SLAXTON/ THAXTON FAMILY

1.    Judith Slaxton, born say 1730, was called Judy (no last name) a "Molatto" servant of George Walker when the Prince Edward County court bound her daughter Merah to her master in September 1755 and in April 1761 when the court bound her daughter Bennaba to Walker. She was called Judith Slaxton in September 1761 when she sued Walker for her freedom. In May 1767 her children Cyrus, Nancy, and Polly Slaxton complained to the court that Walker was mistreating them, but the case was dismissed after a hearing [Orders 1754-8, 59; 1759-65, fol. 83, 106; 1767-70, 5, 17]. By March 1776 Judith had moved to Charlotte County, where the court ordered Christopher Isbell to post bond for her good behavior. She was called Judith Slaxtone on 1 May 1780 when she complained to the Charlotte County court that Thomas Epperson had taken from her a "mulatto" child named Lucy, the daughter of Nancy Slaxon [Orders 1774-80, 78, 215]. Her children were

i. Merah, born say 1748, a "Molatto Girl" bound to George Walker in September 1755, perhaps identical to Polly Slaxton who successfully sued George Walker in Prince Edward County for discharge from her apprenticeship on 18 September 1769 [Orders 1767-70, 230, 233].

2     ii. Nancy, born say 1753.

iii. Bennaba, born say 1755, daughter of "Judith a Molatto" bound until the age of thirty-one to George Walker in Prince Edward County in April 1761 [Orders 1759-65, fol. 83].

iv. Cyrus1, born say 1757, a "Mulattoe" taxable in Botetourt County in 1799 [PPTL 1783-1810, frame 348].

 

2.    Nancy Slaxton, born say 1753, was the mother of Cyrus and Peter Slaxton who were ordered bound to James Mullings in Charlotte County court on 4 July 1778 [Orders 1774-80, 142]. She was probably identical to Nancy Slack, a mulattoe" whose three children were ordered bound to Miller Woodson in Cumberland County on 23 November 1778 [Orders 1774-8, 526]. In June 1778 the Prince Edward County court ordered Miller Woodson to release her from her apprenticeship. The court called her Ann Slaxton on 15 February 1779 when it reversed its decision after Woodson produced her indentures by which he held her until the age of thirty-one [Orders 1771-81, part 2, 2, 13, 16]. She was called Nancy Thaxton when she married Thomas Chavus, 27 January 1786 Charlotte County bond, William Dabbs surety, 3 February marriage [Ministers Returns, 90]. Her children born before her marriage were

i. Cyrus2, born about 1775, ordered bound to James Mullings in Charlotte County on 4 July 1778 and "a mulatto boy" bound to Hugh Frazier on 1 August 1791 [Orders 1789-92, 164]. He was an eighteen-year-old "mulatto" called Saras Thaxton who ran away from Hugh Frazer of Charlotte County according to the 2 January 1793 issue of the Virginia Gazette and General Advertiser [Headley, 18th Century Newspapers, 334].

ii. Peter, born say 1777, ordered bound to James Mullings in Charlotte County on 4 July 1778.

iii. Lucy, born say 1778, a "mulatto" daughter of Nancy Slaxon, taken by Thomas Epperson according to the complaint of her grandmother in Charlotte County on 1 May 1780 [Orders 1774-80, 215].

 

SMITH FAMILY

Northumberland County, Virginia

1.    Hester Smyth, born say 1659, the servant of William Jones, confessed to the Northumberland County court on 19 February 1678/9 that she had a child by a "Negro belonging to Mr. Thomas Haines" [Orders 1678-1698, 21].

 

Middlesex County, Virginia

1.    Joan Smith, born say 1685, confessed in Middlesex County court on 5 December 1704 that she had a "mulatto" bastard child. The court ordered that she receive twenty lashes [Orders 1694-1705, 597].

 

Virginia and North Carolina

1.    John Smith, born say 1690, was a "free negro" taxed on 300 acres in Currituck County in 1715 [Jones, Records of Currituck and Dare Counties]. He may have been the father of

2     i. Ann, born say 1720.

ii. Elijah1, born about 1726, enlisted as a substitute in the Revolution for 18 months from Norfolk County on 15 August 1780 and was sized on 5 April 1781: age 55, 5'4-1/4" high, black complexion, Indian features, a farmer, born in Norfolk County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.29)]. He was a "Free Black" head of a household of 8 "other free" Princess Anne County in 1810 [VA:475].

3     iii. Permenos/ Meanes, born say 1730.

 

2.    Ann1 Smith, born say 1720, was presented by the Norfolk County, Virginia court on 16 November 1744 for not giving in her list of tithables [Orders 1742-46, 108]. She was a "Free Negro" living in Norfolk County on 18 October 1759 when the churchwardens of Elizabeth River Parish were ordered to bind out her daughter Nanny Smith [Orders 1759-63, 2]. She was a tithable in the 1767 Norfolk County household of "free negroes" Sarah and Mary Cuffee in the district from Great Bridge to Edmond's Bridge and New Mill Creek and tithable in her own household in 1768 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1766-80, 23, 55]. She was the mother of

i. ?Elizabeth, born say 1737, a taxable in Benjamin Miller's household in the upper district of Norfolk County in 1753 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1751-65, 46].

4    ii. John, born say 1745.

iii. Ann2, born say 1756, daughter of "free Negro" Nanny Smith, bound to Josiah Randolph in Norfolk County on 18 October 1759 [Orders 1759-63, 2], perhaps the Ann Smith who was taxable in St. Bride's Parish, Norfolk County, from 1792 to 1799: taxable on slave and 2 horses in 1792, a free male tithable in 1795 and 1799 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1791-1812, frames 57, 127, 162, 197, 212, 327].

5     iv. Sarah, born free about 1758.

v. ?John, a "Mo" taxable in Norfolk County in 1782 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1791, frame 392].

vi. Elijah2, born say 1762, bound apprentice to Benjamin Britt by the churchwardens of St. Brides Parish in Norfolk County on 19 February 1767 [Orders 1766-68, 73]. He was taxable in St. Bride's Parish, Norfolk County, from 1788 to 1794 and was included in the "List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes" from 1801 to 1814 [PPTL, 1782-1791, frame 614; 1791-1812, frames 11, 127, 400, 456, 548; 1813-24, frame 67]. He was head of a Norfolk County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:793]. He registered in Norfolk County on 19 June 1815: 5 feet 6 1/4 inches of a light complexion...Born free (no age noted) [Register of Free Negroes, 1809-52, no.99].

vii. Dinah, born say 1764, "Daughter of Ann Smith a free Negro" bound apprentice on 19 February 1767 [Orders 1766-68, 72].

6    viii. ?Roda/ Rosa., born say 1765.

 

3.    Permenos /Meanes Smith, born say 1730, and his wife Sarah were "Molatto" Currituck County taxables in 1755 [SS 837]. He was a witness to the 17 August 1749 Currituck County will of David Linsey [Grimes, North Carolina Wills, 217]. He sold 23-1/2 acres in Currituck County adjoining Hardy Woodhouse on 21 January 1784 [DB 4:214]. Perhaps his wife was the Sarah Smith who was an "other free" woman living alone in Currituck County in 1800 [NC:138]. Their children may have been

7     i. James, born about 1760.

ii. William, head of a Hertford County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:101].

 

4.    John Smith, born say 1745, was a "Mo" taxable on a horse and 5 cattle in Norfolk County in 1782 [PPTL, 1782-1791, frame 392]. His widow may have been Henny Smith, Sr., who registered in registered in Norfolk County on 20 April 1799: resided in the Parish of Saint Brides for upwards of twenty years & has kept a house as such being married to a man of her own Couler & having had many children in the course of that time. They were lawfully married by Parson Porter. And she registered again on 13 June 1801: made oath that Henny Smith, Jnr, a Mulatto woman 21 years of age about 5 feet 4 inches high, Gracy Smith a Mulatto girl 16 years of age, about 4 feet 11 inches high, James Smith a young Mulatto man 19 years of age, William Smith a Mulatto man 27 years of age, Jane Weaver a Mulatto woman 33 years of age and Sally Cuffee were all born free in the County of Norfolk and parish of Saint Brides, that the said Henny Smith, Senr. was their mother [Smith Sr, Henny: Free Negro Certificate, 1801, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. Henny was listed with Grace Smith, a washerwoman in Portsmouth in 1801 [PPTL, 1791-1812, frame 384]. She was the mother of

i. Jane Weaver, born about 1768, a "Mulatto woman 33 years of age" in June 1801.

ii. William, born about 1774, a "Mulatto man 27 years of age" in June 1801.

iii. Sally Cuffee.

iv. Henny, born about 1780, "a mulatto woman, 21 years of age, 5 feet 4 inches high in June 1801.

v. James, born about 1782, a "Mulatto man 19 years of age" in June 1801.

vi. Gracy, born about 1785, a "Mulatto girl 16 years of age" in June 1801.

 

5.    Sarah Smith, born free about 1758, a child of Ann Smith, was bound apprentice to Benjamin Britt by the churchwardens of St. Bridges Parish in Norfolk County on 19 February 1767 [Orders 1766-68, 73]. She registered as a "free Negro" in Norfolk County on 17 July 1810: 5 feet 2 Inches, fifty two years [Register of Free Negros & Mulattos, no.21]. She was the mother of several children who also registered. They were

i. William, born about 1787, registered on 16 July 1810: son of Sally, 5 feet 6 1/2 Inc., Twenty three years of age, of a dark Complexion with long hair [Register, no.9].

ii. Sally, born about 1794, registered on 16 July 1810: daughter of Sally Smith, 5 feet 1-1/4 Inc., Sixteen years of age, of a light Complexion [Register, no.10].

iii. Edward, born about 1796, registered on 16 July 1810: son of Sally, 5 feet 2 1/2 In, fourteen years of age, light complexion [Register, no.11].

iv. Caleb, born about 1808, registered on 16 July 1810: son of Sally Smith, Two years of age, of a dark Complexion [Register, no.12].

 

6.    Roda/ Rosa Smith, born about 1765, registered in Norfolk County as Roda Smith on 14 March 1798 as a woman of colour who was born free, and she registered in Princess Anne County on 19 March 1798: Rosa Smith, a negro woman aged thirty three years, five feet five inches high of a yellow complexion, and born free. She registered her children in Princess Anne County in 1801: Rhoda, mother of Tabitha Smith was ____een years old last July, Mary Smith 15 years old October last once lived in Norfolk County but have now moved in our county near Blackwater Bridge. 9 October 1801. George D. Corprew [Smith, Roda (F): Free Negro Certificate, Smith, Rosa (F, 33): Free Negro Certificate, 1798, Smith, Tabitha (F): Free Negro Certificate, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. She was the mother of

i. Tabitha, born say 1783.

ii. Mary, born October 1785.

 

7.    James Smith, born about 1760, was head of a Hertford County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:25], 4 in Captain Moore's District in 1800, and 11 "free colored" in 1820. He may have been the James Smith who enlisted in the 10th North Carolina Regiment for three years on 17 June 1777 and reenlisted for twelve more months on 1 January 1782 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1159, 1165]. He testified for Malachi Nickens and John Weaver in Hertford County court saying he was a soldier with them. He was one of the "Sundry persons of Colour of Hertford County" who petitioned the General Assembly in 1822 to repeal the act which declared slaves to be competent witnesses against free African Americans [NCGSJ XI:252]. He died in July 1830 according to a deposition made in Hertford County court that same month by his executor, Pleasant Jordan. He named James Smith's heirs: Andrew, Obed, and Jacob Smith and Mary Wiat [NCGSJ XVII:31]. His children were probably

i. Andrew, head of a Hertford County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830.

ii. Obed.

iii. Jacob.

iv. Mary Wyatt. She may have been the wife of Nathan Wyatt, born 1794-1806, head of a Hertford County household of 4 "free colored" in 1830. He was probably the son of Orrin Wiott, head of a Hertford County household of 16 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:182] and 9 in 1830. Orrin Wiott was one of the "Sundry persons of Colour of Hertford County" who petitioned the General Assembly in November- December 1822 to repeal the act which declared slaves to be competent witnesses against free African Americans [NCGSJ XI:252]. The family probably originated in Prince William County, Virginia, where Ann Wyatt, a "mulatto," was bound apprentice on 9 February 1779 [Historic Humphries, Dettingen Parish Vestry, 82].

 

Other members of the Smith family living in or near Norfolk County were

i. Philip, head of a Norfolk County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:796].

ii. George, born say 1760, a "free Black" head of a Princess Anne County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:475]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Princess Anne County on 21 September 1801: I have been well acquainted with George Smith and Elender his wife upwards of thirty years and they have passed as free people. And Ellender received a certificate: Jeane White was her mother & the said Jeane was a mallato that lived to an old age under the character of being free born. Said Ellender has been looked upon as a free person for this forty oude years. Their children were James, Maximillian, Keziah & William Smith [Smith, George (M): Free Negro Affidavit, 1801, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

iii. Neal, head of a Norfolk County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:795].

iv. Betsy, head of a Norfolk County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:804].

 

Prince Edward County

1.    Sarah Smith, born say 1730, was living in Prince Edward County in October 1757 when the court ordered Abner Nash and Philemon Holcomb to bring her children's indentures to court. In February 1758 the court cancelled the indentures of her children Jane, John, and James Smith to Nash and bound them instead to William Boyd and Henry Caldwell who posted bond of 200 pounds currency not to remove the children out of the colony. In the same court Philemon Holcolm produced the indentures binding her unnamed children to him, and the court ordered that the words "taught to write" be inserted [Orders 1754-8, 132, 142]. She was the mother of

i. Jane, bound apprentice to William Boyd in February 1758.

ii. John, bound apprentice to William Boyd in February 1758, perhaps the John Smith who was head of a Charlotte County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:64].

iii. Charles, born say 1758, of Henrico County, deserted from Captain Pope's command in Williamsburg about ten days previous, according to an ad offering $20 reward on 1 August 1777, and describing him as: a stout well formed Mulatto, about 5 feet 10 inches high [Virginia Gazette (Dixon & Hunter), p. 8, col. 1].

iii. James, born say 1753, son of Sarah bound to Henry Caldwell in February 1758, a "Mulato" ordered bound to Thomas Wild by the churchwardens of St. Patrick's Parish in Prince Edward County in June 1767 [Orders 1754-8, 142; 1767-70, 28]. He may have been the James Smith, a "mulatto" from Halifax County, Virginia, who was one of the deserters from Captain Shem's 2d Georgia Batallion who were offered a free pardon if they returned to duty, according to the 28 November 1777 issue of the Virginia Gazette [(Purdie), p.3, col 1]. In 1801 he was in Thomas Green's list of Free People of Colour for the upper district of Prince Edward County at Holcombe's Old Ordinary: a carpenter with (wife) Patty Smith, child Daniel Smith (a farmer), and James's children Josiah, Billy and Rhoda Smith. Samuel, Patsy and Polly Bartlett were living with them. In 1803 he was living there with his wife Patty and his sons Josiah and William and Patsey Artis, Macy Bird, Polly Smith, Caty Smith, Polly Smith (a little girl), George Smith (a little boy, and Daniel Smith (a boatman). He was not listed again in Prince Edward County from 1803 to 1818, so he may have been the James Smith who was a boatman at S. White's with wife Betsy & her son Jno Dandridge, Isaac Smith (a boatman), and Joe Bartlet & wife Nancy in 1819 [List of Free People of Colour, 1801; List of free Negroes, 1803 July 16th, 1803; List of Free People of Colour 1819, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. There was an "other free" Dandridge family in Henrico County in 1810.

iv. ?Shadrick, born about 1776, head of a Prince Edward County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:585]. He registered in Prince Edward County in May 1814: free man, dark yellow, 38 years, 5'6-1/4" [Orders 1814-18, 80].

v. ?Isham, born say 1780, a "Mulatoe" boy, son of ___ Smith, bound out by the Prince Edward County court on 19 November 1787 [Orders 1785-8, 450]. In 1801 and 1802 he was in Thomas Green's list of Free People of Colour for the upper district of Prince Edward County at Holcombe' Old Ordinary: a blacksmith living near Woodson Allen's. He was a blacksmith living on his own land in 1803 [List of Free People of Colour, 1801; List of free Negroes, 1803 July 16th, 1803, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. He was head of a Charlotte County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:68].

 

Perhaps one of their descendants was

i. Lucy, born about 1776, registered in Charlotte County on 2 August 1824: a free woman of bright complexion, 5 feet 6 inches high, aged about 48 years, was born free in the county of Charlotte [Smith, Lucy (F, 68): Free Negro Certificate, 1824, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

 

Henrico County, Virginia

Members of the Smith family in Henrico County were

i. Jammy1, born say 1740, a "free Mulatto" who was charged with stealing a pair of "Calimanco" shoes at a court of Oyer and Terminer in Henrico County on 3 October 1761. He agreed to receive 30 lashes to avoid being charged at the General Court [Orders 1755-62, 527].

1     ii. Jenny, born say 1742.

2     iii. Lucy, born say 1748.

iv. John, and his wife Milly registered their son William Smith in Henrico County on 5 November 1801: a mulatto Lad about nineteen years of age and about five feet five inches high is the son of John Smith & Milley Smith of Henrico County who are free Mulattos [Smith, William (M, 19): Free Negro Certificate, 1801, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

vi. Nancy, born about 1763, registered in Richmond City on 11 October 1800: a dark mulatto woman about 36 or 7 years of age, about 5-4 inches high, was born free [Smith, Nancy (F, 36), 1800, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

 

1.    Jenny Smith, born say 1742, was a "Mulatto" living in Henrico County on 5 August 1752 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Henrico Parish to bind her out. And on 1 December 1766 the court ordered her "Mulatto" child Jammy bound out [Minutes 1752-5, 222; Orders 1763-67, 645]. She and her children received certificates of freedom in Henrico County on 1 August 1796: Noble Jordan of Henrico County aged fifty years last month made oath that he has known Jane Smith a free born Black woman who descended from the Indian Tribes above forty years. The said Jane Smith served her time with his father and the said Jane had eight children; viz. Sucky, Abe, Nanny, Patty, London, James, Lucy, & Betty Smith. That Sukey, Abe, Nanny & Patty served him the time agreeable to law, that London & James were bound out to William Clapton and he believes faithfully served him agreeable to law. That Lucy went to service with Sally Childress & Betty went to service with Fanny Bailie [Smith, Jane (F): Free Negro Affidavit, 1796, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. Her children were

i. Susannah, born say 1759, a "Mulatto" (no parent named) ordered bound out by the churchwardens of Henrico Parish in December 1760 [Orders 1755-62, 481].

ii. Abe.

iii. Patty, head of a Henrico County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:998].

iv. London, "Mulatto" child of Jenny Smith bound out in Henrico County on 3 April 1769 [Orders 1767-9, 429].

v. Jammy2, born say 1764, "Mulatto" child of Jenny Smith ordered bound out on 1 December 1766 [Orders 1763-67, 645].

vi. Lucy.

vii. Betsy, "Mulatto" child of Jenny Smith bound out in Henrico County on 3 April 1769 [Orders 1767-9, 429]. She was head of a Chesterfield County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:1062].

viii. Nanny, born about 1776, obtained a affidavit of her freedom in Henrico County on 7 August 1809: a free woman Calling Herself Nancy Smith, five feet one and a Half Inches High, thirty three years old, Coulerd a Brown Molatoe, this woman served her time with mee. Noble Jordan, and registered in Henrico County perhaps identical to Nancy Smith, mother of Jenny Smith who registered in Chesterfield County on 20 August 1810: a Black woman about twenty years of age, was Born of a Free woman who calls herself Nancy Smith...five feet two and a quarter inch high [Smith, Nancy (F, 33): Free Negro Affidavit, 1809; Smith, Jenny (F, 20), Free Negro Certification, 1810 African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

 

2.    Lucy Smith, born say 1748, was a "Mulatto" (no parent named) living in Henrico County on 5 August 1754 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Henrico Parish to bind her out [Orders 1752-55, 222]. On 2 February 1767 the court ordered the churchwardens of Henrico Parish to bind out her "Mulatto" child Bob [Orders 1763-67, 646]. She was a "FN" taxable in the upper district of Henrico County from 1801 to 1813: taxable on a slave over the age of 16 in 1801 and 1802, taxable on a horse in 1803, in a list of "Blacks free above age sixteen both males & females" in 1813, taxable on 4 acres in 1802 and 7-1/2 acres on Stony River in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1814 frame 453, 641, 757; Land Tax List 1799-1816 (contains PPTL 1803-6)]. Her children were

3     i. Robert/Bob, born say 1766.

ii. Peter, a "free Negroe" taxable on a horse in Henrico County in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 31:251].

 

3.    Robert Smith, born say 1766, was ordered bound out by the Henrico County court on 2 February 1767. He was head of a Chesterfield County household of 11 "other free" in 1810 [VA:1062]. He may have been the father of

i. Nancy, born about 1777, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 14 February 1814: thirty seven years old, brown complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 205].

ii. Polly, born about 1787, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 14 February 1814: twenty seven years old, brown complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 204].

iii. Fanny, born about 1791, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 14 February 1814: twenty three years old, brown complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 206].

 

The Smith family of Charles City County were related to the Evans family. On 9 July 1791 Robert Wills, 81 years old, of Charles City County testified that the "free mulatto or black" Smith family of Charles City County were descendants of a "dark mulatto" woman named Jane Gibson through her daughter Jane Evans [Lynchburg City Chancery case file 1826-033, LVA]. Members of the Smith family in Charles City County were

i. William, fined by the court on 6 September 1758 for failing to list his wife as a tithable.

ii. Arthur, a "mulatto" poor orphan ordered bound out by the churchwardens to Theodorick Carter in August 1758.

iii. Thomas, a "mulatto" ordered bound out to Theodorick Carter on 2 July 1760 [Orders 1758-62, 33, 57, 197].

iv. William, born about 1769, registered in Petersburg on 18 August 1794: a light Mulatto man, five feet seven inches high, twenty five years old, born free & raised in Charles City County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 38].

 

Members of the Smith family in Prince George and Dinwiddie counties were

i. James, born about 1746, enlisted as a substitute in the Revolution from Bedford County in February 1778 and was sized on 5 April 1781: age 35, 5'9" high, black complexion, right eye out, blacksmith, born in Prince George County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.29)].

ii. Joseph, born about 1757, enlisted in the Revolution from Dinwiddie County on 6 June 1782 and was sized on 26 June: age 25, 5'7-3/4" high, yellow complexion, born in Prince George County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.113)].

iii. Lewis, born about 1760, enlisted as a substitute from Dinwiddie County for 18 months on 6 June 1782 and was sized on 26 June: age 22, 5'6-3/4" high, black complexion, a planter, born in Prince George County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.113)]. He was an eighty-year-old "free man of Colour" who was living in Dinwiddie County on 20 August 1832 and 20 May 1833 when he made a declaration in court to obtain a pension for service in the Revolution. He stated that he was born in Prince George County and removed to Dinwiddie County just before the war and resided there ever since. He enlisted in 1779 as a bowman for Captain Covington. He died on 20 August 1833 [NARA, S.6112, M804, roll 2226, frame 169; https://www.fold3.com/image/246/16878961]. He was a "free Black" taxable in Petersburg in 1813 [PPTL 1800-1833, frame 413].

iv. John, born about 1768, registered in Petersburg on 18 August 1794: a dark brown Mulatto man, six feet one inches high, about twenty six years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 42].

v. Polly, born about 1775, registered in Petersburg on 8 September 1795: a likely brown Mulatto woman, five feet four inches high, twenty years old born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 105].

vi. Thomas, born about 1783, registered in Petersburg on 12 December 1800: a dark brown Mulatto man, five feet one and a half inches high, seventeen years old, stout & thick made, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 210].

 

Members of the Smith family in Cumberland County, Virginia, were

i. Robert, born say 1752, a "Mulatto" sued in Cumberland County court by Robert Pleasants, executor of John Pleasants, deceased, on 24 March 1773 [Orders 1772-4, 145-6].

1    ii. Betty, born say 1750.

 

1.    Betty Smith, born say 1750, was living in Cumberland County on 22 April 1771 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Southam Parish to bind her "mulattoe" daughter Catey to William Fretwell. The same order was repeated to the churchwardens of Littleton Parish on 27 July 1772 [Orders 1770-2, 224, 506]. She was the mother of

i. Catey, born say 1770.

 

Greensville County

1.    Mary Smith, born about 1761, registered as a "free Negro" in Greensville County on 2 April 1821: free born of a yellow Complexion, aged Sixty, 5 feet 1 inches & 1/8 high in shoes ... a weaver [Register, no.83]. Her children were

i. Lucy, born about 1792, registered in Greensville County on 3 February 1817: (Daughter of Mary Smith) free born, light Yellow complexion, about twenty five years old, five feet high (in shoes) ... a weaver [Register, no.63].

ii. ?John, born about 1798, registered on 25 January 1820: a free born black Complexion twenty one years old about five feet Seven Inches high [Register, no.77].

iii. ?Berry, born about 1799, registered in Greensville County on 7 September 1824: free Born of a Yellow Complexion supposed to be twenty five years old, 5' 10-3/4 inches high ... a planter [Register, no.114].

iv. Polly, born in February 1804, registered on 25 November 1824: (commonly Called Polly Main) daughter of Mary Smith, free born of a yellow Complexion, 5 feet 1/2 inch high in Shoes, aged 20 years last February ... a weaver [Register, no.121]. She may have been related to John Main, head of a Southampton County household of 4 "other free" in 1810.

 

Granville County, North Carolina

1.    Sarah Smith, born say 1750, was a "Molatto" taxable in the Granville County list of Len Henry Bullock in 1768 [CR 44.701]. She was probably related to Betty Smith who was one of George Anderson's children mentioned in his May 1771 Granville County will [Original in Granville County, not recorded]. Perhaps she was related to Sallie Smith, wife of John Smith, who made an undated request to the Granville County court to bind out as apprentices her children, "all colored," to her father Aaron Alston. They were Corrina, Molly, and Rosa Frances Smith [CR 44.101.2].

 

SMITHERS/ SMOTHERS FAMILY

The Smothers family of Virginia may have been related to Sarah Smither, a "free Mullatto Woman" who had a child called "Mullatto Nanny" by a white man. In August 1743 Nanny brought a successful suit for her freedom against Mrs. Holland, widow of Col. William Holland, in Anne Arundel County, Maryland court [Judgment Record 1743-4, 170]. Members of the family in Virginia were

i. Godfrey Smithers, born about 1713, a twenty-one-year-old "Mulatto" who ran away from Abraham Nicholas of James City County according to the 26 September 1734 issue of the AWM [Headley, 18th Century Virginia Newspapers, 317].

1     ii. Nell, born say 1740.

 

1.    Nell Smothers, born say 1740, was the mother of Thomas Smothers who was called a "Molatto" on 24 February 1780 when the Henry County court ordered him bound to John Stokes and called orphan of Nell Smurthers alias Evans on 25 August 1785 when the court ordered him bound to John Stokes [Orders 1778-82, 72; 1785-8, 46]. She was the mother of

i. ?William1, born about 1763, enlisted in the Revolution while residing in Powhatan County for the length of the war and was sized on 8 March 1782: age 19, 5'3-1/2" high, black hair, yellow eyes, black complexion, born in Albemarle County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.73)]. He sued Jesse Stovall in Powhatan County court for trespass, assault and battery on 22 November 1794 and the jury awarded him 12 pounds currency on 20 March 1795 [Orders 1794-8, 32, 74]. He was taxable in Powhatan County from 1793 to 1804, called a "Mo" in 1793 and 1803 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frames 98, 123, 111, 138, 170, 193, 230, 266, 282]. He married Nancy Brown, 17 September 1795 Powhatan County bond. He and his wife Nancy were living on Cohen & Isaac's land in Powhatan County in 1801 [List Mulattoes and Free Negroes in Powhatan County in the year 1801, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. He appeared in Cumberland County, Virginia court at the age of sixty five on 26 July 1824 to apply for a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted in 1781 in the company commanded by Captain Stephen Southall in the Virginia Regiment commanded by Colonel Charles Harrison and served until the close of the war. He had a wife Nancy who was about 50 years old and four acres of land [NARA, S.38375, M804, roll 2238, frame 588; https://www.fold3.com/image/246/17371111].

ii. ?Elizabeth, born before 1776, head of a Rockingham County, North Carolina household of a white woman and a white male under 16 years of age in 1790 [NC:169], 5 whites in 1810 [NC:177] and 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:584].

iii. ?Charles, born 1775-1796, head of a Rockingham County, North Carolina household of 6 "free colored in 1820 [NC:602] and 9 "free colored" in Guilford County in 1830.

iv. ?William2, born 1775-1796, head of a Guilford County household of 1 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:115]. He married Mason Melton, 6 December 1823 Guilford County bond and Mary Ann Newby, both "colored," 21 November 1825 Guilford County bond, no bondsman listed. William (born about 1787) with Mason Smuthers (born about 1804) was counted as a "Mulatto" laborer in Hertford County in 1850 [NC:648].

v. John, married Fanny Kersey, 25 September 1825 Guilford County bond, Aaron Nuby bondsman.

vi. Thomas, born say 1775, taxable in Patrick County from 1801 to 1805 [PPTL 1791-1823, frames 326, 380, 439], head of a Stokes County, North Carolina household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:371]. He may have been the Thomas Smothers who married Rebecca John, 12 September 1799 Washington County, Virginia bond.

vii. ?Amealey, counted in the list of "Free negros & Malatters" in Patrick County in 1813 [PPTL 1791-1823, frame 598].

 

SNEED FAMILY

1.    Jane Sneed, born say 1753, was the mother of a "Mulatta" girl who the Lunenburg County court ordered bound by the churchwardens of Cornwall Parish to Sherwood and Anne Walton on 14 July 1763 [Orders 1762-3, 87]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Tinsey, born about 1777, registered in Richmond City on 1 July 1797: a mulatto girl about twenty years of age about five feet five six or seven inches high, born free [Seed, Tinsey (F, 20): Free Negro Certificate, 1797, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

ii. the wife of John Vier. On 5 April 1838 he sold for $5 a mare, a yoke of oxen, three cows, two calves, seventeen hogs and household furniture to William Going in Amherst County in consideration for his friendship with Martha Jane Snead, his wife's daughter [DB W:274].

2     iii. Susan, born say 1800.

 

2.    Susan Sneed, born say 1800, was the mother of

i. Betsy, born about 1821, registered in Amherst County on 17 March 1851: a free woman daughter of Susan Sneed, 5 feet 3-1/2 Inches high, bright mulatto ... born in Nelson County of parents free prior to the 1st of May 1806.

ii. Adaline Frances, born about 1824, registered in Amherst County on 11 November 1842: daughter of Susan Snead, eighteen years of age, a bright mulatto 5 ft & 3 inches high .. born free [McLeRoy, Strangers in Their Midst, 63, 80].

 

SNELLING FAMILY

1.    Aquilla Snelling, "son of Aquilla & Mary Snelling," was born 28 June and baptized 14 July 1723 in Christ Church Parish, Middlesex County, Virginia [NSCDA, Parish Register of Christ Church, 113]. He was taxable in Stephen Jett's Granville County tax list for 1755: one "Black" tithe in the household of William Chavis [CR 44.701.23]. By 1761 he was head of a household in Fishing Creek District, taxable on 3 black tithes for himself, his wife Lettice, and hired woman Amey. His wife was most likely Lettice Chavis, born about 1742, taxable in the 1754 Granville County household of her father William Chavis in Edward Moore's list. By 1767 he owned one slave in the list of Stephen Jett and purchased a woman slave and her two children at the sale of the estate of William Chavis on 7 May 1778 [WB 1:178]. On 5 May 1767 he made a deed of gift to his brother Alexander of 100 acres on Long Creek adjoining John Smith whereon Alexander then lived [DB:337]. He entered 640 acres on Little Creek bordering his own land and Chavis' in an undated 1778-85 land entry [Pruitt, Land Entries: Granville County, 10]. The inventory of his Granville County estate, recorded May 1779, including a slave, 4 horses, and 22 cattle, totalled 3,789 pounds [WB 1:232, 235].

His wife Lettice was taxable in 1782 in Fishing Creek District of Granville County on 100 acres, 4 slaves, and 5 cattle. In the 1786 state census she was head of a Granville County household of 4 free females, 1 free male, and 4 slaves. She and her son Hugh sold three tracts of land in Granville County where they were then living on 30 August 1788 [DB O:599]. In 1801 she was given a lifetime right to remain on 180 acres of land on the east side of Mine Creek adjacent to her son-in-law Jordan Chavis in Wake County by a deed from Hugh Snelling to Curtis Snelling [DB Q:520]. Her 2 April 1814 Wake County will, proved August 1814, named their children:

i. Hugh, born perhaps 1762, made provision for Lettice in his 1801 Wake County deed. He married Ann Snelling, 30 August 1779 Granville County bond with Bartlet Tyler bondsman. In 1780 his Epping Forest, Granville County property was assessed at 4,108 pounds. He purchased land in Granville County from Philip Chavis on 20 November 1778 [DB O:3], purchased 800 acres from Benjamin Sewell for 1,000 pounds in ten yearly payments on 20 February 1781 [WB 1:324], and was taxable in 1785 on 940 acres. In 1800 he was head of a Granville County household of 11 "other free," one white woman over forty-five years old, and 11 slaves, and 7 "other free," one white woman, and 23 slaves in 1810 [NC:881]. He was still in Granville County in 1818, taxable on 402 acres and 9 slaves.

ii. Tabathy, married Wright Bass, 12 November 1781 Granville County bond, Drury Pettiford bondsman.

iii. Curtis, born say 1770, head of a Wake County household of 2 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1800 [NC:795]. On 8 January 1801 he bought 180 acres from his brother Hugh on the east side of Mine Creek [DB Q:520]. He married Levina (Silvanius) Evans, 7 February 1811 Wake County bond. His children mentioned in his mother's will were Lemuel and Calvin Snelling. His 28 May 1829 Wake County will, proved November 1829, named his children: Lemuel, Calvin, William, John, Emsley, and Sidney Hugh [WB W:167; North Carolina, Wills and Probate Records, 1665-1998, Wake, Original Wills, Rochel, Alsey-Stephenson, Cora E. [(http://www.ancestry.com)].

iv. a daughter, married Jordan Chavis.

 

SOLELEATHER FAMILY

1.    Mary Soleleather, born about 1771, registered as a free Negro in Essex County on 8 December 1810: free born by the statement of Thomas Brockenbrough in person that she has always passed as a free born person, colour a shade lighter than black, about 39 years of age, four feet 11 inches [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p. 10, no. 19]. She was head of an Essex County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:208]. Mary, Betsey, Thomas and Billy Soleleather were listed as "free Negroes" above the age of sixteen in South Farnham Parish, Essex County, in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1819, frame 522]. Mary was the mother of

i. Jenny Rollins, born about 1785, registered in Essex County on 8 December 1810: by statement of Thomas Brockenbrough daughter of Mary Soleleather, always passed as a free born person, 25 years of age, bright Mulattoe, 5 feet 2-1/4 Inches [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.14, no.30].

ii. William, born about 1789, registered in Essex County on 14 April 1812: son of Mary Soleleather, free born by statement of Thomas Brockenbrough, dark Mulattoe, 23 years of age, 5 feet 5-3/4 Inches. He may have been the husband of Betty Soleleather who registered in Essex County on 8 December 1810: formerly Betty McGuy by certificate of the clerk of Richmond County to be born free, bright Mulattoe, about 21 years of age, five feet 5-3/4 inches [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.9, no. 18; p.21, no. 52].

iii. Philip, born about 1792, registered in Essex County on 8 December 1810: son of Mary Soleleather, born free by statement of Thomas Brockenbrough, dark Mulattoe, 18 years of age, five feet 7 inches [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.10, no.21]. He was head of an Essex County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:208].

iv. Thomas, born about 1795, registered in Essex County on 8 December 1810: son of Mary Soleleather by statement of Thomas Brockenbrough, 15 years of age, five feet 3/4 inches [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, no.20].

v. Mary, born about 1801, registered in Essex County on 8 December 1810: daughter of Mary Soleleather, dark Mulattoe, 9 years of age, five feet 3-3/4 inches [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.11, no. 22].

vi. Nancy, born about 1803, registered in Essex County on 8 December 1810: daughter of Mary Soleleather, dark Mulattoe, about 7 years of age [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.11, no. 23].

vii. Charlotte, born about 1805, registered in Essex County on 8 December 1810: daughter of Mary Soleleather, dark Mulattoe, about 5 years of age [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.11, no. 24].

 

SORRELL FAMILY

1.    Judith1 Serell, born say 1720, had a "Molato" son, Thomas Serell, born 15 October 1738 in Northumberland County, Virginia [Fleet, Northumberland County Record of Births, 82]. Her children were

i. Thomas1, born 15 October 1738.

2     ii. ?James1, born say 1750.

3     iii. ?Edward1, born about 1753.

iv. ?Jesse, born say 1755, head of a Northumberland County household of 4 "Black" persons in 1782 [VA:37] and "free mulatto" head of a Northumberland County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:996].

4     v. ?Thomas2, born about 1758.

 

2.    James1 Sorrell, born say 1750, was head of a Northumberland County household of 6 "Black" persons in 1782 [VA:37]. On 15 October 1783 Captain Thomas received his pay of 91.10.10 for his service as a gunner's mate in the Virginia Navy [Creel, Selected Virginia Revolutionary War Records, I:108]. He was taxable in Northumberland County from 1787 to 1812: listed with a horse and 6 cattle in 1787; taxable on a slave from 1788 to 1794; taxable on 2 tithes from 1799 to 1801 and in 1805; called a "Blk" taxable from 1809 to 1812, called James, Sr., in 1811 [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 331, 367, 382, 396, 412, 426, 439, 448, 494, 508, 517, 539, 568, 577, 626, 659, 675, 690]. He was a "free mulatto" head of a Northumberland County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:996], 10 "free colored" in 1820 and 8 in 1830. In 1833 his heirs applied for bounty land for his services in the Navy and included his discharge papers from Captain John Thomas who certified that James enlisted in the Navy on 10 January 1777 as a gunner's mate for three years, discharged his duty faithfully, and was discharged on 10 January 1780 [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Sorrell, James, 1783, Digital Collections, LVA]. (His brother?) Edward Sorrell was eighty years old on 17 May 1833 when he testified that James had enlisted in the galley Hero under Captain John Thomas in 1776 and later transferred to the ship Tartar. The claim was rejected [Revolutionary War Rejected Claims, Sorrell, James, 1834, Digital Collections, LVA]. His children were

i. ?Judith, married Thomas Jones, 1 January 1802 Lancaster County bond. She registered in Lancaster County on 18 March 1807: wf/o Tho, age 26, yellow, 5'5-1/2" [Burkett, Lancaster County Register of Free Negroes, 3].

ii. Nancy, born say 1796, "daughter of James Sorrell, Sr.," married John Thomas, 7 April 1812 Northumberland County bond, James Sorrell, Jr., security.

iii. ?Thomas3, married Polly Credit, 22 October 1816 Northumberland County bond, John Credit security. He was called a widower when he married, second, Elizabeth Simple 14 May 1821 Northumberland County bond, Thomas Credit security. John Credit was a "free mulatto" head of a Northumberland County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:976].

 

3.   Edward1 Sorrell, born about 1753, was seventy-nine years old when he applied for a Revolutionary War pension in Northumberland County court on 14 August 1832 [M804-2246, frame 0911]. He married Judith Kesterson, 13 April 1789 Northumberland County bond, Charles Curtis security. He was a "mulatto man" residing in Northumberland County on 9 May 1796 when the court certified that he was born free [Orders 1796-7, 26]. He was taxable in Northumberland County from 1792 to 1812, listed as a "Blk" tithable from 1809 to 1812, listed with 2 tithables in 1811, listed with 2 tithables and a slave in 1812 [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 396, 412, 426, 447, 494, 508, 517, 539, 577, 626, 643, 659, 675, 690]. He was a "free mulatto" head of a Northumberland County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:996]. He married Dorcas Lewin on 15 December 1814 in Lancaster County. He died 7 July 1839, and his will was proved in August 1840. His widow Dorcas, born about 1791, moved to Baltimore about 1846 where she applied for and received a survivor's pension on 21 November 1853 [NARA, W.26493, M804, Roll 2246, frame 0927 (frame 925 of 1319 on ancestry.com or fold3.com)]. His children were

i. James2, born about 1790, married Polly Luen (Lewin), 13 November 1815 Northumberland County bond, Edward Sorrell security. Molly and Charles Lewin were heads of "other free" Lancaster County households in 1810 [VA:352]. He was called James Sorrel of Edward on 2 March 1835 when he mortgaged his household goods for $216 in Northumberland County [DB 29:416]. He married, second, Judith Causey 13 May 1837 Northumberland County bond and was listed with her and their four children in the 1850 Northumberland County census.

ii. Cambia, born say 1808, "daughter of Edward Sorrell," married Holland Evans, 4 February 1824 Northumberland County bond, Moses Blundon security.

iii. ?Edward2, Jr., born about 1794, married Betsy Harriman, 1 January 1817 Northumberland County bond, Edward Sorrell security. He registered in Northumberland County on 8 May 1815: bright mulatto, about 21 years old, 5 feet 10 inches high, Born of free parents in Northd County [Register of Free Negroes, 1803-50, no. 87].

iv. Steptoe, married Miranda Lewis, 10 September 1827 Northumberland County bond, Edward Sorrell security, with the consent of Miranda's mother Rebecca Weaver.

v. Delia, married William Toulson, 10 February 1827 Northumberland County bond, Steptoe Sorrell, "son of Edward Soreall, father of Dealy Soreall" security.

vi. Mary, married John Edwards with the consent of her father Edward Sorell, 20 November 1833 Northumberland County bond, James Sorrell security.

vii. Emily, "daughter of Edward Sorrell," married Samuel Green, 13 February 1837 Northumberland County bond, Edward Sorrell security.

viii. Walter, who testified on behalf of (his mother?) Dorcas Sorrell when she applied for her husband's pension [NARA, M804-2246, frame 0927].

 

4.    Thomas2 Sorrell, born about 1758, was taxable in Northumberland County in 1790 [PPTL 1782-1812, frame 367]. He married Elizabeth Lucas, 3 December 1794 Westmoreland County bond. He was listed among the "Free Molattoes" living on Thomas Rowand's land in Westmoreland County in 1801 with his wife Elizabeth and children William and Libby Sorrell [Virginia Genealogist 31:41]. He was a sixty-two-year-old resident of Westmoreland County living with his forty-five-year-old wife and eleven-year-old daughter in 1820 when he applied for a Revolutionary War pension. He stated that he enlisted under Captain Thomas Downing of Northumberland County in 1780, marched to Hillsborough, North Carolina, to South Carolina, marched to Richmond where he was discharged to complete his 18 months service, and then returned to Northumberland County [NARA, S.6137, M804, Roll 2246, frame 0992 (frame 1003 of 1319]. He was probably the father of

i. Sukey, born say 1770, married Spencer Thomas, "widower," 11 June 1792 Northumberland County bond.

ii. Fannah, born say 1771, married John Evins, 23 November 1792 Northumberland County bond, Thomas Pollard security.

iii. Grace, born say 1774, married Augustin Boyd, 24 July 1795 Northumberland County bond, Thomas Pollard security.

iv. William, a "free Molatto" living with Thomas Sorrell in 1801.

v. Libby, a "free Molatto" living with Thomas Sorrell in 1801.

 

Endnotes:

1.     Moses Blundel was head of a Northumberland County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:973].

2.     The name was abstracted as Sonell [Virginia Genealogist 31:41].

 

SPARROW FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth1 Sparrow, born say 1673, was the indentured servant of Roger Rise on 15 September 1690 when the Norfolk County court ordered her to serve another two years for bearing a bastard child named Mary who was "begotten by a negro." The court ordered Mary bound to Rise until the age of twenty-one [Deeds 5, pt. 2, 190]. She was the mother of

2     i. Mary1, born about 1690.

 

2.    Mary1 Sparrow, born about 1690, was called "a Molato woman" on 18 September 1713 when she claimed in Norfolk County court that she had fully served her time as an indentured servant to Mrs. Ann Furlong. The court agreed that she had served her time but imposed a fine of 500 pounds of tobacco for each of two illegitimate "Molato" children she had during her service. She agreed to serve Samuel Boush two years in exchange for his paying her fine. On 15 February 1713/4 the Norfolk County court ordered her daughter Betty bound to Mrs. Ann Furlong because Mary had left the child with her [Orders 1710-17, 69, 77]. Mary was the mother of

3     i. Elizabeth2, born say 1713.

 

3.    Elizabeth2 Sparrow, born say 1713, was bound to Mrs. Ann Furlong on 18 February 1713/4 by the Norfolk County court. She was probably the mother of

4     i. Margaret1, born say 1728.

5     ii. Mary2, born say 1730.

6     iii. Anne, born say 1738.

7    iv. Elizabeth3, born say 1740.

 

4.    Margaret1 Sparrow, born say 1728, was a "Negro" living in Norfolk County on 20 June 1754 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Elizabeth River Parish to bind her son John Sparrow as an apprentice to John Hamilton [Orders 1753-5, 53]. She was a taxable head of a household in Norfolk County in the district from Tanners Creek to Great Bridge in 1759 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1751-65, 147]. Her children were

i. John1/ Jack, born 20 December 1748, ordered bound apprentice to John Hamilton by the Norfolk County court on 20 June 1754, perhaps identical to Jack Sparrow, a "Mullatto" bound for fifteen years by the Princess Anne County court to Thomas Walke on 16 July 1754 to learn to read and write and the trade of sawyer [Minutes 1753-62, 120].

ii. ?Sarah, mother of Penelope Sparrow (no race indicated) who was bound to Wright Brickell of Elizabeth River Parish by order of the Norfolk County court on 18 June 1773 [Orders 1771-3, 181].

8     iii. John2/ Jack, born September 1760.

iv. Roger, son of Peggy Sparrow, bound to George Veale, Jr., on 18 August 1768. He was called a "free negro" on 21 April 1774 when the court ordered him bound to James Nicholson [Orders 1768-71, 11; 1773-5, 38]. He was head of a Princess Anne County household of 3 "free colored" in 1830.

v. ?Alexander Guthery, a "free Negro" bound by the Norfolk County court to Bartholomew Thompson on 20 June 1771 [Orders 1771-3, 1].

vi. Betty, born say 1770, "daughter of Peggy Sparrow, a free Molatto," ordered bound by the churchwardens of Portsmouth Parish to William North on 18 June 1778 [Orders 1776-9, n.p.].

 

5.    Mary2 Sparrow, born say 1730, was a "Negro Woman" who complained to the Princess Anne County court on 15 June 1762 that she was entitled to her freedom but kept in slavery by Tully Robinson, Gentleman. The court appointed James Holt, Gentleman, as her attorney, and he called John Williams, Alice Ivy, Mary Hurt, and Margaret Langley as her witnesses. On 17 July 1764 the court found Robinson guilty and ordered him to pay her forty shillings and the costs of the suit [Minutes 1753-62, 501, 505, 519; 1762-9, 21, 78, 109]. She was a taxable head of a household in Norfolk County in the district from Tanners Creek to Great Bridge in 1759 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1751-65, 147]. She may have been the mother of

i. Lettice, a "Mullatto" bound until the age of eighteen by the Princess Anne County court to Mrs. Frances Smyth on 16 April 1755 to be taught to read, sew, knit and spin [Minutes 1753-62, 168].

ii. Dinah, born about 1748, a "Mullatto" bound to Mary Burgess until the age of eighteen by the Princess Anne County court on 20 January 1756 to be taught to read, sew, knit and spin [Minutes 1753-62, 213]. She (of Elizabeth River Parish) married George Valentine (of Lynhaven Parish), "mulattoes," 14 November 1787 Norfolk County bond [Ministers' Returns, 1787-1790, 2]. They registered in Princess Anne County on 1 April 1794: George Valentine a light Mulatto man five feet seven inches high born free. Dinah Valentine, Wife of George Valentine, a dark Mulatto, five feet three inches high forty six years of age born free [Sparrow, Dinah (M, 23): Free Negro Certificate, 1794, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

iii. Margaret2, born say 1760, a "free Negro" ordered bound to Richard Cheshire by the churchwardens of Elizabeth River Parish, Norfolk County, on 21 April 1763 [Orders 1763-65, 5] and an infant "free Negroe" ordered bound to Robert Ballard by the Princess Anne County court on 22 August 1764 [Minutes 1762-9, 127].

9     iv. America, born about 1762.

10     v. Bash1, born about 1763.

11   vi. John3, born about 1764..

 

6.    Nanny Sparrow, born say 1738, was apparently identical to "Nanny a free Molatto" (no last name mentioned) whose daughters Bridget and Betty were ordered bound by the Princess Anne County court to Robert Dearmore until the age of twenty-one on 15 December 1761. She was called Nanny Sparrow, a "free Mulatto," on 4 April 1771 when the court bound her son George and daughter Bridget as apprentices and called Anne Sparrow on 13 April 1775 when the court bound her daughter Betty [Minutes 1753-62, 460; 1770-3, 116]. She was the mother of

i. Bridget, born in 1756, ordered bound by the Princess Anne County court to Robert Dearmore on 15 December 1761 and bound apprentice to William and Mary Whitehurst on 4 April 1771 [Minutes 1753-62, 460; 1770-3, 116]. She was a "Free Black" head of a Princess Anne County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:474]. Her daughter Nancy registered in Princess Anne County on 20 May 1800: Nancy Sparrow is the daughter of Bridged Sparrow a free black Woman, said Bridget was bound to Wm Whitehurst, decd., & she and her said daughter Nancy lived many years in the neighborhood. Willoughby Whitehurst [Sparrow, Nancy (F): Free Negro Certificate, 1800, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA

ii. Elizabeth3/ Betty, born in 1759, ordered bound by the Princess Anne County court to Robert Dearmore on 15 December 1761 and an infant daughter of Anne Sparrow, a free ___tto, bound to Katherine Anne Broughton by the Princess Anne County court on 13 April 1775 [Minutes 1753-62, 460; 1773-82, 92 and index].

iii. George1, bound to Robert Burley to learn the trade of ship carpenter on 4 April 1771. He was a "Free Black" head of a Princess Anne County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:474] and 2 "free colored" in 1830.

iv. Amy, born about 1764, daughter of Nanny Sparrow, ordered bound to William Whitehurst by the Princess Anne County court on 23 April 1774 [Minutes 1773-82, 45]. She registered in Princess Anne County on 9 May 1794: the Daughter of Nanny Sparrow a black Woman about five feet high near thirty years old born Free [Sparrow, Amy (F, 30): Free Negro Certificate, 1794, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

 

7.    Elizabeth3 Sparrow, born say 1740, registered in Norfolk County on 29 March 1794: Ezbeth Sparrow is a free born in the county of Norfolk and the parresh of Sent Brids and ben leaving in the said County for this fifty years. Edward Whitehouse [Sparrow, Ezebeth (F): Free Negro Certificate, 1794, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. She was the mother of

i. Katy, born about 1752, registered in Norfolk County on 29 March 1794: a negroe woman aged about forty two years, five feet three inches born free. Katy Sparrow the dugtor of Elizebeth Sparrow has been living in the parish of Saint Brids for this forty years [Sparrow, Katy (F, 42): Free Negro Certificate, 1794, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

ii. Nancy, born about 1767, registered in Norfolk County on 29 March 1794: a negro woman about twenty six years of age five feet six or seven inches high born free. Nancy Sparrow the daughter of Elizabeth Sparrow has been living in the County of Norfolk in the Parish of Saint Brids for this twenty five years [Sparrow, Nancy (F, 25): Free Negro Certificate, 1794, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. She was counted in a list of "free Negroes and Mulattoes" in St. Bride's Parish, Norfolk County, in 1803 [PPTL, 1791-1812, frame 456], registered in Norfolk County on 22 September 1812: 5 ft. 7 In., 44 years of age dark Complexion pitted with the Small Pox, Born free [Register of Free Negroes, no.83]. She was head of a "Free Black" Princess Anne County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:474].

 

8.    John2/ Jack Sparrow, born September 1760, was called a "free Negro" when he was bound apprentice in Norfolk County on 18 April 1765 and called the nine-year-old son of "free Molatto" Margaret Sparrow on 15 June 1769 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Portsmouth Parish to bind him to John Carr [Orders 1763-65, 196-7; 1768-71, 91]. He was taxable in Portsmouth and Elizabeth River Parishes in 1792 and from 1800 to 1809: in a list of "free Negroes and Mulattoes" in 1801, a carpenter living near Norfolk with a boy named Jesse and a female named Jenny Sparrow in his household [PPTL, 1791-1812, frame 42, 361, 384, 436, 469, 567, 652, 696]. On 22 April 1806 the court called him a "Mulatto man" when it gave him permission to carry a gun and ammunition [Orders 1806, 62a]. He may have been the John Sparrow, a "free man of color late of Elizabeth River," who was convicted by the Norfolk County court of second-degree murder and sentenced to six years in jail on 1 March 1822 but found not guilty and discharged on 9 September 1822 [Superior court Orders 1820-5, 144, 147, 234]. His descendants may have been

i. Elizabeth4, born about 1771, registered in Petersburg on 4 August 1807: a dark Mulatto woman, five feet five and a half inches high, thirty six years old, born free in Princess Anne p. Cert. of Register from Norfolk Boro [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 416].

ii. George2, born about 1782, registered in Princess Anne County on 3 October 1831: 5 feet 5-1/2" high, 49 years of age, a black man, born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1830-62, no. 247].

iii. Anthony, born about 1783, head of a "Free Black" Princess Anne County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:474]. He registered in Princess Anne County on 1 September 1831: 5'4-1/4", age 48, dark mulatto man, born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1830-62, no. 197].

iv. Billy, head of a "Free Black" Princess Anne County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:474].

v. Adam, born about 1791, registered in Princess Anne County on 3 October 1836: age 45, 5'7-3/4", a black man, born free in Princess Anne County. His wife registered the same day: Polly Fuller, wife of Adam Fuller, age 34, 5'4", light complected negro, born free in Princess Anne County [Register of Free Negroes, 1830-62, nos. 394-5].

 

9.    America Sparrow,born about 1762, was probably identical to America, "a free Negro" living in Norfolk County on 19 November 1778 when the court ordered the churchwardens of St. Bride's Parish to bind him to John Whitehouse [Orders 1776-9, n.p.]. He was taxable in St. Bride's Parish in 1787 and from 1796 to 1811, in the lists of "free Negroes and Mulattoes" which start in 1804 [PPTL, 1782-91, frame 597; 1791-1812, 195, 285, 548, 636, 674]. He registered in Norfolk County on 29 March 1794: Edward Whitehouse made oath that America Sparrow is a free born negroe [Sparrow, America (M), Free Negro Certificate, 1794, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. He married Fanny Rudd, 5 May 1804 Norfolk County bond, Lemuel Bailey security. He registered in Norfolk County again on 4 May 1811: 5 feet 11 In. 49 years of a yellowish Complexion and Pitted with the Small Pox [Register of Free Negros & Mulattos, no.51].  He may have been the father of

i. Charity, born about 1787, registered in Norfolk County on 21 September 1812: 5 ft. 4 1/2 In., 25 years of age light Complexion, born Free [Register of Free Negroes, no.82].

ii. Caty, born about 1788, registered in Norfolk County on 22 September 1812: 5 ft. 1 1/2 Inc., 24 years of age light Complexion, Born free [Register of Free Negroes, no.84].

iii. Chany, born about 1792, registered in Norfolk County on 22 September 1812: 5 feet 2 1/2 In., 20 years of age of a Yellowish Complexion with two Scars on the right cheek [Register of Free Negroes, no.86].

iv. Keziah, born about 1795, registered in Norfolk County on 19 July 1814: 5 feet 2 Inches, 19 years of age of a Light Complexion, born Free [Register of Free Negroes, no.92].

v. Sarah, born about 1798, registered in Norfolk County on 19 July 1814: 5 feet 4 Inc., 16 years of age of a Light Complexion, born Free [Register of Free Negroes, no.93].

 

10.    Bash1 Sparrow, born about 1763, probably identical to Bash, "a free Negro" living in Norfolk County on 19 November 1778 when the court ordered the churchwardens of St. Bride's Parish to bind him to William Whitehouse [Orders 1776-9, n.p.]. He was taxable on a horse in St. Bride's Parish from 1789 to 1817: taxable on 2 tithes in 1791, in the lists of "free Negroes and Mulattoes" starting in 1801, called Bash Sparrow, Sr., starting in 1804 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-91, frames 613, 668; 1791-1812, frames 10, 400, 456, 548, 636, 716, 802; 1813-24]. He registered in Norfolk County on 22 September 1812: 5 ft. 7 Inc., 49 years of age of a Yellowish complexion, born Free [Register of Free Negroes, no.88]. His children may have been

i. Elizabeth5/ Betty, born about 1788, registered in Norfolk County on 21 September 1812: 5 ft. 1 Inch, 24 years of age dark Complexion, born Free [Register of Free Negroes, no.81].

ii. Jonas, born about 1788, registered in Norfolk County on 25 December 1809: 5 feet 8 Inches and a half, Twenty one years of age of a Dark Complexion, Born free [Register of Free Negroes, no.1].

iii. Rose, born about 1791, registered in Norfolk County on 22 September 1812: 5 feet 2 In., 21 years of age of a dark Complexion, born Free [Register of Free Negroes, no.85].

iv. Ned, born about 1793, registered in Norfolk County on 19 July 1814: 5 feet 3 1/2 In., 21 years of age of a dark Complexion with a Scar on his right cheek, born Free [Register of Free Negroes, no.91].

v. Bash2, Jr., born say 1789, taxable in St. Bride's Parish from 1804 to 1811 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1791-1812, frames 548, 674].

 

11.    John3 Sparrow, born about 1764, head of a Nelson County, Virginia household of 12 "other free" in 1810 [VA:728], was taxable in Nelson County from 1809 to 1826: taxable on 2 tithes and 2 horses from 1809 to 1811, a saddler in the list of "free Negroes & molattoes" starting in 1813, aged fifty in 1814, a sixty-year-old saddler in the list for 1818 with Mariah (53 year-old spinster), Alexander (24-year-old ditcher), Judith (22), Sary (20), John (19), Bartlett (17), Edward (13), Sympson (11), William (9), Martha (7), Robert (5) [PPTL 1809-45, frames 12, 28, 42, 79, 98, 190, 306]. He was probably the father of

i. Alex, born about 1781, a twenty-three year- old planter in the list of "free Negroes & molattoes" in 1814, a twenty-three-year-old waterman in 1815 [PPTL 1809-45, 119].

ii. Judith, born about 1796.

iii. Sary, born about 1798.

iv. John4, born about 1799.

v. Bartlett, born about 1801, taxable on a tithe in 1826.

vi. Edward, born about 1805.

vii. Sympson, born about 1807.

viii. William, born about 1809.

ix. Martha, born about 1811.

x. Robert, born about 1813.

 

Endnotes:

1.    Perhaps Reuben Herbert's widow was Nancy Herbert, head of a Norfolk County household of 3 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1810 [VA:832]. See the Hubbard family history.

 

SPELMAN FAMILY

1.    Sarah Spelman, born perhaps 1730, was called a "free Negro wench" on 10 October 1760 when her two-year-old son Tony was bound to Joseph Leech in Craven County [CR 028.101.1]. She was sued for debt about a year later in the July 1761 Craven County court, but the jury ruled in her favor [Minutes 1761-2, 32a]. On 10 January 1762 she was called a "Negors or Mollato Wench" in the service of Mrs. Ann Bryan when the court ordered that Ann Bryan keep Sarah's children in her household until Sarah's suit against her was settled [Minutes 1758-61, 104b]. Sarah's children: Lydia, Asa, Aaron, and David were bound to Ann Bryan in April that year [Minutes 1761-2, 73a]. Her children were

i. Lydia, born about 1749, thirteen years old when she was bound an apprentice by the April 1762 Craven County court, and ordered by the 11 April 1767 court to serve Christopher Dawson an additional year for having borne a child during her indenture [Minutes 1767-75]. She may have been the Lydia Spelman who was head of a Camden County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:16].

ii. Asa, born about 1751, eleven years old when he was bound an apprentice in the April 1762 Craven County court. George Kernegy had a suit against him in Craven County court on 9 April 1767, but Kernegy failed to appear [Minutes 1767-75]. Asa was head of a Craven County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:134] and 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:72]. He purchased land by deed proved in Craven County in 1781. On 1 January 1796 he sold 65 acres on the north side of the Neuse River between Trent and Smiths Creek in Craven County [DB 24:191; 32:873]. He married Esther Sampson, 6 June 1819 Craven County bond, Aaron Spelman bondsman. He was called Asa Spelmore alias Spelman on 13 September 1820 when he made a declaration in Craven County court to obtain a pension for service with Captain Quinn in the tenth North Carolina Regiment. He stated that during his nine months service he was engaged in a skirmish at West Point and at Kings Ferry in Jersey. Isaac Perkins testified that he had seen Asa while they were both on duty in White Plains, New York. John Carter testified that Asa and he were in the same regiment. Asa was a cooper with no family but his unnamed brother (Aaron?) who he was living with in 1820 [NARA, S.42022, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/13712646; Craven County Minutes, September 1820, 136-8; 1821, 185; and May 1822, 16 by NCGSJ XVII:33]

2     iii. Aaron, born about 1753.

iv. David, born about 1755, seven years old in April 1762 when he was bound an apprentice in Craven County court. He was head of a Craven County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 [NC:134]. He married Lethe Brown, 16 June 1798 Craven County bond. She was probably the daughter of Samuel Brown, head of a Craven County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:134].

v. Jacob, born about 1756, the four-year-and-nine-month-old son of Sarah ordered bound by the October 1760 Craven County court [Minutes 1758-61, 85a]. He enlisted in Carter's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 5 May and left the service on 5 May 1782. His final pay for service in the North Carolina Continental Line was received by F. Dixon [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1163; XVII:247]. A 5 May 1800 Fayetteville newspaper warned that a runaway slave might have changed his name to Jacob Spelman in order to pass as free [Fouts, Newspapers of Edenton, Fayetteville, & Hillsborough, 10].

vi. Tony, born about 1758, the two-year-old son of Sarah bound apprentice in Craven County on 10 October 1760 [CR 028.101.1]. He, Asa, and Jacob Spelman were in Captain John Bryan's Craven County Company in June 1778 [N.C. Archives, digital collection, B3F26; http://digital.ncdcr.gov/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p16062coll26/id/471/rec/161].

vii. ?Sarah, born in April 1760, bound an apprentice to Benjamin Fordham by the 14 September 1768 Craven County court [Minutes 1766-75, 89a]. She was freed by the court from this indenture on 10 March 1779 [Minutes 1772-78, 2:4b].

viii. ?Simon, born about July 1764, a "free Negro" bound apprentice to Christopher Dawson on 13 March 1770 [Minutes 1766-75, 137]. He enlisted for the war in Bradley's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 28 June 1779 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1161].

ix. Kent, born in May 1768, a "Free born Negroe Boy" bound an apprentice house carpenter to Sampson Leath by the 15 June 1774 Craven County court [Minutes 1772-84, 1:16d].

x. ?Jenny, born perhaps 1770, head of a Craven County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:132].

 

2.    Aaron1 Spelman, born about 1753, was about nine years old when he was bound out by the April 1762 Craven County court [Minutes 1761-62, 104b]. He was head of Craven County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:134]. He was called Aaron Spelmore when he enlisted in Sharp's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 5 May 1781 and served until 5 May 1782 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1163]. On 18 January 1791 when he assigned his right to his final settlement for services in the "Twelve Months Draftees" in the Revolution [T&C, Box 22, by NCGSJ XVI:234]. The September 1807 Craven County court ordered his two twin boys, aged seven years, and his daughter, aged fourteen years, bound out. He was called Aaron Spelmore on 12 September 1820 and was about sixty five when he made a declaration in Craven County court to obtain a pension for his service under Captain Sharpe in the Tenth North Carolina Regiment. He stated that he was a caulker and was living with his twenty-year-old daughter Betty Spelmore [NARA, S.42023, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/13712617; Court Minutes 1820 and 1821, 125-6, 262-3, by NCGSJ XV:33]. One of his children was

i. Betty, born about 1800 according to her father's pension application.

 

Other members of the Spelman family were

i. Aaron2, head of a Camden County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 [NC:16].

ii. Timothy, head of a Camden County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 [NC:16].

iii. Seney, married Marshall Mitchell, 1 July 1806 Craven County bond, Lewis Cavans bondsman.

iv. Ferebe, married William Mitchell, 14 July 1806 Craven County bond, Joab Mitchell bondsman.

v. Courtney, head of a Pasquotank County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:928].

vi. Nancy, head of a Pasquotank County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:928].

vii. Rachel, head of a Pasquotank County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:928].

viii. David2, born about 1804, listed among "Sundry Free Born Colored persons...needy of proper persons" (to be bound to) in Craven County on 10 March 1818 [CR 28.101.1].

ix. Church, born about 1808, listed among "Sundry Free Born Colored persons...needy of proper persons" in Craven County on 10 March 1818 [CR 28.101.1].

 

There was also a Spelman family in Virginia:

i. Susannah, born say 1763, mother of a "base born Mallatto" child named Elizabeth who was ordered bound out by the Rockingham County court on 23 August 1784 [Judgments & Orders 1776-84, n.p.].

 

SPILLER FAMILY

1.    Judith Spiller, born perhaps 1720, was a "Mullatto Woman" living in Carteret County on 8 December 1742 when George Read brought her daughter Tamer, "begotten by a Negro man," into court to have her bound to him until the age of thirty-one years. She may have been the "Judy a Mulatto formerly belonging unto the estate of Mr. James Winright decd" whose daughter Katherine, "a child of Mixt blood," was bound to Neill Puriell nineteen years later in December 1761 [Minutes 1747-64, fol.54a, 187]. The name Spiller does not appear in the 1790-1820 North Carolina census, so perhaps her descendants used a different surname. Her children were

2     i. Tamer, born 22 January 1738.

ii. Katherine, born in 1748.

iii. Tom, born about 1750, the "one year old boy child of Mixt blood born of one Judy a Mulatto" bound to Thomas Lovick.

iv. Rose, born about 1758, the five-year-old child of "Molato Judy" bound to Cornelius Canady in February 1764.

v. George, born about 1760, the three-year-old child of "Molato Judy" bound an apprentice cooper to Cornelius Canady [Minutes 1747-64, 297].

 

2.    Tamer (no last name), born 22 January 1738, was living in Carteret County on 9 December 1757 when her daughter Rachel, "of a Negroe Wench named Thamer now a Servant to Mrs. Anne Read," was bound to Frances Read [Minutes 1747-64, 42]. Her children were

i. Rachel, perhaps 1756.

ii. Rodey, born about 1758, "Mulato Daughter of Mulatto Tamer" bound apprentice in November 1763 to Thomas Oglesby.

iii. Nan, born about 1762, one-year-old sister of Rodey bound apprentice in November 1763 [Minutes 1747-64, 294].

 

SPRIDDLE FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth1 Spriddle, born say 1716, was a servant in St. Stephen's Parish, Northumberland County, on 19 May 1736 when she was indicted for having a "Mullatto" child within the previous six months. She was ordered to be sold by the churchwardens as a servant for five years on 16 June 1736 [Orders 1729-37, 222, 236, 238]. She was apparently the mother of

i. Spencer Spradley, born 9 January 1735, a "molato" whose birth was registered in Northumberland County [Fleet, Northumberland County Record of Births, 107].

2    ii. Elizabeth2 Sprittle, born say 1753.

 

2.    Elizabeth2 Sprittle, born say 1753, had an illegitimate son Philip Sprittle by William Causey on 29 December 1770 [Fleet, Northumberland County Record of Births, 107]. She was a "free mulatto" head of a Northumberland County household in 1810 [VA:994]. She was the mother of

i. Philip, born 29 December 1770.

3     ii. Nancy, born 26 April 1775 [Fleet, Northumberland County Record of Births, 87].

 

3.    Nancy Spriddle, born 26 April 1775, was head of a Northumberland County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:996]. She was the mother of

i. James, born say 1795, security for the 15 December marriage of Mary Spriddle and Samuel Cassidy.

ii. Mary, born say 1798, married Samuel Cassidy, 15 December 1819 Lancaster County bond, James Spriddle security.

iii. Thomas, married Elizabeth Nickens, 11 August 1817 Northumberland County bond, Joseph Weaver security.

iv. Jesse, married Elizabeth Evans, 11 November 1818 Northumberland County bond, Moses Blundon security.

 

SPRIGGS FAMILY

1.    Anne Spriggs, born say 1687, was indicted by the Lancaster County court on 12 May 1708 for having an illegitimate child. Josias and his wife Phebe Draper paid her fine. She was the servant of Josias Draper of Whitechapel Parish on 11 May 1710 when the court indicted her for having an illegitimate child the previous November, "reputed to be a mulatoe" [Orders 1702-13, 192, 194, 240a]. She was probably the ancestor of

i. Abel, born say 1758, a seaman from Lancaster County who served in the Revolution. He and Thomas Wood, were "mulattoes" listed among the deserters from the ship Dragon who were allowed until 20 July 1779 to return without punishment according to the 3 July 1779 issue of the Virginia Gazette [Dixon's edition, p. 3, col. 2]. He may have been identical to Abm Sprigg, a seaman aboard the Dragon according to an affidavit by a fellow seaman, John Davis, who testified for the bounty land claim of James Jennings on 7 February 1834 and named five of the officers and fifty-two members of the crew who served faithfully for three years and were discharged at the Chickahominy Ship Yard [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Jennings, James (p.9), Digital Collection, LVA].

ii. Aaron Sprigg, a black labourer living with his wife in Alexandria in 1799 [Virginia Genealogist 4:169].

iii. James Sprigg, head of a Washington, D.C. household of 1 "other free" in 1800.

 

SPRUCE FAMILY

The Spruce family may have been related to Elizabeth Sproson who had "lately come out of New Kent County" in November 1712 when the Henrico County court reported that she had delivered a bastard child at the house of Edward Heathcot [Orders 1710-4, 198]. Elizabeth Sproson's illegitimate daughter Elizabeth was baptized in St. Peter's Parish, New Kent County, on 18 June 1710. She may have been related to Sarah Sproson who died in St. Peter's on 28 April 1726 [NSCDA, Parish Register of St. Peter's, 41, 70]. Members of the Spruce family were

i. Mary Sproose/ Spruce, born say 1731, a "Mulatto" presented by the Warwick County court on 6 April 1749 for having a bastard child [Minutes 1748-62, 17].

1     ii. Martha Spruce, born say 1734.

2     iii. William, born say 1736.

 

1.    Martha Spruce, born say 1734, was the mother of David Spruce, a "Molatto" boy bound apprentice in Isle of Wight County on 6 February 1752. She was the mother of

i. David, born say 1751, a "Molatto" son of Martha, bound apprentice in Isle of Wight County to Andrew Sikes [Orders 1746-52, 393], taxable in Elizabeth City County in 1782 [PPTL 1782-1820, frame 2], taxable in York County from 1784 to 1789 [PPTL, 1782-1841, frames 89, 95, 144, 155], and taxable in Elizabeth City County in 1797 and from 1801 to 1807 [PPTL 1782-1820, frame 166, 182, 196, 206, 215, 224, 234, 246]. In Elizabeth City County court he confessed judgment to Robert Armistead of 1 pound, 10 shillings on 27 February 1801; sued William Latimer, Jr., for 4 pounds, 10 shillings on 23 April 1801, and was awarded $27 by a jury in his suit against the administrator of John Bushell on 31 May 1802 [Orders 1798-1802, 234, 252, 288, 342, 394-5].

 

2.    William Spruce, born say 1736, was presented by the York County court on 20 May 1765 for not attending Yorkhampton Parish Church and presented on 15 November 1773 for absenting himself from church and not listing himself as a tithable [Judgments & Orders 1763-5, 374, 448; 1772-4, 437-8]. He and his wife Rebecca had a daughter named Sally who was baptized in Charles Parish, York County, on 3 November 1765, but he was married to Betty by 25 September 1768 when their son John was baptized there [Bell, Charles Parish Register]. The York County court bound out (his daughters) Sarah and Mary Spruce on 21 August 1775, and on 19 April 1784 the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out his daughter Mary because he had left no estate to maintain her [Orders 1774-84, 104, 473]. His children were

i. ?James, a poor orphan bound out in York County on 15 August 1774 [Orders 1774-84, 54].

ii. Mary, born about 1772, probably identical to Polly Spruce, the "free Mulatto" mother of Elizabeth Spruce who was born 1 May 1791 and baptized 4 March 1792 in Bristol Parish [Chamberlayne, Register of Bristol Parish, 370]. She registered in York County on 22 August 1800: about 5 feet high, aged 28 years or thereabouts, of round youthful visage, dark olive complexion, nearly black daughter of one Betty Limas a free woman [Guardians' Accounts, 1780-1823, following the index, No. 10]. She was married to David White, a slave belonging to the estate of Mrs. Murray, on 3 September 1800 when the Petersburg court fined her $30 for licensing and permitting him to go at large in Petersburg while he was hired to her. Polly purchased Richard White from Murray's estate and emancipated him on 1 March 1801 [Hustings Court Minute Book 1800-4, 7, 30, 42; Hustings DB 2:737]. David was emancipated by William Davies, son-in-law of Anne Murray, in 1803 [DB 3:113]. David was deceased by 6 October 1806 when Graham Bell was granted administration of his estate on 500 pounds bond. On 7 August 1809 the court ordered the sergeant to take possession of a lot and houses that had belonged to David as well as any personal estate not yet administered by Graham Bell and his "reputed wife" Polly Spruce and to dispose of them as the law directed [Hustings Court Minute Book 1805-8, n.p.; 1808-12, n.p.].

iii. Sally Scott, born 1 September, baptized 3 November 1765 in Charles Parish [Bell, Charles Parish Register], registered in Petersburg on 13 August 1800: a bright yellow Mulatto woman, five feet three inches high, thirty eight years old, bushy hair, born free by the name of Spruce & raised in York County, had afterwards married to William Scott [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 154].

iv. John, born __ August, baptized 25 September 1768 [Bell, Charles Parish Register]. He was taxable in Elizabeth City County from 1801 to 1807 [PPTL 1782-1820, frames 182, 195, 206, 216, 235, 246] and a "free Negro" taxable in Norfolk County in 1813, 1814 and 1816 [PPTL, 1813-24, frames 67, 188].

 

SPURLOCK FAMILY

Members of the Spurlock family in Virginia were

1     i. John1/ Jack, born say 1728.

ii. John Whitloe, born about 1735, an eighteen-year-old "Mulato" who bound himself for six years as an apprentice to learn carpentry from John Richardson in York County on 21 August 1753 [DB 5:558-9; Judgments & Orders 1752-4, 320]. He may have been the John Spurlock who sued Henry Mann for 4 pounds, 1 shilling in York County court on 18 June 1764 [Judgments & Orders 1763-5, 226].

iii. John2, head of a Norfolk County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:920].

iv.Robert, a "free Negro" listed with his wife Hannah in Hanover County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1804-24].

 

1.    John1/ Jack Spurlock, born say 1728, a "Virginia born Negro" ran away from Thomas Dansie of King William County according to the 15 March 1749 issue of the Maryland Gazette [Headley, 18th Century Virginia Newspapers, 319]. He may have had children by a woman who was a slave of the Neale family. Former slaves Harry and Billy were enumerated in the tax list for King William County after members of the white Neale family in 1805: "Billey frd by N." and "Harry do." A Francis Neale was taxable on 6 slaves in 1804 but only 1 slave in 1805. Henry, Billy and Jane Spurlock were each taxable on a slave tithe in 1809 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1811; 1812-50]. John Spurlock may have been the father of

i. Harry, born say 1780, taxable in King William County from 1807 to 1820: taxable on a slave above the age of sixteen but not taxable on a free tithe from 1807 to 1812, also taxable on a horse in 1810, listed as a "free Negro" taxable from 1813 to 1820, aged 16-45 in 1815 when he was taxable on 5 cattle, taxable on 2 free males in 1820 [PPTL 1782-1811; 1812-50]. On 22 August 1812 he purchased 52 acres in King William County adjoining lands of Jack Spurlock, Jenny Spurlock and Billy Spurlock for $520 [Record Book 6:219].

ii. Billy, taxable in King William County on a slave above the age of sixteen but not on a free tithe from 1807 to 1810 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1811].

iii. John3/ Jack, taxable in King William County from 1807 to 1819: taxable on a slave above the age of sixteen but not on a free tithe from 1807 to 1812, a "free Negro" taxable from 1813 to 1819 [PPTL 1782-1811; 1812-50]. On 22 August 1812 he purchased 51 acres in King William County adjoining land of "Andersons free negroes," Harry Spurlock and Billy Spurlock on Taylor's ferry road [Record Book 6:220-2]

iv. Jane, taxable in King William County from 1807 to 1819: taxable on a slave above the age of sixteen but not on a free tithe from 1807 to 1812, a "free Negro" taxable in 1813 and 1814 [PPTL 1782-1811; 1812-50]. On 22 August 1812 she purchased 55 acres in King William County adjoining lands of Harry Spurlock and Jack Spurlock on Taylor's ferry road for $530 [Record Book 6:218].

v. Edward, counted in James City County as a "free Person of Colour above the age of 16" who was not tithable in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1800-15].

 

STAFFORD FAMILY

Members of the Stafford family were

i. Henry, taxable in Norfolk County in 1767, a "free negro" taxable on the south side of Western Branch District in 1768, and taxable there in 1770 [Norfolk County Virginia Tithables, 1766-1780, 15, 72, 88, 106].

ii. John, head of a Martin County, North Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:68].

iii. Anna, head of a Hertford County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:186].

iv. Cortney, head of a Hertford County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:186].

v. Emus(?), head of a Hertford County household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:190], perhaps identical to Evange Stafford who was counted as an 81-year-old drayman (born in North Carolina) in the 1870 census for Iberville Parish, Louisiana.

 

STEPHENS FAMILY

1.    Rebecca Stephens, born say 1676, was living in York County, Virginia, on 24 September 1706 when she was sold for five years to pay her fine of fifteen pounds for "having a mulato Bastard male Child lately born of her body & Confessing the Father to be a negro" [DOW 13:19]. She may have been the mother of

2     i. Mary1, born say 1692.

 

2.    Mary1 Stephens, born say 1692, was living in Northampton County, Virginia, in 1715 when her four-year-old son Henry and two-year-old son Jonathan were bound apprentices [Orders 1710-6, 197]. She was a tithable head of her own household in Northampton County in 1728 and in 1729, a "malatto" living near Matthew Harmonson. She was called Mary Powell, "negro," in Michael Christian's list of tithables for 1729 and 1731, living near Matthew Harmonson [L.P. 1728, 1729; Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 166, 179, 198, 225]. Mary Powell died before 11 March 1731/2 when Captain Matthew Harmonson informed the court that she left so small an estate that no one would administer it. On 11 April 1732 the sheriff recorded the account of her estate, which included lumber, hogs, corn, flax, bacon, a wheel, sifters, and a tub. The court ordered the sheriff to sell the estate and ordered her children Southy, Daniel, James, Mason and Littleton bound out to Harmonson. And on 12 June 1733 Captain Harmonson asked the court whether Mason, Daniel, Tamer and Southy, children of Mary Powell deceased, were entitled to the benefit of the orphan's law. The court ruled that they were entitled [Orders 1729-32, 138; 1732-42, 51; Deeds & Wills 1725-33, 297]. Mary's children, who all used the name Stephens, were

3     i. Henry1, born on 31 July 1711.

4     ii. Jonathan, born on 4 August 1713.

5     iii. ?Abigail, born say 1715.

iv. James, born say 1722, bound to Matthew Harmonson on 11 March 1731/2.

v. Mason, born say 1724, taxable in the household of (his brother) Henry Stephens in 1744.

vi. Southy1, born say 1726, taxable in the Northampton County household of (his brother) Jonathan Stephens in 1742.

6     vii. Daniel1, born say 1728.

viii. Tamer1, born say 1730, presented by the grand jury of Northampton County on 13 May 1766 for bastard bearing [Minutes 1765-71, 39]. Her suit against Isaac Reed for slander was agreed to at Reed's costs in Northampton County court on 13 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 363].

ix. Littleton1, born say 1731, bound to Matthew Harmonson on 11 March 1731/2.

 

3.    Henry1 Stephens, born on 31 July 1711, the four-year-old son of Mary Stephens, was bound apprentice in Northampton County in 1715 [Orders 1710-16, 197]. He was a "Molatto" head of a Northampton County, Virginia household with his wife Esther Stephens in Peter Bowdoin's lists for 1737 to 1739 [L.P. 1737-9] and in the 1744 list of Thomas Preeson with Esther and Mason Stephens [L.P. 1744]. His wife was probably Esther Mongon, a tithable in the household of their neighbor John Drighouse in 1731. He was called Henry Stephens ("Negro") on 12 February 1754 when he acknowledged that he owed John Custis Matthews a debt of 3 pounds, 16 shillings [Orders 1753-8, 51]. He was taxable in Nathaniel Stratton's household in 1769 [L.P. 1769]. He may have been the father of

i. Mary2, born say 1742, paid a fine in Northampton County on 8 June 1762 for bastard bearing [Minutes 1761-5, 23, 30].

 

4.    Jonathan1 Stephens, born on 4 August 1713, the two-year-old son of Mary Stephens, was bound apprentice in Northampton County in 1715 [Orders 1710-6, 197]. He was taxable with Margaret Stevens in the Northampton County list of Peter Bowdoin for 1738, adjacent to Henry Stephens and Thomas Drighouse, and was a "negro" in the 1742 list of Thomas Preeson with his wife Margaret Stephens "negro" and (his brother) Southy Stephens [L.P. 1738, 1742]. He may have been the father of

i. Henry2/ Harry, born about 1760, a five-year-old "negro" bound out in Northampton County on 10 October 1765 to learn the trade of shoemaker from Richard Hewett's slave [Minutes 1765-71, 26]. He registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 12 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 358].

 

5.    Abigail1 Stephens, born say 1715, received twenty-five lashes on 13 May 1735 and on 13 February 1738/9 for having bastard children. On 13 February 1739/40 she acknowledged an indenture to serve Matthew Harmonson, Gent., for twelve years on condition that he allow her to marry his "Negroe fellow" Cudgeo" [Orders 1732-42, 155, 164, 342, 387]. She was the mother of

7     i. ?Amy, born about 1737.

8     ii. Southy2, born 4 August 1738.

 

6.    Daniel1 Stephens, born say 1728, was bound apprentice on 11 March 1731/2 to Captain Matthew Harmonson. He was sued by Comfort Morris, administrator of Jacob Morris, for a 3 pound, 1 shilling debt on 15 April 1752 [Orders 1751-3, 89]. He may have married Comfort because he was allowed 30 shillings for maintaining the orphans of Jacob Morris, "Negro," deceased, on 10 September 1754 [Orders 1753-8, 129]. He was taxable in Northampton County with (his son?) Daniel Stephens, Jr., in 1766 and taxable with (his wife?) Comfort Stephens in 1769 [L.P. 1769; Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 380, 401]. He may have been the father of

i. Daniel2, born say 1750, taxable in 1766.

 

7.    Amy Stephens, born in May 1737, was an orphan bound as an apprentice in Northampton County in February 1742/3. She was presented for bastard bearing on 13 November 1750. She was called a "Negro" on 14 January 1755 when she was ordered to serve her master Henry Gascoyne for two years commencing 1 March 1755, probably for having an illegitimate child [Orders 1742-8, 58; 1748-51, 281, 332, 363, 404]. She was presented for bastard bearing again on 13 May 1772 and fined 20 shillings [Minutes 1771-7, 58, 70]. She registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 11 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 354]. She was the mother of

i. Anthony, born in December 1755, two-year-old "Negro" son of Amy Stephens, bound apprentice to Daniel Luke on 12 September 1758. He was bound to Jane Luke on 10 April 1764 [Minutes 1754-61, 168; 1761-5, 110].

ii. Ephraim, born say 1760, son of Amey Stephens, bound apprentice to John Tankard on 10 January 1775 [Minutes 1771-7, 277]. He was presented on 13 November 1787 and 11 November 1788 for tending crops on the Indians' land in Northampton County. The Commonwealth discontinued the case on 14 March 1792 for unstated reasons. He registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 11 June 1794. Perhaps his wife was the Lear (Leah) Stevens who registered with him [Orders 1787-9, 64; 1789-95, 193, 354]. He was taxable in Northampton County from 1784 to 1796: taxable on 5 horses and 13 cattle in 1785 and 1786; taxable on a slave and 5 horses in 1788 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 31, 45, 54, 88, 147, 199]. His suit against Lighty Collins was dismissed on agreement of the parties on 13 May 1794, and in July 1794 the court ordered the overseers of the poor to bind Abraham Beckett, son of Comfort Beckett, as an apprentice to him [Orders 1789-95, 346, 369].

9     iii. ?Isaac1, born in July 1763.

iv. Littleton2, born in the Spring of 1773, six-year-old son of Amy, bound apprentice to Hezekiah Belote on 12 October 1779 [Minutes 1777-83, 200]. He registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 12 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 358] and was taxable in Northampton County from 1791 to 1797 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 133, 184]. He was head of a Northampton County, Virginia household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:216].

v. Abigail, registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 11 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95]. She married Abel Gusties, 6 September 1806 Northampton County bond, York Stepney security. He was called Stepney York on 6 June 1807 when he married Peggy Lewis, 6 June 1807 Northampton bond, Jacob Morris security.

10   vi. Ritter, born say 1763.

 

8.    Southy2 Stephens, born 4 August 1738, was a "Negroe" child bound to Matthew Harmonson, Gent., on 13 February 1739/40. He was apparently the son of Abigail Stephens and Matthew Harmonson's slave Cudgeo [Orders 1732-42, 387]. He was taxable in Northampton County from 1783 to 1792: taxable on John Stephens' tithe and 2 horses in 1787 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 16, 75, 132]. He registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 12 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 358]. He was probably the father of

i. John, born say 1762, a "Mulatto" taxable in Northampton County from 1783 to 1794: a 16-21 year-old taxable in Southy Stephens' household in 1787 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 16, 75, 82, 133, 184]. He married Betsey Thompson, 7 August 1798 Northampton County bond, Ben Lewis security.

 

9.    Isaac1 Stephens, born in July 1763, was bound apprentice to William Gascoigne in Northampton County on 15 February 1770 [Minutes 1765-71, 365]. He married Rachel Thompson, 22 January 1791 Northampton County bond, Coventon Simkins security. He registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 12 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 358] and was taxable in Northampton County from 1794 to 1800 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 176, 216]. He may have been the father of

i. Isaac2, married Sabra Nutts, 16 August 1809 Northampton County bond, Isaac Stevens, Sr., security. He was head of a Northampton County household of 9 "free colored" in 1820, called Isaac Steavens, Senr. [VA:215A].

 

10.    Ritter Stephens, born say 1763, complained to the Northampton County court on 11 January 1791 about the treatment of her son Jonathan Stevens by his master Curtis Haslop. The court ordered that he be removed from Haslop's service. She registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 11 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 81, 108, 354]. She was the mother of

i. ?Tobias, born say 1782, ordered bound out by the overseers of the poor to learn the business of planter on 11 September 1789 [Orders 1787-9, 229]. He married Bridget Nutts, 7 September 1804 Northampton County bond, Ben Dunton security. He was head of a Northampton County, Virginia household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:216].

ii. Jonathan2, born say 1783, bound out by the overseers of the poor to learn the business of a planter on 11 February 1789. He was called the son of Ritter Stevens when he was bound to Curtis Haslop on 14 September 1790 [Orders 1787-9, 229; 1789-95, 81].

iii. ?Henry3/ Harry, an orphan bound out to Robert Rodgers to learn the trade of wheelwright on 11 January 1791 [Orders 1789-95, 98].

 

Their descendants in Virginia were

i. Patience, born say 1750, presented by the grand jury of Northampton County on 8 May 1770 for bastard bearing [Minutes 1765-71, 365].

ii. Jacob, about 1758, a three-year-old "Negro" bound apprentice to John Thomas on 12 January 1762 [Minutes 1761-5, 4].

iii. Thomas, a "free Negro" taxable in Northampton County from 1788 to 1795 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 89, 183, 199], registered in Accomack County: born about 1761, Born free in Accomack County, a Black, 5'9" [Register of Free Negroes, 1785-1863, no. 464], head of a St. George Parish, Accomack County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:161] and 9 in 1810 [VA:59].

iv. Simon, a resident of Accomack County who served as a cook and seaman aboard the Accomac during the Revolution according to the application of his and Stephen Stephens' heirs for bounty land. Their application included the certificates for their final pay on 27 April 1785. Simon's name also appears as a cook on board the Accomac in the state navy records. Simon's heir Simon Stephens received bounty land warrant no. 7376 in 1833 [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 376; Revolutionary War Bounty Land Warrants; Stevens, Simon; Powell, Solomon; Digital Collections, LVA].

v. Stephen, a seaman in the state navy during the Revolution. His heir Stephen Stephens received bounty land warrant no. 7376-7 [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Record, 313, 376; Revolutionary War Bounty Land Warrants, Stevens, Simon, Digital Collections, LVA].

vi. Mary3, head of an Accomack County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:57]. She received bounty land scrip as the only heir of (brothers?) Simon and Stephen Stephens [Virginia Genealogist 2:86].

vii. Mary4, born say 1764, married George Morris, 19 October 1785 Northampton County, Virginia bond, David Jones security.

viii. William, born about 1766, sued by Myer Derhaim in Northampton County court on 11 February 1795 for a debt of 2 pounds, 6 shillings [Orders 1789-95, 436], registered as a "free Negro" in York County on 19 September 1831: a black man 5 feet 7 inches high about 67 years of age very high forehead, pitted with the small pox, large full eyes, pouting thick lips, long thin visage & grey thin hair. Born free in Northampton County, Virga, as appeared by satisfactory evidence & has been residing in York County upwards of 30 years [Free Negroes Register, 1831-50, no.288].

ix. Matthew, head of a York County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:883].

x. Leah, born say 1771, married Isaac Thompson, 22 September 1792 Northampton County bond, Jacob Frost security. Isaac was head of a Northampton County household of 12 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:215].

xi. Betty, born say 1772, married Isaac Reed, 2 July 1793 Northampton County bond, Ralph Collins security.

xii. Tamer2, married Jacob Thompson, 26 September 1800 Northampton County bond, Johannes Johnson security.

xiii. Jane, born before 1776, head of a Northampton County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:216].

xiv. Cugis (Cudjo), married Betsy Pool, 20 December 1806 Northampton County bond, Charles Pool security.

xv. Esther, registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 11 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 354]. She was head of a St. George Parish, Accomack County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:163].

xvi. Bello, head of a St. George Parish, Accomack County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:163], perhaps the Annabella Stephens who was an Accomack County taxpayer in 1787 [Fothergill, Virginia Tax Payers, 119].

xvii. Susannah, head of an Accomack County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:59].

xviii. Mary, head of a King George County household of 8 "other free" and one white woman in 1810 [VA:218].

xix. Thomas, head of a King George County household of 3 "other free" and a white woman in 1810 [VA:218].

 

Surry County, Virginia

1.    Lucy Stephens, born say 1759, was taxable in Surry County, Virginia, on a horse in 1803, taxable on "free Simon" in 1804, and taxable on 2 slaves in 1805 and 1806 [Personal Property Tax List, 1791-1816, 543, 576, 599, 617]. Her children were

i. ?Thomas, born about 1777, taxable in Surry County from 1797 to 1807: listed as David Charity's tithable in 1797 and 1798, charged with his own tax in 1803 [Personal Property Tax List, 1791-1816, frames 287, 323, 542, 599, 616, 637]. He registered in Petersburg on 29 October 1817: a free man of colour, yellow brown complection, five feet seven inches high, forty years old, born free in Surry County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 878].

ii. Alexander, born 10 November 1780, registered as a "free Negro" in Surry County, Virginia, on 31 May 1800: son of Lucy Stephens a resident of this county aged 20 years the 10th of November next pretty stout and well made of a yellowish complexion, 5'3-1/4' high, short hair, by profession a water-man - was born of a free parent [Back of Guardian Accounts Book 1783-1804, no.59]. He registered in Petersburg on 6 January 1809 [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 448].

ii. Isham, born 24 December 1782, registered as a "free Negro" in Surry County on 2 October 1800: son of Lucy Stephens a free woman of this county aged 17 years on the 24th day of December last, of a bright complexion stout made and 5' high [Back of Guardian Accounts Book, 1783-1804, no.66].

iii. ?Sarah, married Benjamin Charity, 5 September 1803 Surry County bond, William Scott surety.

 

Another member of the Stephens family was

i. John, born say 1745, head of an Edgecombe County, North Carolina household of 9 "other free" in 1790 [NC:54].

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