MASON FAMILY

1.    Sarah Mason, born say 1723, was living in St. Ann's Parish, Essex County, Virginia, on 21 June 1743 when the court ordered that she be sold for five years as punishment for having a "Mulatto" child [Orders 1742-3, 189]. She may have been the mother of

2        i. Thomas1, born say 1740.

3        ii. Nell, born say 1743.

 

2.    Thomas1 Mason, born say 1740, was taxable in St. James District, Caswell County, North Carolina, from 1777 to 1778 and in 1790 [NC:82]. He was living in Caswell County on 7 November 1788 when he purchased 133 acres on Cobbs Creek from James Kanedy [DB A:71-2]. Person County was formed from this part of Caswell County in 1791 and Thomas sold his land by Person County deed on 4 April 1795 [DB C:472]. He was taxable in Louisa County on himself and son Thomas in 1787, taxable as Thomas Mason, Sen., in 1788, 1790, and 1792 [PPTL 1782-1814]. Thomas was the father of

4        i. Thomas2, born say 1760.

ii. Sally, born say 1770, "daughter of Thomas Mason," married Zachariah Hill, 20 July 1788 Halifax County, Virginia bond, John Jones surety, 31 July marriage by Rev. James Watkins [Minister's Returns, 14].

iii. Jean, born say 1774, married Peter Hartless, 2 January 1792 Amherst County, Virginia bond with the consent of Thomas and Jane Mason. Peter's 16 March 1828 Amherst County will, proved 17 September 1835, mentioned his wife Jane, Nancy Mason (daughter of Larsons Mason, perhaps identical to Lawrence Mason), and Peter Mason [WB 9:124].

iv. Lawrence, born say 1773, "son of Thomas Mason," married Rosanna Landers, 17 January 1794 Louisa County, Virginia bond, Thomas Mason, Jr., and James Kennedy witnesses. Lawrence was head of a Louisa County household of 7 "other free" persons in 1800 [Louisa County Historical Society (June 1972)], taxable in Louisa County in 1801 [PPTL 1782-1814], taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, in 1802 [PPTL 1800-13, frame 121], a "FN" taxable in the northern district of Campbell County in 1809 [PPTL 1785-1814, frame 734], head of a Buckingham County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:796], a "f. negroe" taxable in Bedford County from 1812 to 1815 [PPTL 1806-1816, frames 329, 364, 429, 572] and a "F.N." taxable in Botetourt County in 1817 [PPTL 1811-1822, frame 306]. His daughter Nancy was named in the 16 March 1828 Amherst County will of Peter Hartless [WB 9:124].

v. ?Jesse1, born say 1775, married Polly Ann Branham, 21 March 1796 Louisa County bond, Lawrence Mason, witness. Jesse was taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, from 1800 to 1813: a "Mulatto" listed in 1813 with 3 persons which included females over the age of sixteen [PPTL, 1800-1813, frames 33, 122, 166, 212, 302, 393, 440, 483, 526, 572], head of an Albemarle County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:203] and 5 "free colored" in 1820.

 

3.    Nell Mason, born say 1743, no race indicated, was living in Antrim Parish, Halifax County, Virginia, on 16 August 1770 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her six unnamed children [Pleas 1770-2, 7]. She may have been the mother of

i. Patrick, born about 1762, married Patsey Going, 3 December 1790 Caswell County bond, Zachariah Hill bondsman. He was taxable in St. Lawrence District, Caswell County, in 1790 [NC:83] and was head of a Person County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:613] and 10 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:498]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in the southern district of Halifax County, Virginia, from 1805 to 1807 [PPTL, 1800-12, frame 529, 636, 689] and was head of a Halifax County, Virginia household of 5 "free colored" in 1830 (called Patrick Mason, Sr.). He made a declaration in Person County, North Carolina court on 12 May 1828 to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he was about sixty-six years old, enlisted for twelve months on 1 April 1780, always rented and never owned any land and had no family living with him at that time but his elderly wife and a lame daughter [National Archives Pension file no. S41810, http://www.fold3.com; NCGSJ XIV:172].

ii. Ralph, born before 1776, head of a Stokes County, North Carolina household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:357].

iii. William1, "F.B." head of a Bedford County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:472].

iv. Jesse2, born about 1786, a "FN" taxable in the southern district of Halifax County, Virginia, in 1807 [PPTL, 1800-12, frame 689]. He registered in Halifax County on 25 May 1831: of Dark complexion, aged 45 years, five feet 6 inches high, was born free [Registers of Free Negroes, 1802-1831, no. 165].

v. Joseph, a "F.N." taxable in Botetourt County from 1810 to 1818: listed with (wife?) Sally Mason in 1813 [PPTL 1787-1810, frame 649; 1811-1822, frames 9, 86, 92, 130, 186, 266], perhaps the Joe Mason who was taxable in Louisa County in 1801 [PPTL 1782-1814].

vi. Nancy, born about 1795, registered in Halifax County, Virginia, on 25 May 1831: dark Complexion, about 36 years of age, five feet 2 inches high, was born free [Registers of Free Negroes, 1802-1831, no. 169].

 

4.    Thomas2 Mason, born say 1760, was taxable in the Louisa County household of (his father) Thomas Mason in 1787, taxable on his own tithe and a horse as Thomas Mason, Jnr., in 1788, 1790, 1792, and 1793, probably the Thomas Mason who was taxable on 2 horses in 1789, a horse in 1791 and 1794, 1797-99, 1801, 1803, 1804 and 1805; taxable on 2 tithes and 2 horses in 1806 [PPTL 1782-1814]. He married Elizabeth Ailstock in Louisa County in April 1791 according to her application for a survivor's pension for his services in the Revolution. He was head of a Louisa County household of 6 "other free" persons in 1800 [Louisa County Historical Society (June 1972)] and was listed as a "Mulatto" shoemaker in a "List of free Negroes and Mulattoes" in Louisa County with his wife Elizabeth and children Charles, Susanna, Thomas, Jesse and William (no date but probably about 1801-3) [Abercrombie, Free Blacks of Louisa County, 20]. He purchased land in Louisa County on 10 August 1801 and executed a deed of trust on the land on 14 March 1807 (described as 74 acres in 1801 and 24 acres on both sides of Mare Branch when it was sold in 1812) [DB J:222; L:48; M:32]. He was listed as a "Free Negro" in Campbell County in 1813 with a woman over the age of sixteen, taxable on 2 males in 1814 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 892, 930]. On 1 May 1854 his widow Elizabeth was residing in Campbell County when she made a declaration in court to obtain a pension for his service in the Revolution. She stated that he was a "Free man of Color" who enlisted in 1777 in Caswell County, North Carolina, served six months in a horse corps, enlisted again in 1780 and 1781 and died in October 1832. Her husband had visited North Carolina to obtain evidence of his service. Her maiden name was Ailstock and they were married by the Reverend Douglass of the Protestant Episcopal Church in Louisa County in April 1791. She had a child living who was sixty years old and one who would be sixty-two if still living. Samuel George, a "free person of Color," testified that he had known Thomas for fifty-four years and that Thomas had married Elizabeth Ailstock, a free woman of Color. Thomas's son Thomas also testified and stated that he was the second of his father's six children and had a sister who was sixty years old [National Archives file no. R6993, http://www.fold3.com]. Thomas was the father of

i. Charles, born about 1792, deceased by 1854.

ii. Susanna, born about 1794.

iii. Thomas3, born about 1797, a butcher on regular attendance in the Lynchburg market, made a declaration in Campbell County court on 1 May 1754 in support of his mother's application for a widow's pension. He stated that he was the son of Thomas and Elizabeth Mason, that he had been a resident of Campbell County for fifty years, and had previously lived in Louisa County where he was born [National Archives file no. R6993, http://www.fold3.com].

iv. Jesse3, born say 1798, a "FN" taxable in Campbell County in 1814 [PPTL 1785-1814, frame 930].

v. William2, born say 1800.

 

Other members of a Mason family in Virginia were

i. Jack and Will, born say 1680s, two of six Tuscarora Indians accused by five other Tuscarora Indians of murdering Jeremiah Pate of New Kent County on 14 October 1707. The other four accused were Tom Jumper, Charles, Stephen and George. Jack was exonerated when it was shown that he had spent the day of the murder at Colonel Hill's [McIlwaine, Journals of the Council, III:158, 167].

ii. Hatter Wood, born say 1740, a "Molatto" added to the list of tithables in Elizabeth City County on 6 November 1764 [Court Records 1760-9, 258].

iii. John, a "FN" taxable in Campbell County in 1814 [PPTL 1785-1814, frame 930].

iv. Chloe, born say 1778, registered as a free Negro in Northumberland County on 9 January 1809: bright mulatto about 24, 5 feet 8-3/4 inches high - having 5 children [Register, no.37]. She was a "free mulatto" head of a Northumberland County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:989].

v. James, head of an Essex County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:202].

vi. Rane, head of a Buckingham County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:786].

vii. Sally, born about 1801, registered in Augusta County on 16 June 1823: Formerly Sally Mason, wife of Fountain Maxwell, about twenty two years of age, a high mulatto, of slender and rather delicate stature, five feet one and a half inches high, and free born as attested by affidavit of Jno. Dowell [Augusta County Register of Free Negroes, nos. 26, 62 by http://valley.vcdh.Virginia.edu]. They recorded the certificates in Ross County, Ohio [Turpin, Register of Black, Mulatto, and Poor Persons, p.32].

 

MATTHEWS FAMILY

1.    Katherine Matthews, born say 1668, was a white servant woman living in Norfolk County in June 1686 when she was presented by the grand jury for having a "Mulatto" child [Orders 1675-86, 315]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Francis, born say 1710, no surname given when he and Gage, two "Mollattoes," were the subject of a dispute between Mr. Maximillian Bush and Mr. Matthew Mathias which was settled by the Norfolk County court on 15 January 1713/4. The court ordered the churchwardens to bind Francis to Maximillian Bush and the younger child Gage to Mr. Mathias [Orders 1710-7, 76]. He was called "Francis Matthews a free Negro" when he successfully petitioned the Norfolk County court for his freedom on 17 August 1732, "being Born of a Free Woman and of Lawful age" [Orders 1723-34, 154].

ii. Gage, born say 1712, (no surname given) a "free born Negro" formerly belonging to James Ewell, deceased, on 8 January 1735/6 when he petitioned the Princess Anne County court for his freedom. The court ruled that the Act of Assembly which required children to serve until the age of thirty-one did not apply in his case and ordered that he be set free. He was called Gage Matthews and had bound himself as a servant to George Oldner of Princess Anne County by 16 May 1758 when he sued his master for not providing him with sufficient food and clothing. The court ruled in his favor and ordered his master not to punish him without applying to the court for permission [Minutes 1728-37, 298; 1753-62, 318].

iii. George, born say 1722, a "Mullatto" who was bound by indenture to serve Susannah Hancock, orphan of William Hancock. He sued for his freedom in Princess Anne County on 22 August 1753, and the court ruled that he had served his time required by law and that "he be set at liberty to go where he pleased for employment" [Orders 1753-62, 51].

2        iv. Ruth1, born say 1728.

3        v. James1, born say 1730.

vi. Susannah, born say 1740, married Isaac Wilson, 18 August 1785 Halifax County, Virginia bond.

4        vii. Dinah, born say 1746.

 

2.    Ruth1 Matthews, born say 1728, (no race indicated) was bound to Robert Downing in Bristol Parish on 30 Oct 1732 [Chamberlayne, Register of Bristol Parish, 63]. She was called "a free Mulattoe" on 7 March 1756 when her daughter Elizabeth was baptized by the Rev. William Douglas of St. James Northam Parish, Goochland County [Jones, The Douglas Register, 348]. She was called an Indian woman on 26 September 1757 when the Cumberland County, Virginia court ordered the churchwardens of Southam Parish to bind her children Betty, Jemmy, Bristol, and Judith to William Fleming [Orders 1752-8, 501]. Her children were

i. Rachel1, born say 1746, consented to the marriage of her daughter Fanny Mathews to William Liggon, 14 July 1787 Henrico County bond, surety Nathaniel Couzins who certified that Fanny was over the age of twenty-one.

5        ii. Elizabeth, born October 1748, baptized 7 March 1756.

iii. James2, born say 1750, taxable in Halifax County, Virginia, from 1787 to 1793: called a "Mulatto" in 1792 and 1793 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1799, frames 110, 274, 421, 446]. He married Molly Cumbo, daughter of Thomas Cumbo, 20 July 1790 Halifax County, Virginia bond, David Gowing surety, 29 July marriage. He was a "Free Person of Colour" taxable on Kerr's Creek in Rockbridge County in 1813 [Waldrep, 1813 Tax List].

iv. Bristol, born say 1752, married Nanny Lynch of Hanover, "Mulattoes," in Goochland County on 25 September 1775 [Jones, The Douglas Register, 347].

v. Judith, born say 1754.

vi. Joseph, taxable in Halifax County, Virginia, from 1789 to 1792, called a "Mo" in 1792 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1799, frames 274, 421]. He married Susanna Burchfield, 23 April 1792 Halifax County bond.

vii. ?Nathaniel, born about 1763, described as "a mulatto, about 12 years old," when Josias Cook of Pittsylvania County, to whom he was bound, advertised in the Virginia Gazette that Nathaniel had been stolen from him on 16 March 1775 [Virginia Gazette, Purdie edition, p. 4, col. 1].

6        viii. ?_illy, born say 1765.

ix. ?John, bound apprentice to William Fleming, Esquire, by order of the Chesterfield County court on 7 February 1783 [Orders 1774-84, 393].

ix. ?Archer, bound apprentice to William Fleming, Esquire, by order of the Chesterfield County court on 7 February 1783 [Orders 1774-84, 393].

xi. ?Ruth2, born about 1772, bound apprentice to William Fleming, Esquire, by order of the Chesterfield County court on 7 February 1783 [Orders 1774-84, 393]. She registered in Petersburg on 25 August 1794: a dark brown Mulatto woman, five feet two inches high, twenty two years old, born free & raised by Wm Fleming in Chesterfield [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 84].

 

3.    James1 Matthews, born say 1730, was indicted by the court in Henrico County on 6 November 1752 for failing to list his "Mulatto" wife as a tithable [Minutes 1752-5, 19]. He was called a "Negroe" and his wife Susannah Ford a white woman when their son Richardson was baptized on 17 April 1760 by the Rev. William Douglas of Goochland County, Virginia [Jones, Douglas Register, 348]. He was a "Mulattoe" taxable in John Pope's list for Granville County, North Carolina, in 1766. He was taxed with the notation "Mullatoe, has a wife and daughter not listed" [CR 44.701.19]. His children were

i. a daughter born before 1755, taxable in 1766.

ii. Richardson, born 17 April 1760, baptized 24 June 1760.

iii. ?Ford, head of a Franklin County, North Carolina, household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:60].

 

4.    Dinah Matthews, born say 1746, was taxable on the west side of Church Street in Norfolk Borough in 1767 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables 1766-80, 34]. She may have been the mother of

i. Peggy, a "free Negro" bound to John Scott of Elizabeth River Parish by the Norfolk County court on 19 April 1771 [Orders 1768-71, 253].

ii. Grace, a "free Negro" bound to John Scott of Elizabeth River Parish by the Norfolk County court on 17 August 1771 [Orders 1771-3, 27].

iii. Phillis, a "free negro" bound to Alexander Guthery of Elizabeth River Parish by the Norfolk County court on 21 August 1772 [Orders 1771-3, 107].

 

5.    Elizabeth Matthews, born October 1748, was baptized 7 March 1756 by the Rev. William Douglas of St. James Northam Parish, Goochland County [Jones, The Douglas Register, 348]. She was living in Halifax County, Virginia, on 20 January 1774 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Anterim Parish to bind her son Peter to William Wyly. She may have been identical to Elizabeth Haton whose son David Haton was ordered bound to Philip Gowen on 20 February 1777. David Haden was called the illegitimate son of Elizabeth Matthews when he was ordered bound out by the overseers of the poor on 21 June 1787 [Pleas 1772-4, 335; 1774-9, 193; 1786-9, 172]. She was the mother of

i. ?Ezekiah/Ezekiel, born say 1772, bound apprentice to William Cole in Halifax County, Virginia, on 15 June 1786 [Pleas 1783-6, 476]. He married Sarah Cumbo, 23 April 1793 Halifax County bond, Thomas Maskell surety (Sarah signed her own consent), and 7 May 1793 Caswell County, North Carolina bond with Allen Going bondsman. He was head of a Person County household of 5 "other free" in 1800, and 10 in Caswell County in 1810 [NC:489]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Halifax County, Virginia, in 1804 and 1805 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1800-12, frames 384, 529].

ii. Peter, born about 1773, married Lucy Banger ("colored people"), 24 October 1791 Halifax County, Virginia bond, surety William P. Martin, 28 October marriage by Rev. William P. Martin. Lucy registered as a "free Negro" in Halifax County, Virginia, on 20 May 1802: aged about twenty five years, five feet two inches high, between a black and yellow colour, Emancipated by William P. Martin on the 17th day of February 1785 by his Bill of that date and Peter registered on 31 May 1802: aged about twenty nine years, five feet seven inches and one quarter high, black colour...born of a free woman [Halifax County Register, no. 6, 11]. Peter was a "Mulatto" taxable in Halifax County from 1793 to 1812: a planter living with Lucy Matthews who was a spinner in the list of "free Negroes and Mulattoes" in 1801 [PPTL, 1782-1799, frames 446, 607; 1800-12, frames 66, 159, 384, 530, 811, 1036], but not listed there in 1807 when he was a "FN" taxable in the northern district of Campbell County [PPTL, 1785-1814, frame 699].

iii. ?Elizabeth, ordered bound out by the overseers of the poor in Halifax County, Virginia, on 20 September 1787 and bound to William McDaniel on 18 October 1787 [Pleas 1786-8, 263, 270], married Bartlett Chavis, 10 February 1803 Halifax County, Virginia bond.

v. David Haden, taxable in the northern district of Halifax County in 1801 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1800-12, frame 99] and counted in the list of "Free Negros & Malatters" for Patrick County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1791-1823, frame 598].

v. ?John Haden, a "Mulo" taxable in Halifax County from 1795 to 1804 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1799, frame 605; 1800-12, frame 189, 376].

vi. James Haden, illegitimate son of Elizabeth Matthews, ordered bound out by the overseers of the poor of Halifax County, Virginia, on 21 June 1787 [Pleas 1786-8, 172].

vii. ?Jordan, a "FN" or "Mulatto" taxable in Halifax County from 1804 to 1806 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1800-12, frames 384, 529, 636].

viii. ?William, a "FN" or "Mulatto" taxable in Halifax County from 1806 to 1809 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1800-12, frames 636, 810].

 

6.    _illy Matthews, born say 1765, was head of a Brunswick County, Virginia household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:724]f, perhaps identical to Nelly Matthews who was a "Mulatto" taxable on a horse in St. Andrew's Parish, Brunswick County, in 1810 and was counted in a list of "Free Negroes & Mulattoes" in Brunswick County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 495, 622]. Her children may have been

i. Luke, born about 1783, head of a Brunswick County, Virginia household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:724] and 10 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:620]. He registered as a "Free Negro" in Brunswick County on 29 August 1815: a free black man of a yellow complexion, about five feet nine inches high Thirty two or three years old [Wynne, Register of Free Negroes, 20].

ii. Thomas, born say 1785, a "Mulatto" taxable in St. Andrew's Parish, Brunswick County, from 1804 to 1810 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 276, 320, 419, 495, 583], head of a Brunswick County household of one "other free" in 1810 [VA:724].

iii. Edmund, born about 1788, registered in Brunswick County on 24 August 1812, a free man of a yellow Complexion about twenty two or twenty three years of age about five feet ten or eleven inches high ... Who it appears was freeborn.

iv. Betsey, born about 1792, registered in Brunswick County on 24 June 1822, a free woman of colour about thirty years old 5.5 high and yellow complexion ... born free in this county as appears from the evidence of Raleigh H. Abernathy [Wynne, Register of Free Negroes, 14, 50].

 

Other members of the Matthews family were

i. Ned, born about 1760, registered in Petersburg on 9 February 1795: a dark brown Mulatto man, five feet ten inches high, about thirty five years old, born free and raised in Dinwiddie County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 98].

ii. Aldrick, born about 1771, registered in Petersburg on 19 August 1794: a brown Mulatto man, five feet six inches high, twenty three years old, born free & raised in Dinwiddie County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 52].

iii. Rachel2, "free Mullatto" mother of Thomas (aged ten years), Samuel (aged six years) and William (aged four years) who were bound out by the Loudoun County court on 15 September 1790 [Orders 1788-90, 385].

iv. Nancy, born about 1774, registered in Petersburg on 9 August 1799: a dark brown free Mulatto woman, five feet four inches high, twenty five years old, spare & straight made with bushy hair, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 147].

v. Peggy, born about 1775, registered in Petersburg on 14 August 1800: a light colourd Mulatto woman, five feet high, small made with blue or grey eyes & strait brown hair, twenty five years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 167].

vi. Rachel3, born about 1787, registered in Rockbridge County on 4 October 1830: a free woman of Colour, about forty three years of age, bright mulatto complexion, five feet four & a half inches high, born free, has straight hair. She registered her children James, Ruth, Samuel, Isaac, Susan and Dinah Matthews: bright mulatto complexion, hair mixed between white and Negro [Free Negro Register 1803-28, no. 71].

 

A member of a Matthews family in Caroline County was

i. William, born say 1730, an East Indian, produced a warrant in Caroline County court on 13 February 1752 for taking up a runaway servant woman [Orders 1746-54, 296].

 

Eastern Shore of Virginia

1.    Isabel Matthews, born say 1725, a "free Negro," was presented on 15 August 1745 in Northampton County court for bastard bearing. On 8 April 1746 the court ordered that she serve her master John Fathery four months after the completion of her indenture for running away [Orders 1742-8, 245]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Okey, head of an Accomack Parish, Accomack County household of 6 in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 1:161].

ii. Scarborough, head of a St. George Parish, Accomack County household of 7 in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 1:161].

iii. Betty, head of a St. George Parish, Accomack County household of 5 in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 1:161].

iv. Moses, a "free Negro child" bound by the churchwardens of St. George's Parish in Accomack County to John Garrison to be a shoemaker on 24 September 1776 [Orders 1774-7, 466].

v. Candis, head of an Accomack County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:44].

vi. Sally, head of an Accomack County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:39]. She registered in Accomack County: born about 1782, a black, 5'4" high, born free in Accomack County [Register of Free Negroes, 1785-1863, no. 714].

 

A member of the Matthews family in South Carolina was

i. Peter, head of a Phillip's and Michael's Parish, Charleston, South Carolina household of 4 "other free" and a slave in 1790. He (a "free Negro" butcher), Thomas Cole, and Matthew Webb petitioned the South Carolina State Legislature on 1 January 1791 to repeal the discriminatory laws against free African Americans [Berlin, Slaves Without Masters, 65-6].

 

MAXFIELD FAMILY

The Maxfield family may have descended from Priscilla Maxfield of Chappel Parish, Lancaster County, who was presented for having an illegitimate child, no race indicated, on 8 May 1728 [Orders 1721-9, 270]. They may have been related to Isaac Maxwell, a "mulatto man," who made proof in Wythe County court on 11 August 1801 that he was born within the bounds of the county in 1776 of a white woman [Kegley, Court Orders of Wythe County, 80]. Members of the Maxfield family were

i. William, taxable in the upper district of Henrico County on his own tithe, Lewis Fortune's tithe and 2 horses in 1787 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 128]. He was head of a Henrico County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:1015].

1        ii. Hannah, born say 1760.

2        iii. Thomas, born say 1770.

iv. Richard, a "Mulatto" taxable in Hanover County from 1801 to 1814 [Personal Property Tax List, 1792-1803, pp. 232, 255; 1804-24], head of a Hanover County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:897].

v. Sally, head of a Hanover County household of 5 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:844].

vi. Joseph, head of a Richmond City household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:362].

vii. Judith, head of a Hanover County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [V:897].

 

1.    Hannah Maxfield, born say 1760, was the mother of

i. George, born say 1784, "orphan of Hannah Maxfield," ordered bound out by the overseers of the poor in the lower district of Henrico County on 6 April 1795. He was apparently identical to George Maxwell who was ordered bound out on 6 February 1797 [Orders 1794-6, 268; Orders 1796-8, 232]. He was a "Malatto" taxable in Henrico County in 1801 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frame 435].

ii. ?Betty, counted in a list of "Blacks Free" above the age of sixteen in the upper district of Henrico County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frame 759].

 

2.    Thomas Maxfield, born say 1770, was a "Mulatto" taxable in St. Paul's Parish, Hanover County, from 1791 to 1815: called Thomas Maxwell in 1791, 1793 and 1815. Perhaps his wife was Joanna McField who was counted in a list of "free Negroes and Mulattos" in Hanover County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-91, p.265; 1792-1803, pp.15, 47, 69, 98, 111, 153, 192, 213, 226, 249; 1804-24]. Thomas Maxfield was head of a Hanover County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:845]. He may have been the father of

i. Fountain, born about 1796, obtained a certificate of freedom in Hanover County on 25 February 1818: about twenty two years of age, about 5 feet four or five inches high, is of a dark mulatto complexion; was born free. He registered the certificate in Augusta County on 31 August 1819 and registered again on 22 February 1832: Fountain Maxfield alias Maxwell, a dark mulatto, aged about 34 years. His wife Sally registered in Augusta County on 16 June 1823: Formerly Sally Mason, wife of Fountain Maxwell, about twenty two years of age, a high mulatto, of slender and rather delicate stature, five feet one and a half inches high, and free born as attested by affidavit of Jno. Dowell [Augusta County Register of Free Negroes, nos. 26, 62 by http://valley.vcdh.Virginia.edu]. They recorded the certificates in Ross County, Ohio [Turpin, Register of Black, Mulatto, and Poor Persons, p.32]. He was a free person of "Colour" taxable in Augusta County in 1820 [PPTL 1811-20, frames 620, 636].

 

MAYO FAMILY

The Mayo family was not free until 1785, but their family history is included here because they had relations with several families who had been free since the colonial period.

 

Joseph Mayo left a 27 May 1780 Henrico County, proved in November 1791, by which he asked that his executors petition the General Assembly for leave to set free all his slaves. However, if that was not possible, then he bequeathed his "mulattoe women called Maria and Suckey" and his "mulattoe waiting boy Bob" to John Tabb. The administrator procured an act of Assembly for emancipation of the slaves which was carried out by the High Court of Chancery in November 1789 [Catterall, Judicial Cases I:98; Hening 12:611]. His slaves over the age of 16 years and from 12-16 years were listed as taxables in his Mecklenburg County estate in 1783:

Slaves aged 16 and over: Fortune, Will, Jack, Bristol, Jeffrey, Sci, Doll, Ciller, Pompey, Sue, Linder. Slaves 12-16 years of age: Jude, Moll, Fanney, Rose, Harry, Ned, Jacob, Mercer, Less? Left?, Cuffie, Patience, Phillis, Daniel, Joseph, Jupiter, Charles, Cuffey, Tiller, James, Amy, Mingo, Jeaney, Tom, John.

in 1784:

Slaves aged 16 and over: Fortin, Will, Jack, Bristol, Jeffry, Berry, Cye, Doll, Sinster?, Siller Sue. Slaves 12-16 years of age: Judy, Molly, Fanny, Rose, Henry, Nell, Hutchins, Marh, Scipio, Cuffy, Patience, Phillis, Daniel, Will, Amy, Mingo, James, Jenny, Tom, Affey, Tiller, Joseph, Cupit, Charles, Gilbert, Peter, Jacob

and in 1786:

Slaves aged 16 and over: Fortin, Will, Jack, Brister, Pompey, Jeffrey, Cyfax, Sue, Doll, Siller, Linder, Jude, Ame, Jacob, Tiller. Slaves 12-16 years of age: Moll, Fanny, Rose, Ned, Hany, Fortin, Mingo, James, Jinny, Tom, Affa, Meria, Sipio, Cuffe, Patience, Philis, Daniel, Quominer, Joseph, Jupiter, Charles, Gilbert, Peter [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frames 43, 80, 162].

His emancipated slaves Jamey, Jubiter, Charles and Tom were in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on 14 December 1789 when the court ordered the overseers of the poor to bind them to Benjamin Morton of Halifax County, Virginia, "with the exception that from the peculiar situation of these people that learning them to read, wright and the performance of arithmatick be dispensed with" [Orders 1787-92, 461].

 

Members of the Mayo family were

1        i. Fortune1, born say 1730.

2        ii. Lenda, born say 1760.

iii. Susanna, born say 1760, purchased 50 acres in Mecklenburg County near the Warren County line from John Chavis Walden for 25 pounds on 25 December 1797 with Moses Stewart and Charles Durham as witnesses [DB 9:431-2]. She was taxable in Mecklenburg County on 50 acres from 1799 to 1812 [Land Tax List 1782-1811A; 1811B-1824]. She was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 13 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:144a].

iv. Pompy, born say 1765, a taxable in Joseph Mayo's estate from 1783 to 1786, married Nancy Marks, 17 December 1801 Mecklenburg County bond, Mingo Mayo security. On 10 October 1803 the Mecklenburg court ordered him, Robert Brannum, Thomas Spence, William Stewart, Humphrey Wilson, Joseph Stewart, Frederick Ivey, Robert Cole and Richard Dunston to work on the road which Benjamin Edmundson was surveying [Orders 1803-5, 45].

v. William, born say 1765, a "Free Negro" taxable in St. Paul's Parish, Hanover County from 1799-1801 [Hanover County Taxables, p.88].

vi. Judy, born about 1770, 12-16 years old in 1784 and 16 years old in 1786 when she was listed in Joseph Mayo's estate. She was the mother of an illegitimate child named Jeremiah who was bound out by the Mecklenburg County court on 14 September 1795, the same day Fortune Mayo's orphans were bound out [Orders 1792-5, 496]. Jerry was a "free Negro" taxable in Mecklenburg County in 1810 [Personal Property Tax List, 1806-28, frame 168]. He married Betsy Pettiford, 8 December 1813 Warren County bond.

vii. Tom, born say 1771, married Abbey Cousins, 2 July 1799 Goochland County bond, Joseph Attkisson surety. He may have been the Thomas Mayo who was a "free Negroe" taxable in Charlotte County in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist, 15:170]. And a Thomas Mayo registered in Powhatan County on 16 October 1823: Age: 50; Color: Black: Stature 5'6"; Emancipated by Jos. Mayo [Register of Free Negroes, no. 120].

viii. Hutchings, born say 1772, bondsman (signing) for the 6 July 1803 Warren County marriage of John Chavis and Betsy Carsey. He married Sally Stewart, 10 February 1806 Mecklenburg County, Virginia bond, Daniel Mayo security. Hutchings was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:160b].

ix. Cuffee, born say 1774, married Celey Stewart, 2 April 1802 Mecklenburg County, Virginia bond, Daniel Mayo security. Cuffee was taxable in Haw Tree District of Warren County, North Carolina, in 1808 and 1815 [Tax List CR 100.702.1; Tax List Papers, Vols TC 8, 1795-1815] and head of a Warren County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:802].

x. Rhoda, born say 1776, married Elijah Garnes, 5 February 1797 Warren County bond. Elijah was head of a Mecklenburg County, Virginia, household of 5 "free colored" in 1820.

xi. Fanny, married Isaac Garnes, 17 February 1797 Warren County, North Carolina bond, Elijah Garnes bondsman.

xii. Peter, born about 1780, registered as a "free Negro" in Rockingham County, Virginia, on 1 March 1811: a black man, about 6 feet high ... 30 years old the 25 day of December 1810 ... (by) certificate of the clerk of Cumberland County showing that he was emancipated by the last will of Joseph Mayo, deceased [Rockingham County Register of Free Negroes, #7, p.4]. He may have been the Peter Mayo who was a "Free Black" head of a Powhatan County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:9].

xiii. Isaac, born about 1786, registered in Mecklenburg County on 22 May 1827: a man of dark complexion about Forty one years of age, five feet ten inches high who it appears was emancipated by Joseph Mayo [Free Person of Color, #35, p.31].

 

1.    Fortune1 Mayo, born say 1730, born say 1730, sold her property to Samuel Hopkins & Company by bill of sale proved in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on 13 January 1794: 3 cows, 2 calves, 5 sheep, a mare and colt, 14 hoes, 4 axes, set of cooper's and carpenter's tools, 25 barrels of corn, 400 pounds of seed cotton, frying pan, dishes, and other household items [DB 8:372]. On 8 February 1795 the court ordered her tithables to work on a road with the tithables of John C. Walden, Eaton Walden and John Walden. She died before 14 September 1795 when the court ordered the overseers of the poor to bind out Edward, Henry, Fortunatus, and Robert Mayo, orphans of Fortune Mayo deceased, and Jeremiah, a bastard son of Judy Mayo [Orders 1792-5, 496; 1795-8, 11]. Fortune was the mother of

i. Edward, born say 1767, a 12-16 year-old listed in Joseph Mayo's estate from 1783 to 1786.

ii. Henry, born say 1769, a 12-16 year-old listed in Joseph Mayo's estate in 1783, married Margaret Guarns (Garnes), 17 October 1809 Warren County, North Carolina bond, Richard Russell bondsman. He was head of a Warren County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [NC:745] and a Mecklenburg County, Virginia household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:145b].

iii. Fortune2, born about 1770, 12-16 years of age when she was taxable in Mecklenburg County in 1786, about fifty-five years of age when she registered in Powhatan County on 16 January 1823: Age: 55 years; Color: Black; Emancipated by Joseph Mayo of Henrico County deceased [Register of Free Negroes, no. 109].

iv. Robert, born 1776-1794, head of a Mecklenburg County, Virginia household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:149b]. He may have been the "mulattoe waiting boy Bob" mentioned in Joseph Mayo's 1780 will.

 

2.    Malinda/ Lenda Mayo, born say 1760, was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:156b]. The Mecklenburg County court bound her children Jacob and Alpha to John Wilson, blacksmith, on 14 April 1794 [Orders 1792-5, 261]. She was called Melinda Mayo when she was counted as a "free Negro" in Mecklenburg County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1806-28, frame 353]. She was the mother of

i. Jacob, born about 1780, head of a Mecklenburg County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:148b]. He was a seventy-year-old "Black" man counted in the 1850 Mecklenburg County census with (his wife?) sixty-five-year-old Sally Mayo [VA:116b].

ii. Alpha.

 

Other members of the family were

i. James, head of an Albemarle County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:166A].

ii. Dylsy, head of a Cumberland County, Virginia household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:115].

iii. Cato, head of a Cumberland County, Virginia household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:132].

iv. Molley, head of a Chesterfield County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:1062].

v. Patience, head of a Chesterfield County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:1062].

vi. Darkis, head of a Chesterfield County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:1062].

vii. Phillis, head of a Chesterfield County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:1062].

viii. Anily, head of a Henrico County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:998].

ix. Graysey, head of a Henrico County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:996].

x. Richard, head of a Fluvania County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:441].

xi. Henry, head of a Fluvania County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:441].

xii. Bob, head of a Henrico County household of 1 "other free" and 1 slave in 1810 [VA:1015].

xiii. Elizabeth, born before 1776, head of a Beaufort County, North Carolina household of 2 "free colored" women in 1820 [NC:25].

xiv. Samuel, born about 1802, registered in Mecklenburg County on 22 May 1827: a man of dark complexion about twenty five years of age, five feet eleven inches high who it appears was born of a free woman in this County [Free Person of Color, #34, p.31].

xv. Lewis, born about 1804, registered in Mecklenburg County on 22 May 1827: a man of dark complexion about twenty three years of age, five feet seven inches high ... who it appears was born free [Free Person of Color, #36, p.32].

xvi. Isham, called "Isham (a free boy) on 9 June 1806 when the Mecklenburg County court ordered that he be bound apprentice to Frederick Ivey and called Isham Mayo when the order was set aside and he was bound instead to Isham Garnes [Orders 1806-8, 215, 221].

xvii. John, born 1794-1806, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 6 "free colored" in 1830. He and William Toney paid Arthur Toney's recognizance to appear in the case of State vs Jack Avant and Arthur Toney on 21 May 1833, and the 17 August 1841 Halifax County court gave him permission to carry his gun in the county.

 

MAYS FAMILY

1.    Mary Mays, born say 1728, was living in Hanover Parish, King George County, Virginia, on 7 November 1746 when the County court presented her for having an illegitimate "Mulatto" child within the previous six months and for attempting to murder the child [Orders 1735-51, pt.2, 503]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Jesse, head of a Chesterfield County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:70/1062].

ii. Rebecca, head of a Chesterfield County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:70/1062].

iii. Lucy, head of a Richmond County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:346].

 

MEADE FAMILY

1.    Mary1 Meade, born say 1710, was presented by the churchwardens of Bruton Parish in York County court in August 1741 for having a "Molatto" bastard child and was called Mary Meade alias Bryan when she was presented for the same offense on 19 November 1744. Robert Crichton and John Scrivener sued her in York County in a suit which was dismissed on 15 February 1747/8 by agreement of the parties, and Thomas Hornsby, merchant, sued her for 7 pounds, 12 shillings on 19 March 1749/50. She was paid 1 pound, 13 shillings by the York County estate of Joseph Valentine on 10 March 1773 [W&I 19:52, 72, 79, 314; Judgments & Orders 1746-52, 69, 300; W&I 22:369]. She paid rent of between 3 and 4 pounds per year to Timson Crawley, orphan of Robert Crawley, 1763 and 1773 [Guardians' Accounts, 1736-1780, 396, 425, 485]. She was probably the ancestor of

i. Mary2, born say 1730, called Mary Mead, Jr., on 21 May 1750 when she was presented by the York County court for having a bastard child. She was fined 500 pounds of tobacco. She was called Mary Mead (no Jr.) on 15 July 1751 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Bruton Parish to bind out her children Ann and Frances Mead because she was incapable of supporting them "by reason of her idle, dissolute, and disorderly Course of Life" [Judgments & Orders 1746-52, 307, 326, 435].

ii. John, head of a York County household of 4 "other free" in 1810. He was paid 2 pounds, 18 shillings by the estate of Joseph Valentine on 10 March 1773 [W&I 22:369].

iii. Milley, head of a Richmond City household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:339].

iv. Milley Meads, head of a Richmond City household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:380].

v. Dicey, of Bruton Parish, married Thomas Jameson, 17 March 1800 York County bond, James Jameson security.

 

MEALY FAMILY

1.    James1 Mealy, born say 1720, was an overseer on Philip Lightfoot's Goochland County estate in 1746 [List of Tithables, 1730-1755, frame 73]. He died before 2 October 1778 when his widow Elizabeth married David Grantum in Goochland County [Jones, Douglas Register, 18]. David left a 17 October 1801 Goochland County will, proved 18 June 1804, by which he lent to his wife Elizabeth land which was to revert to his wife's son James Mealy at her decease. He also mentioned his granddaughter Jenny Mealy [DB 19, part 1: 64]. Elizabeth was a "Mulatto" midwife who was taxable on a horse and lived near Joseph Shelton's in the upper district of Goochland County from 1806 to 1814 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 782, 824, 867; 1810-32, frames 8, 73, 99, 193]. She was head of Goochland County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:693]. James and Elizabeth were the parents of

2        i. James2, born about 1764.

ii. ?Archer, born say 1772, taxable in the upper district of Goochland County from 1789 to 1814: a "free born" tithable living near William Isbell's in 1805, living on Betty Grantum's land from 1806 to 1814 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1809, frames 224, 241, 300, 426, 469, 531, 601, 673, 746, 828, 872; 1810-32, frames 13, 113, 201].

 

2.    James2 Mealy, born about 1764, was taxable in the upper district of Goochland County from 1787 to 1814: his tax charged to David Grantum in 1798, a "Mulatto" planter living near Licking Hole and charged with William Mealy's tithe in 1804 and 1807, living on (his mother) Betty Grantum's land from 1806 to 1814, listed with his wife Frankey in 1813 and 1814 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1809, frames 154, 224, 285, 300, 363, 426, 481, 550, 621, 692, 746, 828, 871; 1810-32, frames 103, 167, 201]. He registered as a free Negro in Goochland County on 18 December 1822: about fifty eight years old, about five feet ten inches high ... yellowish complexion and was free born. Perhaps his wife was Frances Mealy who registered on 13 May 1831: yellow complexion, about fifty three years of age, about five feet two inches high [Register of Free Negroes, pp.136, 223]. He was a soldier in the Revolution from Goochland County who received a pension in 1831 [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 41]. He may have been the father of

3        i. William, born about 1787.

ii. Jenny, a "Mulatto" who did housework and lived on B. Drumwright's land in the upper district of Goochland County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1810-32, frame 169].

iii. Elizabeth, a "Mulatto" who did housework and lived on B. Drumwright's land in the upper district of Goochland County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1810-32, frame 169].

 

3.    William Mealy, born about 1787, registered in Goochland County on 16 February 1808: a free man of Color, about five feet three inches high, about twenty one years of age, yellow complexion ... free born. He was taxable in the upper district of Goochland County from 1804 to 1814: a "Mulatto" farmer on M.V. Woodson's land from 1809 to 1814 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1809, frames 692, 828, 871; 1810-32, frames 103, 201]. He may have been the father of

i. Elizabeth, born about 1808, registered in Goochland County on 18 August 1829: about twenty one years old, about five feet four inches high of yellow complexion.

ii. Margaret, born about 1815, registered in Goochland County on 13 May 1831: about sixteen years of age of yellowish complexion, about five feet four & a half inches high [Register of Free Negroes, pp.17, 201, 223].

 

MEEKINS FAMILY

1.    Thomas1 Meekins, born say 1710, and his wife Mary were "free negroes" who registered the birth and baptism of their children in St. Peter's Parish, New Kent County, Virginia [NSCDA, Parish Register of St. Peter's, 98, 111, 119, 141]. He may have been the son of Elizabeth Meekings, born about 1677, who was seventeen years old in 1694 when she petitioned the York County court for her freedom [OW 10:3]. Thomas and Mary Meekins' children were

i. Elizabeth, died in St. Peter's Parish in 1734.

ii. Christmas, born 25 December 1735, baptized 13 February 1736. He may have been the Christmas Meekins who was charged with felony in Halifax County, Virginia court on 1 May 1779 but acquitted after the court examined divers papers that he had in his possession [Pleas 1774-9, 410]. He was head of a New Kent County household of 5 "Black" persons in 1782 [VA:36]. He was taxable in New Kent County from 1782 to 1814, listed with his unnamed wife in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1800, frames 11, 87, 99, 131, 149, 189, 213; 1791-1828, 297, 309, 320, 344, 397, 405, 455, 466, 491, 503] and head of a New Kent County household of 2 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:761]. He was taxable on 60 acres in 1782 and 1789 [T.L.C. Genealogy, New Kent County Land Tax Lists, 30, 57].

iii. Sarah, born 17 August 1739, baptized 23 September 1739 [NSCDA, Parish Register of St. Peter's, 141].

iv. Joel, born 29 October 1747, apparently the Joseph Meekins who was head of a "black" New Kent County household of 7 persons in 1782 [VA:36]. He was taxable in New Kent County from 1783 to 1803: taxable on 3 cattle in 1784, taxable on his son Charles in 1785 and 1786, exempt from personal tax starting in 1787; and taxable on a free male tithable and a horse in 1810 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1800, frames 21, 44, 64, 99, 117, 131, 149, 169, 189; 1791-1828, frames 359, 371, 384, 455] and head of a New Kent County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:761]. He was taxable on 60 acres in 1782 and 1789 [T.L.C. Genealogy, New Kent County Land Tax Lists, 1782-90, 30, 57].

v. David, born 17 April 1749 [NSCDA, Parish Register of St. Peter's, 98], head of a "black" New Kent County household of 4 persons in 1782 [VA:36]. He was taxable in the lower end of St. Peter's Parish on a horse and 3 cattle from 1782 to 1814: listed with his unnamed wife in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1800, frames 11, 21, 44, 87, 100, 117, 149, 169, 189, 213; 1791-1828, frames 359, 371, 384, 397, 409, 421, 432, 444, 455, 491, 503] and head of a New Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:761].

vi. Isaac1, born 19 April 1754, "Son of Mary Mekins, a free negroe woman," taxable in New Kent County from 1783 to 1803 and from 1807 to 1814: taxable in 1785 on a slave named Sally who was called his wife Sarah in 1786; taxable on 2 free male tithables in 1807 and 1809, 3 in 1810 and 1811, 2 in 1812, listed with his unnamed wife in 1813. He may have been the father of Richard Meekins, a "FN" tithable in 1812 who was listed with his unnamed wife in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1800, frames 21, 67, 89, 117, 131, 149; 1791-1828, frames 384, 396, 409, 420, 452, 444, 455, 466, 477, 491, 503] and head of a New Kent County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:762].

 

Other members of the Meekins family were

i. Peter, taxable in New Kent County from 1793 to 1798 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1800, frame 213].

ii. Thomas2, taxable in New Kent County from 1793 to 1799 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1800, frame 213].

iii. Jane, head of a Richmond City household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:362].

iv. Nancy, born about 1779, registered in Henrico County on 11 November 1831: 52 years of age, brown woman, 5 feet 4 inches, born free as appears from her register from the Richmond Hustings Court [Register of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, 1831-1844, p.10, no.669].

v. Isaac2, born about 1785, registered in Henrico County on 14 November 1831: 46 years of age, a man of light complexion, 5 feet 6 inches, Born free as appears from the evidence of George P. Crump [Register of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, 1831-1844, p.10, no.672].

vi. Patteson Meacon, a "free Negro & mulatto over 16" in York County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frame 392].

vii. Dandridge, born about 1791, a "free Negro" taxable in York County in 1814 [PPTL, 1782-1841, frame 409]. He registered in York County on 17 March 1823: a man of tawny complexion about 32 years of age, 5 feet 9 inches high, high forehead, large eyes and a flat nose...Born of free parents in New Kent Cy as appears by a certificate by the Honble Jos Semple dated 14 Decr 1822 filed in my office [Guardians' Accounts, 1780-1823, following the index, No. 205].

 

MEGGS FAMILY

Members of the Meggs family in

i. Christian, born say 1750, not a tithable herself but taxable on slaves Joan, Francis and Frank (an exempt tithable) in 1783, 3 slaves in 1784, a slave in 1785 and 1790, and taxable on a horse in 1791 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1850, frames 13, 28, 29, 67, 75]. She was head of a Middlesex County household of 5 "Blacks" in 1783 (abstracted as Chatharine Meggs) [VA:56].

1        ii. James1, born say 1752.

iii. Peter, born say 1766, a "yellow" tithable in the Middlesex County household of James Meggs in 1787, taxable on his own tithe in 1791, a "free negro" tithable in 1803 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1850, frames 45, 75, 116, 124, 188, 272]. He was listed as a "mulatto or Free negro" in Gloucester County in 1819 and 1820 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20].

 

1.  James1 Meggs, born say 1752, was taxable in Middlesex County from 1782 to 1819: taxable on 2 slaves and 2 horses in 1782, a "yellow" tithable in 1787, a "Mulatto" tithable in 1788, taxable on 2 free tithes and a slave over 16 in 1800 and 1801, a "Mulattoe" tithable in 1805, 1806 and 1810, called "James Meggs, Sr., free negro" in 1812 [PPTL, 1782-1850, frames 12, 13, 23, 29, 34, 45, 83, 91, 100, 107, 116, 124, 132, 142, 153, 162, 173, 205, 215, 242, 251, 261, 272, 292, 313, 322]. He was head of a Middlesex County household of 5 "Blacks" in 1783 [VA:56] and a "free negro" head of a Gloucester County household of 1 "other free" and 5 slaves in 1810 [VA:665] and 10 "free colored" in 1830 (said to be over the age of 100). He may have been the father of

i. James2, born about 1782, called "James Meggs, Jr., Mulatoe" when he was tithable in Middlesex County in 1805, 1812 and 1819 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1850, frames 205, 261, 343]. He registered in Middlesex County on 26 June 1805: born free; 24 years of age; 6'; Tawney complexion [Register of Free Negroes 1800-60, p.15] and registered in Essex County on 16 March 1818: born free by affidavit of John B. Burke, Colour: Tawny, 36 years of age, 6 feet 1 inch high [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.30, no.78].

ii. Betsy, born about 1782, registered in Middlesex County on 2 December 1832: born free; 50 years of age; 5'7-1/2"; yellow complexion [Register of Free Negroes 1827-60, p.6].

iii. Robert, born about 1784, registered in Middlesex County on 26 June 1805: born free; 24 years of age; 5'8"; tawney complexion [Register of Free Negroes 1800-60, p.15]. He was a "negroe" taxable on a slave in Gloucester County in 1809, 1813, and 1814, a "mulo" taxable on 2 slaves from 1815 to 1817 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20]. He was a "free negro" head of a Gloucester County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:665].

iv. Parthenia, born about 1792, registered in Middlesex County on 2 December 1832: born free; 40 years of age; 5'6"; Tawney complexion [Register of Free Negroes 1827-60, p.6].

v. Christiana, born about 1798, registered in Middlesex County on 20 June 1825: born free; 27 years of age; 5'5"; yellow complexion [Register of Free Negroes 1800-60, p.15].

 

MELVIN FAMILY

Members of the Melvin family in Virginia were

i. Jane, born 19 November 1764, a "base born Mulatto" child ordered bound to Fielding Turner, Gentleman, in Cameron Parish, Loudoun County, on 9 June 1766 [Orders 1765-7, 83].

ii. Winney, born April 1769, a "Mullatto" child bound to Fielding Turner on 13 August 1770 [Orders 1770-3, 4]. She was a "Ma" taxable on a slave in Culpeper County in 1797 [PPTL 1782-1802, frames 647].

iii. ?Rheubin Melvil, a taxable "free Negro" in Fauquier County in 1813 [Waldrep, 1813 Tax List].

 

MILES FAMILY

1.    Alice Miles, born say 1642, was the servant of John Hill on 10 March 1661/2 when the churchwardens of York Parish presented her in York County court for "fornication with a Negro." The court ordered that she be whipped "till her backe be bloody," but she escaped from the sheriff's custody before he could inflict the punishment. The court ordered her master to produce her in court [DOW 3:151, 159]. She was probably the ancestor of

i. Richard, born say 1764, taxable in Charles City County on a tithe and a horse from 1788 to 1799 [PPTL, 1788-1814] and taxable in York County in 1804 and 1805 [PPTL, 1782-1841, frames 297, 307].

ii. Eleanor, born about 1766, a sixty-seven-year-old farmer and ditcher in a list of "Free Negroes and Mulattoes" in King William County in 1833, perhaps the mother of Daniel (aged 48) and Polly (aged 45) and Nancy (aged 35) who were in the same household [LVA, Auditor of Public Accounts inventory entry no. 757, Reports of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, 1833; transcribed by Selma Stewart].

2        iii. Isaac1, born about 1766.

iv. Jacob, born say 1766, taxable in Charles City County on a horse from 1788 to 1791 [PPTL, 1788-1814].

v. James, born say 1767, taxable in Charles City County on a horse from 1788 to 1800 [PPTL, 1788-1814].

vi. John, born say 1776, taxable in Charles City County from 1792 to 1799, a "Mulattoe" taxable in 1813 and 1814 [PPTL, 1788-1814]. He was a fifty-three-year-old farmer and ditcher in a list of "Free Negroes and Mulattoes" in King William County in 1833 [LVA, Auditor of Public Accounts inventory entry no. 757, Reports of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, 1833; transcribed by Selma Stewart].

vii. David, born about 1778, a "Mulattoe" taxable in Charles City County in 1813 and 1814 [PPTL, 1788-1814] and taxable on horse in King William County in 1833 and 1834 [PPTL 1833-51]. He was a fifty-five-year-old farmer and ditcher in a list of "Free Negroes and Mulattoes" in King William County in 1833 [LVA, Auditor of Public Accounts inventory entry no. 757, Reports of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, 1833].

3        viii. Nat, born say 1780.

ix. Tabby, head of a Culpeper County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:56], probably the mother of Judith Miles, a "Mulatto" bound out to Josiah Pratt by the Culpeper County court on 15 October 1804 [Minutes 1803-5, 245].

 

2.    Isaac1 Miles, born about 1766, was taxable in Charles City County from 1790 to 1812, a "Mulattoe" taxable in 1813 and 1814 [PPTL, 1788-1814] and head of a Charles City County household of 11 "other free" in 1810 [VA:959]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 20 October 1831 on testimony of Jesse Ladd: a bright mulatto man, about 65 years old, born free in this county [Minutes 1830-9, 79]. He was a sixty-seven-year-old farmer and ditcher in a list of "Free Negroes and Mulattoes" in King William County in 1833 [LVA, Auditor of Public Accounts inventory entry no. 757, Reports of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, 1833]. He may have been the father of

i. Edward, head of a Charles City County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:959].

ii. Pleasant, a "Mulattoe" taxable in Charles City County in 1813 and 1814 [PPTL, 1788-1814]. He was one of the Pamunkey Indians who signed a letter to the governor in the 1840s [Rountree, Pocahontas's People, 344].

iii. Isaac2, Jr., taxable on a horse in King William County in 1834, 1842 and 1849 when he was listed as a "free Negro" [PPTL 1833-51]. He was one of headmen of the Pamunkey Indians who signed a letter to the governor in the 1840s [Rountree, Pocahontas's People, 344].

 

3.    Nathaniel Miles, born say 1777, was taxable in Charles City County in 1798, a "Mulattoe" taxable in 1813 and 1814 [PPTL, 1788-1814] and head of a Charles City County household of 11 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:7]. He purchased 75 acres in Charles City County which had belonged to Charles Mackaney, deceased, from James Mackaney for $225 on 15 August 1807 [DB 5:181]. He died before 3 January 1844 when the inventory of his Charles City County estate was taken [WB 4:512]. He was the father of

i. Harris, born about 1810, registered in Charles City County on 20 October 1831: son of Nat Miles, a man of yellow complexion, about 21 years old, born free in this county [Minutes 1830-9, 80].

 

MILLER FAMILY

1.    Ephraim Miller, born say 1710, was taxable in his own household in Norfolk County, Virginia, from 1731 to 1734, and a "free negro" taxable in the household of James Wilson, Sr., in the district from Deep Creek to the Bridge in 1736 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables 1730-50, 24, 83, 127, 175]. He may have been related to the Miller family of Maryland and Delaware. His widow may have been Elizabeth Miller, a "free Negro" who was taxable in Currituck County, North Carolina, with her daughter Johanah in 1755. They may have been the ancestors of

i. Isaac, born say 1732, a "free Negro" taxable in Currituck County in 1755. He apparently joined the Tuscarora Indian reservation in Bertie County before 12 July 1766 when he signed as one of the chief men in their lease of 8,000 acres of Tuscarora Indian land [DB L:56]. He did not sign the next lease of 1777, so he was probably one of the 155 members of the tribe who went north with them to New York State. (The remainder left in 1802).

ii. Johannah, born say 1738, taxable in her mother's Currituck County household in 1755.

iii. Judia, a taxable in Samuel Willoughby's household on the southside of Tanner's Creek in Norfolk County in 1780 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables 1768-80, 272].

iv. Hannah, mother of Ezekiel Miller (born about 1789) who registered as a free Negro in Norfolk County on 11 May 1810: twenty one years of age of a Yellowish complexion ... with long hair ... Born free [Register of Free Negros & Mulattos, no.3].

v. Jacob L., head of a Stokes County, North Carolina household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [NC:514].

vi. Polley, head of a Richmond City household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:347].

vii. Nelly "(free)" head of a Charleston, St. Phillips & Michaels Parish household of 1 "other free" and a slave in 1790.

 

MILLS FAMILY

1.    Frances Mills, born say 1740, was living in Bute/ Warren County, North Carolina, between 10 August 1774 and October 1783 when her "Mulatto" children (called orphans of Francis Mills) were bound to John, William, and Richard Sherry [Bute County Minutes 1767-76, 296; WB 2:95, 96, 97, 98, 243 by Kerr, Warren County, North Carolina Records]. She was called Fanny Mills on 7 February 1778 when she sold her cattle and household goods to Stephen Shell in Bute County and called Frances Mills on 11 May 1779 when the Bute County court ordered that John Sherry be paid as a witness for her against Stephen Shell [Minutes 1777-79, 86, 169; WB 2:214]. Warren County was formed from Bute County in 1779, and Fanny's children were bound out there to the Sherry family in February 1782 [Minutes 1780-83, 87]. She was head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [NC:327]. Her children were

2        i. Elizabeth, born about 1758.

3        ii. ?Daniel1, born about 1761.

4        iii. Sarah, born about 1764.

iv. James1, born about 1766, eight-year-old orphan of Francis Mills (no race indicated), bound to Richard Sherry in Bute County on 10 August 1774 [Bute County Minutes 1767-76, 296; Warren County WB 2:243 by Kerr, Warren County, North Carolina Records].

v. Ann, born about 1769, a five-year-old "mulatto" orphan of Francis Mills, deceased, bound to William Sherry in Bute County on 9 August 1774 [WB 2:96], perhaps the Nancy Mills, born before 1776, who was head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 1 "free colored" in 1830 [NC:305].

vi. John, born say 1771, "mulatto child and orphan of Francis Mills, dec'd," bound to John Sherry in Bute County on 9 August 1774 [WB 2:98], head of a Halifax County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:34], 6 "free colored" in Nash County in 1820 [NC:416] and 9 in Halifax County in 1830 [NC:306].

vii. ?Polly, born about 1776, a six-year-old, no parent named, bound by the Warren County court to George Webb in February 1782 [Minutes 1780-83, 87].

viii. Isham, born about 1776, seven-year-old, base-born child of Fanney Mills, bound by the Warren County court to George Webb in February 1782, called seven-year-old child of Francis Mills when he was bound to John Sherry in October 1783 [Minutes 1780-83, 87; 1783-7, 15]. He was head of a Warren County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:812].

ix. Winnie, born about 1778, six-year-old child of Fanney Mills bound by the Warren County court to George Webb in February 1782, called five-year-old, base-born child of Francis Mills in October 1783 when the court bound her to John Sherry [Minutes 1780-83, 87; 1783-7, 15].

x. Aggey, born about 1778, base-born child of Fanney Mills, bound to George Webb in Warren County in February 1782, called three-year-old child of Francis Mills when she was bound to John Sherry in October 1783 [Minutes 1780-83, 87; 1783-7, 15].

xi. Charlotte, born about 1779, three-year-old child of Fanney mills, bound by the Warren County court to George Webb in February 1782 [Minutes 1780-3, 87].

xii. William Christmas, born in December 1781, two-month-old, base-born child of Fanney Mills, bound by the Warren County court to George Webb in February 1782, called two-year-old child of Francis Mills when he was bound to John Sherry in October 1783 [Minutes 1780-83, 87; 1783-7, 15].

 

2.    Elizabeth Mills, born about 1758, a "young mulatto woman," the sixteen-year-old orphan of Francis Mills, was bound to John Sherry in Bute County on 10 August 1774 [WB 2:97]. She was living in Warren County in February 1782 when the court bound out her son James. She was head of a Halifax County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:156] and was a "free colored" woman living alone in Halifax in 1830 [NC:296]. Her children were

i. James2, born about July 1781, six months old in February 1782 when he was ordered bound to George Webb by the Warren County court [Minutes 1780-83, 87].

ii. ?Isham2, born about 1790, head of a Halifax County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:157] and 9 in 1830 [NC:309]. On 16 February 1836 the Halifax County court bound to him two "free boys of color" Henry Mills (ten years old) and Everett Mills (thirteen years old). The 20 August 1839 Halifax County court bound five children to him: Alfred, Wilson, Franky, Ann, and Penny Mills. He purchased land from Fred Goins (Gowen) by a deed proved in Halifax County court on 21 November 1836. He and John Mills were permitted by the 17 August 1841 Halifax County court to carry their guns.

iii. ?Frances, born about 1790, no parent named when the 25 May 1800 Halifax County court ordered her bound as an apprentice to William Pike [Minutes 1799-1802, 105].

 

3.    Daniel1 Mills, born about 1761, was listed in the Militia Returns of Halifax County, North Carolina, as a twenty-year-old planter born in Halifax County [The North Carolinian VI:727]. He appointed Benjamin Hawkins of Warren County his attorney to receive his final settlement pay for service in the North Carolina Continental Line on 23 March 1791 [NCGSJ XIII:98]. His "orphans" were bound out by the Halifax County court. They were

i. Judith, born about 1783, bound out by the Halifax County court on 20 February 1786.

ii. Gilford, born about 1785, sixteen-year-old "orphan of Daniel Mills" ordered bound apprentice by the 18 August 1801 Halifax County court, perhaps the Guilford Mills who married Sally Goins 13 January 1834 Halifax County bond with John Jordan bondsman.

iii. Gideon, born 3 September 1786, "orphan of Daniel Mills," ordered bound to Samuel Tarwell in Halifax County court on 23 May 1799 [Minutes 1799-1802, 37].

 

4.    Sarah Mills, born about 1764, was the ten-year-old "mulatto" orphan of Frances Mills, deceased, who was ordered bound to Richard Sherry in Bute County on 9 August 1774 [WB 2:95]. She was living in Warren County in February 1794 when the court bound out her son Claiborn. Her children were

i. Claiborn, born about 1787, seven-year-old, base-born child of Sarah Mills who was bound by the Warren County court to William Ballard on 25 February 1794. He was bound instead to John Moore in February 1799 and called a "boy of colour" in May 1800 when John Moore, Esquire, was ordered to bring him to court and show cause why Claiborn should not be bound to a proper person [Minutes 1793-1800, 45, 152, folio 183]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:34], 9 "free colored" in 1820, and 8 in 1830 [NC:306].

ii. ?Daniel2, born about 1797, no parent named when he was bound out by the Halifax County court on 18 August 1801. He was head of a Halifax County household of 8 "other free" in 1830 [NC:305]. On 16 February 1824 the Halifax County court bound to him "Jack Mills, a free boy of color." The same session of the court found Daniel guilty in an issue of traverse with a punishment of twenty lashes on his bare back at the public whipping post. He died before 19 February 1836 when the court ordered the coroner to be paid for summoning jurors to view his body [Minutes 1832-46, n.p.].

iii. ?Elizabeth, born about December 1799, no parent named when she was bound an apprentice by the 18 August 1801 Halifax County court [Minutes 1799-1802].

 

Other members of the Mills family were

i. Jacob, taxable in the Princess Anne County household of "free Negro" Marshall Anderson in 1784 [Virginia Genealogical Society Quarterly 27:267].

ii. Taylor, head of a Robeson County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [NC:423].

 

MILTON/ MELTON FAMILY

Members of the Milton family were

1        i. Elisha, born say 1740.

2        ii. Josiah, born say 1742.

iii. Hardy, not found by the sheriff in Southampton County on 10 October 1782 when his property was attached for a 3 pound, 12 shilling debt he owed John Wright. The property included a spinning wheel, an iron pot, chairs, a small tub, a pewter dish, spoons, knives, wooden plates and a bedstead [Orders 1778-84, 247].

 

1.    Elisha Milton, born say 1740, was sued in Southampton County by John Woodross in 8 August 1765 in a suit which abated by the death of the plaintiff, and he was sued by James Dunlop for trespass on the case on 12 June 1766 [Judgment Papers, 1765-6, 1226; 1766-1767, frames 40-1]. He was presented by the Southampton County court on 11 May 1780 for concealing a tithable, on 13 May 1784 for retailing liquor without a license, and on 12 July 1786 for failing to list himself, a slave over the age of 16, 2 horses, and 8 head of cattle as tithables [Orders 1778-84, 111, 389; 1784-9, 189, 271, 286]. He was taxable in Southampton County from 1782 to 1785: taxable on 2 horses and 6 cattle in 1782, taxable on a horse and 9 cattle in 1787, taxable on a slave and a horse in 1788 [PPTL, frames 503, 549, 571, 642, 665]. His 1 December 1788 Southampton County will, proved 21 August 1797, left land to his granddaughter Patsy, daughter of Ann Milton, who was to receive the deed from Ethelred Taylor and named his children Leah and Randolph [WB 5:2]. He was the father of

i. James1, born say 1762, brother of Ann Melton Bowzer, said to have enlisted in the Revolution and died of smallpox at Bunker Hill [Brown, Genealogical Abstracts, Revolutionary War Veterans Script Act, 1852, 139; Gwathmey, Historical Register of Virginians in the Revolution].

ii. Leah.

iii. Randolph, born say 1768, a witness to the 1 December 1791 St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County will of John Reese [WB 4:649]. He married Amy Felts, 13 February 1792 Southampton County bond, Randolph Newsum security. He sued John Wright in Southampton County court on 9 August 1793 for trespass, assault and battery. His witnesses William Jarrell and Lewis Fort failed to appear on 16 August 1794 [Minutes 1793-9, 34, 109]. He was taxable in Southampton County from 1790 to 1811: taxable on 2 free male tithables in 1801 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92, frames 765, 821; 1792-1806, frames 58, 86, 166, 197, 274, 323, 385, 419, 522, 698, 813, 847; 1807-21, frames 52, 74, 172, 197]. He was head of a Southampton County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:71]. He may have been the Randol Milton who was head of an Orange County, North Carolina household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:336]. His wife Amy was probably related to Jacob Felts, head of a Henrico County household of 13 "other free" in 1810 [VA:979].

iv. Ann, born say 1771, married Thomas Bowser, 28 December 1792 Southampton County bond, Randolph Milton security. She was called "Ann Milton, alias Ann Bowser," in a codicil to the 20 February 1791 Southampton County will of Ethelred Taylor, recorded 14 July 1791. The will also mentioned Patsey Milton, "so called daughter of Ann Milton, Jr." [WB 4:437]. Ann was called Ann Milton on 9 August 1792 when she sued a member of the Wright family for trespass, assault and battery in Southampton County court [Minutes 1793-99, 33, 153, 155]. She was taxable in Southampton County on a horse from 1790 to 1795, but her name was crossed off the list in 1796 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92, frames 764, 821; 1792-1806, frames 58, 86, 166, 197]. She was living in Nansemond County on 8 July 1834 when she made a deposition in court stating that her brother James Melton, a free man of color, enlisted in the Revolution in Southampton County, served under Captain James Gray, and died of smallpox at Bunker Hill. In 1833 her husband Thomas Bowzer deposed that his wife lived in Nansemond County for 42 years but her father and family were from Southampton County [Brown, Genealogical Abstracts, Script Act 1852, 139].

 

2    Josiah Milton, born say 1742, was taxable on two tithes in Hertford County, North Carolina, in 1770 (called Josiah Meltiah) and one in 1779 [Fouts, Tax Receipt Book, 41; GA 30.1]. He was taxable in St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County, from 1782 to 1790: taxable on 2 horses in 1782, and on a tithe and 3 cattle in 1787 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92, frames 507, 522, 549, 571, 594, 642, 665, 765]. He was head of a Hertford County household of 10 "other free" in Captain Lewis' District in 1800. Perhaps his children were

i. James2, born about 1770, head of a Hertford County household of 1 "other free" in 1800, 3 in Southampton County in 1810 [VA:75], and 4 "free colored" in Hertford County in 1820 [NC:188]. He was a eighty-year-old "Mulatto" sailor counted in the 1850 census for Hertford County [NC:653].

ii. Surrell, head of a Hertford County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820, one of whom was a woman over forty-five years of age [NC:186].

iii. John, head of a Hertford County household of 3 "other free" in 1800.

iv. Mourning, born about 1780, head of a Hertford County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:186] and 1 in 1830 [NC:404]. She was counted as a seventy-year-old "Black" woman in Hertford County in 1850 [NC:666].

v. Mills, head of a Hertford County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 (Mills Melton) [NC:107], 12 "free colored" in Orange County in 1820 [NC:336], and a "Negro" head of a Guilford County household of 8 "free colored" in 1830. He married Patsy Shoecraft according to the testimony of Jeremiah Shoecraft, grandson of William Shoecraft and Bicey Nickens, when he applied for Cherokee benefits in 1908 (rejected).

vi. Mary Anna, a sister of Mills Milton, married James Shoecraft according to testimony by their grandson Samuel Shoecraft when he applied for Cherokee benefits in 1908 (rejected).

vii. Matthias, born about 1775, registered in Southampton County on 11 September 1796: age 21, Mulattoe, 5 feet 4 and 1/2 inches, free born in N. Carolina, Hertford county as p. certificate filed [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 112]. He was head of an Orange County, North Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1810 (called Matthew Melton) [NC:831]. He was bondsman with Moses Bass for the 13 April 1813 Orange County marriage of Polly Roberts and Moses Archer. He married Betsy Shoecraft, 12 June 1821 Orange County bond.

viii. Corde, born 1794-1776, head of a Hertford County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820.

ix. Meede Melton, head of a Hertford County household of 8 "other free" in 1830 [NC:396].

x. David Melton, among the "Sundry persons of Colour of Hertford County" who petitioned the General Assembly in 1822 to repeal the act which declared slaves to be competent witnesses against free persons of Colour [NCGSJ XI:252].

 

MITCHELL FAMILY

The Mitchell family probably had a very early origin since there were several members of the family born about 1720. The earliest records are for

1        i. ____, born say 1720, married Mary ____.

2        ii. ____, born say 1722, married Ann Hawley.

3        iii. Ann, born say 1730.

4        iv. Jane, born say 1735.

5        v. Thomas1, born say 1744.

6        vi. Rachel, born say 1745.

7        vii. Sarah, born say 1747.

viii. James, born about 1755, about eighteen years old on 20 May 1773 when he complained to the Halifax County, Virginia court against his master Isaac Coles, Gentleman. The court ruled that the indentures were insufficient and bound him instead to Moses Estes. He was called a "Mulatto" the following month on 17 June 1773 when he was bound instead to Leonard Baker [Pleas 1772-3, 117, 146].

 

1.    ____ Mitchell, born say 1720, was the husband of Mary Mitchell (maiden name unknown) who had eight children before she married Lawrence Pettiford according to her great-great-grandchild [28 June 1893 letter from Narcissa Rattley to her children]. By 1752 she was married to Lawrence Pettiford, two "Black" taxables in Robert Harris' 1752 Granville County list [CR 44.701.19]. She may have been the mother of the Mitchells who were early taxables in Granville County. They were

8        i. Archibald, born about 1743.

9        ii. David1, born say 1744.

10      iii. Esther, born say 1747.

 

2.    ____ Mitchell, born say 1725, married Ann Hawley, daughter of Michael Hawley. Their son William Mitchell received 60 acres near Cypress Swamp in Northampton County by his grandfather's 1 March 1752 Northampton County will, with the proviso that his mother (unnamed) be allowed to live on the land [SS original]. Ann was not mentioned in the will nor was her husband, but she and William Mitchell sold the 60 acres he received by the will (when he was 21?) on 17 December 1767 [DB 4:133]. Her child was

11       i. William1, born say 1746.

 

3.    Ann Mitchell, born say 1730, was a "free Mulattoe," who petitioned the Bertie County court on 24 October 1758 to apprentice her children to James Boon [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, II:452]. Her children were

i. William Shoecraft, born about 1749, about nine years old in 1758 when he was indentured to James Boon [NCGSJ XVIII:170].

ii. Mary Ann Mitchell, born about 1753, ordered bound to James Boon, perhaps the Mary Mitchell who married Burrell Evans, 22 July 1779 Granville County bond.

iii. ?Nancy Mitchell, born say 1757, married Cato Copeland, 11 December 1778 Halifax County bond.

 

4.    Jane Mitchell, born say 1735, was living in Bertie County in 1755 when Robert Butler posted bastardy bonds for two unnamed children he had by her [Camin, N.C. Bastardy Bonds, 8]. Her children may have been

i. Jeremiah, born say 1751, a free male "Mulatto" in Thomas Pugh's Bertie County household in his list for 1764 [CR 10.702.19].

ii. John, born say 1752, a "free molatto" in the household of "free molatto" Robert Butler in the 1764 Bertie Summary Tax list [CR 10.702.1]. John's race was not stated when he was bound apprentice in Bertie County to Lemuel Hardy to be a blacksmith on 23 March 1765 [NCGSJ XIV:32].

iii. Hezekiah, born about 1753, no race stated when he was bound apprentice in Bertie County to Edward Hardy to be a cordwainer on 28 March 1765 [NCGSJ XIV:31].

 

5.    Thomas1 Mitchell, born say 1744, received a grant for 39 acres in Edgecombe County on 9 November 1784 and sold this land on 20 February 1792 [DB 4:380; 6:535]. He was head of an Edgecombe household of 10 "other free" in 1790 [NC:55], 7 in 1800 (called Free Negro) [NC:221], and 9 in 1810 [NC:741]. Perhaps his widow was Esther Mitchell, born before 1776, head of an Edgecombe County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:117]. Thomas may have been the father of

i. Stephen, head of an Edgecombe County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [NC:767].

ii. Joel, born before 1776, head of an Edgecombe County household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:87].

 

6.    Rachel Mitchell, born say 1745, was head of a Pasquotank County household of one "Mulatto" taxable in 1769 [SS 837], 9 "other free" in 1790 [NC:28] and was still living there in 1810 [NC:915]. Her children may have been

i. Tom, head of Pasquotank household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [NC:914].

ii. John, head of a Pasquotank household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [NC:914].

iii. Robert1, born before 1776, head of a Pasquotank household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:271].

iv. Ismael, born about 1789, bound as an apprentice wheelwright to James Chamberlain of Pasquotank County in 1806 [NCGSJ XI:93].

 

7.    Sarah Mitchell, born say 1747, was a "Mulatto" head of a Pasquotank County household in 1769 [SS 837]. She may have been the mother of

i. Benjamin1, born say 1767, married Elizabeth Gregers (Driggers), 27 August 1788 Craven County bond, Benjamin Moore bondsman. He was head of a Craven County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:130]. His 7 March 1803 Craven County will, proved December 1817 by George Godett, Jr., left 5 pounds to his mother-in-law (stepmother?), Susannah Mitchell, and left all the remainder of his property to his wife Elizabeth Mitchell [WB 1810-21, pt.1, 157].

ii. Robert3, born say 1782, head of a Pasquotank County household of 6 "free colored" and 2 slaves in 1820 [NC:285].

 

8.    Archibald Mitchell, born about 1743, was taxable with his wife Sealia in Stephen Jett's 1767 Granville County tax list. She was probably the daughter of Benjamin Bass, taxed in her father's household in the 1762 list of Samuel Benton [CR 44.701.19]. Archibald was taxed on 2 horses and 5 cattle in Oxford District in 1782. In 1786 he was taxed on 260 acres and one poll, and he was head of an Oxford District household of 10 free males and 3 females in the state census. He was last taxed in Granville in 1793 on 100 acres and no polls, indicating that he was considered to be over fifty years of age [Tax List 1767-1823]. His wife may have been the Cealy Mitchell who was head of a household of 1 "other free" in the 1810 census for Granville County [NC:866]. The Mitchells who were living in Granville and Wake counties after 1793 may have been some of the nine free males in his 1786 Granville County household:

i. Josiah, married Rebecca Corn, 23 February 1798 Wake County bond, David Valentine bondsman. Josiah was head of Wake County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [NC:780].

ii. Joab, taxable on one poll in Beaverdam District in 1796 [Tax List 1796-1802, 17]. He was head of a Wake County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 and 2 "free colored" in Northampton County in 1820 [NC:244].

iii. Joel1, born before 1776, married Ellis Pettiford, 2 January 1801 Wake County household, Martin Locus bondsman. He was head of an Orange County household of 12 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:A:404].

iv. Zachariah, married Jain Anderson, 25 August 1795 Granville County bond, Abel Anderson bondsman. He was taxed on one poll in Tabbs Creek District in 1799 [Tax List 1796-1802, 171] and head of a Granville County household of 14 "other free" in 1810 [NC:882]. According to the 2 July 1814 refunding bond on the estate papers of Winny Anderson, Zachariah married Joyce Anderson.

v. William2, born say 1775, taxable on one poll in Oxford District, and there was another taxable on one poll in Island Creek in 1796 [Tax List 1796-1802, 30, 44]. He was head of a Granville County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 and 9 in 1810 [NC:866]. He was the bondsman for the 31 January 1796 marriage of Rhody Anderson and Darling Bass. He married Bythea Hedsbeth, 11 August 1796 Granville County bond with Darling Bass bondsman.

vi. Robert2, born say 1780, taxable on one poll in 1801 in Napp of Reed District [Tax List 1796-1802, 277]. He was head of a Guilford County household of 12 "other free" in 1810 [NC:991] and 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:107]. He married Sopha Bibba (Bibby), 13 November 1828 Franklin County bond, A.S. Perry bondsman.

vii. Benjamin2, born say 1782, married Winnie Anderson, 19 December 1803 Granville County bond with George Anderson bondsman. He was head of a Granville County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:907].

 

9.    David1 Mitchell, born say 1744, was taxed in the 1764 Granville County list of Samuel Benton in Jeremiah Anderson's household, and he was taxed with his wife Silvey in Benton's 1765 list. In 1768 he was called "David Mitchell Negro" in Len Henley Bullock's list. Between 1768 and 1770 he married, second, Jane/Jean Tylor, a taxable in the 1768 Granville County household of her brother Bartlet Tyler [CR 44.701.19]. Olive and William Bass called her Jean Tylor, alias Mitchell, when they sued her in Granville County court on 7 April 1770 [Minutes 1754-70, 202]. Between 1778 and 1785 as "David Mitchell free Negro" he entered 640 acres in Granville on Beaverdam Creek [Pruitt, Land Entries Granville County, 23]. Not long afterwards he made his 18 July 1780 Granville County will which was proved in August court 1781. He mentioned his wife Jean and his children [WB 1:307]. His children: Molley (twelve and one-half years old), Susanna (ten years), Jesse (eight years), and David (four years), "all free negroes," were bound out by the 3 November 1784 Granville County court [Owen, Granville County Notes, vol. VI]. His wife Jean/ Jane was taxed on 300 acres, 1 horse, and two cattle as Jane Tylor in 1782 and as Jane Mitchell on 365 acres in 1786 and on 200 acres in 1788. She apparently died about August 1799 when her children were indentured by the court, and her son Jesse was taxable on the land. The ages of Mary, Susannah, and Jesse were stated in the indentures and certified by "me Susannah Harris that was present the time they were born" [CR 044.101.2]. David's children were

i. Drury, born say 1765, bound apprentice to Drury Pettiford on 6 February 1781 [Owen, Granville County Notes, vol. VI]. He received 100 acres by his father's will. He probably sold this land since he was taxed on one poll only in 1786. The February 1799 Granville County court reported that he had deserted his wife Mary Jones when it bound out their son Ephraim Jones Mitchell (born 1789). He married Mary, widow of John Harris, in Wilkes County. He was head of a Wilkes County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [NC:867]. He was probably related to Daniel Mitchell (born about 1778) and Absolem Mitchell (born about 1780) "free Negro" orphans bound to Maxwell Chambers by the Rowan County court on 8 November 1786 [Minutes 1773-7, 6 (abstract p. 420)].

ii. Martha.

iii. Ann.

iv. Mary, born 24 March 1774, called Molly Mitchell on 24 January 1800 when she married Martin Locust, Orange County bond.

v. Susannah, born 28 September 1776.

vi. Jesse, born 29 March 1778. He received the balance of his father's land after his mother's death and was taxable on 263 acres in Beaverdam District in 1800 and 1801 [Tax List 1796-1802, 294].

vii. David2, born about 1780, four years old on 3 November 1784 [Owen, Granville County Notes, vol. VI]. He married Polly Locklear(?), 1 January 1804 Granville County bond with John Tyner bondsman. He was head of a Caswell County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:72].

 

10.    Esther1 /Easter Mitchell was probably born about 1747 since her oldest child was born circa 1763. She was taxable in the 1767 Granville County tax list of Stephen Jett in Lewis Pettiford's household [CR 44.701.19]. She was head of a Franklin County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:825]. Many of her children were identified in Granville County indentures [CR 044.101.2]. Others may have been those counted as "other free" in Franklin County. Her children were

i. Isaac Cursi(?) (Kersey?) Mitchell, born about 1763, orphan of Hester Mitchel, bound to Malichiah Reaves on 21 July 1769.

ii. Judah, "base born Mulatto of Esther Mitchel," bound on 1 October 1771.

iii. Abigail, born about 1767, "base born Mulatto of Esther," bound to Sarah White on 18 May 1772. She was called "Abby" Mitchell, head of a Franklin County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:825]. Her six-year-old child James was bound apprentice to Ross Conyers in Franklin County in March 1792 [Minutes 1789-93, 286]. Her 22 November 1817 Franklin County will, no probate date, left 20 shillings each to her sons John and Isaac Mitchell and the rest of her property to her children: Samuel, Polly, Keziah, Henry, and Winney, and her grandson Willis Dunce (Dunston) [Bradley, Franklin County Wills, I:58].

12      iv. Winnifred, born June 1768.

v. Fanny, born say 1770, "base born child of Easter Mitchell," bound to Jeremiah Frazier on 6 November 1777. She may have been the F. Mitchell whose son Chesley, born about 1789, was bound apprentice in Granville County on 7 February 1799.

vi. Edward, born say 1771, "base born child of Easter Mitchell," bound to Jeremiah Frazier on 6 November 1777. He married Mariah Bass, 5 January 1795 Granville County bond, Thomas Bass bondsman.

vii. ?Polly, head of a Franklin County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:826].

viii. ?Prissy, head of a Franklin County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:825].

 

11.    William1 Mitchell, born say 1746, received 60 acres on Cypress Swamp in Northampton County by the 1 March 1752 Northampton County will of his grandfather Michael Hawley [SS original]. He and (his mother?) Ann Mitchell sold this land (when he was 21?) on 17 December 1767 [DB 4:133]. He may have been the William Mitchel who was a "Mixt Blood" taxable in Bladen County in 1774 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:123] and head of a Bladen County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:188]. Perhaps his descendants were

i. Joyce, head of a Northampton County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:76] and 2 in Halifax County, North Carolina, in 1810 [NC:38].

ii. Meney, head of a Gates County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:24].

iii. Thomas2, born say 1770, head of a Bladen County household of 7 "other free" in 1800.

iv. Elizabeth, head of a Northampton County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:461].

v. Olive, born before 1776, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:157].

vi. Michael, born say 1780, married Lucy Bass, 25 April 1805 Granville County bond. He was head of a Granville County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [NC:877]. Perhaps she was the Lucy Mitchell, born before 1776, who was head of a Northampton County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:244].

 

12.    Winnifred Mitchell, born June 1768, "base born of Esther," was bound an apprentice in Granville County on 20 August 1771 [CR 044.101.2]. She was head of Franklin County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:826]. Her children were bound apprentices in Granville County in May 1793 [Minutes 1792-95, 64-5]. Her children weree.

i. Esther2, born about 1787.

ii. Lewis, born about 1788.

iii. Jemima, born about 1790.

 

Endnotes:

1.    Narcissa Rattley's letter is in the possession of Robert Jackson of Silver Spring, Maryland.

2.    See the Shoecraft family history which assumes that Ann Shoecraft was Ann Mitchell's maiden nam

 

MICHAM/ MEACHAM/ MITCHAM FAMILY

1.    Joseph1 Meacham, born say 1700, received land on the Roanoke River (in Halifax County, North Carolina) and slaves Moll, Fortune and Rose by the 16 November 1726 Chowan County will of Paul Bunch. This was land that Bunch had purchased from Thomas Wilkins. Bunch also divided his household goods, livetock and slave Daw between Joseph Meacham and Fortune Holdbee and appointed Fortune and Meacham as his executors [Secretary of State Record of Wills, 1722-1735, SS 876, 3:138-9]. Joseph was probably the ancestor of the members of the Micham family in North Carolina:

i. Joseph2, head of a Halifax County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:330].

ii. Jacob, head of a Halifax County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:330] and 8 in 1810 [NC:38].

iii. Paul, born before 1776, head of a Halifax County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:38] and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:156].

iv. Mary, head of a Halifax County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [NC:38].

 

Members of the Mitcham family in South Carolina were

i. Elizabeth, head of a Sumter County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [SC:953].

ii. Joseph3, head of a Sumter County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [SC:934] and 3 in 1810 [SC:218a]. He owned land on the Santee River and a branch of Bear Creek on 6 July 1793 when Robert Waring recorded a plat for land adjoining his [South Carolina Archives, Series S213190, 32:244].

iii. Jesse, head of a Sumter District household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [SC:218a]. He owned land on Wideboo Swamp near the Santee River in Clarendon County, Sumter District, on 21 August 1802 when James Davis recorded a plat for land adjoining his [South Carolina Archives, Series S213192, 39:69].

iv. Thomas, head of a Sumter District household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [SC:218a].

v. Nelly, head of a Sumter District household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [SC:218a].

vi. Gudon(?), head of a Sumter District household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [SC:218a].

vii. Elias, born before 1776, head of a Barnwell District household of 6 "free colored" in 1830.

 

MONGOM/ MONGON FAMILY

1.    Philip1 Mongom, born say 1625, was the slave of Captain William Hawley who claimed him as a headright in 1646 in Northampton County court [DW 1645-51, 39 by Deal, Race and Class, 383-93]. In 1645 he was whipped in court for entertaining and concealing Sibble Ford, a runaway English maidservant [DW 1645-51, fol.2]. He and Mingo Mathews were slaves hired out by Hawley to John Foster who complained that

the Negros which hee had of Capt. William Hawley were very stubborne and would not followe his business.

 

In 1649 Hawley made an agreement with them that they would be free upon payment of 1700 pounds of tobacco or one white servant [DW 1654-55, fol.25, 54]. However, there is some evidence to suggest that they were freed not by this payment but by warning the local English population of an Indian plot to poison their wells in July 1650 [DW 1645-51, fol.217]. In 1651 he arranged to marry Martha Merris, an English widow, signing a deed of jointure with her to reserve her property for herself and her children [DW 1651-54, 33, fol.33]. In May 1660 he was acquitted of stealing hogs but was fined 100 pounds of tobacco for throwing some hogs' ears on the table where the justices were sitting [Orders 1657-64, 68]. In 1663 he was fined for having an illegitimate child by Margery Tyer, a white woman [Orders 1657-64, fol.173, 175]. In 1666 he recorded his livestock mark in court [DW 1651-54, at end of volume, 6]. Philip was a taxable head of a Northampton County household in 1664 and was taxable with his then wife Mary (a free African American) from 1665 to 1677 [Orders 1657-64, 198; 1674-79, 190]. He and two white men, Edward Parkinson and Peter DuParks, were renting 300 acres on the bay side on Mattawaman Creek from John Savage when he made his 26 August 1678 will, and in 1680 he leased 200 acres near the Pocomoke River by the Maryland-Virginia border [Orders 1674-9, 316; 1678-83, 151; Whitelaw, Virginia's Eastern Shore, I:228; II:1216]. On 20 August 1678 Canutus Benne/ Bents confessed in Accomack County court to owing him 555 pounds of tobacco [Orders 1678-82, 7]. On 29 January 1684/5 he submitted to the court that he had notoriously abused and defamed his most loving friends and neighbors John Duparkes and Robert Jarvis. In November 1687 a group of his white neighbors gathered at his house with him, his wife Mary, and his son Philip, Jr. After much "drinkinge and carrousinge," his guests began beating one of the white members of the group, and Philip and his wife and son joined in the melee. The fight broke up when Philip threatened one of them with his gun. They were all fined 500 pounds of tobacco in Northampton County court [OW 1683-89, 118-9, 320-322]. He was last mentioned in the court record of 30 September 1691: "Phillip the Negro planter" [DW&c 1680-92, 306]. He was the father of

2        i. Philip2, born say 1659.

 

2.    Philip2 Mongom, born say 1659, rented 200 acres in Accomack County near Guilford Creek from John Parker on 18 January 1679/80 (called Philip Mongon) [WD 1676-90, 185-6]. He and his wife Mary died before 15 June 1700 when their estate, consisting of livestock, household goods, and a sword, was sold to pay their creditors [DW&c 1692-1707, 262; OW&c 1698-1710, 44]. Their children were

i. Philip3, born about 1690, the twelve or thirteen-year old "Negro" son of Philip Mongom bound by the Northampton County court to his grandmother Mary Mongom on 1 March 1702/3 [OW&c 1698-1710, 126-7]. He was granted administration on the estate of William Harmon on 12 January 1725/6 when William's orphans Edward and Jane Harmon chose him as their guardian [Orders 1722-9, 225]. He was taxable in Abraham Bowker's household in 1723, head of his own household in 1726 with Edmund and Jean Harmon, and taxable with his wife Dinah Mongon and (her sister?) Jane Harmon in 1727 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 102, 119]. He made a 5 January 1727/8 will, proved a few days later on 9 January, by which he left all his estate and a "Negro girl named Jane Harman" until she arrived at lawful age to his wife Dinah [WD 1725-33, 102, 106]. Dinah was head of a household in 1728 with Jean Harmon. Dinah married Richard Malavery/ Munlavery about a year later. In one list for 1729 she was called Dinah Mongom when she and Jean Harmon were in Richard ___ery's household, and in another list for 1729 she was called Dinah Malavery when she and Jane were tithable in Richard Malavery's household. Richard and Dinah were tithables in 1731 but were not taxed again in any of the surviving lists [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 169, 201, 221]. They probably moved to Somerset County, Maryland where Thomas Malavery was a taxable in 1743 [List of Taxable Persons].

ii. Mary, born about 1691, daughter of Philip Mongom, twelve years old on 29 December 1702 when she consented to her indenture to George Corbin in Northampton County court on 29 January 1704/5. And she consented to her indenture on 29 January 1704/5 to Thomas Roberts who obliged himself to give her a two-year-old heifer and new clothing when she came of age [OW&c 1698-1710, 122, 215]. She was tithable in Thomas Savage's household in 1724 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 66] and was presented by the grand jury of Northampton County on 11 May 1725 for having a bastard child. On 12 August 1725 the court excused Captain Thomas Savage from paying her fine because he had given due notice that she was out of the county [Orders 1722-29, 181, 189, 202, 387].

iii. Jane, born about 1693, the nine-year-old "Negro" daughter of Philip Mongom, "free Negro," deceased, bound apprentice to George Corbin at her own request on 29 December 1702 [OW&c 1698-1710, 122].

iv. Esther, born say 1698, chose her guardian in Northampton County court in 1714 [Orders 1711-16, 155]. She was tithable in John and Henry Smaw's households from 1724 to 1727, in the household of Jean Left (Webb) in 1729, and in Thomas Drighouse's household in 1731. She probably married Henry Stephens, Thomas Drighouse's neighbor, the Esther Stephens tithable in Henry's household from 1737 to 1744 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 72, 103, 119, 167, 226, 266].

 

MONOGGIN FAMILY

Members of the Monoggin family in Gloucester County were

i. Samuel, born say 1758, a soldier in the Revolution from Gloucester County [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 29]. He was head of a Petsworth Parish, Gloucester County household of 5 free persons in 1783 (called Samuel Menoggin) [VA:53], and was taxable in Ware Parish, Gloucester County, on 4 horses in 1783 and 2 horses in 1785 (called Samuel Menorgan), taxable from 1786 to 1791 (called Samuel Nogin/ Noggin): taxable on 2 slaves in 1786, a slave in 1789, and taxable on a horse in 1790 and 1791. He was called Samuel Morgan negro in 1806 and 1809, Samuel Monoggon mulo in 1814, Samuel Morgan negroe in 1815 and Samuel Monoggin from 1816 to 1820 when he was taxable in the "List of Mulattos and Free negroes" [PPTL, 1782-99; 1800-20]. He was head of a Gloucester County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 (called Sam Manoggin) [VA:409a] and 3 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:192]. From 1807 to 1813 he was called "Samuel Morgan, Negro" or "Samuel Morgan mulo" when he was taxable in Gloucester County on 60 acres of forest land called "Mulattoe Town." In 1814 he was called "Samuel Monoggin negro" when he transferred 15 acres of this land to "George Noggins, mulo, by deed recorded in Gloucester Court office" [Land Tax 1782-1820]. He may have been the ancestor of a slave named Samuel Noggin who was freed by Robert Richeson by deed recorded in York County on 20 October 1794 [Orders 1788-95, 662]. In 1830 "Fanny McNoggin & Saml.," supposedly over the age of 100 was head of a Gloucester County household of 3 "free colored."

ii. Jesse, born before 1770, a "mulo." taxable in Gloucester County from 1809 to 1820, listed in 1813 with his wife Cate, a "negroe," over the age of 45 in 1815 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20]. He was head of a Gloucester County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:192].

iii. George, born before 1770, called George Noggins in 1814 when he was taxable on 15 acres in Gloucester County which had been transferred to him by Samuel Monoggin [Land Tax 1782-1820]. He was taxed in the "List of Mulattos and Free negroes" from 1815 to 1820, called George Monoggon (over the age of 45 in 1815) [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20]. He was head of a Gloucester County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:192].

 

MONTH FAMILY

1.    Mary1 Month, born say 1690, was a free Indian whose son Henry was baptized in Christ Church Parish, Middlesex County, on 14 April 1717. She was called Mary Moneth in Middlesex County court on 7 April 1719 when the court ruled for the defendant in her petition against Jacob Rice. Mary alleged that the ruling was contrary to evidence, but the court was divided over whether she should have a new trial [Orders 1710-21, 421, 424, 431, 434, 435, 439]. She was the mother of

2        i. ?Sarah, born say 1714.

3        ii. ?Susannah1, born say 1717.

iii. Henry1, born 24 February 1717/8, baptized 14 April 1718 in Christ Church Parish, died 14 November 1718 and was buried the same day [NSCDA, Parish Register of Christ Church, 99, 175].

 

2.    Sarah Month, born say 1714, was a "free Indian" living in Spotsylvania County on 7 April 1742 when the court ordered the churchwardens of St. George Parish to bind out her children Robin, Nat and Harry because she was neglecting to bring them up [Orders 1740-2, 165]. She was the mother of

i. Robin, born say 1734, called Robert Month in June 1765 when John Downer sued him for debt in Caroline County court. The sheriff attached some of his effects to pay the debt. In August 1771 his estate was attached to pay a debt to Thomas Pennington. On 1 July 1774 he was tried for breaking into the house of Nathaniel Holloway and stealing cloth, but the court ruled that the evidence was not sufficient to subject him to further trial [Orders 1765-7, 81, 186, 344; 1767-70, 7; 1770-2, 280; 1772-6, 14, 210, 265, 414, 516, 564].

ii. Nat, born say 1736.

iii. Harry2, born say 1738.

 

3.    Susannah1 Month, born say 1717, (no race indicated) petitioned the Spotsylvania County court for her freedom from Larkin Chew on 2 May 1738. On 1 August 1738 the court ruled that she was free and ordered Chew to pay her five shillings for one month's pay. On 7 October 1740 the court called her "Indian Sue" when she was added to the list of Larken Chew's tithables. She was a "free Indian" living in Spotsylvania County on 6 May 1760 when the court ordered her "free Mulatto" children Ambrose and Mary bound out as apprentices to Larken Chew, Gent. [Orders 1738-40, 6, 15, 17; 1740-2, 104; 1755-65, 158; 17]. She was the mother of

4        i. Ambrose, born say 1750.

5        ii. Mary2, born say 1752.

iii. ?Susannah2, born say 1754, called "Susannah Month alias Mann" on 5 September 1789 when she testified in Spotsylvania County court that a slave belonging to Spilsbe Coleman named Gimboes Sam broke into the house of James and William Month and raped her on the night of 27 August 1789. The court found the slave innocent after hearing Susannah's testimony and the testimony of John Lahone [Minutes 1787-92, 312].

iv. ?James, born say 1760, living in Spotsylvania County in August 1789, a "Mulo" taxable in Halifax County, Virginia, from 1794 to 1812 (sometimes called James Munt) [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1799, frame 542; 1800-12, frames 199, 328, 529, 810, 1036].

 

4.    Ambrose Month, born say 1750, indentured his children Charity Grymes Penn, David Penn, and Averilla Penn (Pinn) to Micajah Poole in Spotsylvania County on 13 February 1779 [DB J:431]. They were called David Pinn Month, Charity Grimes Pinn Month and Averilla Pinn Month on 21 December 1780 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Berkeley Parish to bind them out [Orders 1774-82, 151]. He was paid 3 shillings by the Spotsylvania County estate of Richard Coleman in December 1788 [WB 1772-98, 1485]. The mother of his children was apparently Patsey Maclin whose son David Pinn received land by the 30 September 1796 Halifax County, Virginia will of David Pinn, Sr. [WB 3:359]. Ambrose received a pension for his services in the Revolution based on his application from Knox County, Tennessee, in 1834. He stated that he was born in Spotsylvania County and was a free man who was part Shawnee and part Negro [National Archives pension file cited by NSDAR, African American and American Indian Patriots of the Revolutionary War, 138]. He was the father of

i. Charity Grimes Pinn, born say 1772.

ii. David Pinn, born say 1774.

iii. Averilla1 Pinn, born about 1776, an eleven-year-old "bastard" child bound to Micajah Poole in Spotsylvania County on 7 August 1787 [DB L:364].

 

5.    Mary2 Month, born say 1752, may have been the mother of two "Mulatto" children bound out by the Spotsylvania County court on 21 May 1778. They were

i. Jane, born say 1775, a "Mulatto" child ordered bound out by the churchwardens of St. George Parish, Spotsylvania County, on 21 May 1778.

ii. William, born say 1775, a "Mulatto" child bound out by the churchwardens of St. George Parish, Spotsylvania County, on 21 May 1778 [Orders 1774-82, 90].

 

Another member of the family was

6        i. Nancy, born say 1795.

 

6.    Nancy Month, born say 1795, was living in Louisa County on 11 December 1849 when her daughter Avey registered as a "free Negro." Her daughter was

i. Avey/ Averilla2, born about 1817, registered on 11 December 1849: daughter of Nancy Month both born free, woman of dark complexion, about 5'4-3/4" high, between 31-32 years old, thick lips [Abercrombie, Free Blacks of Louisa County, 77].

 

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