25:240 & 1:299]. He was living alone in Robeson County, counted as white in 1790 [NC:49] and "other free" in 1800 [NC:388]. He sold land in Robeson by deed proved on 9 January 1799 [Minutes I:61].

viii. Job, head of a Robeson County household of 4 "other free" and one white woman in Bladen County in 1800 and 5 "free colored" and one white woman in 1820 [NC:154].

ix. Abraham, head of a Liberty County, South Carolina household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [SC:785].

 

7.    Peter3 Kersey, born say 1720, received a mare by the 28 October 1730 Bertie County will of his father Thomas1 Kersey. He was taxable on one "white" tithe in Bladen County in 1763 and a "Molato taxable with his son David from 1768 to 1772 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:8, 44, 79]. He received a patent for 100 acres on the northwest side of Drowning Creek on 16 December 1769 and sold this land on 19 November 1779 for 500 pounds [Hoffman, Land Patents, II:167; DB 37:185]. He was taxable on 150 acres and one poll in Captain Regan's district of Bladen County in 1784 and was head of a Robeson County household of 7 "other free" in 1790 [NC:50]. He was the father of

i. David, born say 1750, a "Molato" taxable in Bladen County from 1768 to 1772.

ii. ?Redding, a "Mix Blood" taxable in Jacob Locklear's Bladen County household in 1774 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:135]. He entered 50 acres between Drowning Creek and Gum Swamp in Bladen County on 20 January 1789 [Pruitt, Robeson County Land Entries, 1787-1795, 21]. He was head of a Robeson County household of one white man in 1790 [NC:48].

 

8.   Thomas3 Kersey, born say 1735, purchased 175 acres in Southampton County on the north side of Three Creeks adjoining Thomas Wiggins and McLemore on 13 April 1760 [DB 2:357-8] and sold property by deed proved in Southampton County court on 12 April 1781 [Orders 1778-84, 149]. Walter Peter & Co. sued him in Southampton County court in August 1766 for 1 pound, 17 shillings which was payment for cloth, a hat, a pound of powder and a claw hammer [Judgment Papers, 1766-1767, frame 282]. He may have been the father of

9     i. William3, born about 1761.

10   ii. Agatha, born say 1762.

iii. Thomas5, born before 1767, taxable in Southampton County from 1787 to 1790, taxable in 1807 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1792, frames 641, 664, 713, 763; 1807-21, frame 70] and head of a Southampton County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:71].

iv. Walden, born before 1767, taxable in St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County, from 1787 to 1795 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92, frames 641, 664, 713, 763, 878; 1792-1806, frames 56, 84, 164]. The Southampton County court fined him 500 pounds of tobacco on 14 August 1789 [Minutes 1786-90]. His house in Southampton County was mentioned in the 3 April 1793 Southampton County will of John Claud [WB 4:608]. He was taxable in Smith Creek District, Warren County, North Carolina, in 1801 [Tax List 1781-1801, 419], taxable in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, in 1806 and 1807, and a "Mulatto" taxable in Mecklenburg County in 1818 and 1820 [Personal Property Tax List 1806-28, 39, 66, 167, 656, 705]. He married Betsey Hawley, 1817 Granville County, North Carolina bond.

v. Willis, taxable in Southampton County in 1792, taxable in James Caulthorpe's household in 1793, taxable in his own household on a horse in 1794 and 1795 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92, frames 878; 1792-1806, frames 49, 84, 164].

vi. Delilah, born say 1778, married Cordall Reed, 19 November 1798 Southampton County bond, James Sweat surety.

vii. Loudoun, taxable in St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County, from 1801 to 1811, called a "M"(ulatto) in 1806 [Personal Property Tax List 1792-1806, frames 512, 550, 688, 839; 1807-21, frames 47, 70, 189].

 

9.    William3 Kersey, born about 1761, was presented by the Southampton County court on 11 May 1780 for concealing a tithable [Orders 1778-84, 111]. He was taxable in Southampton County on a horse in 1782, taxable in John Claud's household in 1784, taxable from 1787 to 1792, charged with Willis Kersey's tithe in 1790 and 1791 but not listed as a tithable himself in 1791, taxable on his own tithe and a horse from 1793 to 1797, a "M"(ulatto) taxable in 1806 and 1807 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92, frames 504, 545, 641, 664, 713, 763, 820, 878; 1792-1806, frames 56, 84, 164, 194, 267]. He was taxable in the Mecklenburg County, Virginia household of John Chavis Walden in 1786 [Personal Tax List, frame 149]. He married Polly Evans, 23 December 1786 Mecklenburg County bond, Kinchen Chavous surety. She was mentioned in the 22 May 1787 Mecklenburg County, Virginia will of her father Thomas Evans, Senior [WB 2:250]. He purchased 150 acres in Mecklenburg County on the Warren County line in 1804 and was taxable on 184 acres in 1813 and 274 acres in 1820 with the initials "C.S." after his name [Land Tax List 1782-1811A, 1811B-1824A]. He was head of a Warren County household of a white male over 16, two under 16, and three white females in 1790 (called William Corsey) [NC:76], 10 "other free" in 1800 [NC:814], 11 in 1810 [NC:765], and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:798]. His 26 June 1829 Warren County will was proved in August 1836 (called William Cursey). He was called William Carsey in his pension application in which he stated that he was born in Southampton County in 1761, lived there and in Bute County, North Carolina, during the war, and married Polly Evans in Mecklenburg County in 1786. He died 26 June 1836 and his widow Mary died 14 September 1840. His children were named in his will, pension file, and in a Mecklenburg County chancery case [M804-481; Chancery suit 1841-010, LVA; Estate file CR 100.508.30, N.C. Archives]. He was the father of

i. Thomas6, born about 1785, married Sally Kersey, 22 December 1813 Mecklenburg County bond, surety Hardaway Drew. He was sixty-five years old and Sally was fifty-five when they were counted in the 1850 Mecklenburg County census [VA:90].

ii. Elizabeth Carsey, born say 1787, married John Chavous, 6 July 1803 Warren County bond, Hutchings Mayo bondsman. John was head of a Carroll County, Tennessee household of 14 "free colored" in 1830. Elizabeth received land in Carroll County by her father's will.

iii. Peggy, born say 1790.

iv. Sally, born about 1798, married John Stewart.

v. Nancy, born say 1799, married Anderson Drew.

vi. Babby, married Martin Anderson.

vii. William H., born say 1800, married Margaret Ivey, 5 December 1822 Mecklenburg County bond. He was probably the Hill Kearsey who married Martha Stewart, 20 December 1821 Warren County bond, William Kearsey bondsman.

viii. Edmund, born say 1805.

 

10.    Agatha Kersey, born say 1762, received a plantation of 150 acres by the 31 January 1791 Southampton County will of James Calthorpe, proved 12 December the same year and witnessed by John Claud. The land and money from the sale of his four slaves were to be used to raise and school three children: Mary Black, Agatha's son Joshua Cursey, and the child Agatha was pregnant with. If Agatha died or married, Mary Black was to have the land and Agatha's children were to have the plantation utilities [WB 4:600]. Agatha was taxable in St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County, on 3 free male tithables and a horse in 1794, 2 male tithables in 1796, taxable on a horse in 1803 and 1804, a free male tithable from 1807 to 1811, was a "M"(ulatto) taxable on a horse in 1813, and was living with her son Miles in 1814 [Personal Property Tax List 1792-1806, frames 84, 196, 321, 384, 619, 688; 1807-21, frames 70, 167, 189, 321, 415]. She was head of a Southampton County, Virginia household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:71]. She was the mother of

i. Joshua, born say 1784, named in the 31 January 1791 Southampton County will of James Calthorpe. The court appointed Joel McClemonds as his guardian on 12 July 1800 [Minutes 1799-1803, 103]. He was a "M"(ulatto) taxable in Southampton County from 1812 to 1814 [Personal Property Tax List 1807-21, frames 288, 321, 415].

ii. Miles, born say 1791, married Nancy Bass, 12 November 1810 Southampton County bond, Cordall Reed surety. He was taxable in Southampton County from 1802 to 1815: called a "Mulatto" from 1801 to 1806, taxable with his wife Viney Bass on Littleton Mason's land in 1812, living on land owned by his "Mother Aggy" in 1814 and 1815 [Personal Property Tax List 1792-1806, frames 511, 549, 618, 687, 802, 838; 1807-21, frames 70, 166, 288, 415, 440].

 

KEYTON FAMILY

1.    William1 Keyton, born say 1716, was a "Mulatto Man" presented by the Westmoreland County, Virginia court on 26 May 1741 for cohabiting with a white woman named Sarah Heath and having several children by her. He was probably the brother of Bridget Keyton who was presented two months later on 29 July for cohabiting with Aaron Rose and having several children by him [Orders 1739-43, 99a, 114a].

 

KING FAMILY

James King & Ellenor King were apparently the children of a white woman because their petition to the Westmoreland County court for their freedom was dismissed on 24 February 1719/20 when they and attorneys John Barker and Philpott Bonam "entered into rule that the sd James King and Ellenor King shall continue and be servants or slaves till each of them shall attaine the full age of thirty yeares and no longer [Orders 1705-21, 384]. They may have been the ancestors of

1     i. Francis, born say 1752.

2     ii. Samuel, born say 1755.

iii. Ann, born say 1760, a "mulatto" taxable on one free male tithable in Gloucester County in 1803 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20].

iv. Milly, head of a Petersburg household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:123a].

v. Samuel, head of a Prince William County household of 5 "other free" and 4 slaves in 1810 [VA:513].

vi. Sarah, head of a Prince William County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:518].ii. Sarah, head of a Prince William County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:518].

vii. George, head of a Charles City County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:939]. On 1 June 1808 the Charles City County court bound William King to him as an apprentice cooper [WB 2:27].

viii. Mason, born about 1784, registered in Petersburg on 31 May 1808: a dark brown Negro woman, five feet two inches high, twenty four years old, born free & raised in the County of Prince George [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 422]. She was head of a Petersburg household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:123a].

ix. Susannah, born about 1785, registered in Petersburg on 16 January 1809: a dark brown Negroe woman, five feet five and a half inches high, twenty three, strait made, born free & raised in the County of Prince George [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 454].

x. Edy, born about 1786, registered in Petersburg on 25 March 1809: a dark brown, near black Negro woman, five feet one and half inches high, twenty three years old, born free & raised in the County of Prince George [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 459].

xi. Anna, born about 1787, registered in Petersburg on 31 May 1808: a very dark brown, near black Negro woman, five feet five inches high, straight made, twenty one years old, born free & raised in the County of Prince George [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 423].

xii. Polly, born about 1788, registered in Petersburg on 31 May 1808: a dark brown Negro woman, five feet six inches high, twenty years old, straight made, born free & raised in the County of Prince George [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 424]. She was head of a Petersburg household of 2 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:122b].

 

1.    Francis King, born say 1752, was head of an Abingdon Parish, Gloucester County household of 7 free persons in 1784 [VA:68]. He may have been the Francis King who received a discharge from Captain Machem Boswell on 27 May 1783 that he had enlisted in the 2nd Virginia Regiment in June 1777, re-enlisted in 1779 and served for the war [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, King, Francis, 1783, Digital Collections, LVA]. He was listed as a waiter to Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Posey, enlisted for the war, on the muster from January 1782 to March 1783 when he was tranferred to Virginia. He received his final pay of 67 pounds on 27 October 1783 [NARA, M881, Roll 1089, frames 920-7 of 1808]. He was taxable in Gloucester County from 1783 to 1812: taxable on a slave, 4 horses and 8 cattle in 1783; taxable in Ware Parish in 1785; taxable on a horse and 5 cattle but his personal tax paid by Thomas Lewis in 1788; taxable on his own tithe and a horse in 1789, taxable on his own tithe in 1799 and 1800, a "mulatto" taxable in 1801 [PPTL, 1782-1799; 1800-20]. He was the father of

i. John, born about 1771, registered in Petersburg on 11 September 1800: a dark brown Mulatto man, five feet four inches high, twenty nine years old, born free & raised in Gloster County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 206]. He was head of a Gloucester County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:407A]. He was called the "mulattoe son of Francis King" when he was taxable in Gloucester County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20].

ii. ?Ellick, a "mulattoe" taxable in Gloucester County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20].

iii. ?Sally, a "mulo" living at Robert Meggs' in Gloucester County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20].

iv. ?Ruth, a "mulo" living at Robert Meggs' in Gloucester County 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20].

 

2.    Samuel King, born say 1755, was head of a Petsworth Parish, Gloucester County household of 1 free person in 1783 [VA:53] and was taxable in Gloucester County from 1785 to 1799: taxable in Petsworth Parish on two head of cattle in 1785, taxable on a horse and 3 cattle in 1786, and taxable on a horse in 1797 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-99]. He was head of a Gloucester County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:407A]. He and his unnamed wife were "mulattoes" living at Hill Neck in Gloucester County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20]. He may have been the father of

i. Isaac, born say 1777, listed himself as a tithable the same day as Samuel King in Gloucester County in 1798 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-99].

ii. Lewis, born about 1778, a "mulattoe" bricklayer taxable in Gloucester County from 1804 to 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20]. He obtained free papers in Gloucester County in February 1827 and registered in York County on 6 June 1832: a free tawney coloured man about forty nine years of age, five feet four and a half inches high ... born free ... appears from the above is about fifty four years of age [Free Negroes Register 1831-50, no.338].

iii. Ruth, a "mulo" living at "H.N." in Gloucester County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20].

iv. Fanny, Sr., a "mulo" living on Matthew Kemp's land in Gloucester County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20].

v. Catey, a "mulo" living on Matthew Kemp's land in Gloucester County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20].

vi. Martha, a "mulo" living on Matthew Kemp's land in Gloucester County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20].

 

KENNEY/ KINNEY FAMILY

The Kinney family were slaves of the Johnson family of Amelia and Louisa counties in 1798 when they won their freedom based on testimony from William Denton that they descended from an Indian woman named Joan Kenny who was an elderly woman in 1729 and came from the Indian Town on Pamunkey [LVA, Albemarle County Free Negro Papers, April 1798]. Patrick Belches named members of the family in his 29 December 1763 will which was proved in Louisa County on 10 April 1764: to my wife Judy Belshches all my land in Louisa and following Negroes to wit Cuffy, Cupid, Sue, Sarah, Lewis, Liddy, Dilse, Phillis (at present in Spotsylvania) also Nell and her three children Jane, Lucy and Moll also Anna a daughter of Beck Kinny's also two old Negroes named Harry and Judy--these last mentioned seven Negroes being in Louisa...also following Negroes to wit Indian Ben and wife Beck Kinney and their son Thom, also Moses Hoomes for the time he has to serve...unto my Daughter Margaret after my wife's decease the following slaves to wit Indian Ben and his wife Beck Kinny and her increase and their son Thom and old Jane...to my daughter Mary, Robin and Rachell children of Beck Kinny's [WB 1:59-62]. Other members of the family born during the colonial period were

i. Isaac1, born say 1745, an outlawed "Mulatto Fellow" who belonged to the estate of Colonel Richard Johnson on 20 July 1772 when he ran away. W. Johnson placed an ad in the 10 September 1772 issue of the Virginia Gazette offering twenty pounds to anyone who would kill him or three pounds for his capture. The ad described Isaac as: Height five Feet nine or ten Inches, wears his own Hair, which is remarkably black, and curls well. The ad went on to say that it was supposed he was harbored by Colonel John Snelson's Negroes, near this Place, among whom he has a Wife, or by his Brother, John Kenney, a Mulatto Slave belonging to Mr. Thomas Johnson of Louisa [Windley, Runaway Slave Advertisements 1:120].

ii. John1 Kenney, brother of Isaac, a "Mulatto" slave who belonged to Thomas Johnson of Amelia County on 20 July 1772, perhaps identical to John Kenney, "Free Negro" taxable in St. Paul's Parish, Hanover County, on 3 slaves and 2 horses in 1803 [Cocke, Hanover County Taxables, 74].

1     iii. ____ (torn), born say 1765.

2     iv. Amy, born say 1770.

3     v. Betsey, born say 1770.

vi. Wilson, born say 1772, a "free Mulatto" shoemaker living on Eppa Fielding's land in Louisa County about 1802 [Abercrombie, Free Blacks of Louisa County, 20]. He may have been identical to slave Wilson who was taxable in the Louisa County household of Thomas Johnson (Minor) from 1782 to 1786 [PPTL, 1782-1814]. He obtained a certificate of freedom on 27 April 1821: We certify that we have been acquainted with Wilson Kinney from an infant & that he came from a family that obtained there freedom from Capt Thomas Johnson's estate by a suit at law [Kinney, Wilson (M): Free Negro Certificate, 1821, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

vii. David1, born before 1776, head of a Louisa County household of 2 "free colored" in 1830.

viii. William1, born before 1776, head of a Louisa County household of 11 "free colored" in 1830.

ix. Joanna, born before 1776, head of a Louisa County household of 8 "free colored" in 1830. Her son Archy Kinny registered in Louisa County on 3 April 1830: was born in Louisa County of a free Woman by the name of Jone and we have no doubt of his being over twenty on, perhaps twenty two or three [Kinny, Archy (M, 21): Free Negro Affidavit, 1830, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

x. Sally, born before 1776, head of a Louisa County household of 5 "free colored" in 1830. Her son William registered in Louisa County on 12 October 1833: son of Sally Kinney who was free born...a man of Dark Complexion about five feet seven inches high, about twenty one years of age [Kinney, William (M, 21): Free Negro Register, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

 

1.    ____ (torn) Kenny, was a "free Mulatto" tailoress living with (her brother?) Wilson in Louisa County with her four children John, Betsey, Jane and Phillis about 1802 [Abercrombie, Free Blacks of Louisa County, 20]. She was the mother of

i. John3, born about 1791, a tithable of Chapman Johnson in Staunton in 1811 [PPTL, 1809-1820, frame 9]. He registered in Staunton on 20 June 1817: 5'6" high, Black Complexion, age 26 years [5/22/2015; http://valley.lib.Virginia.edu/VoS/govdoc/fblack.early.html].

ii. Betsy.

iii. Jane, born about 1779, registered in Louisa County on 9 July 1849: a woman of colour who was born free, 5'4-1/2" high, believed to be 70 years old ... dark copper colour [Abercrombie, Free Blacks of Louisa County, 75].

iv. Phillis, born about 1791, registered in Louisa County on 5 September 1831: a free woman of colour, about 40 years old ... rather yellowish complexion. Her son William (born about 1805) registered on 29 May 1826: son of Phillis Kinney who was born free, bright mulatto, 5'4-1/2" high, hair inclined to be straight [Abercrombie, Free Blacks of Louisa County, 37].

 

2.    Amy Kenny, born say 1770, was counted in a list of "free Mulattoes" at "Captain Johnson's old place" in Louisa County about 1802 with her children Sally, James, Daniel, Mary and Lucy [Abercrombie, Free Blacks of Louisa County, 20]. She was the a "free woman of colour," born in Louisa County, the daughter of an Indian or of Indian descent, and the wife of a slave of Chapman Johnson according to testimony of her son Thornton Kinney in his freedom suit in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1853 [Kinney, Thornton, a man of color v. Hatcher, John F.; Bridges, Charles C., Nov. 1853, Case No. 35, Circuit Court Case Files, Office of the Circuit Clerk, City of St. Louis, Missouri; 5/22/2015; http://stlcourtrecords.wustl.edu/display-case-images.php?caseid=6898&page=1]. She was the mother of

i. Sally.

ii. James.

iii. Daniel.

iv. Mary.

v. Lucy, born about 1797, registered in Louisa County on 2 February 1847: a woman of color, having been born free, aged 50, 5 feet 1 inches high, dark complexion [Kenney, Lucy Ann (F, 50), 1847, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

vi. John4, born about 1802, registered in Louisa County on 13 August 1827: son of Amy Kinney a man of colour who was born free, dark complexion [Abercrombie, Free Blacks of Louisa County, 32].

vii. David3, registered in Louisa County on 10 January 1831: son of Amey Kinney who was born free, dark complected about 5'6" high [Abercrombie, Free Blacks of Louisa County, 36].

viii. Isaac3, born about 1805, registered on 14 September 1829: son of Amey Kinney born free, dark complexion about 5'9-3/4" high, 24 years old [Abercrombie, Free Blacks of Louisa County, 34].

ix. Thornton, born about 1811, registered in Staunton on 23 July 1832: dark complexion, aged 21, five feet nine and a quarter inches high [http://valley.lib.Virginia.edu/VoS/govdoc/fblack.early.html]. He was born in Charlottesville, Virginia, the son of Amy Kinney, a free woman of colour, born in Louisa County, her mother an Indian woman or one of Indian descent. His father was a slave belonging to Chapman Johnson, "the celebrated Virginia lawyer," of Augusta County. He moved to Staunton while very young and was apprenticed to J. J. Kennedy, a farmer and shoemaker, until the age of twenty-one. About three or four years later he went to Ohio, Michigan and then Louisville, Kentucky. He emigrated to Liberia and stayed there for five years before returning to the United States. He worked on a ship that sailed from Salem, Massachusetts, to Cuba, then to New Orleans. And worked as a cook and steward aboard steam boats. About 1851 he married a woman who had been the slave of William Moore but who had bought her freedom. In 1853 he sued for his freedom when he was taken up as a runaway slave in St. Louis, Missouri. He made a deposition in which he detailed his life from birth and stated that he had a brother John Kinney who was a cooper in Cincinnati, another brother in Sulphur Springs and a sister in Campbell County, Ohio [Kinney, Thornton, a man of color v. Hatcher, John F.; Bridges, Charles C., Nov. 1853, Case No. 35, Circuit Court Case Files, Office of the Circuit Clerk, City of St. Louis, Missouri; 5/22/2015; http://stlcourtrecords.wustl.edu/display-case-images.php?caseid=6898&page=1]. On 4 March 1835 he was listed as a 20-year-old shoemaker who was an emigrant to Liberia from New Orleans [American Colonization Society, VI 16; 5/22/2015; https://fold3.com/image/46669694].

 

3.    Betsey Kinney, born say 1770, was called the housemaid of Thomas Johnson (minor) in his 13 March 1795 Louisa County will, proved 14 September 1795, by which he set her and her youngest daughter Rebecca free. He also gave Rebecca a slave named "Nancy's child Nanny." And he allowed Betty the use of 50 acres of land during her lifetime, a horse, two cows, four sheep, two sows and pigs and eight pounds annually [WB 3:605; Abercrombie, Free Blacks of Louisa County, 130-2]. She was living with (her brother?) Wilson in Louisa County with her two unnamed children about 1802 [Abercrombie, Free Blacks of Louisa County, 20]. She was the mother of

i. Jane, born about 1789, registered in Louisa County on 8 February 1839: (daughter of Betsey Kinney) who was free born, darkish complexion about 50 years of age, about 5'3-1/2" high, lame in left leg which occasions a hopping in walking [Abercrombie, Free Blacks of Louisa County, 56].

ii. Rebecca, set free in 1795.

 

Other members of the Kinney family were

4     i. Milly, born about 1777.

ii. Isaac2, born about 1784, counted as a "free Mulatto" blacksmith living with Cob at the Green Springs in Louisa County about 1802, registered there on 25 June 1817: a free man of colour, born in sd. county, 33 years old, 5'6" high, rather light complexion [Abercrombie, Free Blacks of Louisa County, 20, 24].

iii. Abraham, sued for the representatives of Thomas Johnson, Minor, deceased, for his freedom in Louisa County on 10 August 1795 [Kinney, Abraham: Freedom Suit, 1795, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. John Quarles witnessed his petition and wrote that he was of opinion that Abraham was entitled to his freedom. He was a free male taxable in Louisa County from 1795 to 1813 when he was included in a "List of Free Negroes & Mulattoes." He may have been identical to slave Abram who was taxable in Thomas Johnson (Minor)'s Louisa County household in 1782 [PPTL, 1782-1814]. He was a "free Mulatto" living near Trinity Church in Louisa County about 1802 [Abercrombie, Free Blacks of Louisa County, 20]. He made a deed of trust on 11 March 1817 for a horse, cart, two cows, a bed and all his property as payment for $150 lent to him by William C. Ailstock [DB N:192].

iv. Benjamin, a "F.N." taxable in Isle of Wight County from 1792 to 1800 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1810, frames 248, 337, 478].

v. David2, born about 1794 in Fredericksville Parish, lived with William Morris at the Green Springs in Louisa County about 1802, registered in Louisa County on 30 December 1817: bright mulatto, 23 years of age, 5'10" high [Abercrombie, Free Blacks of Louisa County, 24, 28]. He registered in Rockbridge County on 8 January 1831: a man of Color born free in County of Louisa, will be 36 on 15 May next, light mulatto complexion, 5'10" high, curly negro hair [Free Negro Register 1803-28, no. 76].

vi. John2, a "free Mulatto" living with William B. Graves in Louisa County about 1802 [Abercrombie, Free Blacks of Louisa County, 20].

 

4.    Milly Kinney, born about 1777, registered as a "free Negro" in Augusta County on 26 February 1822: a dark coloured negroe ... aged about Forty five years ... Born free. She also registered her children the same day. They were

i. Elizabeth, born about 1799, "black complexion."

ii. Jane, born about 1802, "dark complexion."

iii. Sally, born about 1804, "yellow complexion."

iv. Mary, born about 1807, "dark complexion."

v. William2, born about 1810, "dark complexion".

vi. Macy, born about 1813, "dark complexion."

vii. Esther, born about 1815, "yellow complexion" [Register of Augusta County, no. 38; 5/22/2015; http://valley.lib.Virginia.edu/VoS/govdoc/fblack.early.html].

 

KNIGHT FAMILY

1.    William1 Knight, born say 1710, received a patent for 320 acres in Bertie County on 29 March 1743/4 [Saunders, Colonial Records of North Carolina, IV:632]. He purchased two tracts of land in Bertie County on 20 February 1746/7, one for 50 acres and the other for 350 acres on the north side of Potecasi Creek and land of Thomas Bonners. He sold 125 acres of this land on the same day to William Conner and made further sales of 100 acres on 7 August 1747 and 140 acres on 5 August 1749 [DB G:18, 19, 45, 204]. William Conner was taxed in his household in 1751 [CCR 190]. His 3 December 1751 Bertie County will was proved in February 1752. He mentioned his wife Martha, three of his children, and other unnamed children. Martha was taxed on one tithe in the 1753 list [CCR 190]. His children were

i. John.

ii. William2, born say 1735, taxed on 1 tithe in Bertie County in 1753 and 9 tithes in 1754 [CCR 190]. He was a taxable "free Mulatto Male" in the 1761 list of William Gray and was in Henry Wood's household in an untitled 1765 fragment [CR 10.702.1]. Perhaps he was the William Knight who was taxed in Hertford County in 1779 on 165 acres and 5 slaves in district 2 [GA 30.1] and was head of a Hertford County household of 5 whites and 2 slaves in 1790 [NC:25].

iii. Nehemiah.

iv. ?James, a taxable "free Mulatto Male" in the 1761 Bertie Summary list.

 

2.    Benjamin Knight, born say 1740, was listed in the muster roll of Colonel Richard Richardson's Battalion of South Carolina Militia in the 1759 Cherokee Expedition from 18 October 1759 to 10 January 1760 [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 898]. He was called Ben Night, "Mulatto," head of a 96 District, South Carolina household of 1 "other free" in 1790. Perhaps his children were

i. Dick, "Mulatto" head of a Cheraw District household of 7 "other free" in 1790 [SC:49] and a Chesterfield County, South Carolina household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [SC:103] and 15 in 1810 [SC:557].

ii. Alexander, head of a Chesterfield County household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [SC:103].

iii. Moses,born about 1755, was head of a Frederick County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1800 (Moses Night) [MD:788] and 10 in 1810 (M. Knight) [MD:635]. He was about seventy six years old on 26 March 1831 when he appeared in Davis County, Indiana court and petitioned (signing) for a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted in 1779 in South Carolina in the regiment commanded by Colonel Jack McIntosh. He had not applied earlier because he had been living in Maryland where he had owned 146 acres in 1818. He had a wife named Maryann (54), son Abraham (17), son Isaac (10), daughter Analisa (8-9), and grandson Elijah (9-10). He appeared in court again on 13 May 1833 and added (again signing) that he was sometimes called Moses Sharper and Moses McIntosh because he was raised by Colonel Alexander McIntosh. His widow Mariam H. Knight applied for a widow's pension in Knox County, Indiana, on 4 December 1850 and stated that they were married about 1795 in Pleasant Valley, Washington County, Maryland, and her husband died on 2 April 1848 [NARA, W.10182, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/24655780].

 

3.    George Night, born say 1745, was a taxable "mulatto" in Richard Acock's household in Daniel Harris' list for Baptist District, Granville County, in 1761 [CR 44.701.1]. He was probably the husband of Martha Acock who was mentioned in Richard Acock's 5 May 1788 Warren County will [WB 5:99].

 

Another member of the Knight family was

i. Lotty, head of a Gates County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:161], perhaps the mother of Mary Knight who married Smith Cuff, 24 October 1799 Gates County bond.

 

LAMB FAMILY

1.    Mary Lamb, born say 1705, was granted land in Bladen County in 1735 and entered 100 acres in Bladen County on Hogg Swamp, including the place she was then living, on 17 March 1756 [DB 1:288; Philbeck, Bladen County Land Entries, 1743-61, #254]. Her 11 November 1769 Bladen County will named the following legatees: Jacob Lamb, Isaac Lamb, Thomas Clark, Hardy Inman, Joshua Lamb, Rachel Davis, and Patience Carter. Jacob and Isaac Lamb were executors. Needham Lamb was a witness [Campbell, Bladen County Abstracts of Wills, 47]. She was probably the mother of

i. Jacob.

2     ii. Isaac, born say 1725.

iii. Joshua.

iv. Patience Carter.

 

2.   Isaac Lamb, born say 1725, entered 250 acres on the north side of Hogg Swamp in Bladen County on 16 May 1754 [Philbeck, Bladen County Land Entries, 1743-61, #1004]. He was a Bladen County taxable in 1763. On 1 August 1770 he purchased 130 acres on Hogg Swamp which had been granted to Abram Lamb on 26 November 1757 and sold this land on 6 March 1775. And on 6 March 1775 he sold 130 acres on Hogg Swamp which had been granted to Abram Lamb on 26 November 1757 and conveyed to Isaac on 20 October 1758. He sold 200 acres on Old Field Swamp northeast of Tadpole on 26 April 1775 [DB 23:478, 520]. He was a taxable "Mulato" in Bladen County in 1768 (with his son Needham), in 1770 (with his son Needham and a white man named Shadrack Huit), in 1772 (with sons Needham and Ephraim), and taxable on 3 polls in 1774 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:7, 35, 111, 130]. He was living in South Carolina on 3 April 1786 when he sold 100 acres on the south side of Drowning Creek which was land he had been granted on 1 October 1758, and the same day he sold another 100 acres on the west side of Drowning Creek on Hog Swamp which had been granted to Mary Lamb in 1735 [DB 1:132]. He recorded a plat for 350 acres on Flat Swamp in Georgetown District, South Carolina, on 17 June 1788 [South Carolina Archives, Series S213190, 23:76]. He was the father of

i. ?Arthur, born say 1745, taxable in Thomas Odam's Bladen County household in 1763, a "Mulato" taxable in Bladen County from 1768 to 1774, taxable with Meedy (Needham?) Lamb in 1776, and taxable on one male from 21 to 60 years old, two males under 21 or over 60, and seven females in 1786 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:4, 15, 35, 81, 111, 130; II:68, 84, 182]. He received voucher no. 4465 on 4 September 1783 in Wilmington District for 10 pounds specie for service in the militia [North Carolina Revolutionary Pay Vouchers, 1779-1782, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2WT-PD2M, Lamb, Arthur]. He was counted as white in Robeson County in 1790, head of a household two males over 16 and five females [NC:49], and was counted as "other free" in Robeson County in 1800, head of a household of 5 persons [NC:389a].

ii. Needham, born say 1748, taxable in his father's Bladen County household from 1768 to 1774, perhaps identical to Meedy Lamb who was living in the household of (his brother?) Arthur Lamb in 1776. Meedy was counted in the 1786 state census with one male 21 to 60 years old, two males under 21 or over 60, and five females [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:7, 35, 111, 130; II:68, 185]. He was counted as white in Robeson County in 1790, head of a household of one male over 16, two under 16, and six females [NC:49]. He entered 100 acres in Robeson County in the fork of Big and Little Hog Swamp on 6 September 1787 [Pruitt, Robeson County Land Entries, 1787-1795, 7].

iii. ?Barnabas, taxable in Bladen County in Thomas Odam's household in 1772 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, II:I:78]. He was counted as white in Robeson County in 1790, head of a household of one male over 16 and one female [NC:49], and counted as "other free" in Robeson County in 1810, head of a household of 7 persons [NC:155].

iv. Ephraim, born say 1760, taxable in his father's Bladen County household in 1772.

 

Other members of the Lamb family in North Carolina and Virginia were

i. Stephney, born say 1743, "free negro" head of a Norfolk County, Virginia household in 1766.

ii. Peggy, born say 1745, taxable head of a Norfolk County household in 1766 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables 1766-80, 8].

iii. Lemon /Lamentation, born say 1760, a waiter in the roll of Lieutenant William Davidson's North Carolina Company in the Revolution on 23 April 1779 [NARA M246, Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783, https://www.fold3.com/image/10200387], head of Northampton County, North Carolina household of 6 "other free" and 1 white woman [NC:72] in 1790, called Lamentation Land in 1800 when he was head of a Northampton County household of 8 "other free" [NC:459], called Lemuel Land in 1810, head of a Halifax County household of 6 "other free" [NC:32] and called Lemon Lamb in 1820, head of a Halifax County household of 5 "free colored" [NC:156].

iv. Rachel, born after 1794, head of a Gates County, North Carolina household of 1 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:161].

 

LANDUM/ LANDRUM FAMILY

1.    Jane Driggers, born in 1644, was one year old on 27 May 1645 when Emmanuel Driggers bound her to Captain Francis Pott to serve him until the age of thirty-one. On 24 May 1652 when she was eight years old, Driggers paid Captain Pott for her freedom [DW 1651-54, 82]. In 1663 she had an illegitimate daughter, Sarah Landum, by an Irish freeman, Dennam Olandum [Orders 1657-64, fol.179]. Jane married first, John Gussal, about 1665. He died shortly afterwards and in April 1666 she was charged in court with failing to prove his will. She had married William Harman by June 1666 when he submitted letters of administration on her first husband's estate [Orders 1664-7, fol.24, p.24]. Dennam and Jane's child was

2     i. Sarah, born about 1663.

 

2.    Sarah Landum/ Landrum, born about 1663, was living in Northampton County in 1689 (called Sarah Landrun) when she and (her aunt) Sarah Driggers, "free Negroes," were given twenty-five lashes on their bare backs for stealing some yarn from "a free Negro woman commonly called Black Nanny" [Orders 1679-89, 463]. A suit brought against her (called Sarah Landman, alias Driggus Negro") by Honorable John Custis, Esq., was dismissed by the Northampton County court on 29 December 1702 because he was not ready to prosecute. Frances Driggers and Samuel George were her witnesses. She was probably the mother of Thomas Landum, a one-year-old "Negro" bound to Richard Jacob in Northampton County in 1710 [OW&c 1698-1710, 123, 182-3, 504]. Her son was most likely

i. Thomas Landman, born about 1709, tithable in John Driggers' Northampton County household in 1729 [L.P. 1729].

 

LANG FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth1 Lang, born say 1653, was presented by the Accomack County court in 1671 for having an illegitimate child by an Indian named Kitt. Her child was bound as an apprentice to William Custis until the age of twenty-four, and she was ordered to serve an additional three years. She petitioned the court

that the Indyan may not have the bringing up of my child, nor anything to doe with itt ... It being the humble desire of your petitioner that a pagan may not have my child [Deal, Race and Class, 54-5].

Her child was apparently the parent of

2     i. Elizabeth2, born say 1705.

 

2.    Elizabeth2 Lang, born say 1705, was presented by the grand jury of Northampton County, Virginia, for fornication on 11 May 1725. In February 1726/7 she complained to the court that her master Thomas Dell, a minister, was not supplying her with sufficient apparel. He called her "an Indian servant bought the last of Oct." when he replied that she tore her clothes when "she went romping with Negroes." On 12 September 1727 Dell proved to the court that she had absented herself from his service for sixty-seven days and asked that she be listed as a tithable in his household [Orders 1722-9, 181, 252, 295; Mihalyka, Loose Papers 1628-1731, 101, 140, 141]. On 12 February 1729/30 she acknowledged an indenture binding herself to John Satchell for three years and seven months from 11 April 1729 [Orders 1729-32, 8]. Her children were most likely

3     i. Rachel, born say 1724.

ii. Daniel, born say 1726, bound apprentice by the Northampton County court to John Floyd on 13 September 1732 to learn the trade of weaver [Orders 1732-42, 23].

 

3.    Rachel Lang, born say 1724, was the mother of Jacob Lang, a six-year-old "Negro" boy who was bound by the Northampton County court to Captain Holloway Bunting on 9 June 1747 [Orders 1742-8, 148, 414-5]. Her petition against Addison Nottingham was dismissed on 10 September 1751. Sarah Etheridge was her witness. She may have been the Rachel Lang who sued Thomas Stripes on 10 October 1780 [Orders 1751-3, 11, 13; Minutes 1777-83, 278]. She was the mother of

i. Jacob, born on 19 February 1740/1, a "Negro Boy" bound to Halloway Bunting on 13 March 1743/4, called the son of Rachel on 9 June 1747 when he was again ordered bound to Captain Holloway Bunting [Orders 1742-8, 148, 414-5]. He was a "Mulatto" or "Negro" taxable in Northampton County from 1787 to 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 74, 81, 179, 413, 540].

ii. ?Abraham, born say 1750, a "free Negro" accused of murdering Thomas Fisherman "Indian," in Northampton County on 10 May 1774 and sent for trial at the General Court of Virginia [Minutes 1771-7, 269]. He and his wife and others sued Devorax Godwin in Northampton County on 12 May 1778. He and William Roberts were sued in Northampton County court by John Daniel (an Indian) in a case which was decided in their favor [Minutes 1777-83, 54, 188]. He was tending crops on the Gingaskin Indian reservation, married to an Indian woman and also living with another woman off the reservation according to a report filed by the commissioners of the reservation in January 1785 [L.P. cited by Rountree, Eastern Shore Indians, 186, 299-300]. He was security for the 30 December 1791 Northampton County marriage of William Francis and Polly Jacob. He was taxable in Northampton County in 1784, 1794 and from 1800 to 1811: a "Negro" free from taxation starting in 1809. Perhaps his widow was Betsy Lang who was a "N"(egro) listed in the Indian Town of Northampton County in 1812 and 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 31, 174, 289, 473, 492, 514, 540].

iii. ?Nancy, born say 1758, married Samuel Stevens, 16 July 1779 Northampton County bond, Abraham Lang security.

iv. ?Ann, born say 1780, head of a Norfolk County household of 5 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:908].

 

LANGSTON FAMILY

 

Allmond.jpg (127343 bytes)

Leah Langston (born June 1846) and members of the Almond family, Pamunkey Indians

[Smithsonian Institution Photo no. 895. ca. 1900].

 

The Langston family probably descended from "Indian Langston" who was paid by the Henrico County court on 12 October 1691 for killing wolves [Deeds, Wills 1688-1697, 249]. He was probably an ancestor of

i. Lucy Jane Langston, slave of African and Indian descent and wife of her owner Ralph Quarles who emancipated her in Louisa County in 1806. Her sons were Gideon Quarles, Charles Henry Langston (grandfather of Langston Hughes), and John Mercer Langston, first African American elected to the U.S. Congress from Virginia. Ralph Quarles was the nephew of John Quarles of King William County who petitioned the legislature for additional funding for widows of men serving in the Revolutionary War. A woman named Sukey Langston/ Lucy Langton was one of those who received the benefits [See below].

 

Other members of the family in Virginia were

i. George, born say 1720, one of the only seven surviving men of the Pamunkey Indians who petitioned the Virginia Assembly to sell a small tract of their land in 1748 [Winfree, The Laws of Virginia, 416-7].

ii. John1, born say 1723, one of the only seven surviving men of the Pamunkey Indians who petitioned the Virginia Assembly to sell a small tract of their land in 1748 [Winfree, The Laws of Virginia, 416-7].

iii. William, born say 1724, one of the only seven surviving men of the Pamunkey Indians who petitioned the Virginia Assembly to sell a small tract of their land in 1748 [Winfree, The Laws of Virginia, 416-7]. He or a younger William Langston was a private in Captain James Gray's Company of the 15th Virginia Regiment in the Revolution, from August 1777 to December 1777, reported as sick on most rosters and deceased in the muster for February 1778. The musters included Robert Mush, Elias Peay, Edmund Absolam, and several other soldiers whose widows or dependents received support from the King William County court in 1779. William Bigger received his final pay of 15 pounds [NARA M246, Roll 113, frames 322, 325, 328, 331, 337, 340 of 752; https://fold3.com/image/9642083, 9642136, 9642178, 9642229, 9642251, 9642291; NARA, M881, Roll 1084, frame 897]. Therefore, William's widow must have been the Sukey Langston, widow, who received support from the King William County court on 23 June 1779, called Lucy Langton when she was allotted 12 pounds support on 6 November that year [Quarles, John: Petition, 1779-11-06 and 1779-06-23, Legislative Petitions Digital Collection, LVA]. Lieutenant Henry Quarles certified that William Langston served for three years and was dead by February 1778. His bounty land was assigned to George Langston [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Langston, William, 1786, Digital Collections, LVA].

iv. John2, born say 1742, an Indian boy attending William & Mary College in 1754 [William & Mary College Quarterly VI:188]. He was probably identical to John Langston, Sr., who was one of the headmen of the Pamunkey Indians who petitioned the Virginia Legislature on 7 December 1798 to inform them that they had met at Armstead Sampson's house and agreed to the appointment of trustees to regulate their internal government [Pamunkey Indians: Petition, King William County, 1798-12-27, Legislative Petitions Digital Collection, LVA]. He was an Indian taxable on a slave and 3 horses in King William County in 1787 and 1797, 1799 [PPTL, 1782-1832, frame 164].

v. Gideon, born say 1740, an Indian boy attending William & Mary College in 1754 [William & Mary Colle Quarterly VI:188]. He was one of the headmen of the Pamunkey Indians who petitioned the Virginia Legislature on 4 December 1812 [Pamunkey Indians: Petition, King William County, 1812-12-04, Legislative Petitions Digital Collection, LVA]. He was an Indian taxable on a slave in King William County in 1809 [PPTL, 1782-1832]. He married Judy Sweat [Rountree, Pocahontas's People, 337]. Judy descended from Robert Sweat who had a child by a "negro" in James City County in 1640.

vi. Edmund, born say 1765, an Indian taxable in King William County on a horse in 1787 [PPTL, 1782-1832, frame 164].

vii. Willis, born say 1775, one of the Pamunkey Indians who petitioned the Virginia Legislature on 7 December 1798 [Pamunkey Indians: Petition, King William County, 1798-12-27, Legislative Petitions Digital Collection, LVA]. He was taxable on a slave in King William County in 1798 and 1800, 1805, 1806, 1807 [PPTL, 1782-1832].

viii. John3, Jr., born say 1777, one of the Pamunkey Indians who petitioned the Virginia Legislature on 7 December 1798. He was also one of the headmen who petitioned the legislature in 1812 [Pamunkey Indians: Petition, King William County, 1798-12-27, 1812-12-04, Legislative Petitions Digital Collection, LVA]. He was an Indian taxable in King William County on a horse in 1834 [PPTL, 1833-1851].

ix. Archibald, born say 1788, one of the headmen of the Pamunkey Indians who petitioned the Virginia Legislature on 4 December 1812 asking permission to lease out a 300 acre tract of their land. They stated that held two separate tracts of land in King William County: one an island on which they had been living for a considerable time and the other a tract, about two miles away, of about 300 acres, which they had rented since colonial times and which they had no need of due to the very great diminution of the tribe [Pamunkey Indians: Petition, King William County, 1812-12-04, Legislative Petitions Digital Collection, LVA].

x. Louis, born say 1788, one of the headmen of the Pamunkey Indians who petitioned the Virginia Legislature on 4 December 1812 [Pamunkey Indians: Petition, King William County, 1812-12-04, Legislative Petitions Digital Collection, LVA].

xi. James, born about 1784, an Indian taxable on a slave in King William County in 1807 and taxable on 3 horses in 1833 and 1834 [PPTL, 1782-1832; 1833-1851]. He was one of the headmen of the Pamunkey Indians who petitioned the Virginia Legislature on 4 December 1812 and he also signed the petition of 26 November 1842 [Pamunkey Indians: Petition, King William County, 1812-12-04, Legislative Petitions Digital Collection, LVA]. He testified on 30 June 1837 for the pension application of Jane Collins, widow of John Collins, that he was acquainted with her since he was a small boy in King William County [NARA, W.6736, M804, roll 613, frame 689 of 761; also https://www.fold3.com/image/12861980]. He was head of a King William County household of 11 "free colored" in 1830. His widow was probably Nancy Langston, born about 1797, a "Mulatto" listed in the 1850 census with 7 children who were farmers and laborers.

xii. Agnes, born say 1790, had been the friend of Nancy Major when she testified in the coroner's inquisition on Nancy's death in Henrico County due to domestic violence on 12 September 1819. She stated that she had lived with Nancy for some time and that Nancy's husband, a slave named John who belonged to Thomas Cowls, was in the habit of beating his wife severely and frequently. Another slave was present the night of the beating and confirmed Agnes's statement [Major, Nancy: Coroner's Inquisition, 1819, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. Agnes was head of a Henrico County household of 2 "free colored" persons in 1820: a girl under the age of 14 and a woman 26-45 years of age.

xiii. John4, born about 1797, head of a King William County household of 7 "free colored" in 1830, a "Mulatto" farmer living in King William County with Owney (45), William (12), Coley (12) and John Whisler in 1850.

xiv. Tazewell H., born say 1805, petitioned the Virginia Legislature on 26 November 1842, objecting to a petition by the whites to sell their land and objecting to the claim that: they all have one fourth or more of negro blood. They responded, there are many here that are more than half-blooded Indian, tho we regret to say that there are some here that are not of our Tribe [Pamunkey Indians: Counter Petition, King William County, 1843-01-21, Legislative Petitions Digital Collection, LVA]. He was an Indian taxable on 2 horses in King William County in 1843 [PPTL, 1833-1851].

 

LANSFORD/ LUNSFORD FAMILY

1.    Ann1 Lansford, born say 1695, the indentured servant of John Redford, confessed to the Henrico County court in July 1713 that she had an illegitimate child by a "Negro" [Orders 1710-4, 198, 247]. She was the mother of

2    i. Hanna "Glansford," born say 1713.

 

2.    Hanna Lunfford, born say 1713, a "mulatto," was the mother of Ann, Elizabeth, William, John, and Mary Lunfford whose births from 1731 to 1739 were recorded by the clerk of the vestry of St. John's Church, Henrico County, on information of Captain John Redford [Brock, Vestry Book of Henrico Parish, Virginia, 1730-73, 154-5]. Hannah Lunfford petitioned the Henrico County court for freedom from her master John Redford in June 1739. The court ruled that she had to serve until the age of thirty-one [Orders 1737-46, 81]. She was the mother of

i. Ann, "Daughter of Hannah Lunfford, mulatto, born 13 September 1731.

ii. Elizabeth, born 10 July 1732.

3    iii. William, born 5 March 1735.

iv. John, born 19 September 1737.

v. Mary, born 14 October 1740 [Brock, Vestry Book of Henrico Parish, Virginia, 1730-73, 154-5].

vi. ?Joseph, born about 1748, a cooper from Richmond who emigrated to Liberia with Susan Langford aboard the ship Oswego in 1823 [https://www.fold3.com/image/46670209].

 

3.    William Lansford, born 5 March 1735, was ordered bound apprentice to William Radford by the churchwardens of St. James Northam Parish, Goochland County, in December 1750 (no race mentioned) and then bound to Mary Radford in February 1752 [Orders 1750-57, 47, 120]. William married Elizabeth Scott in Goochland County on 24 December 1761: Mulattoes, he in this parish and she in Hanover [Jones, The Douglas Register, 347]. He may have been the William Lansford who was head of an Amherst County household of 10 free persons in 1783 [VA:48]. His children were

i. Milley, born 28 May 1762, baptized 8 August 1762: daughter of William Lansford & Eliz: Scott Mulattoes [Jones, The Douglas Register, 348].

ii. ?Zachariah Lankford, born say 1763, a "free Negro" taxable on a horse in St. Paul's Parish, Hanover County, in 1784, a "Mulatto" taxable in 1788, 1789, and 1792 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-91, pp. 211, 222, 265; 1792-1803, 14]. He was a "F.N." taxable in the upper district of Henrico County from 1801 to 1814: listed with his unnamed son in 1811 and 1812, listed with son and 2 unnamed daughters in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 448, 490, 536, 666, 725, 759, 824; Land Tax List, 1799-1816]. He was head of a Henrico County household of 13 "other free" in 1810 [VA:986].

ii. ?John Langford, a "FN" taxable in the upper district of Henrico County in 1801 and in 1811 with no race indicated. He was probably related to John Langford Scott who was taxable in the lower district in the lower district of Henrico County in 1797 and 1799 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 375, 391, 448, 666].

iv. ?Joseph, head of a Person County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:681].

 

LANTOR/ LANTERN FAMILY

1.    Thomas1 Lantor and his wife Isabella registered the birth and baptism of their children in Christ Church Parish, Middlesex County, Virginia [NSCDA, Parish Register of Christ Church, 52, 60, 64, 67, 72]. Their children were

i. John, born 30 July, baptized 1 October 1698.

2    ii. Peter1, born 25 January 1699/1700.

iii. Mary, born 9 September 1700, baptized 22 May 1709.

iv. Margaret, baptized 21 November 1702.

3    v. Thomas2, baptized 5 November 1704.

 

2.    Peter1 Lantor, born 25 January 1699/1700, was baptized February 1699/1700 in Christ Church Parish, Middlesex County [NSCDA, Parish Register of Christ Church, 52]. He was required to post bond for his good behavior in King George County court on 4 February 1725/6 for abetting Richard Haines to assault Thomas Farmer [Orders 1725-8, 298]. He was special bail for Thomas Lantor in a Caroline County court suit on 11 May 1732. He sued Thomas in court about a year later on 8 March 1732/3, but the case was dismissed. He owned land in Caroline County before 8 August 1734 when the court ordered that a road be cleared from Caroline Courthouse to his property. And on 12 September 1734 he was one of the freeholders ordered to clear a road from Bee Tree to the Spotsylvania County line. He purchased land from John Thomas by deed proved in Caroline County on 14 September 1739 [Orders 1732-40, 9, 54, 152, 157, 558]. On 20 April 1742 he and Thomas Powell entered a claim in Spotsylvania County court for taking up a runaway servant named Vincent Mills who belonged to William Covington of Essex County [Orders 1740-2, 165]. And on 24 August 1744 he made a claim in Caroline County court for taking up a runaway Negro slave named Jeffery who belonged to Captain James Garnett of Essex County. On 8 November 1745 the Caroline County court allocated 2,400 pounds of tobacco for his building Ginings Bridge [Orders 1740-6, 312, 540]. He was a witness for John Morgan in his suit against William Sisson in Orange County, Virginia court in May 1753, and on 28 September 1753 he sued Jeremiah Morton for a "Dary" he had built for Morton. He and William Sisson were sued for debt by Charles and Peter Copland on 25 July 1755 [Orders 1747-54, 447, 469, 501; 1754-63, 152, 169]. On 11 October 1755 he and (his son?) Reubin Lantor, "Mulattos of St. Thomas's Parish...Planters," were charged in Orange County court with assaulting and beating John Lynch who they mistook for a runaway servant. On 24 March 1757 he sued Andrew Mannen for trespass, assault and battery, and on 27 April 1758 Andrew Bourn, administrator of the estate of Robert Bourn, brought suit against him. In May 1757 he sued Henry Bourn for payment for work he had done in building an addition to Bourn's house and an outside chimney in 1755 [Judgments, August 1758-June 1759, Court Papers August 1758, frames not numbered, about frame 58-68, LVA microfilm reel no. 116]. On 24 November 1757 he and Sarah Bourn were indicted by the grand jury for fornication on the information of Andrew Bourn and Andrew Mannen. This indictment was titled "Peter Lantor and his wife" when it was dismissed on 23 June 1758. He recorded his livestock mark on 28 February 1760 [Orders 1754-63, 178-9, 357, 368, 388, 392, 411, 443, 511]. In September 1762 he sued Colonel William Talliaferro for 115 pounds currency for work he had done for Talliaferro between 1759 and 1763 as well as wheat and corn he had delivered. The work included: a 24 x 26 foot barn, a 6 x 8 foot house, a 20 x 40 foot tobacco house, a 60 x 20 foot tobacco house, twelve dressers for the dairy, a 12 x 12 foot house with an outside chimney for the overseer, a 8 x 8 x 30 foot high pigeon house, a turkey house and three hen coops, a coffin for a child, legs for a table, mending a wagon, and a garden gate. Colonel Talliaferro countersued and gave his accounts of debts Peter had accumulated with him from 1750 to 1760 which included: 4 shillings cash in 1750, rum and brandy, cash paid to "yr Brother Tom" in 1752, "yrs & Toms Levys" and "Spotswood's rent" in 1754. The court appointed a jury which viewed and valued the work and services to determine a fair payment [Judgments, May-August 1764, Court Papers, May 1764, LVA microfilm reel 123]. On 2 November 1765 the court ordered that he be paid for building the bridge over the Mountain Run. On 24 November 1768 the grand jury presented Peter for concealing his tithable-wife Sarah Lantor but excused him the following day [Orders 1763-9, 366, 535, 538]. Peter signed all the accounts and promissory notes in the relevant court cases [Judgments, March 1754-August 1764, LVA microfilm reels 108, 111, 113, 114, 116, 123]. He was a tithable head of household in Orange County from 1755 to 1769 - called Lanthorn, Lanter, Lantor, Lanton: taxable on his own tithe in 1755, 2 tithes in 1757, 4 tithes in 1759, 3 in 1761 and 1762, listed near Thomas Balkham and Christopher Underwood [Little, Orange County Tithables, 42, 46, 58, 59, 65, 82, 97, 101, 109; Judgments, LVA microfilm reels 114, 115, 116, 117, 119, 122, 132]. On 29 September 1769 Alexander Waugh won two suits of ejectment against him, one for 156 acres and the other for 100 acres. On 2 October 1769 John Booth was charged with feloniously shooting and killing him. The court ordered Booth sent to the General Court for trial. (Booth was a co-defendant with Peter in a suit for debt on 24 August 1764) [Orders 1769-77, 35, 90; 1763-9, 190]. Sarah received 4 pounds annually for five years by the 21 June 1771 Orange County will of Caleb Sesson, proved 22 August 1771 [WB 2:436-7]. Her plantation was located near a new road which was ordered to be opened on 23 June 1774 from Chestnut Mountain over the Mountain Run [Orders 1769-77, 319, 340]. Peter may have been the father of

i. Reuben, born say 1734, charged in Orange County court along with (his father?) Peter Lantor, "Mulattos of St. Thomas's Parish...Planters," on 11 October 1755 for assaulting and beating John Lynch who they mistook for a runaway servant. He sued Henry Bourn on 26 May 1757 and was awarded 1 pound, 8 shillings. In October 1757 the court ordered the sheriff to sell a horse of his for a debt he owed Hugh Jones [Orders 1754-63, 178-9, 331, 355, 379, 413]. On 22 June 1758 the Orange County court ordered that Thomas Baulkham, a "Mulattoe," be paid as a witness in William Minor's suit against him [Orders 1754-63, 404]. The Goochland County court granted Thomas Pleasants an attachment on his estate for 7 pounds, 17 shillings in August 1760. The garnishee, Richard Curd, testified that he owed Reuben money for building a house, but "he thinks the same not to be worth any thing being badly done." The court appointed a commission to view the house and decided it was worth 4 pounds, 11 shillings [Orders 1757-61, 347-8, 374-5]. He was sued for a debt 18 pounds in Amherst County on 7 July 1767 [Orders 1766-9, 172, 210].

ii. Mordecai, sued William Talliaferro in Orange County court in June 1764 for 16 pounds current money for building a shed, the floor for the barn and sawing 586 feet of plank [Judgments, May-August 1764, June Court Papers, LVA microfilm reel 124].

iii. Jacob, born say 1740, sued for debt in King George County court on 3 June 1762 [Orders 1751-65, pt.4, 1013, 1015, 1071]. He married Polly Webb, 20 December 1787 Orange County, Virginia bond, Henry Clayton surety.

iv. Peter3, born about 1763, on the pay roll of Captain Spencer's Company of the 7th Virginia Regiment on 13 February 1778 [NARA, M246, roll 105, frame 213 of 806; ancestry.com]. He was drafted from Orange County for another 18 months service on 29 March 1781: age 18, 5 feet 9 inches high, dark hair, gray eyes, dark Complection, a planter, born Orange County, former service 7th V.R. [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (pp.19-20)]. He married Hannah Webb, 31 May 1787 Orange County, Virginia bond. He was head of a Lancaster, Gerard County, Kentucky household of 8 whites in 1810. He died in Bourbon County, Kentucky, on 14 August 1811. His widow Hannah Lantern applied for a widow's pension in Fayette County, Kentucky, on 3 March 1843 at the age of seventy. Her witness testified that she was the daughter of John Webb [NARA, W.9114, M804, roll 1524, frame 437 of 1027].

 

3.    Thomas2 Lantor, baptized 5 November 1704 in Christ Church Parish, was paid 30 pounds of tobacco in King George County, Virginia, on 8 December 1722 for helping to guard a prisoner in the county jail. He was involved in several minor suits in King George County between 2 February 1722/3 and 6 March 1724/5 [Orders 1721-3, 74, 101; 1723-5, 166, 186, 208, 220, 236]. And he was involved in a number of lawsuits, mostly for debt, in Caroline County court as plaintiff and defendant between 11 May 1732 and 13 June 1746 [Orders 1732-40, 9, 11, 62, 63, 83, 91, 125, 129, 137, 149, 165, 166, 384; 1740-6, 139, 464, 561, 590]. He was the father of Elizabeth Saunders' "mulatto" child born before 12 September 1735 when Elizabeth identified him as the father in Caroline County court. The court ordered Elizabeth to serve her master Samuel Coleman additional time and ordered the child bound to Coleman. On 12 May 1738 Thomas sued Richard Buckner, Gentleman, for work he had done building two sheds adjoining John Buckner's house. The court ordered Buckner to pay him 40 shillings [Orders 1732-40, 307, 378, 481, 491, 503, 520]. On 10 February 1745/6 he produced a certificate in court for taking up two white servants belonging to John Glanton of Caroline County. That same day he was ordered to be placed in the stocks for half an hour, no explanation being given for the punishment [Orders 1740-6, 563, 565]. He was apparently identical to "yr Brother Tom" who William Talliaferro listed in his account of transactions with Peter Lanter in 1752. Taliaferro paid Peter and Tom's levies in 1754 [Judgments, May-August 1764, Court Papers, May 1764]. The Orange County court dismissed Joseph Brown's suit against him on 25 November 1752 and Joseph Williams' suit against him on 26 April 1753 [Orders 1747-54, 405, 415]. He may have been the father of

4     i. Elizabeth, born say 1730.

ii. Thomas2, born about 1757, married to Mary Walker on 28 August 1783 by Rev. Aaron Bledsoe in Orange County [Ministers' Returns, 13]. He was taxable in Orange County, Virginia, on 1 tithe, 4 horses and 5 cattle in 1782 [Little, Orange County Tithables, 144] and taxable on 2 tithes, 4 horses, and 6 cattle in 1787 [Schreiner-Yantis, 1787 Census, 735]. He was head of an Orange County household of 5 whites in 1782 [VA:39] and 7 in 1785 [VA:97] and a Montgomery County, Kentucky household of 10 whites in 1810. He was seventy-five years old on 7 January 1833 when he applied for a pension in Madison County, Kentucky, for his service in the Revolution. He stated that he was born, raised and resided about twelve miles from the courthouse in Orange County, Virginia, until 1805. He had a sister named Milly Webb [NARA, W.9114, M804, roll 1524, frame 468 of 1027].

iii. Mildred, born say 1769, married John Webb, Jr., 20 January 1790 Orange County, Virginia bond, Jacob Lantor surety, 20 January marriage.

 

4.    Elizabeth Lantern, born say 1730, testified in Kent County, Delaware, on 22 November 1769 that (her son?) Peter Lantorn, who was assessed as a tithable the previous year, was born on 8 April 1750 and therefore should not have been tithable [Kent County Levy Assessments, 1768-84, Reel no.3, frame 38]. She married Robert Game before September 1782 when Robert named her (called Elizabeth Lanthorn) and her daughters Mary and Sarah in his Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, Delaware will [WB L-1, fol. 267-8]. She was the mother of

i. Peter2, born 8 April 1750, had an illegitimate child by Keziah Dean in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, about December 1773 [DSA, RG 3505, MS case files, May 1774 Indictments; RG 3805.003, 1735-1779, frame 580]. He was tithable in Little Creek Hundred in 1772 and 1773, in Dover Hundred in 1778, in Little Creek in 1779 and 1780, and a delinquent Duck Creek Hundred taxable in 1781 and 1782 (called Peter Lantern/ Lanthron). In May 1785 he and Francis Day, laborers, were charged with stealing 200 pounds of flour from John Pernell and 400 pounds of bacon from Joseph Harper in Murderkill Hundred on 4 April 1785 [DSA, RG 3805, MS May 1785 Indictments]. He was head of a Murderkill Hundred household of 3 "other free" in 1800 (called Peter Lanteron) [DE:126].

5     ii. ?Joseph1 Lantern, born say 1756.

iii. Mary.

iv. Sarah.

 

5.    Joseph1 Lantern, born say 1756, was tithable in Dover Hundred, Kent County, Delaware from 1776 to 1785. He married Elizabeth Harmon, widow and administrator of Daniel Harmon's 10 May 1774 Kent County estate [de Valinger, Kent County, Delaware Probate Records, 289]. He purchased 6 acres in Halifax County, North Carolina, for 44 pounds on 23 December 1789. On 30 October 1795 he, Moses Matthews, and John Kelly purchased 100 acres, tools, furniture, cattle, and hogs from John Harmon, and he purchased 100 acres near the road from Halifax Town to Enfield old courthouse from John Harmon on 3 December 1795 [DB 17:231, 920; 18:130]. Joseph was head of a Halifax County household of 7 "other free" and 7 slaves in 1800 [NC:324]. Perhaps his widow was Charity Lantern, head of a Halifax County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:34]. Joseph may have been the father of

i. Joseph2, Jr., born about 1772, head of a Halifax County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [NC:324] and a seventy-eight-year-old "Mulatto," born in Delaware, counted in District 1 of the 1850 Montgomery County, Alabama census with (wife?) Nancy Lanton who was born in South Carolina and $1,000 real estate.

ii. James, born say 1780, head of a Halifax County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:33] and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:155].

 

LAWRENCE FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Leurance, born say 1657, the servant of Thomas Townsend, confessed to the Middlesex County court on 3 September 1677 that she had a child by Ananias. Her master paid her fine and posted bond for maintenance of the child, so Ananias may have been a slave [Orders 1673-77, 76]. She may have been the ancestor of

2    i.    Alice, born say 1700.

ii. Charles, born in June 1704, a "Mulatto" servant of Windsor Kenner who sued his master in Northumberland County court for his freedom on 18 July 1733. The court ruled that he was twenty-nine years old and would not be thirty-one until June 1735 [Orders, 1729-37, 102, 150].

iii. Spencer, born 2 April 1711, a "Mullatto" servant of Richard Kenner who sued his master in Northumberland County court for his freedom on 14 January 1739/40. After considering the deposition of Mrs. Elizabeth Footman of Westmoreland County, the court ruled that he would not be thirty-one until 2 April 1742 [Orders 1737-43, 119, 127, 130].

 

2.    Alice Lawrence, born say 1700, was presented by the Prince George County, Virginia court on 13 May 1718 for having an illegitimate child, no race indicated [Orders 1714-20, 186]. She may have been the mother of

i. Drury, born about 1726, petitioned the Amelia County court on 26 June 1755 asking to be discharged from his indenture to Charles Irby [Orders 1754-8, n.p.]. On 9 November 1769 the Lunenburg County court presented Richard Claiborne, Gentleman, for not listing him as a tithable [Orders 1769-77, 5]. He was apparently identical to Jury Larrance, an "Indian" taxable in Cumberland Parish, Lunenburg County, in Henry Blagrave's list for 1772. A Drurey Larrance was taxable the same year in Richard Claiborne's list for Cumberland Parish; a Drurey Larrance was taxable in the compiled list for 1774, and a Jerry Laurance was taxable in the compiled list for 1775 [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 291, 293, 339, 361]. (The original tax lists have not survived). Drury enlisted in the Revolution in Brunswick County, Virginia, on 20 August 1780 and was sized in 1781: born in Prince George County, residing in Dinwiddie County, 5'3-1/2" high, grey hair, yellow complexion, a farmer [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.19)].

3     ii. Martha1, born say 1728.

4     iii. Robin, born say 1735.

 

3.    Martha1 Lawrence, born say 1728, was living in Brunswick County, Virginia, on 25 September 1751 when the court ordered the churchwardens of St. Andrew's Parish to bind out her poor infant son Richard Littlepage Lawrence. On 23 May 1753 the court bound out her son Isham Lawrence [Orders 1751-3, 55, 501]. She was the mother of

5     i. Richard1, born say 1747.

6     ii. Isham, born say 1745.

iii. ?Frances, born say 1752, mother of a "Mulatto" child ordered bound out to Elizabeth Woodward in Sussex County on 17 July 1777 [Orders 1777-82, 18].

7     iv. ?Martha2/ Patty, born about 1754.

v. ?Fanny, born about 1756, a 47-year-old woman who did washing in Petersburg in 1803 [List of People of Color in Petersburg 1803, 1803, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

 

4.   Robin Lawrence, born say 1735, died before 14 October 1786 when his widow Sarah married John Thomas, Brunswick County, Virginia bond. He was called "Indian" Robin Lawrence when his son Woody registered as a "free Negro" in Charlotte County on 15 April 1811 [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 16]. Sarah was called Sarah Thomas on the 7 March 1796 Charlotte County marriage bond of her daughter Mason Lawrence. She was called Sarah Lawrence when she was taxable on a horse in Charlotte County from 1792 to 1795 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 255, 279, 329]. Robin and Sarah were the parents of

i. Wood, born about 1767, taxable in the middle district of St. Andrew's Parish, Brunswick County, from 1782 to 1787: taxable on 2 horses and 4 cattle in 1782, taxable on a slave and 2 horses in 1788 [PPTL 1782-1798, frames 11, 42, 189, 218]. He was bondsman for his mother's 14 October 1786 Brunswick County marriage. On 30 November 1786 he sued Charles Brandum in Brunswick County court for a debt of 8 pounds. On 6 November he and (his mother) Sarah Thomas sold for 5 shillings 200 acres where he was then living at the head of Lloyd's Run which his father had purchased from Drury Stith [Orders 1784-8, 432, 475; DB 15:60]. He was taxable on a horse in Charlotte County from 1791 to 1810 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 231, 279, 329, 386, 451, 519, 657, 726, 792] and was a "Free Negro" head of a Charlotte County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:969]. On 15 March 1798 he sold 100 acres in Charlotte County on Turkey Cock Creek which was part of a tract of land he had purchased from John Sandifer [DB 8:76]. He registered as a free Negro in Charlotte County on 15 April 1811: a Mulatto of Indian extraction four feet five inches high. 44 years of age the 10th of 1811 Son of Indian Robin Laurance & Sarah his wife both free persons, was born in the County of Brunswick [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 16].

ii. Sarah, born say 1767, "daughter of Robert Lawrence, deceased," married Peter Rouse, 19 October 1786 Brunswick County bond, Wood Lawrence bondsman.

iii.?Levina, born about 1768, married Alexander Flood, 4 April 1792 Charlotte County bond. She registered in Charlotte County on 26 November 1806: the wife of Alexander Flood a Mulato Woman about 38 years of age, five feet seven inches high...Born a free Woman in the County of Brunswick [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 9].

iv.?Berry/ Littleberry, born about 1769, taxable on a horse in Charlotte County from 1791 to 1799 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 231, 279, 329, 386, 451]. He married Hannah Jumper (daughter of C. Jumper), 7 March 1796 Charlotte County bond, John Williamson surety. He registered as a "free Negro" in Charlotte County on 21 October 1799: a Black Man five feet seven inches and half high about thirty years old been a freeman in the County of Brunswick [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 5]. Berry registered again in Pittsylvania County using his Charlotte County papers: a fifty-year-old black man with "mulatto" wife Hannah (aged thirty-five) and four daughters [Register of Free Negroes, pp. 6-7, nos. 16-20]. He was a "free Negro" taxable in Pittsylvania County from 1810 to 1815 [PPTL 1797-1812, frame 688; 1813-23, frames 39, 62, 142].

8     v. Nanny, born say 1770.

vi. Mason, born say 1775, married John Williamson, 7 March 1796 Charlotte County bond, Littleberry Lawrence surety. John Williamson was a "Mulatto" taxable in Charlotte County from 1798 to 1806 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1813, frames 425, 456, 697].

vii. ?Ferguson, born 10 April 1782, taxable in Charlotte County in 1798 and 1799 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 420, 451], registered in Charlotte County on 2 October 1805: a Black Man five feet Eleven inches high 23 years old the 10th day of April 1805. born a freeman in the County of Brunswick [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 6].

 

5.   Richard1 Lawrence, born say 1747, infant son of Martha Lawrence, was living in Brunswick County, Virginia, on 25 September 1751, when the court ordered the churchwardens of St. Andrew's Parish to bind him to Drury Stith, Gentleman. Richard was called an "Indian" on 26 September 1758 when the court again ordered the churchwardens to bind him out [Orders 1751-3, 55; 1757-9, 244]. On 28 October 1771 the court ordered the sheriff, Thomas Stith, Gentleman, to pay him 1 pound, 4 shillings for repairing the bridge over Sturgeon Run at Drury Stith's [Orders 1768-72, 423]. He was called Richard Littlepage Lawrence (signing) on 25 September 1775 when he and his wife Tabitha sold 100 acres in St. Andrew's Parish, Brunswick County, on Loyd's Run which he had been devised by the 26 July 1765 will of Drury Stith [DB 11:491]. In 1784 he was paid 6 shillings by Thomas Lundie, guardian of Thomas Stith, for making shoes [Guardians Accounts 1780-1808, 27]. He was taxable in the middle district of St. Andrew's Parish from 1784 to 1796: called Richard Littlepage Lawrence when he was listed with his son Miles in 1785 [PPTL 1782-1798, frames 77, 109, 189, 217, 251, 286, 339, 516]. On 26 July 1784 the Brunswick County court ordered the churchwardens of St. Andrew's Parish to bind out his children, "it appearing he does not take proper steps in bringing them up," and on 24 September 1787 the court ordered the overseers of the poor to bind out his son Zachariah. On 25 August 1788 he was presented for living in adultery with Nancy Chavous. This was probably the case against him which was dismissed on 24 March 1790 [Orders 1760-84, 471; 1784-8, 572; 1788-92, 60, 299]. He was the father of

i. Miles, born say 1767, taxable in the middle district of St. Andrew's Parish, Brunswick County, from 1784 to 1804: under the age of twenty-one when he was taxable in Richard Lawrence's household in 1784, called Richard's son in 1785, a "M"(ulatto) taxable from 1804 to 1807, crossed off the list in 1809 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1798, frames 77, 109, 286, 339, 378, 414, 448, 516, 615; 1799-1815, frames 16, 116, 168, 225, 275, 319, 371, 418, 457].

ii. ?Sterling, born say 1769, taxable in St. Andrew's Parish, Brunswick County from 1799 to 1814: a "M"(ulatto) taxable from 1804 to 1809, perhaps married to Tabitha Lawrence who was listed with him in 1813. He was listed as a "FN" in 1814, probably identical to Sack Lawrence who was taxable in St. Andrew's Parish from 1796 to 1798 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1798, frames 516, 565, 615; 1799-1815, frames 16, 66, 116, 168, 225, 275, 319, 418, 457, 494, 535, 622, 652]. Sterling was head of a Brunswick County, Virginia household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:721].

9     iii. Winny, born say 1771.

iv. Zachariah, son of Richard Lawrence ordered bound out by the overseers of the poor on 24 September 1787 [1784-8, 572].

 

6.  Isham Lawrence, born say 1745, son of Martha Lawrence, was ordered bound out in Brunswick County, Virginia, on 23 May 1753 [Orders 1751-3, 501]. He purchased 5 __ and 1/2 acres on the south side of Flat Rock Road in Brunswick County for 150 pounds on 8 August 1780 [DB 14:189]. He was taxable in Brunswick County from 1782 to 1794: taxable on a horse and 2 cattle in 1782 [PPTL 1782-1798, frames 11, 109, 217, 251, 286, 360, 448]. He and Daniel Duggar were sued for debt of 6 pounds in Brunswick County court on 28 March 1785. Otha Jumper sued him and his unnamed wife for trespass, assault and battery. The suit was dismissed at the defendant's cost on 26 April 1785 [Orders 1784-8, 78, 93, 119, 125]. He was taxable in Lunenburg County from 1795 to 1804, taxable on 2 tithes and a slave in 1801 [PPTL 1782-1806]. He was counted in a "List of all free Negroes & Mulattoes in the lower District of Lunenburg" with his wife Letitia and children: Richard, Polly, Sally, and Griffin in 1802 and 1803 [LVA, Free Negro & Slave Records, 1802-1803 p.1]. Lettence was head of a Surry County, North Carolina household of 7 "free colored" in 1820. Isham's children were

i. Richard2, married Sally Barber, 23 September 1817 Surry County, North Carolina bond. He was head of a Surry County household of 5 "free colored" in 1830.

ii. Polly.

iii. Sally.

iv. Griffin.

 

7.    Martha2/ Patty Lawrence, born about 1754, registered in Petersburg on 18 August 1794: a dark brown woman with long black hair, five feet high, about forty years old, born free & raised in Dinwiddie County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 41]. She was the mother of

i. Stith, born about 1775, ordered to be bound apprentice in Dale Parish, Chesterfield County, on 7 November 1783 and in June 1784 [Orders 1774-84, 496, 541]. He registered in Petersburg on 16 November 1796: a dark brown Mulatto man, pitted with the small pox, short knotty hair, stout & well made, five feet nine inches high, Twenty one years old, born free & son of Patty Lawrence a free Mulatto woman & raised in County of Prince George [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 117]. He was taxable in Petersburg from 1800 to 1804, listed in the Chesterfield County part from 1801 to 1804 [PPTL 1800-33, frames 7, 40, 95, 132], a waterman in 1803 [List of People of Color in Petersburg 1803, 1803, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

ii. ?Rhody, born about 1779, registered in Petersburg on 14 August 1800: a dark brown Mulatto woman, five feet three inches high, twenty one years old, short bushy hair, holes in her ears for rings, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 160].

iii. Peter2, born about 1784, registered in Petersburg on 19 January 1802: (son of Patty Lawrance, a free Mulatto woman) a dark brown Mulatto boy, seventeen to eighteen years old, five feet three and a half inches high, pitted with the small pox [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 222].

iv. ?Fanny, born about 1774, registered in Petersburg on 14 August 1800: a dark brown Mulatto woman, five feet one half inches high, twenty six years old, with bushy hair, born free & raised in the County of Prince George. Renewed 15 July 1805 [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 161]. She was head of a Petersburg Town household of 1 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:119a].

 

8.    Nanny Lawrence, born say 1770, was living in Brunswick County, Virginia, on 20 March 1808 when her son Willie registered as a "free Negro" [Wynn, Registry of Free Negroes, 8]. Her children were

i. Willie1, born about 1787, "a base born Child of Colour," bound to Edward Murden of Halifax County, North Carolina. On 16 September 1796 the court charged Murden and John Harrison with having sold him (into slavery) and removed him from the state. He was apparently recovered because he registered as a "free Negro" in Brunswick County on 20 March 1808: a mulatto man abt 21 years of age near 6 feet high is reputed to be the son of Nany Lawrence a free woman residing in this county.

ii. ?Thomas, born about 1792, registered in Brunswick County on 25 May 1813: a mulatto man about twenty one years of age five feet ten inches high of a bright complection... born free in this county as appears by the certificate of John Elliott [Wynn, Registry of Free Negroes, 16].

iii. Sarah, born about 1785, a base born child, no race mentioned, bound apprentice to Mascoff(?) Daley, spinster, by the 18 February 1800 Halifax County, North Carolina court.

iv. Pheba, born say 1790, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:33].

 

9.    Winny Lawrence, born say 1771, was the "free Mulatto" mother of Francis Littlepage Lawrence who was baptized in Bristol Parish, Virginia, on 26 August 1792 [Chamberlayne, Register of Bristol Parish, 334]. She was the mother of

10     i. Francis, born 20 June 1791.

 

10.    Francis Lawrence, born 20 June 1791, was baptized in Bristol Parish, Virginia, on 26 August 1792 [Chamberlayne, Register of Bristol Parish, 334]. He was living in Greensville County on 23 January 1794 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind him to Edmund Branscomb [Orders 1790-9, 237]. He was taxable in St. Andrew's Parish, Brunswick County, Virginia, in 1811 [Personal Property Tax List 1799-1815, frame 535]. He registered as a "Free Negro" in Brunswick County on 28 March 1820: about twenty eight years of age five feet five & 1/4 inches high and of a yellow complexion ... by occupation a carpenter who it appears by the evidence of Thomas Lanier was born free [Wynne, Register of Free Negroes, 31]. He was head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 6 "free colored" in 1830 and was probably the father of

i. Willie2, born about 1821, a fifteen-year-old boy of color ordered bound apprentice to John Sumerville by the Halifax County court on 15 August 1836 [Minutes 1832-46].

 

Other members of the Lawrence family were

i. Moses, born say 1760, a "Mulatto" head of household in Buxton's list for the 1784 census of Nansemond County [VA:74] and a "Free Negro" taxable on 4 horses and two slaves in Nansemond County in 1815 [PPTL, 1815-1837, frame 11].

ii. John, married Pheribe Darden, 10 January 1793 Southampton County bond. He was head of a Southampton County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:92].

iii. Peter1, born about 1772, registered in Petersburg on 13 October 1794: a dark brown Mulatto man, five feet eight and a half inches high, twenty two years old, born free & raised in County of Prince George [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 92].

iv. Bilcey, head of a Washington County, Virginia household of 1 "other free" in 1810.

v. Fed, born say 1780, a "mulatto lad" who ran away from Edward Harrison of Prince George County according to an ad placed in a Virginia newspaper on 18 August 1792 [Headley, 18th Century Newspapers, 201].

 

Members of the Lawrence family in Essex and Westmoreland counties were

i. John, a "free Mulatto" overseer living on Ronand's land in Westmoreland County in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:40].

ii. William, head of Westmoreland County, Virginia household of 2 "other free" in 1810.

iii. Jane, head of Westmoreland County, Virginia household of 2 "other free" in 1810.

iv. Cornelius, born about 1797, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County, Maryland, on 28 November 1816: aged nineteen years ... light complexion ... born free [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 37]. He registered in Essex County, Virginia, on 21 June 1824: born free by certificate of St. Mary's County, Maryland, 27 years of age [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.46, no. 115].

 

LAWS FAMILY

1._____ Laws, born say 1730, was a white woman in Lancaster or Northumberland County who had children by a slave. The children of her daughter Martha Laws were bound out until the age of thirty-one, and Martha was thought to be tithable in Lancaster County in 1769 [Orders 1764-7, 234; Judgments, 1768-78, frames 51-2]. An elderly resident of Northumberland County testified in 1838 that a family of Laws lived in the county at the time of the Revolution "and their descendants ever since" [Laws, Timothy: Revolutionary Bounty Warrants, Digital Collections, LVA]. Her children were

1    i. Martha, born say 1745.

2    ii. William, born say 1755.

iii. Timothy, born say 1758, a gunner who served on the Tempest and died in the service in 1782. He was listed as a gunner in the account of necessaries delivered to the officers on board the Tempest on 30 December 1779. His nephew Daniel $730 as bounty for his service [Laws, Timothy: Revolutionary Bounty Warrants, Digital Collections, LVA]. He was issued a warrant of 219 pounds on 7 September 1779 for re-enlisting [Creel, Selected Virginia Revolutionary War Records, III:159, citing Auditors' Account, Volume III:53, LVA].

iv. John, a boatswain's mate on the Dragon who served for three years according to testimony by John L. Kesterson of Northumberland County on 6 March 1738. On 24 March 1838 the accounts of his wages and expenditures from 1777 to 1779 was produced in Fredericksburg by Abraham Henderson, son of David Henderson who kept the accounts [Laws, Timothy: Revolutionary Bounty Warrants, Digital Collections, LVA].

 

1.    Martha Laws, born say 1745, apparently the child of a white woman by a slave, was the mother of unnamed "Mulatto children" bound by the Lancaster County, Virginia court to Thomas B. Griffin, Gent., on 16 February 1767 until the age of thirty-one [Orders 1764-7, 234]. In November 1769 the Lancaster County court presented Griffin for not listing her as a tithable [Judgments, 1768-78, frames 51-2]. She was apparently the ancestor of

i. Amine/ Ammala/ Amy, born about 1764, successfully petitioned the Lancaster County court for freedom from her indenture to Rev. John Leland on 21 October 1779 [Orders , 36, 40], taxable on a horse in Lancaster County from 1792 to 1801, taxable on a free male tithe in 1804 [PPTL, frames 97, 130, 230, 256], registered in Lancaster County on 21 October 1816: Age 52, Color tawny .. born free [Burkett, Lancaster County Register of Free Negroes, 7], head of a Lancaster County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:352].

ii. Adam, born say 1770, a "free mulatto" charged in Richmond City on 6 November 1787 with receiving stolen goods [Hustings Court Orders 1787-92, 236].

iii. Leroy1, born about 1772, registered in Lancaster County on 18 April 1808: Age 36, Color yellow...born free in this county.

iv. Lindsay, born about 1774, taxable in Helen Gilmer's Lancaster County household in 1795, charged with his own tax in 1800 [PPTL, frames 130, 202], registered in Lancaster County on 19 May 1803: Age 29, Color mulatto...born free [Burkett, Lancaster County Register of Free Negroes, 1, 2].

v. Ephroditus, granted a certificate in Lancaster County on 23 May 1798 that she was born free [Orders 1792-9, 437].

vi. Ann, charged in Lancaster County on 22 November 1797 with stealing three barrels of corn from the fodder stock of William Carpenter. The case was dismissed on insufficient testimony [Orders 1792-9, 390].

vii. William2, born 1786-1804, head of a Lancaster County household of 8 "free colored" in 1840.

viii. Daniel, born about 1810, head of a Lancaster County household of 10 "free colored" in 1840, a "Black" farmer with Margaret Laws, age 37, and $400 worth of real estate in Northumberland County in 1850. He was the nephew of Timothy, John and William Laws who applied for his uncles's bounty land on 2 April 1838 [Laws, Timothy: Revolutionary Bounty Warrants, Digital Collections, LVA].

 

2.    William Laws, born say 1755, older brother of Timothy, was a seamen aboard the Defiance for three years, and died "soon after peace was declared according to an affidavit by John S. Kesterson of Northumberland County on 6 March 1838. Kesterson also stated that a family of Laws lived in the county at the time of the Revolution "and their descendants ever since." His widow may have been Chris Laws, born about 1760, registered in Lancaster County on 16 June 1806: Age 46, Color dark...emancipated by Doodridge P. Chichester [Burkett, Lancaster County Register of Free Negroes, 2], head of a Lancaster County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:352]. They may have been the ancestors of

i. Eliza, born say 1775, married Thomas Weaver, 7 July 1794 Lancaster County bond.

ii. Leroy2, born about 1810, head of a Northumberland County household of 8 "free colored" in 1830, a "Mulatto" farmer in Lancaster County with Elizabeth Laws.

 

LAWSON FAMILY

1.    Margaret Lawson, born say 1668, was the servant of John Jones on 17 April 1689 when she won a suit for her freedom in Northumberland County court. Anne Farmer testified on Margaret's behalf that her husband William Farmer had imported Margaret into the country and sold her to Thomas Hobson for four years. She was one of the headrights for which Thomas Hobson was granted land in January 1701/2. On 16 July 1701 she was called the covenanted servant to Mrs. Sarah Howson when she confessed in Northumberland County court that she had had a child by a "Negro called Daniell Webb." The court ordered the churchwardens to dispose of her according to law at the expiration of her service [Orders 1678-98, part 2, 462; 1699-1713, part 1, 167, 195]. She was probably the mother of

i. Martha, a "Mulatto Girl" living in Essex County on 7 August 1689 when the court ordered the sheriff to take her into custody and deliver her to Walter Anderson to whom she was bound by indenture [Orders 1686-92, 162].

2     ii. Robert1, born say 1701.

 

2.    Robert1 Lason, born say 1701, was the "Mulatto" father of John Lason who was born in St. Stephen's Parish, Northumberland County, Virginia, on 10 December 1722 [Fleet, Northumberland County Record of Births, 1661-1810, 100]. He was the father of

i. John, born 10 December 1722.

 

They may have been the ancestors of the following members of the Lawson family:

i. Charles, born say 1770, head of a Cecil County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:223] and 10 "other free" in Loudoun County, Virginia, in 1810 [VA:296].

ii. Polly, head of a Spotsylvania County, Virginia household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:108a].

iii. George, head of a Stafford County, Virginia household of 7 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1810 [VA:128].

iv. Henry, head of a Dover Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:42].

v. Thomas, "Mulatto" taxable in St. Paul's Parish, Hanover County, Virginia, from 1793 to 1801 [Personal Property Tax List 1792-1803, pp. 47, 97, 152, 192, 213].

vi. Charles, "Free Negro" taxable in St. Paul's Parish, Hanover County, from 1805 to 1815: taxable on 2 slaves from 1809 to 1812 [Personal Property Tax List, 1804-24].

vii. Robert2, "Free Negro" taxable in St. Paul's Parish, Hanover County in 1812 [Personal Property Tax List 1804-24].

 

LEE FAMILY

1.    Frances Lee, born say 1696, was living in York County on 17 September 1716 when she was presented for having a "Mulatto" child on the information of Edmund Curtis [OW 15:27, 38]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Peggy, a "F.M." living in Richmond City in 1782 [VA:111].

ii. William, head of a York County household of 6 "other free" in 1810.

iii. John, head of a York County household of 2 "other free" in 1810.

iv. Nancy, head of a Richmond City household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:338].

v. Benjamin, head of a Hertford County, North Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:107].

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