TANN FAMILY

Georgetta_Pope.jpg"

Ruth Tann, daughter of Solomon Tann and Georgetta Pope of Northampton

Ruth Tann, daughter of Solomon Tann and Georgetta Pope of Northampton County, N.C.

Solomon was the grandson of Exum Tann who was the son of Madison Tann and Elizabeth Sweat.

1.    John1 Kecatan, born about 1636, had been the slave of the Hoe family of Charles City County, Virginia, for about twenty-nine years on 14 October 1665 when he appealed to the Governor and Council of Virginia for his freedom. He was called "John a Negro" when he presented a note written on 26 November 1653 by his master, Rice Hoe, Sr., deceased, that he should be free after serving eleven years, "provided that he the sd Negro doth carefully and honestly performe his labour." Hoe's son, Rice Hoe, Jr., refused to release him, claiming that he had not lived up to the agreement. The General Court ruled that he should be free but referred the case back to the local court to determine if John had kept his half of the agreement. Hoe testified before the Charles City County court that his servant had been "refractory and disobedient" and presented the deposition of a former servant, Margaret Barker, who swore that

the sd Hoe had never a serv't maid but the sd Jack the Negro lay with her or got her w'th child.

But five other neighbors deposed that

John Kecatan Mr Howes Negro have done Mr Hoe true and good service,

and the court ordered him set free in February 1665/6 [DWO 1655-65, 601, 604, 605, 617, 618]. He was probably the "Jack negro" who was taxable on two persons in Surry County in 1670 [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy, vol.22, no.1, 23]. He was apparently the father of

2     i. John2, born about 1670.

 

2.    John2 Kiketan/ Kicotan, born about 1670, was a seven-year-old "Mollato boy" bound until the age of twenty-four on 3 November 1677 when Stephen Lewis sold the remainder of his indenture to William Edwards by Surry County deed for 2,500 pounds of tobacco [DW 2:157]. He was called a "Molatto boy Named Jno. Kikeson(?)" when he was named in a 7 May 1678 Surry County court suit between William Edwards and Stephen Luies [Haun, Surry County Court Records, III:381]. John Kickotan was taxable in William Edwards' household from 1687 to 1694. He was head of his own household in 1695 and 1696 and lived adjacent to the Cornish family in Lawnes Creek Parish on Hog Island from 1697 to 1702. John Blackshire was taxable in his household in 1700 [DW 5:22b, 60b, 109b, 134b, 191b, 194a, 208b, 234b, 258b, 291a; Magazine of Virginia Genealogy, vol.23, no.2, 63; no.3, 56, 60, 65; no.4, 68, 71 vol.24, no.1, 69, 74, 76; no.2, 73, 77, 81; no.3, 71, 75]. He married Margaret Sweat before 6 July 1697 when they (making their marks as Jno and Margt. Kicotan) returned an account of the estate of her deceased husband Robert Sweat, valued at 2,930 pounds of tobacco. In September 1797 they were ordered by the Surry County court to present an account of the estate of Cornish Sweat, orphan of Robert Sweat. Anthony Cornish was Margaret's security. John Kecotan and Evan Humphreys were witnesses in the May 1705 Surry County court case between Roger Case and John Sugar [DW 5:129a; Haun, Surry County Court Records, V:168; VI:57]. In 1717 he sued Roger Delk for assault and battery in Surry County court [Orders 1713-18, 128]. He was paid 7 shillings by the Surry County estate of Edward Portice on 17 December 1723 [DW 1715-30, 496]. His children were most likely

i. William1 Kicatan, paid 1 shilling by the Surry County estate of John Ogburn on 25 May 1721 [DW 1715-30, 378].

3    ii. Anthony1 Tann, born say 1697.

 

3.    Anthony1 Tann, born say 1697, was one of the residents of Brunswick County, Virginia, who were paid for a wolf's scalp on 2 December 1737. He was involved in a Brunswick County court case for debt on 3 May 1739 and 4 September 1740, and on 3 September 1741 he was one of the taxables who were ordered to keep the road from Flat Creek to the Meherrin River in repair [Orders 1732-41, 182, 243, 348]. His son Benjamin Tann was called an "orphan" on 20 February 1744 when the Surry County, Virginia court ordered the churchwardens of Albemarle Parish to bind him out [Orders 1744-9, 11, 22]. Anthony was married to the unnamed daughter of John Jeffries, Sr., of Albemarle Parish whose 3 November 1746 Surry County will, recorded on 16 June 1752, mentioned his grandson Benjamin Tann [DW 1738-54, 798]. He may have been identical to the Anthony Tann who was granted 550 acres of land on Jeffreys Creek and the Pee Dee River for himself, his wife, and nine children on 6 June 1749 [Holcomb, Petitions for Land from the South Carolina Council Journals, I:266]. He recorded a plat for this land in Craven County, South Carolina, on 7 June 1749 [Plats 5:306]. Anthony's children were

4     i. ?Thomas1, born say 1721.

ii. ?Joseph, born say 1726, living in Southampton County on 9 November 1752 when Matthew Revel sued him for failure to pay 2 pounds for the purchase of a mare. The suit was dismissed that December on agreement of the parties [Orders 1749-54, 286; Judgment Papers 1752-5, frames 68-70]. e

5     iii. ?John3, born say 1730.

iv. William2, born say 1732, named in a memorial of 13 November 1771 as having title to 550 acres on Jeffrey's Creek in Craven County (apparently the land which belonged to Anthony Tann in 1749) [S.C. Archives series S2111001, vol. 10:238].

6     v. ?Anthony2, born say 1734.

7     vi. Benjamin1, born about 1735.

 

4.   Thomas1 Tann, born say 1721, was paid 7 shillings by the Isle of Wight County estate of Joseph Bridger on 25 September 1742 [Guardian Accounts 1741-66, 3]. On 15 May 1745 Boaz Little was charged in the Surry County court of oyer and terminer with stealing five sides of leather from John Bennett and a side of leather from Thomas [Surry County Criminal Proceedings Against Free Persons, 1742-1822, p.6]. Thomas purchased 100 acres adjoining Allen and Newitt Edwards in Surry County on 14 September 1745 and sold 20 acres of it on 18 March 1748 [DB 1741-6, 341; 1746-9, 388]. On 21 November 1758 he and thirteen other "Mulatto" residents of Surry County were presented by the court for failing to pay tax on their wives [Orders 1744-64, 135]. He and his wife Sarah Tan were "free mulattos" who recorded the birth of their son Thomas in Bruton Parish, James City County, in 1766 [Bruton Parish Register, 28]. He enlisted for three years in Isle of Wight County on 26 December 1776 and was listed as deceased in the 1 July 1777 muster of Captain Thomas Edmunds' Company in the 15th Virginia Battalion [NARA, M246, roll 110, frame 285 of 768; roll 113, frame 189; https://www.fold3.com/image/9639784; https://www.fold3.com/image/9952883]. He left no will, but his oldest son was probably Jacob Tann who sold part of Thomas's land in 1777. His children were

8     i. Jacob1, born say 1755, died circa 1780.

ii. Thomas2, born in 1766 [Bruton Parish Register, 28].

 

5.    John3 Tann, born say 1730, sued Chambers Humphries in Surry County court for a debt of 2 pounds, 12 shillings on 26 February 1754 [DB 1753-7, 114, 191]. He and his wife Susannah "of Southampton County" sold 400 acres in Brunswick County, Virginia, on both sides of Little Creek which he had purchased by deed recorded in the General Court on 11 October 1757 [DB 8:220-1]. Sue was paid 12 shillings by the Isle of Wight County estate of Martha Fiveash, orphan of Peter Fiveash, for seven yards of Virginia cloth before 7 August 1766 [Guardian Accounts 1741-66, 356]. John and Susannah Tan, "Both free Mulattas Now Living in Southampton County," had their son John baptized in Bruton Parish, James City County on 30 May 1768 [Bruton Parish Register, 32]. He purchased 65 acres near Beetree Branch adjoining Edwards and Thomas Pritlow in Nottoway Parish, Southampton County, on 9 March 1771 and sold this land on 13 October 1789 [DB 4:341; 7:332]. He was taxable in Southampton County from 1782 to 1792: taxable on a horse and 5 cattle in 1782, on 2 tithes, a horse, and 4 cattle in 1787, 2 tithes in 1789, called John, Sr., in 1791 and 1792, listed next to John, Jr. [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92, frames 503, 526, 542, 576, 598, 625, 696, 745, 857; 1792-1806, frame 18]. He and his wife Susannah gave their consent for their daughter Elizabeth to marry by 27 December 1786 Southampton County bond. He was exempted from further payment of taxes by the Southampton County court on 13 June 1793 [Minutes 1793-9, 18]. Nelson Peirce, orphan of Peter Peirce, chose him as his guardian in Isle of Wight County court on 4 January 1796 [Orders 1795-7, 269]. John's children were

i. ?Susannah, married Matthew Williams, both of Isle of Wight County, 22 December 1783 Southampton County bond.

ii. John4, Jr., born 26 October 1767, baptized 30 May 1768 [Bruton Parish Register, 32], taxable in Southampton County from 1791 to 1800 [Personal Property Tax List 1792-1806, frames 18, 251, 301, 358, 459]. He registered in Southampton County on 6 January 1795: aged 26, 5 feet 6-3/4 inches, Free born and on 28 June 1797: aged 31, Mulatto, 5 feet 7 inches, Free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, nos. 96, 115]. He was a "F.N." taxable in Isle of Wight County in 1802 and 1803 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1810, frames 587, 607].

iii. ?Isham, presented by the Southampton County court on 9 November 1786 for living in fornication with Sarah Crocker (a white woman) [Orders 1784-9, 217, 270].

iv. Elizabeth, "daughter of John and Susannah Tan," married John Cannady, 27 December 1786 Southampton County bond, John Tann surety, Thomas Tann witness. The bond said her name was Susannah, but the Minister's return said Elizabeth.

v. ?Thomas3, born about 1770, registered in Southampton County on 28 September 1794: a free mulatto abt 24 years of age 5 feet 7-1/2 inches high born of free parents in Southampton [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 91].

vi. Sarah, born about 1778, twenty-five years old when she married Lewis Bazden, 27 October 1803 Southampton County bond, Mat Williams surety, 28 October marriage. Sally registered in Surry County on 15 February 1812: Sally Bazden late Sally Tann a daughter of John and Susanna Tann decd. free mulattoes of Southampton county, of a bright complexion, aged about thirty four years of age ... is 4'11-1/4" high [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 47]..

vii. ?Ann, mother of a poor child named Betsy Thomas living in the upper district of Nottoway Parish when the Southampton County court ordered the overseers of the poor to bind her out [Minutes 1799-1803, 104].

 

6.    Anthony2 Tann, born say 1734, was a "Free Mulattoe" taxable in Colleton, St. Bartholomew's Parish, South Carolina, in 1786 [S.C. Tax Returns 1783-1800, frame 138]. He purchased land by lease and release recorded in South Carolina between 1800 & 1801 [Lucas, Index to Deeds of South Carolina, D-7:277]. He was counted as white in 1800: head of a St. James Goose Creek household of one male aged 45 or older, one female 26-45 years, and one male and two females 10-16 years old [SC:66]. He and his wife Margaret sold 100 acres in St. James Goose Creek Parish, Charleston District, on 21 October 1801 [Register of Mesne Conveyance Book, Charleston, E7:450]. He was listed in the 1807 census for Knox County, Indiana [IN:50]. He was living on the east bank of the Wabash in July 1808 when he was visited by Shaker missionaries. He and his family were members of the Shaker Village in West Union, Knox County, by May 1810. According to Shaker records, he was a "coloured man" man who died on 17 June 1811. His wife Peggy, a "real white woman," was "near fifty" when she died on 28 December 1814 [MacLean, Shakers of Ohio, 279-80, 286, 312]. His 17 June 1811 Knox County, Indiana will was proved in July 1811. He left his wife Margaret all his estate which was to be equally divided among his unnamed children at her death [Original Knox County will, box 3; recorded p.35]. His children were

9     i. ?Jacob2, born say 1760.

ii. ?Barney, census entry blank in St. Bartholomew Parish, South Carolina in 1790.

iii. ?George, counted in the 1820 Knox County, Indiana census: entry blank with one "free colored" female 14-25 [IN:90].

iv. William, born September 1794, left the Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, on 10 October 1828 [Shaker Village Roll Book, p.208].

v. Polly, born on the Santee River in South Carolina on 13 March 1797, died 1 April 1883 according to the records of Shaker Village, Pleasant Hill, Kentucky [Roll Book, p.65]. She was counted in the Mercer County, Kentucky census in Shaker Village in 1850: born in South Carolina about 1799 [MERC:281].

vi. Charlotte, born 1 August 1799 in Charleston, South Carolina, joined the Shaker Village in West Union, Knox County, Indiana, in May 1810, moved to the Shaker Village at Pleasant Hill on 30 March 1827 (after the Shaker Village at West Union closed), and died 15 March 1875 according to the records of Shaker Village in Pleasant Hill, Kentucky [Record Book C, p.77, Harrodsburg, Kentucky, Historical Society; Pleasant Hill Roll Book, p.62]. She was counted in the Mercer County, Kentucky census in 1850: born in South Carolina about 1802 [MERC:280].

 

7.    Benjamin1 Tann, born say 1735, orphan of Anthony Tann, was ordered bound out by the churchwardens of Albemarle Parish in Surry County on 19 December 1744. In 1754 he was an insolvent Sussex County taxpayer [Southside Virginian 6:48]. He moved to Northampton County, North Carolina, where he was listed among the "Black" members of the undated colonial muster roll of Captain James Fason [N.C. Archives Mil. T.R. 1-3]. He was occupying land adjacent to James Morgan when Morgan made his 24 November 1774 Nash County will [WB 1:19]. He was taxed in Nash County on 260 acres, a mule, and 5 cattle in 1782. He received 9 pounds payment on certificate number 1859 from the North Carolina Army Accounts on 10 June 1783 and a further 14 pounds, 18 shillings on undated certificate no. 238 [N.C. Archives T&C, Rev. War Accounts, Vol I:45 folio 2; XI:48, folio 2]. Benjamin Taylor testified in Scrivener County, Georgia, that he recalled serving with Benjamin Tann as a volunteer from Nash County, North Carolina [https://www.fold3.com/image/22557962]. On 15 October 1787 Benjamin purchased 200 acres on the south side of the Tar River on Cooper's Creek in Nash County [DB 4:42]. He was head of a Nash County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:71] and 8 in 1800 [NC:122]. He sold 10 acres of his land to his neighbor and executor of his will, Jesse Booth, on 10 February 1804 [DB 7:215]. His 11 September 1806 Nash County will, proved November 1806, mentioned his wife Priscilla and two of his children, Benjamin Tann and Amy Locus [WB 4:42]. Priscilla was probably identical to Priscilla Booth whose illegitimate children Jesse and Sylvia Booth were indentured by the Nash County court in April 1778 [Bradley, Nash County Court Minutes I:5]. On 28 September 1807 there was a judgment levied on Benjamin's land for a $35 note in favor of John Lewis. Buyers at the sale of his estate included Larkin Taybon (Taborn), Hardy Taybon, Ephraim Locust, Arkel Boothe, Burrel Taybon, Pharaby Tann, Willis Hammons, and Joseph Allen [Estates Records 1770-1909, 1807]. The account of sale of his estate on 5 June 1813 mentioned $129.94 divided among six unnamed heirs [DB 9:265]. His children were

i. ?Ephraim, a private in Baker's Company, enlisted on 20 July 1778 for nine months. He was deceased before 8 March 1785 when his heirs received 640 acres for 84 months service in the North Carolina Continental Line [Clark, State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1173; T&C Rev. War Army Accts. Vol III:73, folio 3 & VII:108, folio 3; NARA, M246, https://www.fold3.com/image/291770905].

ii. ?James, a soldier who died in the service in Philadelphia during the Revolutionary War. He enlisted on 20 July 1778, listed in the roster of Quinn's North Carolina Company and omitted in 1779 [Clark, State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1173; https://www.fold3.com/image/291770905]. Jesse Boothe, executor of Benjamin Tann's Nash County will, deposed in Nash County on 20 June 1821 that James' rightful heir was Hannah Tann, daughter of his brother Jesse Tann [S.S. 460.1]. She received a land warrant for 640 acres for her uncle's service [S.S. 460.1, 460.2, 460.3, 460.12].

iii. ?Joseph, died before 1792 when his heirs received 640 acres for his 84 months service in the Revolution [N.C. Archives, S.S., Land Warrants, Tennessee, file no. 117, Micajah Thomas, Assignee of Joseph Tann (Military Warrant No. 1586).

iv. ?Jesse, died before 20 June 1821, father of Hannah Tann.

10     v. ?Drury, born about 1760.

11     vi. Benjamin2, born say 1765.

vii. Amy Locus.

viii. Pheraby, living in Franklin County on 28 January 1822 when she sold land in Nash County adjoining Jesse Booth to Hardemon Taborn [DB 10:391].

 

8.    Jacob1 Tann, born say 1755, was listed as a buyer in the 21 December 1775 account of the sale of the Halifax County, North Carolina estate of James Barnes [Gammon, Record of Estates II:25]. He sold 30 acres adjoining Ethelred Edwards and William Allen in Surry County, Virginia, on 19 July 1777 [DB 1769-78, 531]. His 1 December 1780 Surry County will was recorded 26 June 1780. He mentioned his unnamed wife, and underage children. He divided his land between his sons Thomas and Jacob [Wills 1778-83, 187]. His wife was Jemima Tann who was taxable on property tax for this land from 1787 until 1795 when Thomas reached maturity. The transfer of the land from Jemima to Thomas Tann was recorded in the Surry County Property Tax Alterations for that year. On 3 December 1801 Jemima was described as "a white woman late of this county" in her son's registration paper as a "free Negro." When her son Thomas married on 27 March 1804, he was called "alias Thomas Price," so perhaps this was her maiden name. Jacob and Jemima's children were

i. Thomas4, born say 1774, taxable in Surry County from 1791 to 1812 [Personal Property Tax List, 1791-1816, frames 46, 224, 274, 305, 546, 577, 617, 658, 696, 715]. He was taxable on his father's 70 acres in Surry County in 1795 [Land Tax List 1782-1820]. He brought suit against his brother Jacob, still "an infant," in Surry County court on 28 February 1795, perhaps over payment of the taxes. The suit was continued until 28 May 1799 [DB 1795-1803, 309, 337, 367]. He sold the 35 acre portion of his inheritance in Surry County on 22 June 1795 [DB 1792-9, 272]. He married Selah Cofer, 27 March 1804 Surry County bond and marriage. He was head of a Surry County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:617].

ii. Martha, born say 1778, chose Jeremiah Banks as her guardian on 28 February 1795 to represent her interests in her father's will. She registered as a "free Negro" in Surry County on 18 June 1810: a mulattoe woman born of free parents late of the county of Surry deceased, of a bright complexion, aged about 26 years, has long straight hair ... 5'1-1/4" high [Surry County Register, p.41]. She registered in Petersburg on 18 October 1810: a light coloured Mulatto woman, five feet one inches high, twenty six years old, long straight hair, born free in Surry p. certificate [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819].

iii. Jacob3, born about 1777, taxable in Surry County from 1797 to 1810, his tax charged to John Banks in 1797 [Personal Property Tax List, 1791-1816, frames 284, 504, 546, 639, 658, 676] and taxable in Surry County on his 35 acres inheritance in 1798, sold his land on 27 June 1803 [Land Tax List 1782-1820; DB 1800-4, 387]..

iv. William2, born September 1780, not mentioned in his father's will, registered as a "free Negro" in Surry County on 3 December 1801: a Mulatto man and son of Jemima Tan a white woman late of this county - he is of a bright complexion, has straight & black hair, pretty stout and straight made, aged 21 last September [Back of Guardian Accounts, 1783-1804, no.136].

 

9.    Jacob2 Tann, born say 1760, was head of a Charleston District, Bartholomew Parish, South Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [SC:36]. His children may have been

i. Sarah, born say 1785, married Peter Graves 15 September 1801 in South Carolina [Bryan Journal].

ii. William, fled from South Carolina to Georgia about 1835 after Simon Verdier posted his bond on charges he had killed a "Negro" on John's Island in Colleton District. Upon the court's determination of his race as "colored," Verdier captured him, and he was tried and executed [S.C. Archives series S165015, item 5164].

iii. Jacob4, living in St. Bartholomew's Parish, South Carolina, in 1840 [COLL:268].

iv. Jonathan C., living in Spartanburg, South Carolina, in 1840 [SPAR:268].

 

10.    Drury Tann, born about 1760, enlisted for fourteen months as a private in Hadley's Company of the 2nd Regiment of the North Carolina Continental Line on 1 August 1782 according to the muster of 1 September 1782 [M256, Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783, https://www.fold3.com/image/10200698 accessed on 3 October 2015; Clark, State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1175]. He was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 3 "Black" persons 12-50 years old and 2 "Black" persons less than 12 or over 50 years old in Dupree's District for the 1786 state census. He was head of household of 4 "other free" in Northampton County in 1790 [NC:74], 3 in Hertford County in 1800 [NC:722], and 2 "free colored" in Southampton County, Virginia, in 1820: a man and woman over 45 years of age. He was taxable in Southampton County as a "free Negro" laborer in 1813 and 1814, living on Arthur Carr's land in 1820. In 1830 he was listed as a "F.N." on Samuel Williams' land [PPTL 1807-21, frames 326, 426]. He was probably the "free colored" man over 55 years of age counted in Hamilton Tann's household in the 1830 Southampton County census. He made an application for a Revolutionary War pension in Southampton County court on 7 March 1834 in which he told about his early years in North Carolina:

he was stolen from his parents when a small boy by persons unknown to him, who were carrying him to sell him into Slavery, and had gotten with him and other stolen property as far as the Mountains on their way, that his parents made complaint to a Mr. Tanner Alford who was Then a magistrate in the county of Wake State of North Carolina to get me back from Those who had stolen me and he did pursue the Rogues & overtook Them at the mountains and took me from Them [NARA, S.19484, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/19565717].

He may have been the son of Benjamin1 Tann since Benjamin was listed in the 1782 Nash County Tax list as a neighbor of Tanner Alford. Drury did not name his children, but they may have been

i. Nancy, born before 1776, head of a Hertford County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:198] and 3 in 1830.

ii. Jincy, born 1776-94, head of a Northampton County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:262], married James Boon, 5 June 1826 Northampton County bond.

iii. Britton, born about 1800, head of a Northampton County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:264], taxable on one poll in District 10 of Northampton County in 1823 and District 6 in 1824. He married Mitetto Jones, 24 March 1828 Halifax County bond, and was head of a Halifax County household of 2 "free colored" in 1830.

iv. Randall/Randolph Tann, born about 1807, married Betsy Banks, 5 July 1816 Northampton County bond, John Predens bondsman. He was taxable on one poll in District 9 of Northampton County in 1825.

v. Anney, married Acre Johnson, 27 February 1826 Northampton County bond.

12   vi. Patsey, born say 1793.

13   vii. Cherry, born about 1796.

viii. Exum, born 1794-1806, head of a Northampton County household of 1 "free colored" in 1830.

ix. William3, born about 1800, indentured to John Priden to be a shoemaker in Northampton County in 1812.

x. Hamilton, born about 1803, taxed in 1819 as a "free Mulatto" over sixteen years old in Southampton County, Virginia. He married Jane Gardner in Southampton County on 28 December 1824, and he was taxed on a horse in Southampton County in 1826. He was counted as white in 1830 with 2 "free colored" in his household, probably Drury Tann and his wife. On 21 November 1831 he (called "fn.") and his wife Jincy Tan sold 160 acres adjoining Seacock Swamp in Southampton County for $150 [DB 22:107]. He was a 34-year-old shoemaker from Southampton County who emigrated to Liberia aboard the James Perkins in 1831 with Henney (22), William Henry (6), Martha Ann (4) and Mary Jane Tann (3) [https://www.fold3.com/image/46670330].

 

11.    Benjamin2 Tann, born about 1765, was head of a Nash County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:122]. He received land by his father's 10 February 1804 Nash County will. On 14 August 1809 the Nash County court bound John and Susanna Locus to him as apprentices [Rackley, Nash County North Carolina Court Minutes VI:71]. Perhaps his children were

i. Benjamin3, born about 1795, "Negro," purchased land in Cincinnati District, Indiana, on 21 April 1837 [Land Entries, Vol I, SE 1/4 - SE 1/4 - SE 1]. He was head of a Randolph County, Indiana household of 3 "free colored" in 1840 [Census p.108]. He was counted in the 1870 census for Porter Township, Cassapolis, Michigan: a seventy-five year-old born in North Carolina living with seventy-five-year-old Mary Tan who was born in Virginia [household no.221].

ii. Leroy, purchased one acre on the north side of Tar River and Fox Swamp in Franklin County on 15 March 1824 and sold this land to Elizabeth Tan on 3 January 1831 [DB, p.319]. He married Margaret Pettiford, 15 March 1831 Franklin County bond.

iii. Amy, purchased 3 acres on Driving Branch joining John Predens in Northampton County on 5 January 1818 [DB 20:164].

 

12.    Patsey Tann, born say 1793, was the mother of Newsom Tann who was ordered bound an apprentice carpenter to Nathaniel Ingram by the Northampton County court on 5 June 1822 [Minutes 1821-25, 104]. Patsy married Winborne Manly, 27 February 1826 Northampton County bond. Her children were

14    i. Newsom, born about 1810.

ii. ?Cordy, born about 1813, may have been Newsom's brother since he was living near him in Ohio. He was head of a Jefferson Township, Logan County, Ohio household of 4 "free colored" in 1840 [Census p.77]. In 1850, still in Jefferson Township, he was counted as a "Mulatto" with Eliza Tan, born 1820 in North Carolina, with five children born in Ohio, the oldest born in 1838 [Census p.288].

 

13.    Cherry Tann, born about 1796, was head of a Northampton County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:264] and was living in household no. 1038 in Northampton County in 1850. On 6 December 1853 when she was about fifty-seven years old, she married Everett Banks, Northampton County bond. Her children may have been

i. Madison, born about 1812, paid $2.60 as a witness in the State against Anthony Deberry on 8 June 1824 in Northampton County court. James Daughtrey received the money for him [Minutes 1821-25, 288]. The December 1826 court presented him for being without a guardian. He was bound an apprentice to William R. Taylor on 6 December 1826, no parent named, and was bound to Alfred Aldridge to be a farmer a year later on 4 December 1827 [CR 71.101]. His poll tax was charged to Herod Faison in District 6 in 1835, to Drewry Bass in District 3 in 1838, and to Diley Kee in District 3 in 1843. In 1837 he had a child by Tissie, a slave of the Kee family. Their son James Tann Kee named his father and mother in his marriage license when he married for the second time in Northampton County on 5 March 1894. Madison married Elizabeth Sweat, 11 September 1838 Northampton County bond. He was head of a Northampton County household of 4 "free colored" in 1840 and was counted in the Northampton County census for 1850, 1860, and 1880 with nine children. His oldest Louisa married Hardy Artis.

ii. Joseph, born about 1831, living in Cherry's household in 1850.

iii. Benjamin, born about 1838, living in Cherry's household in 1850.

iv. Winnifred, born about 1837, living near Cherry in household no. 1040 in 1850.

 

14.    Newsom Tann, born about 1810, was bound to Nathaniel Ingram "to read and write" on 6 June 1822 in Northampton County, North Carolina [CR 71.101.1]. In 1840 he was living in Monroe Township, Logan County, Ohio: head of a household of 4 "free colored" [Census, p.19]. By 1850 he had moved to Cass County, Michigan, where he was listed as a "Mulatto" farmer, married with a $400 estate, unable to read or write. Catherine, born about 1815 in North Carolina, living in his household, was probably his wife [Census, p.576]. By 1870 he was married to Rachel, born about 1830 in Indiana [Census p.21]. He had real estate in Cass County worth $3,000 in 1860 [household no.750]. His 28 March 1873 Cassapolis, Michigan will, recorded 26 September 1879, lent his farm in Calvin Township to his wife Rachel, and at her death to Levi Hathcock. He mentioned his daughter Margaret Roberts. His daughter was

i. Margaret, born about 1836 in Ohio, living with her parents in Cass County, Michigan, in 1850. She married first, Andrew Shavers in Cass County on 31 December 1854, recorded 18 January 1855; and second, Exum A. Roberts (born about 1826) on 23 September 1855 at Allen Hill's house, Jefferson Township, Cass County.

 

Other members of the family were

i. John4, born say 1760, listed in the payrolls of Captain Uriah Goodwyn's company of the 3rd South Carolina Regiment from March 1779 to March 1780 [M246, Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783, www.footnote.com/image/967385, /967940, /967941 viewed on 2 January 2008].

ii. Elizabeth, born say 1770, said to be a "colored woman with thick skin and long hair" originally from North Carolina who claimed to be an Egyptian. She married a white man named Miller in South Carolina and had a daughter named Nancy who married a member of the Patrick family--described as a "colored man." Nancy's grandson refused to pay the discriminatory South Carolina capitation tax in a case heard in the Court of Appeals in May 1843. The case referred to an earlier case June 1836 in which Isaac Winningham and his wife Rachel were judged to be exempt from tax as descendants of Egyptians [Johnson v. Basquere, 28 S.C.L. (1 Speers) 329 (Ct. App. 1843)]. John and Lewis Winningham were heads of Colleton District households in 1810, Lewis with a white woman in his household [SC:592].

iii. Lydia, born say 1795, married (second) a white man named John Erick Miller and had two children, one named Sally and an unnamed sister, described as a "quadroon" who married a member of the Patrick family. Sally Miller married a white man named Benjamin Johnson and had sons Thomas, Henry and John Johnson who won their case against the tax collector of St. Paul's Parish and the sheriff of Colleton District in the South Carolina Court of Appeals [Johnson v. Boon, 28 S.C.L. (1 Speers) 268 (Ct. App. 1843)].

 

TATE FAMILY

1.    James1 Tate, born say 1660, "a Negro slave to Mr. Patrick Spence," was married to Hester Tate, an English woman servant of James Westcomb. Their son James was bound an apprentice to James Westcomb in Westmoreland County, Virginia, in 1691, and that same year three more of their children were bound apprentices. Her children were probably the "two mulatto servants" who belonged to the orphans of Patrick Spence, Jr., in December 1703 [Orders 1690-98, 40-41; 1698-1705, 210a]. James and Hester's children were

i. James2, born say 1685, bound to James Westcomb in 1691. On 30 August 1716 John Chilton sued Joseph Moxley, claiming that he was detaining James who he claimed as his servant. The court ruled that James was a free person [Orders 1705-21, 261a].

ii. Jane1, born say 1687, bound apprentice to Patrick Spence in 1691.

iii. Elizabeth, born say 1688, bound to Patrick Spence in 1691. She was presented by the churchwardens of Cople Parish, Westmoreland County, in September 1714 for having a "Mulatto" bastard child. On 27 April 1715 her attorney George Eskridge argued that she was not within the purview of the law against having illegitimate children because she was a "Mulatto." He posted bond to appeal the case to the general court. On 30 August 1716 the court ordered that John Chilton, Gentleman, pay her 1,160 pounds of tobacco for attending court for nine days in the suit which he brought against Joseph Moxley for detaining his servant James Tate [Orders 1705-21, 261a, 293].

iv. William1, born say 1690, bound to Patrick Spence in 1691.

 

Their descendants were

2     i. William2, born say 1726.

3     ii. Joyce, born say 1730.

4     iii. Penelope, born say 1732.

5     iv. Winnie, born say 1750.

6     v. Nancy, born say 1758.

vi. Jesse1, born say 1758, born say 1758, entered the service on the galley Dragon on 10 September 1777 and was paid on 20 January 1779. He was listed as one of the crew of the Dragon which was waiting for provisions on 2 September 1779, listed as entitled to bounty land, but had not received it by 23 November 1834 [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 8, 13, 71, 217]. He was head of a Richmond County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:395].

7     vii. William3, born say 1766.

viii. James4, married Charity Grimes, 22 August 1804 Westmoreland County bond, Nathaniel Brewer security. James Teet, Jr., was head of a Westmoreland County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:787].

ix. Fanny, born say 1775, a "free Negro" farmer living with children George, Elliner, James, and Jenney Tate, on William Edward's land in Westmoreland County in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:45].

8     x. Peggy, born say 1780.

xi. Peter, born say 1780, a "Molatto" farmer living with (his wife?) Phillis Tate in Westmoreland County on William Hutt's land in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:45]. Phillis Tate was in a "List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes over the age of 16" in Northumberland County in 1813 [PPTL, frame 22].

 

2.    William2 Tate, born say 1726, was a "Mullatto" boy who still had 17 years to serve when he was listed in the inventory of the Westmoreland County estate of Captain Patrick Spence taken on 10 April 1740 [Estate Settlements, Records, Inventories 1723-46, 230]. He was taxable in the upper district of Westmoreland County 1783 to 1791: taxable on William Tate, Jr.'s tithe in 1787 and 1789 [PPTL, 1782-1815, frames 263, 311, 335, 343, 343, 355]. Perhaps his widow was Judy Tate who was taxable on 2 horses in the upper district of Westmoreland County from 1792 to 1797 [PPTL, 1782-1815, frames 395, 419, 444, 469]. She was listed as a farmer in Westmoreland County in 1801 with children: Elfried, Molley and Yewell Tate and Mimea Locus. She married Dick Young, 3 June 1805 Westmoreland County bond, John Watts and Jesse Tate security. William may have been the father of

i. William4, born say 1771, taxable in the upper district of Westmoreland County from 1787 to 1798, called William, Jr., in 1790 and 1791 [PPTL, 1782-1815, frames 395, 419, 469, 485], listed as a "free Mulatto" in 1801 when his place of abode was Louisa County [Virginia Genealogist 31:42].

ii. Elfried.

iii. Molley, head of a Westmoreland County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820.

iv. Yewell.

 

3.    Joice Teet (Joyce Tate), born say 1730, was an "Old woman" in 1801 when she was a "free Molatto" living on William Fitzhugh's land in Westmoreland County, listed next to James Teet [Virginia Genealogist 31:42]. She may have been the mother of

i. James3, born about September 1742 in Westmoreland County, taxable on 2 horses and 3 cattle in Westmoreland County in 1782 [PPTL, 1782-1815, frame 249]. He was a "Molatto" farmer living with (his wife?) Sarah Teet and children: Lovell, Betsey, Mauening, Sary, Laurence, and Lucey Teet on Henry Lee's land in Westmoreland County in 1801. Perhaps John and Ann Locus, two children living in their household, were his wife's relatives [Virginia Genealogist 31:42]. He was head of a Westmoreland County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820. He was about 91 years old the next September when he appeared in Westmoreland County court on 28 January 1833 for a pension for his service in the Revolution. He was called into service in the militia in Westmoreland County under Captain James Muse to defend against the British invasion by small vessels at Pope's Creek [NARA, M804, S.7696, Roll 2355, frame 283 of 607, Teete, James; https://www.fold3.com/image/18352288].

ii. Samuel, born about 1779, married Hannah Lucas, 30 December 1809 Westmoreland County bond, Lawrence Ashton security. Samuel Teet was head of a Westmoreland County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:788] and 5 "free colored" in 1820 as Samuel Tate. He registered in Westmoreland County in May 1843: light complexion, 5 feet 6-1/2 inches high, about 64 years of age, Born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1828-1849, no.349].

iii. Joseph, born say 1781, a "free Molatto" farmer living with Felicia Tate and children Sophia and Delphia on William Fitzhugh's land in Westmoreland County in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:47]. He was head of a Westmoreland County 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:787] and 7 "free colored" in 1820. Felicia registered in Westmoreland County in May 1833: a mulatto woman, 5 feet 4-1/2 inches high, 50 years of age, born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1828-1849, no.180].

iv. Ann, listed with children Nacy and Willis(?) Tate in Westmoreland County on William Fitzhugh's land in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:47], head of a Westmoreland County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:787]. Perhaps Willis(?) was the William Tate who married _ Pumroy, 1805 Westmoreland County bond. William Teet was head of a Westmoreland County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:787].

 

4.    Penelope Tate, born say 1732, brought complaint to the Westmoreland County court against (her master) James Clayton on 29 January 1756. The suit was dismissed in February 1757 [Orders 1755-8, 34, 123a]. She was living in Richmond County on 6 April 1767 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Lunenburg Parish to bind her son Charles to William Dekins. On 5 June 1786 the parish of Lunenburg allotted 280 pounds of tobacco to (her son?) Matthew Tait for her support [Orders 1765-9, 237; 1784-6, 335]. She was the mother of

i. ?Matthew, born say 1760, allowed 280 pounds of tobacco for the support of (his mother?) Penelope Tait on 5 June 1786. He was a "free Molatto" farmer living with children: John, Lucy, Rodham, Alcey, and Presley Teet on Lusetty Smith's land in Westmoreland County in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:42].

ii. Charles, born say 1765, a "free Molatto" farmer living with (his wife?) Abby Teet and children James, Betsey, John, and Campbell Teet on John Neal's land in Westmoreland County in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:42].

 

5.    Winnie Tate, born say 1750, was living in Westmoreland County on 26 August 1777 when the court ordered that she appear at the next session to show cause why her daughter Judith should not be bound out [Orders 1776-86, 46]. And on 22 February 1785 she was summoned to appear at the next court to show cause why her son Henry should not be bound out. On 26 March 1793 the court ordered her children Jesse and William bound out but rescinded the order the following day [Orders 1776-86, 46, 262; Orders 1790-5, 236, 239, 253]. She was the mother of

i. Judith, born say 1770, married John Evins, 28 April 1795 Westmoreland County bond, Hugh Quinton, security. John and Judy Evins and child Rockey Tate were "free Negro" farmers living on William Fitzhugh's land in Westmoreland County in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:47].

ii. Henry, born say 1780, married John Johnson, 25 December 1809 Westmoreland County bond, Edmond Tate security.

iii. Jesse2, born say 1782, head of a Westmoreland County household of 11 "free colored" in 1820.

iv. William, born say 1784.

 

6.    Peggy Tate, born say 1780, was head of a Westmoreland County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:787]. She was the mother of

i. Henry, born about 1800, registered in Westmoreland County in September 1821: a Black Boy about 5 feet 6 or 7 inches high about 21 years of age and son of Peggy Teete who was free born [Free Negro Register 1819-1826, p.7].

 

7.    William3 Tate, born say 1766, married Ann West, 28 January 1787 Culpeper County bond. He was taxable in Madison County from 1793 to 1817: taxable on his unnamed son in 1803, taxable on two sons in 1809, a F.N." listed with unnamed wife and son in 1813 [PPTL, 1793-1818]. He was head of a Madison County household of 14 "other free" in 1810 [VA:409]. He was apparently the father of

i. Beverly, born about 1789, taxable in Madison County on John Tate's tithe and 2 horses in 1811 [PPTL, 1793-1818], registered in the Corporation of Staunton, Virginia, on 14 August 1820: a yellow man (now) aged about 31 years, five feet 7-3/4 inches high, who was born free; is registered...upon the certificate of Benjamin Cave, Clerk of Madison County Court dated 10 October 1812 [Register of Free Negroes, no.53].

ii. John, taxable in Madison County in 1811, listed as a "F.N." in 1813 [PPTL, 1793-1818].

iii. Reuben, a "F.N." listed with his unnamed wife in Madison County in 1813 [PPTL, 1793-1818].

iv. Coleman, a "Free Negro" taxable in Madison County in 1815 [PPTL, 1793-1818].

 

8.    Nancy Tate, born say 1758, living in Westmoreland County on 26 March 1793 when the court ordered the overseers of the poor in Cople Parish to bind out her children Edmond and Eliza. The court rescinded its order the following day [Orders 1790-5, 236, 239, 253]. She was a "free Negro" farmer on William Edward's land in Westmoreland County in 1801 with children Edmond, Jesive(?), Lewis, Haney, and Simon Tate [Virginia Genealogist 31:44]. Her children were

i. Jesive(?).

ii. Lewis, born about 1775, perhaps identical to James Lewis alias Tate who registered in Westmoreland County on 16 May 1835: light complexion, about 60 years old, 5 feet 4-1/2 inches, Born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1828-1849, no. 215].

iii. Edmond, born about 1777, married Peggy Aston (Ashton), 12 December 1806 Westmoreland County bond, Joseph Tate security. He registered in Westmoreland County in 1809: a Black Man aged about twenty two years, is free by Birth [Tate, Edmond (M, 22): Free Negro Register, 1809, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA] and registered again in October 1828: a black man, 5'6" high, about 49 years of age, free born [Register of Free Negroes, 1828-1849, no.24]. He was head of a Westmoreland County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820.iv. Haney, listed in Nancy Tate's Westmoreland County household in 1801, perhaps identical to Haraway Tate (born about 1786) who registered in Westmoreland County in April 1846: a Mulatto woman, 5 feet 2-1/2 inches high, about 60 years of age, Born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1828-1849, no.415].

v. Simon.

 

Other members of the family were

i. William4, born before 1776, head of a Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820.

ii. William5, married Sally Going, 31 December 1815 Albemarle County bond.

iii. Willis, born about 1799, head of an Albemarle County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830, 10 in 1840 and a "Mulatto" counted with Mary Tate and their children in Concord, Highland County, Ohio, in 1850. He married Mary Goings before 4 April 1831 when she obtained a certificate of freedom in Albemarle County: a woman of colour, aged twenty six years, five feet six and a quarter inches high, of light complexion. She registered again on 2 August 1833: Mary Tate, wife of Willis Tate, Born free of Indian decent, her parents James Goins & Rebecca his wife both being free [Tate, Mary (F, 26); (F): Free Negro Register, 1833, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

iv. Noah, born about 1804, married Anna Going, 25 October 1832 Albemarle County bond. He registered in Albemarle County on 7 November 1831: a man of Color, aged twenty seven years, five feet 11-1/2 inches high [Tate, Noah (M, 27): Free Negro Register, 1831, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. On 22 November 1844 Noah and his wife Jincy made an Albemarle County deed of trust for land they inherited from her parents Sherod and Susan Goings [DB 42:444-5].

 

Tate Family of Stafford County:

1.    Jane Tate, born say 1740, was a white woman who was born in Scotland. She had a daughter Barbary Red who married John Bates. Jane appeared in Stafford County on 21 April 1808 to testify for the certificate of freedom for her grandchildren: Rachel Bates is my grandaughter born of my daughter Barbary Red who intermarried with John Bates and that she Rachell Bates is free as well as her brother & sisters I do certify that I am a native of that part of Grate Britton called Scotland & was born as free as other British subjects are. 21st Aprl 1808. Charles Julian also testified: I do certify that I have been acquainted with Rachel Bates for 6 or 7 years & always knew her to be free & the grandchild of Mrs. Jane Tate. 21 Apl. 1808. Chs Julian [Fredericksburg City Certificates and Registry of Free Negroes, 1790-1862, 136]. Jane was head of a Stafford County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:128]. She was the mother of

i. Barbary Red, born say 1760.

 

TAYLOR FAMILY

1.    Susannah Pickett, born say 1718, was called Susannah Pickett alias Taylor when her children: Sarah, Edward, Lydia, and James were bound out by the Surry County, Virginia court in January 1745/6 [Orders 1744-9, 108]. She was the mother of

i. Sarah, born say 1739.

2     ii. Edward, born say 1741.

3     iii. Lydia, born say 1743.

iv. James, born say 1745.

 

2.    Edward Pickett, born say 1741, complained to the Surry County court on 16 January 1754 against his master Joseph Eelbeck. The court noted that Eelbeck had moved to North Carolina and ordered the churchwardens of Southwarke Parish to take him under their care [Orders 1753-7, 43]. He may have been the Edward Taylor whose son Aaron Taylor registered as a "free Negro" in Surry County in 1796. His children were

i. Aaron Taylor, born say 1770, taxable in Surry County from 1786 to 1816: called Aaron Peters in 1789 and 1790; listed in Armstead Peters' household in 1791; called a "M"(ulatto) in 1811; listed with 2 "free Negroes & Mulattoes above the age of 16" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 399, 461, 482, 557, 603; 1791-1816, frames 15, 68, 118, 245, 577, 601, 639, 676, 696, 728, 869]. He married Milly Scott, 24 December 1793 Surry County, Virginia bond, Armstead Peters surety, 29 December marriage. On 23 January 1796 he registered as a "free Negro" in Surry County: son of Edward Taylor, resident of this County, a bright mulattoe man aged about 26 years, straight & well made, 6'1/2" high - born of free parents [Back of Guardian Accounts Book 1783-1804, no.18]. He married, second, Elsey Charity, 23 December 1799 Surry County bond and was head of a Surry County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:617].

ii. ?John Taylor, married Arry Williams, 25 December 1797 Southampton County bond. John apparently died before 19 February 1803 when his widow Aira Taylor married Aaron Byrd, Southampton County bond, Burwell Gardner surety.

 

3.    Lydia Taylor, born say 1750, was a "Mulatto" living in Surry County, Virginia, on 19 June 1753 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Albemarle Parish to bind her out [Orders 1751-3, 443]. She may have been the mother of

i. James, born about 1783, registered in Surry County on 26 August 1805: a negro man aged about 22 years, 5'7-1/4" high, of a complexion more bright than otherwise ... born of a free woman late of this county [Hudgins, Register of Free Negroes, 27]. He registered in Petersburg on 23 July 1806: a dark brown Negro man, five feet seven inches high, twenty three years old, born free & raised in Surry County by Cert [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 389]. His Surry County tax was charged to Armstead Peters in 1801 and 1802 [Personal Property Tax List, 1791-1816, frames 459, 496].

 

Richmond and Essex counties

1.    Ann Taylor, born say 1725, was the servant of Captain William Brockebrough in Richmond County, Virginia, on 5 October 1747 when the court ordered her to serve him an extra year after her time of indenture for having an illegitimate "Molatto" child. And the court ordered the churchwardens of Lunenburg Parish to bind the child to her master [Orders 1746-52, 86]. She may have been the mother of

i. Prince, born say 1745, head of an Essex County household of 6 "Blacks" in 1783 [VA:52]. He was head of an Essex County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:197] and was listed as a "Free Negro" or "Mulatto" in the tax list for 1814 [PPTL 1782-1819, frame 552].

 

Other members of a Taylor family in Virginia were

i. John, born say 1740, in jail for eighteen months in Norfolk County and in the public jail in Williamsburg but freed in May 1762 when no one appeared to claim him [McIlwaine, Executive Journals, VI:220]. He may have been the John Taylor who was head of a Norfolk County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:923].

ii. Thomas, head of a Petersburg Town household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:127a].

iii. Dick, head of a Southampton County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:54].

iv.Phil, head of a Southampton County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:60]. He was living on Ben Jordan's land in Southampton County with his wife Patty and with Bitha & Lisha Artis in 1813 [PPTL 1807-21, frame 326].

v.Dicey, living with husband David Bird on Jerry Drakes' land in Southampton County in 1813 [PPTL 1807-21, frame 313].

vi. John, head of a Prince George County household of 1 "other free" and 5 slaves in 1810 [VA:541].

vii. Charles, born about 1794, registered in Sussex County on 12 October 1816: light complexion, 5'3-1/2", free born, 22 years old [Register, no.89].

 

Members of the family in North Carolina were

i. Burwell, head of a Nash County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:71].

ii. Keziah, head of a Halifax County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:346] and 4 in 1810 [NC:52].

iii. Malachi, head of a Halifax County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [NC:52].

iv. Margaret, head of a Halifax County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:52].

v. George, born before 1776, head of a Cumberland County household of 10 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:216].

vi. Harry, born before 1776, head of a Cumberland County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:158].

 

TEAGUE FAMILY

1.    John Teage, born say 1700, was called an Indian in Accomack County court on 8 September 1725 when the land he was renting was the subject of a court case between John Goodright and Thomas Thrustout [Orders 1724-31, 37]. His likely descendants were

i. Robert, born say 1750, a "Mulato" taxable on himself and a horse in Northampton County, Virginia, in 1787 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frame 75].

ii. Peter, born about 1751, a "Mulatto" bound apprentice in Northampton County in July 1753 [Orders 1751-53, 322].

iii. Mason Teague Toby, born about 1756, "a nego Girl aged 2 years," bound apprentice to Thomas Marshall in Northampton County on 12 December 1758 [Minutes 1754-61, 174].

2     iv. Jacob, born about 1757.

v. Abraham, head of a St. George's Parish, Accomack County household in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:163]. He married Martha ___, July 1791 Northampton County bond.

vi. Nelly Tigue, head of an Accomack County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:65].

 

2.    Jacob Teague, born about 1757, was head of an Accomack County household of 7 "other free" in St. George's Parish in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:164] and 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:65]. He was a 63 year-old "man of color" who appeared in Accomack County court to apply for a pension for his service in the Revolution on 2 August 1820. He enlisted in the 11th Virginia Regiment under Captain Thomas Parker. His family consisted of his wife Alicia, about 29 years old, and his step children Arthur Harrison, age 11 years, and another step child aged 7 years [NARA, S.41235, M804, Roll 2354, frame 204 of 1099; https://www.fold3.com/image/18334061]. He may have been the father of

i. Liliah, head of a St. George's Parish, Accomack County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:164].

ii. Rachel, born say 1781, married Daniel Moses, 25 September 1802 Northampton County bond, Levin Morris security.

iii. Armistead, registered in Accomack County: born about 1781, a dark yellow, 5'4-1/4", born free in Accomack County [Register of Free Negroes, 1785-1863, no. 657].

iv. Sacker, registered as a "free Negro" in Accomack County: born July 1785, a light Black, 5 feet 10-1/2 Inches, Born free [Register, no.3].

v. Levin, registered in Accomack County: born about 1797, a light Black, 5' 6-1/2" high, Born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1785-1863, no.267].

 

TEAMER FAMILY

1.    Sarah1 Teemo, born say 1690, a "malato," bound her son James to William and Elizabeth Brooks in Elizabeth City County court on 15 June 1720 [Orders 1715-21, 189]. She was the mother of

2     i. ?Mary, born say 1710.

ii. James1, born say 1719.

iii. ?William1, born say 1721, ordered to pay John Webb 25 pounds of tobacco for appearing as a witness for him against Charles Hopson in Elizabeth City County on 20 July 1743 [Orders 1731-47, 341]. William was taxable in Jeremiah Creech's household in the Western Branch District of Norfolk County in 1761 and taxable in his own Norfolk County household in 1765 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables 1751-66, p.134, 171, 191].

3     iv. ?Sarah2, born say 1723.

4     v. ?Ann, born say 1727.

 

2.    Mary Temo, born say 1710, was presented by the Elizabeth City County court on 15 December 1731 for having two bastard children (no race indicated) [Orders 1731-47, 15]. She may have been the mother of

i. ?John/Jack, born say 1730, won a suit in Elizabeth City County court on 22 September 1743 against his master William Bayley for not supplying him with sufficient clothing and misusing him [Orders 1731-47, 352]. He was taxable in Norfolk Borough, Norfolk County, in 1767 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables 1766-80, 35].

 

3.    Sarah2 Teamer, born say 1723, was living in Elizabeth City County on 7 February 1748/9 when her son William (no race indicated) was ordered to be bound out. On 4 February 1755 the court ordered her "Molatto" son Sam bound out [Orders 1747-55, 68, 467]. She was a taxable head of household in Norfolk Borough, Norfolk County, in 1767 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables 1766-80, 35]. Her children were

i. ?Edward, born say 1743, no parent or race indicated, ordered bound to George Barbee in Elizabeth City County on 21 September 1743 [Orders 1731-47, 348]. He was taxable in Norfolk Borough, Norfolk County, in 1767 and in Elizabeth River Parish in 1768 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables 1766-80, 35, 83].

ii. William2, born say 1748, ordered bound out in Elizabeth City County on 7 February 1748/9. He was taxable in Norfolk County in 1770 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables 1766-80, 119].

iii. Samuel, born say 1754, ordered bound out in 1755.

iv. ?Jeremiah, born say 1760, "Mulatto" head of a Nansemond County household in 1784 [VA:74]. He was over 45 years of age in 1815 when he and his two unnamed sons (16-45 years of age) were "free Negro and Mulatto" taxables in Nansemond County. He was probably the father of William Teamer (16-45 years of age) who was also a "free Negro and Mulatto" taxable in Nansemond County in 1815 [PPTL 1815-1837, frame 12].

 

4.    Ann Teamer, born say 1727, no race indicated, was living in Elizabeth City County on 7 February 1748/9 when the court ordered her daughter Bess bound to Ann Hawkins [Orders 1747-55, 69]. On 22 March 1756 her son James was bound to Robert Miller on the condition he give security not to carry him out of the colony [Orders 1755-57, 47]. On 5 October 1756 she complained to the court that her son Thomas had been bound to Charles Neilson but was then in the possession of Archibald White who was not teaching him any trade. On 5 April 1757 the court ordered her children Bess and Thomas bound to Ann Pattison. On 5 April 1757 the court ordered her children Bess and Thomas bound to Ann Pattison, on 3 April 1759 the court ordered her daughter Sarah bound out, and on 25 June 1767 the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her son Sam [Orders 1755-57, 81, 85, 106; Minutes 1756-60; Court Records 1760-9, 461]. Her children were

i. Bess, born say 1748, ordered bound to Ann Hawkins on 7 February 1748/9 and then to Ann Pattison on 5 April 1757 [Orders 1755-57, 106].

ii. James2, born say 1755, "son of Ann Teemer," ordered bound to Robert Miller to learn the trade of "Barber and Perry Wigg Maker" by the Elizabeth City County court on 22 March 1756 [Orders 1755-57, 47].

iii. Thomas, born say 1750, bound to Charles Neilson in Elizabeth City County on 5 April 1757, called "Thomas Teemare a free negro" on 21 May 1772 when the Norfolk County court ordered the churchwardens of Elizabeth River Parish to bind him to Francis Jordan [Orders 1771-3, 68]. He taxable in Francis Jordan's Norfolk County household in 1771 and in his own household in 1772 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables 1766-80, 167]. On 19 August 1773 the Norfolk County court ordered Amos Etheridge, George Bowness, and Thomas Temar to audit the estate of Hardress Lamount [Orders 1771-3, 192]. He was a "free Negro" taxable in Isle of Wight County from 1783 to 1803: taxable on slave Nancy and a horse in 1785, taxable on slave Suck and a horse in 1786 [PPTL 1782-1810, frames 37, 70, 83, 94, 154, 189, 236, 252, 280, 341, 355, 400, 424, 438, 482, 501, 532, 587, 607]. Perhaps his widow was Sally Teamer who was listed as a "free Negro" in Isle of Wight County with her unnamed daughter in 1813 [PPTL 1811-1833, frame 124].

iv. Sarah, ordered bound out on 25 April 1759.

v. Sam, ordered bound out on 25 June 1767.

 

THOMAS FAMILY

1.    Ann Thomas, born say 1720, was the servant of Mrs. Clark Hobson on 14 October 1740 when she admitted in Northumberland County, Virginia court that she had a "mulatto" child. The court ordered that she serve her mistress an additional year after the completion of her indenture and then be sold for five years. She was convicted of having a second "mulatto" child on 13 June 1743 [Orders 1737-43, 169, 345]. She was probably the ancestor of

i. Milly1, born say 1743, a servant who was bound until the age of thirty-one years to Joseph Ball. On 14 April 1778 the Northumberland County court denied his petition that she serve him an additional three years for having three children during her time of service [Orders 1773-83, 319]. Perhaps she was identical to Milley, a "Molatto" listed in the Northumberland County estate of William Townsend on 8 April 1771:

Negro man Jack 80 pounds

Mulatto man Rawleigh 30 pounds

Molatto woman Amy 15 pounds

Molatto woman Milley 17 pounds [RB 1770-2, 248].

 

2     ii. Spencer, born about 1750.

3     iii. James, born say 1760.

iv. John/ Jack, born say 1760, married Nancy Credit , 12 July 1805 Northumberland County bond, Raleigh Thomas security; and second, Nancy Sorrell, "daughter of James Sorrell, Sr.," 7 April 1812 Northumberland County bond, James Sorrell, Jr., security.

v. Rawleigh, born say 1767, perhaps related to the "Mulatto man Rawleigh" in the estate of William Townsend in 1771, taxable in Northumberland County from 1788 to 1814: taxable on a slave and a horse in 1788, not listed in 1803 and 1804, taxable in 2 tithes in 1809, listed as "Blk" in 1811 and 1812, in the list of free Negroes and Mulattoes in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1813, 389, 402, 431, 454, 465, 488, 502, 525, 533, 577, 643], a "free Mulatto" head of a Northumberland County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:997].

 

2.    Spencer Thomas, born about 1750, served in the Virginia Battalion of Northumberland County [Gwathmey, Historical Register of Virginians in the Revolution, 767; Eckenrode, Virginia Soldiers of the American Revolution, 434, citing War 4:372 at LVA]. Charles Jones received his final pay of 18 pounds on 26 Februray 1784 [NARA, M246, 679 of 752; M881, Roll 1088, frame 1851 of 1808; https://www.fold3.com/image/23306931]. He was taxable in Northumberland County from 1787 to 1812: taxable on a slave from 1788 to 1798; listed as a "Blk" taxable from 1806 to 1812; taxable on 2 free males from 1809 to 1811, in the list of free Negroes and Mulattoes in 1813 with 3 females over the age of sixteen [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 323, 331, 352, 368, 382, 396, 412, 426, 447, 479, 508, 517, 540, 554, 568, 577, 605, 626, 643, 675]. He was a widower when he married Sukey Sorrell, 11 June 1792 Northumberland County bond, Thomas Pollard security. He married, third, Salley Hogins, widow, 11 October 1817 Northumberland County bond, John Credit security. He registered in the District of Columbia court in Alexandria on 1 April 1803: a yellow man about 53 years of age was free born in the family of the grandfather of the deponent and that he served in Northumberland County until he became thirty-one years of age. William Lewis, Justice of the Peace [Arlington County Register of Free Negroes, 1797-1861, p. 4]. He was a "free mulatto" head of a Northumberland County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:996]. His children were

i. Nancy, born say 1790, "daughter of Spencer Thomas," married John Wood, 13 January 1807 Northumberland County bond, Spencer Thomas security.

ii. ?Sukey, "free mulatto" head of Northumberland County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:997].

iii. ?Amy, "free mulatto" head of Northumberland County household in 1810 [VA:997]. She was a "free mulatto" whose son Bill Thomas was bound as an apprentice cooper to Bridgar Haynie by the Northumberland County court on 11 September 1809 [Orders 1807-11, 124].

 

3.    James Thomas, born say 1760, a "Colored man," enlisted in Norfolk County and served for three years as a boatswain aboard the brig Northampton in the Revolution. His heir Nancy Bell applied for bounty land on 26 December 1838. James Barron described him as: a fellow of daring and though a man of color was respected by all the officers who served with him. In 1840 Nancy Bell, his sole heir, received two land warrants of 1,333 acres each for his services [Thomas, James, 1840, Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Digital Collection, LVA]. Perhaps his widow was Rosa Thomas, head of a Norfolk County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:829].  His children were

i. Nancy, married ___ Bell, perhaps the John Bell, born about 1777, who registered in Norfolk County on 20 July 1812: 5 feet 6 inches 35 years of age. light complexion, Born free [Register of Free Negros & Mulattos, no.79].

ii. ?John, head of a Norfolk County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:922].

iii. ?David, born about 1777, registered in Norfolk County on 13 May 1802: a black man about twenty five years old, five feet four inches high, is free born, was bound to James Matthews by an order of the court [Thomas, David (M, 25): Free Negro Certificate, 1802, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

 

Note: there was also a white Spencer Thomas in Northumberland County who was born about 1760 [See 1810 census and taxlists].

 

Elizabeth City, Charles City, Prince George and Dinwiddie counties

1.    Hannah Thomas, born say 1705, was a "free Negro" presented by the court in Elizabeth City County on 16 May 1728 for having a bastard child [DWO 1724-30, 244]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Philip, a "servant Mulatto" of Thomas Yuille on 1 February 1765 when he was found guilty of petty theft by the Chesterfield County court. He was given twenty-five lashes because he could not pay his fine of ten pounds currency [Orders 1763-7, 626].

ii. John, born say 1740, married Sarah Lawrence, widow of Robin Lawrence, 14 October 1786 Brunswick County, Virginia bond. Sarah was called Sarah Thomas on the 7 March 1796 Charlotte County marriage bond of her daughter Mason Lawrence. The Lawrence family was from Prince George, Dinwiddie, and Brunswick counties.

2     iii. Robert, born about 1749.

3    iv. Buckner, born about 1758.

4     iv. William, born say 1760.

v. John, born about 1751, drafted into the Revolution for the length of the war from Caroline County on 26 March 1781 and was sized on 14 May 1781: age 30, 5'11-1/2" high, yellow complexion, a shoemaker, born in Prince George County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.51)].

vi. Abraham Thomas (alias Cumbo), born say 1769, married Mary Brown, "daughter of Abram Brown deceased," by marriage agreement of 13 April 1791 proved in Charles City County court on 15 December 1791 by which he recognized her right to slaves Isaac and Jane, two feather beds, and some stock of cattle and hogs which were in her possession [DB 4:66]. He was taxable in Charles City County as Abraham Cumbo alias Thomas from 1790 to 1799 and called Abraham Thomas in 1800 and thereafter, taxable on 2 slaves and a horse in 1800 and a "Mulatto" taxable on 2 slaves in 1813 and 1814 [PPTL, 1788-1814]. He (called Abraham Cumbo) was taxable on 30 acres in Charles City County from 1794 to 1801 [Land Tax List, 1782-1830]. He purchased 20 acres in Charles City County on the dividing line between the land of William Brown and John Brown from William Brown for 30 pounds on 17 July 1800 and he and his wife Mary sold 30 acres of land called Currabunga(?) on 21 November 1801. He purchased 41-1/2 acres from William Brown for 65 pounds on 20 February 1806 and he made a deed of trust for 50 acres on 23 April 1811. He purchased 40 acres for $240 in July 1816, and he and his wife Mary sold 40 acres to George Jones for $259 on 6 November 1816. He and his wife Mary made a deed of trust for a tract of 40 acres, a tract of 35-1/3 acres, a mare, seven cattle and two featherbeds on 15 May 1818 to secure a debt he owed Edward B. Colgin [DB 4:520, 600; 5:118, 384, 625; 6:47, 143]. He was head of a Charles City County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:7] and 5 in 1830. Administration on his wife Mary's estate was granted to Abraham Brown on 17 March 1836 with Morris Harris providing $90 security [Minutes 1830-7, 270].

vii. David, born about 1766, registered in Petersburg on 16 August 1794: a dark Mulatto man near five feet eleven inches high, twenty eight years old, born & raised in Prince George & Dinwiddie County's. His wife Parthena Cornett/ Coronet registered on 18 August 1794: a yellow Mulatto woman, five feet six & a half inches high, twenty seven years old, born in the County of Northampton, No. Ca., born free [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, nos. 14, 20]. He was a 50-year-old tobacco stemmer listed in Petersburg with Thena Thomas, age 40, and children in 1803 [List of People of Color in Petersburg 1803, 1803, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

viii. Sarah, born in August 1770, registered in Petersburg on 1 January 1799: a Brown Mulatto woman, twenty eight in August last, five feet two and a half inches high, dark bushy hair, born free in Prince George County & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 143].

ix. Willis, born about 1772, registered in Petersburg on 15 August 1800: a light brown Mulatto man, five feet nine inches high, twenty eight years old, born free & raised in Dinwiddie County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 178].

x. Benjamin, born say 1767, taxable in Charles City County in 1788, a "Mulattoe" taxable in 1813 and 1814 [PPTL, 1788-1814].

xi. Reuben, head of a Charles City County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:959].

 

2.    Robert Thomas, born about 1749, registered in Petersburg on 5 May 1795: a brown Mulatto man, six feet one inches high, forty six years old, born free & raised in the County of Prince George [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 100]. His widow Hannah Thomas, born about 1760, registered in Petersburg on 18 August 1800: a dark brown Mulatto woman, widow of Robert Thomas, deced., four feet eleven inches high, forty years old, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 187]. They were the parents of

i. Susannah, born about 1778, registered in Petersburg on 14 August 1800: a brown Mulatto woman, five feet six inches high, twenty two years old, thick bushy hair, being a daughter of Robert Thomas, born free & raised in the County of Dinwiddie [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 164].

ii. ?John, born about 1781, registered in Petersburg on 4 August 1803: a dark mulatto man, five feet five inches high, twenty two years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 255].

iii. ?Frederick, born about 1784, registered in Petersburg on 13 January 1809: yellowish brown free Negro man, five feet four inches high, twenty five years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg, a shoe maker [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 451].

iv. Nancy, born about 1791, registered in Petersburg on 13 January 1809: a yellowish brown free Negro, daughter of Hannah Thomas, five feet one inches high, eighteen years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 452].

 

5.    Buckner Thomas, born about 1758, was a sixty-year-old "man of Colour" who resided in Nottoway County when he appeared there in court on 18 May 1818 to make a declaration to obtain a pension for his service in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted in Dinwiddie County in September 1777 and served for three years. He was in the muster of Captain Peter Jones's Company of the 10th Virginia Regiment from February to August 1779 with Isham Valentine [NARA, M246, Roll 109, frame 87, 102 of 795; https://www.fold3.com/image/10067205; S.41248, M804, Roll 2367, frame 416 of 853; https://www.fold3.com/image/18729500].   He was a "Black" tithable on his own tithe and 1-3 horses in Nottoway County from 1791 to 1812 (called Buck Thomas) [PPTL 1789-1822]. He may have been the father of

i. William3, born say 1775, a taxable in Nottoway County in 1791, a "FB" taxable from 1801 to 1807: taxable on 2 tithes and a horse in 1801; taxable in 1813 on 2 tithes and 2 women over the age of sixteen, taxable from 1814 to 1819. Perhaps his widow was Lucy Thomas who was taxable on a horse from 1820 to 1822 [PPTL 1789-1822, frames 79, 235, 249, 313, 332, 431, 459, 532, 560, 585, 611, 637, 665, 692].

ii. John, a "FB" taxable in Nottoway County in 1803 and 1804 [PPTL 1789-1822, frames 265, 279].

iii. Frederick, a "FB" taxable in Nottoway County from 1804 to 1822: taxable on a woman over the age of sixteen in 1813 [PPTL 1789-1822, frames 279, 313, 332, 350, 368, 387, 405, 431, 460, 560, 637, 665, 692]. Perhaps identical to the Frederick Thomas, born about 1784, who registered in Petersburg on 13 January 1809: yellowish brown free Negro man, five feet four inches high, twenty five years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg, a shoe maker [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 451].

iv. Matt, a "FB" taxable in Nottoway County from in 1809 and 1810 [PPTL 1789-1822, frames 350, 368].

 

4.    William Thomas,born about 1759, enlisted in the Revolution for 18 months while resident in Charles City County on 22 September 1780: age 21, 5'7" high, a planter, yellow complexion, born in Charles City County County [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.39)]. He was taxable in Upper Westover Precinct of Charles City County in 1784, taxable on 2 horses from 1788 to 1793, a "Mulattoe" taxable in 1813 and 1814 [PPTL, 1788-1814] and head of a household of 3 "free colored" in 1820. He made a deed of trust for 140 acres bounded by land of Peter Crews and the road leading to Westover on 29 December 1818 to secure a debt of $150 he owed Samuel Ladd, and he and his wife Lisey made a deed of trust for 50 acres adjoining Peter Crews and the road leading from the Long Bridges to Westover on 15 June 1820 [DB 6:281, 368]. He was about sixty five on 17 May 1821 when he appeared in Charles City County court to apply for a pension for his service in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted at Charles City court house in 1777 and was at Valley Forge under the company commanded by Lieutenant Callohill Minnis of the 1st Virginia Regiment. He was discharged in 1779 and reinlisted for 18 months in Charles City County just prior to the siege of York and marched to Chesterfield Court House where he entered the company commanded by Captain Joseph Scott for about three weeks when he was taken into the family of General Peter Muhlenburg and discharged in Shenandoah County. He was living on rented land with a wife aged about forty two or three and and a thirteen-year-old girl. William Wills called him a coulored man when he testified to his service [NARA, S.38435, M804, roll 2372, frame 540 of 934; https://www.fold3.com/image/246/18338890]. He was called William Thomas, Sr., in his 22 February 1824 Charles City County will, proved 19 August 1824. He gave Hannah Fields her first choice of bed, cow and household items and five barrels of corn, left his granddaughter Elizabeth Thomas a bed and furniture, left his son Claiborn Thomas $6 cash and divided the balance between his daughter Elizabeth Thomas, son Claiborn and granddaughter Elizabeth Thomas. His estate paid Benjamin Harrison $10 for rent. Bolling and Smallwood Bradby purchased items at the sale of the estate [WB 3:28, 99, 158]. He was the father of

5     i. ?William, Jr., born say 1780.

ii. Claiborn.

iii. Elizabeth, born 23 March 1808, married to Littleberry Fields by 16 February 1826 when he received the legacy due her from her father's estate [WB 3:158]. She obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 17 November 1831: (testimony of Peter Crew) wife of Littleberry Fields who was Elizabeth Thomas, bright mulatto, was twenty three years old 23 March last [Minutes 1830-7, 84].

 

5.    William Thomas, Jr., born say 1780, purchased 50 acres in Charles City County adjoining Abraham Binford's, Benjamin Harrison's and Herren Creek for $200 on 15 June 1820. He and his wife Elizabeth sold this land on 27 November 1820 [DB 6:369, 430]. He made a 22 March 1835 Charles County will (signing), proved 18 June 1835, by which he left $1 to his son Barnett, $10 to his daughter Elizabeth Field, $10 to his son James. He left his land to his wife Elizabeth and after her death left his "mill pond tract" of 50 acres to his son William on condition he pay $40 to his daughter Susannah Miles, and left his daughter Judith 50 acres on the east side of Herring Creek. And he named his wife Elizabeth and son William executors [WB 4:126]. He was the father of

i. Barnett.

ii. Elizabeth Fields.

iii. Susannah Miles.

iv. James.

v. William, born 17 July 1815, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 17 September 1835: son of William Thomas, a mulatto man, aged twenty years 17 July last [Minutes 1830-7, 248].

vi. Judith.

 

Other members of the Thomas family in Virginia were

i. Milly, born about March 1775, "a mulatto bastard girl," about two and one-half years old when she was bound to Fanny Melton in Dettingen Parish, Prince William County on 2 September 1777 [Historic Dumfries, Records of Dettingen Parish, 119].

ii. Grace, head of a Prince William County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:499].

iii. Ralph, "Free Negroe" head of a Fauquier County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:370].

iv. Samuel, "Free Negroe" head of a Fauquier County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:370].

v. Moses, head of a Botetourt County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:661].

vi. Susanna Thomas, alias Humbles, born about 1790, married John Redcross, in Amherst County in 1807.

 

North Carolina

1.    James1 Thomas, born say 1755, was assessed 4 pounds tax in Currituck County in 1779. He was head of a Currituck County household of 8 "other free" and 1 slave in 1790 [NC:21] and 9 "other free" ("Mulattoes") in 1800 [NC:150] and 1 white woman over 45 and 8 slaves (perhaps listed in the wrong column) in 1810. His 27 June 1811 Currituck County will, proved in 1812, divided his furniture among his wife Jane, daughters Lydia and Patsy, and son Joseph, gave $10 to his son Aaron, and only a shilling to his three youngest sons John, Sam and William. He left his land and plantation to his wife Jane and then to his son James [WB 3:17-18]. He was the father of

 

i. James2.

ii. Lydia, born about 1770, an eighty-year-old "Mulatto" woman living at Powell's Point with Samuel Thomas (Black, 60) and George Thomas (Mulatto, 27) in the 1850 Currituck County census.

iii. Samuel, born about 1790.

iv. Joseph, born about 1795, head of a Currituck County household of 2 "free colored" in 1830 and a fifty-five-year-old "Black" farmer living with Sally Thomas (28) and six "Black" children, all members of the Gordon family.

v. Aaron.

vi. John.

vii. William, born about 1800, head of a Currituck County household of 4 "free colored" with a woman over fifty five years of age, and a fifty-year-old "Black" man living with Nancy (47) and Amelia (20) at Powell's Point in Currituck County in 1850.

 

2.    Hillery Thomas was head of a Wake County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:105]. He may have been the father of those counted as "other free" in Franklin County, North Carolina, in 1810:

i. Lettice, head of a household of 5 [NC:826].

ii. Eliza, head of a household of 3 [NC:826].

iii. Basdil, head of a household of 2 [NC:825].

 

3.    Ross Thomas, born about 1759, was in the 3 September 1778 list of new levies from Hyde County who enlisted for nine months from the following March: place of abode Hyde, born Hyde, 5'7", 19 years of age, Black Hair, Black Eyes and skin [N.C. Archives, digital collection, Troop Returns, B4F42, http://digital.ncdcr.gov/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p16062coll26/id/699/rec/164]. He received voucher 770 for six pounds specie on 1 May 1792, being a fourth of the pay and interest due him for military service in the Revolution [North Carolina Revolutionary Pay Vouchers, 1779-1782, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2WT-GJ6Y]. He was head of a Hyde County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 and 1 in 1800 [NC:378].

 

THOMPSON FAMILY

1.    Joshua Thompson, born say 1690, and his wife Sarah bound their daughter Martha to John Sorrell until the age of twenty-one. On 25 March 1732 Martha petitioned the Westmoreland County court for freedom from John Footman, Gentleman, who then held the indenture. She testified that she was twenty-one years old on 22 June 1731 and the daughter of Sarah Thompson, a free "Mulatto" who was married to Joshua Thompson by whom she had several children [Orders 1731-9, 15]. Joshua and Sarah were the ancestors of

2     i. Martha, born 22 June 1710.

 

2.    Martha Thompson, born 22 June 1710, was twenty-one years old on 25 March 1732 when she successfully petitioned the Westmoreland County court for her freedom. She may have been the mother of

i. Thomas, born say 1731, a "Free Mulatto" who bound himself as an apprentice carpenter and joiner for six years to John Ariss of Cople Parish by Westmoreland County indenture on 31 January 1748/9 [Records & Inventories 1746-52, 81].

ii. William, born say 1735, a "Mallato boy" listed in the 4 June 1751 Westmoreland County inventory of the estate of Thomas Collensworth.

iii. John, born say 1737, a "Mallato boy" listed in the 4 June 1751 Westmoreland County inventory of the estate of Thomas Collensworth [Records & Inventories 1746-52, 156b].

 

They may have been the ancestors of some of the members of the Thompson family in Virginia and North Carolina:

i. John1, born say 1730, and his wife Hannah, "Mulatto" taxables in the Fishing Creek District list of Daniel Harris in Granville County, North Carolina, in 1761 [CR 44.701.19].

ii. William1, born say 1735, taxable with his wife Eliza in John Brickell's Bertie County tax list in 1757 [CR 10.702.1, box 1].

3     iii. Mary, born say 1747.

iv. Nicholas, born about 1747, registered in Petersburg on 20 August 1794: a dark brown Man, five feet two and a half inches high, forty seven years old, born free in Hampshire County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 69].

4     v. Lazarus, born say 1750.

5     vi. John2, born say 1750.

6     vii. Amy, born say 1752.

viii. Perkins, Jr., born about 1752, in a list of drafts from Charles City County who deserted according to an ad placed in the 28 November 1777 issue of the Virginia Gazette by Lieutenant John Dudley: Perkins Thomson, jun., who is twenty five years of age, of a yellow complexion, a shoemaker by trade, and is lurking about a place called Fo(u)ntain's Creek in Brunswick County [Virginia Gazette (Purdie), p. 3, col. 2]. He may have been related to Perkin Thompson who was taxable on 5 slaves in Charles City County in 1783 [PPTL, 1783].

ix. John3, born say 1758, ran away from Accomack County, apparently in company with Peter Weeks before 28 June 1775 when the York County jailer placed an ad in the 7 July 1775 issue of the Virginia Gazette: committed to York jail, the 28th ult. a MULATTO LAD 5 feet 4 inches high, thin made, who says his name is Peter Weeks and that he belongs to John Parker of Accomack County; has on an old dusfil jacket, striped Virginia cloth breeches, and an old ragged shirt--Likewise, on the 1st of this instant (July) a BLACK LAD 5 feet 3 inches and a quarter high, thin made, has the wool on his crown cut close, say his name is John Thompson, and that he belongs to William Hack of Accomack county, has on a new osnabrug shirt, old purple coloured breeches, and a sustian or jeans coat with metal buttons [Virginia Gazette; http://www.accessible.com].

x. William, born about 1770, registered in Petersburg on 18 August 1794: a light brown Mulatto man five feet three and a half inches high, twenty four years old, born free in Charles City County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 34].

xi. Reuben, born about 1774, registered in Petersburg on 3 July 1799: a light brown, strait well made Mulatto man, five feet ten inches high, long bushy hair, twenty five years old, born free in Charles City on testimony of Travis Harwood [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 145]. He was head of a Charles City County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:943].

xii. Joshua, born about 1781, registered in Petersburg on 8 June 1810: a light brown Mulatto man, five feet eight and a half inches high, twenty nine years old, born free in Charles City County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 560]. He was head of a Petersburg household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:119a].

xiii. George, head of a Charles City County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:940].

xiv. John, head of a Charles City County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:958].

 

3.    Mary Thompson, born say 1747, had been a resident of Surry County, Virginia, sometime before 19 August 1822 when her son Samuel registered there as a "free Negro." Mary was the mother of

7     i. Samuel1, born 12 February 1765.

ii. ?William3, born about 1777, registered as a "free Negro" in Brunswick County on 25 October 1830: a free man of Colour about fifty three years of age, five feet seven inches high... born free as appears from the evidence of Robert Hicks [Wynne, Register of Free Negroes, 108].

 

4.    Lazarus Thompson, born say 1750, was a "Mulatto" taxable in Northampton County, Virginia, from 1787 to 1799 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 75, 98, 216, 273]. He was probably related to Kesiah, Tamer, Mary and Betsy Thompson who registered as "free Negroes" in Northampton County on 12 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 358]. He may have been the ancestor of

i. Peter, born about 1767, a "Mulatto" taxable in Northampton County from 1788 to 1799 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 82, 112, 217, 273], registered in Accomack County: born about 1767, a light black, 5'8" high, born free in Accomack County [Register of Free Negroes, 1785-1863, no. 739].

ii. Rachel, born say 1770, married Isaac Stevens, 22 January 1791 Northampton County bond, Coventon Simkins security.

iii. Isaac, born say 1771, married Leah Stevens, 22 September 1792 Northampton County bond, Jacob Frost security. He was taxable in Northampton County from 1796 to 1800 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 217, 294].

iv. Jacob1, born say 1774, a "Negro" taxable in Northampton County from 1788 to 1799 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 89, 273]. He married Sukey Morris, 26 May 1795 Northampton County bond, Thomas Lewis security. He registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 11 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 354] and was head of a Northampton County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:215].

v. Sarah, born say 1776, registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 12 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 358], married Abraham Beckett, 26 October 1797 Northampton County bond, Jacob Thompson security.

vi. Jacob2, Jr., taxable in Northampton County from 1798 to 1800 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 256, 294], married Tamar Stevens, 26 September 1800 Northampton County bond, Johannes Johnson security.

 

5.    John2 Thompson, born say 1750, was a "Free Negro" farmer living with (his wife?) Haney Thompson and children on Henry Lee's land in Westmoreland County in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:45]. He was head of a Westmoreland County household of 13 "other free" in 1810 [VA:788]. Their children living with them in 1801 were

i. James, born say 1773.

ii. Priscilla, born say 1775.

iii. Bennett, born say 1777, married Barbara Bell, 28 December 1807 Westmoreland County bond, William Thornton Peirce security. Bennett was head of a Westmoreland County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:788]. William T. Peirce and Fanny and Barbara Bell were "Free Molattoes" listed in Samuel Day's Westmoreland County household in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:40].

iv. Nancy, born say 1779.

v. Joseph, born say 1781.

vi. Meriah, born say 1783, married John Smith, 13 February 1804 Westmoreland County bond, William Thompson, Jr., security. John Smith was a "Free Negro" farmer living with Rose Smith in Westmoreland County in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:45].

vii. William4.

viii. Gerard, called Jarrat Thompson on 21 May 1822 when he married Betsy McKoy, 21 May 1822 Westmoreland County bond.

 

6.    Amy Thompson, born say 1752, was living in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on 25 January 1798 when she consented to the marriage of her daughter Suckey Thompson to Boling Chavous (Chavis). She was the mother of

i. Susan, born say 1770, married Boling Chavis, 25 January 1798 Mecklenburg County bond.

ii. John, born say 1775, called "S. Amy" in the 1790 Mecklenburg County tax list [PPTL, p.44].

iii. ?William, born say 1784, married Thrudy Stewart, 1805 Mecklenburg County bond, and second, Mary Hailestock (Ailstock), 19 February 1808 Mecklenburg County bond, Abel Stewart bondsman. He was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 10 "free colored" in 1820.

 

7.    Samuel1 Thompson, born 12 February 1765, married Edy Debrix, 18 September 1790 Surry County, Virginia bond, Howell Debrix surety. He was taxable in Surry county from 1789 to 1812: taxable on a slave named Daphne in 1790; taxable on 2 tithes in 1812 [PPTL, 1782-90, frames 538, 585; 1791-1816, frames 196, 545, 638]. He was counted in the 1803 census of "Free Negroes and Mulattos" in Surry County with his wife Eady and children: Edwin Thompson (a sailor), Polly, Betsy, Rebekah, Nancy, and Averilla. He was head of a Surry County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:617]. He registered in Surry County on 19 August 1822: a Mulatto Man, free born, the Son of Mary Thompson formerly of Surry County, who is 5'6-1/4" high, a pretty bright Mulatto...by profession a Black-smith, aged 57 years the 12th Feby last pass'd [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 75]. His children were

i. Edwin, born about 1791, registered in Surry County on 26 August 1826: a Mulattoe man of a bright complexion, his left Shoulder out of place...aged about 35 years and is 5'6-3/4" high, a black Smith by trade [Hudgins, Register, 82].

ii. Mary Whiten, born about 1794, registered in Surry County on 19 September 1817: a mulattoe woman, the daughter of Samuel and Edith Thompson free persons, of this County aged about 23 years, is 5' high, of bright complexion, has long bushy hair [Hudgins, Register, 67].

iii. Betsey Atkins, born about 1796, registered in Surry County on 19 September 1817: a Mulattoe Woman the daughter of Samuel and Edith Thompson...about 21 years of bright complexion, long bushy hair...is 5'2-1/4" high [Hudgins, Register, 67].

iv. Rebecca, born about 1799, registered in Surry County on 26 August 1822: daughter of Samuel and Edy Thompson...aged 23 years, is 5'2-1/8" high...is a bright Mulattoe [Hudgins, Register, 75].

v. Nancy.

vi. Averilla.

 

Members of the family in North Carolina were

i. Ann, born before 1776, head of a Halifax County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:167].

ii. Zac(?), born before 1776, head of a Craven County household of 14 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:67].

iii. Samuel3, head of a Chatham County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:208].

 

An unrelated member of the family was:

1.    Talbot/Talbert Thompson, born say 1735, entered into an agreement with Benjamin Waller to purchase his freedom after his master Alexander McKensie moved to England. He paid Waller sixty pounds and then petitioned the governor and Council of Virginia for his freedom in November 1761. Eight years later he purchased his wife Jenny from the estate of Robert Tucker of Norfolk County and then successfully petitioned for her freedom [McIlwaine, Executive Journals, VI:200; VI:320]. He was a taxable "free negro" on the east side of the borough of Norfolk in 1767 with his slave Joseph, and in 1774 he was taxable on "negroes" (slaves): Peter, Murray and Joe [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables 1766-80, 39, 243]. On 18 May 1762 the Princess Anne County court bound Joseph and Peter Anderson to him to be sailmakers [Minutes 1753-62, 488]. He sued John Mallett in Norfolk County court for a 5 pound debt on 22 December 1769. The court found in his favor and ordered the sheriff to give Mallett 39 lashes if he failed to pay immediately. He was ordered to pay James Cooper for 13 days attendance as a witness for him in his suit against Christopher Bustin which was heard between 1769 and 1773. On 18 August 1774 the court ordered the churchwardens of Elizabeth River Parish to bind Jacob, "a free negro," as an apprentice to him [Orders 1768-71, 145, 147; 1773-5, 9, 60]. He appeared in the City of Norfolk Hustings Court as both plaintiff and defendant between 23 February 1768 and 24 August 1773 [Orders 1761-9, 176b, 252b; 1770-82, 16b-17a, 123a, 199b]. He and his wife Jenny defected to Lord Dunmore after his property and sailmaking business was destroyed by the Virginia military in January 1776. He died in New York in April 1782 just before his family relocated to Nova Scotia. Jenny submitted a claim to the Loyalist Claims Commission for the loss of their house and sail loft burnt by Patriot forces as well as land and livestock confiscated and a slave killed while working for the British at Great Bridge. She included a copy of the original deed for the land and buildings Talbot purchased from Samuel Boush [Loyalist Claims Commission file A.O. 13/25/479, NA (UK), cited by Cassandra Pybus, University of Sydney, Australia]. He may have been the father of

i. Samuel, "free negro" head of a Norfolk County household in 1773 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables 1766-80, 206].

 

TIMBER(S) FAMILY

1.    Sarah Timber, born say 1736, was the mother of a "mollato" girl named Priscilla whose birth was registered in Overwharton Parish, Stafford County. She was the ancestor

i. Priscilla, born 19 March 1757 [Overwharton Parish Register, 1724-1774, 189]. On 3 July 1805 a Mrs. Mary McCalanahan appeared in Greenville County, South Carolina court and testified that Sarah Timbers and her daughter Priscilla had lived with her in Virginia and that Priscilla was the mother of David, Thomas, Lewis, James, John, Patsy, and Charlotte Burden/ Burdin [DB R:162].

ii. ?Thomas, taxable in Culpeper County from 1792 to 1802 [PPTL 1782-1802, frames 460N, 551, 592, 632, 768, 851], a "F.N." head of a Culpeper County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:82], and a "Free Negroe" taxable in 1813 [PPTL 1803-1823, frame 189], perhaps the husband of Hannah Phillips, alias Timbers, who was found not guilty of felony by the Culpeper County court on 5 January 1803 [Minutes 1802-3, 135].

iii. ?John, "Free Negroe" taxable in Culpeper County in 1813   [PPTL 1803-1823, frame 189].

iv. ?Susanna, "Free Negroe" listed in Culpeper County in 1813   [PPTL 1803-1823, frame 189].

 

TONEY FAMILY

1.    James Tony, born say 1698, was a "mulatto man Servant" of Thomas Jefferson (grandfather of the president). In February 1719/20 James confessed to the Henrico County court that he had been absent from his master's service for eighteen days without permission, and a year later confessed to another thirteen days absence [Minutes 1719-24, 7, 61]. He may have been the father of

2     i. Elizabeth1, born say 1716.

3     ii. Mary1, born say 1732.

iii. ?William1, born say 1737, a taxable "Mulatto" in Wood Jones' list for Raleigh Parish, Amelia County, in 1753. He appeared in Granville County, North Carolina, on 8 March 1755 and bound himself an apprentice: William Toney late of Colony of Virginia Molatto bound himself apprentice to Wm Eaton & unto Mary his wife 7 years [CR 044.101.2]. A few years later William was taken up as a runaway in Prince Edward County, Virginia, and accused of burning down the county's prison while in jail. He was acquitted of the arson charge, but the court ordered that he be given thirty-nine lashes because he "appeared to be a great Imposture by appearing in womans cloaths and by often changing his name." And the court ordered that he be returned to his master William Eaton in North Carolina [Orders 1754-8, 66, 67].

 

2.    Elizabeth1 Toney, born say 1716, was summoned before the Prince George County court on 13 March 1738 to answer for her "Misbehavior to the Gentlemen of the Court," and the same court ordered the churchwardens of Martin Brandon Parish to bind out her children Margaret and Elizabeth (no race mentioned). On 9 May 1739 the complaint against her was dismissed [Orders 1737-40, 244, 280]. Her children were

4     i. Margaret1, born say 1733.

ii. Elizabeth2, born say 1738.

5     iii. ?Mary2, born about 1745.

 

3.    Mary1 Toney, born say 1732, was living in Bristol Parish, Virginia, on 22 December 1750 when the birth of her son Charles by Matt Steward (Stewart) was recorded [Chamberlayne, Register of Bristol Parish, 369]. Mary was the mother of

i. Charles2, born 22 December 1750.

ii. ?Lucy, born about 1758, registered in Petersburg on 20 August 1794: a dark brown Mulatto woman, five feet two and a half inches high, thirty six years old, born free & raised in County of Prince George [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 66].

iii. ?Susannah, born about 1762, registered in Petersburg on 20 August 1794: a dark brown Mulatto woman, much pitted with the small pocks, five feet one and a half inches high, thirty two years old, born free & raised in County of Prince George [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 67].

iv. ?Anthony2, born say 1767, head of a Bertie County, North Carolina household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:15].

v. ?Peter, head of a Buckingham County, Virginia household of 14 "other free" in 1810 [VA:835].

 

4.    Margaret1 Toney, born say 1733, was living in Amelia County on 25 March 1756 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Raleigh Parish to bind out her children Charles, Jack, and Margaret Toney to Charles Hamlin. She was called a "poor Mulatto" on 28 January 1768 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Raleigh Parish to bind out her unnamed children to John Hamlin [Orders 1754-8, n.p.; 1767-8, 132; 1766-9, 123, 175]. She was the mother of

i. Charles1, born say 1749, a "Free Mulatto" added to Wood Jones' list of tithables for Amelia County on 27 November 1766 [Orders 1766-9, 24].

6     ii. John1, born say 1750.

7     iii. Margaret2/ Peg, born say 1752.

iv. Arthur1, born about 1764 in Dinwiddie County, Virginia. He lived there until he was ten years old when he moved to Halifax County, North Carolina. He took the place of his brother John Toney in the Revolutionary War in Warren County and marched to Bacon's Bridge in South Carolina where he reinlisted. He was not involved in any battles since he was assigned to the baggage wagon. When he returned in 1782, he moved to Caswell County and made his declaration to obtain a pension in Caswell County court fifty years later on 9 October 1832. He was in Halifax County on 1 April 1847 when he made another declaration for a pension. His widow, formerly Elizabeth Edwell, born about 1780, was living in Caswell County on 10 November 1854 when she appeared before the Hustings Court in Virginia to obtain a survivor's pension. She stated that they were married in December 1799 in Caswell County, and her husband died there in his own house on 19 July 1847 [NARA, W.4835, M805-807, frame 582]. Elizabeth Edwell was the five-year-old daughter of Winnie Edwell (not identified by race) who was bound to John Williams of Caswell County on 20 December 1780. Winnie Edwell was probably the "free Winnie" who was counted as a "Mulatto" in the 1786 State Census for the Caswell District of Caswell County adjacent to "Mulattoes" Arthur Toney, William Hood, and John Wright. Arthur was a Caswell County taxpayer in 1790 [NC:79], an insolvent taxpayer in 1802 [Court Minutes E:38], and head of a Caswell County household of 10 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:90].

 

5.    Mary Toney, born about 1745, registered in Petersburg on 10 July 1805: a yellow brown Mulatto woman, five feet four and a half inches high, about sixty years old, born free in Dinwiddie County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 315]. She may have been the mother of

8     i. John2, born say 1763.

ii. Mat/ Matthew1, born say 1768, taxable in Dinwiddie County in 1800, counted in the "List of Free Negroes" at the end of the tax list from 1801 to 1819 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-19, (1800 A, p.18)], head of a Dinwiddie County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:154].

iii. Charles4, born about 1775, taxable in Dinwiddie County in 1800, counted as a sawyer or carpenter in the "List of Free Negroes" at the end of the tax list from 1801 to 1817 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-19, (1800 A, p.18)]. He registered in Petersburg on 16 June 1809: a light brown free Negro, five feet nine inches high, thirty four years old, short bushy hair, a sawyer, born free & raised in Dinwiddie County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 480].

iv. Becky, born about 1783, registered in Petersburg on 10 July 1805: a light Mulatto woman, five feet five and a half inches high, twenty two years old, holes in her ears, born free & raised in the County of Dinwiddie [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 316].

v. Kezia, born about 1783, registered in Petersburg on 30 April 1806: a dark brown Mulatto woman, five feet six and a half inches high, twenty three years old January last, spare & straight made, holes in her ears, born free in the County of Dinwiddie [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 375].

 

6.    John1 Toney, born say 1750, was a "Free Mulatto" added to Wood Jones' list of tithables for Amelia County on 27 November 1766 [Orders 1766-9, 24]. He married in May 1777 Martha Carpenter who was born about 1753 according to Winney Holly of Halifax, North Carolina, who testified for Martha's 14 August 1838 application for John's Revolutionary War pension. Winney stated that she attended the same school as John's children. John enlisted in the 10th Regiment of the North Carolina Continental Line. He fought at the battle of Guilford Courthouse and "ran home and was taken and made to serve to the end of the war." He died in November 1823 [NARA, W.9859, M805, reel 807, frame 623]. He was taxable on one free poll in District 6 of Halifax County in 1782 and 1790, and was listed in Halifax County in the 1786 North Carolina state census with 3 free males and 3 free females in his household. He was head of a Halifax County household of 7 "other free" in 1790 [NC:62], 16 in 1800 [NC:344], 11 in 1810 [NC:51], and 11 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:167]. On 28 September 1801 he was living on the land of Archibald Sledge when Sledge sold it [DB 18:817]. His 20 August 1823 Halifax County will, proved in February 1825, mentioned his unnamed wife and children [WB 4:1]. His widow Patsey Toney was a 100-year-old "Mulatto" counted in the 1850 census for Halifax County in the household next to Rebecca Scott (age 55). John and Martha were the parents of

i. Charles3, born before 1775, head of a Halifax County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820.

ii. Kinchen, born about 1775, head of a Halifax County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:167] and 9 in 1830. He was charged in Halifax County court for a variety of petty offenses between 1833 and 1841. He was fined $10 on 20 February 1833, $20 on 19 February 1834, acquitted of a charge on 16 May 1836, placed in the stocks for two hours and fined $25 for "keeping a disorderly house" on 21 November 1837, and fined $10 the same day for assault and battery. On 19 November 1837 he was indicted along with (his wife?) Maria Toney [Minutes 1832-46].

iii. Matthew2, born about 1787, head of a Halifax County household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:167]. He married Celia Evans, 22 December 1808 Warren County bond with Allen Green bondsman. He was living in Wilson County, Tennessee, when he was counted in the 1850 census: a sixty-three-year-old Black laborer, born in North Carolina, living with Catherine, thirty years old, and six children born in Tennessee [Census p.267].

iv. William3, head of a Halifax County household of 4 "free colored" in 1830.

v. Nancy Cart[er], perhaps the wife of Samuel Carter.

vi. a daughter or perhaps two, names obliterated from the will.

vii. Martha, born before 1775, head of a Halifax County household of 3 "free colored" in 1830.

viii. Israel, who had a suit in Halifax County court against William B. Toney (his brother?) on 20 November 1835. The court gave him permission to use his gun in the county on 16 August 1841 and renewed his license on 24 August 1843.

ix. Arthur2, born about 1802, registered in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on 21 July 1828: a man of dark complexion, five feet eleven and three quarter inches high about 26 years of age who it appears was born of a free woman in the County of Halifax and State of North Carolina [Free Person of Color, no.51, p.40]. He was found guilty in the Halifax County court of a minor offence on 20 August 1833. On 18 February 1836 he and John Fulder were charged with larceny, for which he paid $100 bail. And the next day, 19 February 1836, he brought a suit against Thomas Scuggins.

 

7.    Margaret2/ Peg Toney, born say 1752, was the "free Mulatto" wife of an unnamed slave of John Hamilton of Prince George County. He was described in the 28 January 1775 issue of the Virginia Gazette as: a likely Virginia born Negro Fellow, about 25 years of age, of yellowish Complexion, lisps a little, and plays on the Fiddle. He, Peg, and their two-year-old boy were headed towards her relatives in Charles City [Dixon's edition, p. 3, col. 2]. She was the mother of

i. George, born about 1771, registered in Petersburg on 15 November 1796: a dark brown Mulatto man, five feet six and a half inches high with short knotty hair, twenty five years old, son of Peggy Toney a Free woman, & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 116].

 

8.    John2 Toney, born say 1763, received voucher no. 589 for 22 pounds specie in the counties of Anson, Montgomery and Richmond on 4 September 1782 for military service in the Revolution [North Carolina Revolutionary Pay Vouchers, 1779-1782, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2WT-5N8M, Toney, John]. He was head of a household of 3 free males and 2 free females in District 5 of Halifax County, North Carolina, in 1786 for the state census (called John Toney, Jr.) and was head of a Fayetteville, Cumberland County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:42]. He and Cader Bryant were bondsmen for the 20 October 1788 Fayetteville marriage of Isaac Hammonds and Dicy Peters [NARA, W.7654, M805, reel 393; https://www.fold3.com/image/21891940]. He sold 50 acres by deed proved in the July 1792 session of Richmond County, North Carolina court [Minutes 1779-92, 231]. Perhaps he was the father of

i. Malachi, head of a Cumberland County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [NC:570] and 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:191], married Russia Hammons, 1 February 1810 Cumberland County bond.

 

TOOTLE FAMILY

1.    Dorcas Tootle, nee Letchworth, born say 1738, was the wife of Absalom Tootle when she had a "Molatto Girl" by her father's "Negro fellow" Caesar [Byrd, In Full Force and Virtue, 2]. She was the mother of

2     i. Elizabeth, born about 1758-1763.

 

2.    Elizabeth Tootle, born about 1759, was a "Molatto Girl" who lived with Doctor James Seay in the upper part of Bertie County near Norflet's ferry. Seay died before December court 1772 when the account of his estate was recorded in Bertie County court. In May 1787 her son William was bound by the court to Thomas Rhodes. Sometime before February 1788 she and her children petitioned the Bertie County court for their freedom from Joel Brown [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes IV:87; VI:691, 750]. One of the deponents at the trial testified that two of her children were with (bound to) Thomas White, one with Thomas Rhodes, and two with Jesse Brown [Byrd, In Full Force and Virtue, 3]. She was head of a Bertie County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:82]. She was the mother of

i. Eady, born about June 1779, ten years old "last June" in May 1790 when she was bound by the Bertie County court to John Johnston.

ii. ?Celia, head of a Tyrrell County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:796].

iii. William, born 3 March 1785, bound to Thomas Rhodes by the Bertie County court in May 1787, called Wylie Tootle in May 1790 when the court bound him to John Johnston [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes V:649; VI:812].

iv. David, born 4 October 1787, bound to John Johnston in May 1790.

v. ?Jonathan, born say 1776-1794, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:166].

vi. ?Janasal, born 1776-1794, head of an Edgecombe County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:125].

vii. ?Thomas, born 1794-1806, head of a Halifax County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:166].

 

TOULSON FAMILY

Several members of the Toulson family, born about 1750, were living in Northumberland County in the 1770s. They were

1     i. Patrick, born say 1750.

2     ii. Sarah1, born say 1752.

 

1.    Patrick Toulson, born say 1750, was head of a Northumberland County household of 8 "blacks" in 1782 [VA:37], no whites and a dwelling in 1784 [VA:75], and a "free Mulatto" head of a Northumberland County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:997]. He was taxable in Northumberland County from 1784 to 1809: listed with 2 tithes in 1793, 1800 and 1805, a "Blk" taxable from 1806 to 1809 [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 266, 323, 331, 412, 448, 494, 508, 518, 540, 577, 605, 644] and head of a Northumberland County household of 4 "free colored" in 1830. He and his wife Elinder were the parents of

i. Elizabeth, born 31 August 1772, "Daughter of Patrick Toleson," [Fleet, Northumberland County Record of Births, 88]. She registered in Northumberland County on 11 November 1811: black woman, aged about 37 years, Born of free parents in Northd County [Register of Free Negroes, 1803-50, nos. 29, 57], and she was in the list of "free negroes and mulattoes" in Northumberland County in 1813 [PPTL, 1813-49, frame 24].

ii. ?Isaac Tolson, born say 1773, head of Perquimans County, North Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [NC:647] and 7 in 1810 [NC:970].

iii. Sarah2, born 20 November 1775, "Daughter of Patrick & Elinder his wife" [Fleet, Northumberland County Record of Births, 88]. Sally registered in Northumberland County on 1 August 1814: Black woman, about 36 years (of age), 5 feet 4-3/4 inches [Register of Free Negroes, 1803-50, no. 81].

iv. ?William2 Tolson, born say 1777, head of a Perquimans County household of one "other free" in 1800 [NC:647], and 2 "other free" and a white woman in 1810 [NC:970].

v. ?Polly, born about 1791, married William Boyd, 13 March 1809 Northumberland County bond, Jerry Toulson security.

vi. ?Jerry, bondsman for the 13 March 1809 Northumberland County marriage of (his sister?) Polly Toulson.

 

2.    Sarah1 Toulson, born say 1752, was the "free mulatto" mother of William and James Toulson whose births were recorded in Northumberland County [Fleet, Northumberland County Record of Births, 107]. Her children were

i. William1, born 22 February 1771, "Son of Sary Toulson," a "free mulatto" head of a Northumberland County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:998]. He married Sally Boyd, 22 February 1802 Northumberland County marriage, Joseph Boyd security, with the consent of her father Augustine Boyd. He was a "Blk" taxable in Northumberland County from 1798 to 1812, listed with a slave in 1812 [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 480, 494, 518, 540, 554, 605, 644, 660, 675, 690].

ii. James, born 15 July 1773, "son of Sary Toulson," a "free mulatto" head of a Northumberland County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:998].

iii. ?Nelly, born say 1781, married Gabriel Bee, 29 September 1802 Northumberland County bond, James Toulson security.

iv. Thomas, a "Blk" taxable in Northumberland County from 1798 to 1812, taxable on a slave in 1812 [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 480, 540, 554, 690].

v. John, a "Blk" taxable in Northumberland County from 1807 to 1812 [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 626, 660, 675, 690].

 

TOYER FAMILY

1.    Anne1 Toyer, born say 1678, was the mother of a "Mulatto" child named Anne Toyer who was bound out by the churchwardens of Kingston Parish, Gloucester County, to Robert Johnson until the age of thirty years on 3 October 1699. She identified Peter, a "Negro" slave belonging to Captain John Gwyn of Gwyn's Island, as the father of her child. On 10 May 1733 James Callis of Kingston Parish deposed before three of the justices of Northampton County, Virginia, that Anne alias Judah was the daughter of a white woman owned by his father. His father gave the younger Anne to Robert Johnson who carried her to Middlesex County where he sold her to John Jacob of Northampton County when she was about twelve years old [Mihalyka, Loose Papers II:19]. Ann and Peter were the parents of

2     i. Ann2, born 28 August 1698.

 

2.    Ann2 Toyer, born 28 August 1698, was bound to Robert Johnson in Gloucester County on 3 October 1699 and sold by him to John Jacob of Northampton Count about 1710. She was called "Nanny Bandy alias Judea Mulatto" on 12 July 1732 when she petitioned the Northampton County court saying she was detained as a slave by Clark Nottingham. Her petition was rejected at first based on insufficient evidence. However, the court allowed Elias Roberts to examine witnesses in Gloucester County on behalf of "Nanny Bandy, alias Toyer," and freed her on 12 June 1733 based on the new evidence [Orders 1732-42, 15, 17, 26, 35, 47, 53]. She was probably married to Bandy, a "negro" slave who was tithable in William Jacob's Northampton County household from 1723 to 1737. Nanny may have been identical to Nan, a tithable in John Jacob's household from 1726 to 1727 in the same district as William Jacob and Bandy [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 45, 63, 109, 123-4, 142, 187, 267]. On 10 July 1733 she petitioned the court against William Jacob for detaining her son Solomon, against Addison Smaw for detaining her daughter Jane Toyer, and Clark Nottingham for detaining her daughter Rhodea in slavery. The court released Solomon and Jane, but ordered Rhody to continue in slavery until the age of thirty years. Ann was presented for bastard bearing on 14 May 1734 [Orders 1732-42, 59, 60, 67, 70, 71, 107, 114]. She was the mother of

i. Solomon1, born on 22 January 1720/1, thirteen-year-old "son of Ann Toyer" freed by the Northampton County court from the service of William Jacob and bound as an apprentice turner to Elias Roberts on 11 September 1733. He was sued for debt by Nathaniel Brown on 12 April 1780 [Orders 1732-42, 70-1; Minutes 1777-83, 233].

2     ii. Jane, born about 1722.

3     iii. Rhody, born say 1726.

4     iv. Dido, born about 1734.

 

2.    Jane Toyer, born 20 November 1722, was bound apprentice to Elias Roberts by the Northampton County court on 11 September 1733. Her petition to the court against John Roberts was dismissed on 15 November 1749 [Orders 1732-42, 71; 1748-51, 151]. Her son was

i. Peter1, born in March 1748, "son of Jane Toyer," bound to Henry Tomlinson in Northampton County on 10 August 1756 [Orders 1753-58, 354]. He was eleven years old on 12 December 1759 when the court bound him to John Holland to be a blacksmith [Minutes 1754-61, 210]. He was taxable in Northampton County from 1789 to 1800: called a blacksmith from 1795 to 1798, taxable on a free male aged 16-21 in 1797 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 104, 200, 217, 234] and was security for the 7 December 1803 Northampton County marriage of Thomas Carter and Sophia Jeffries.

 

3.    Rhody Toyer, born about 1725, was a "Negro slave girl called Rhodie of 11 years of age" who came into the possession of Esau Jacob by the distribution of the Northampton County estate of his father John Jacob on 14 December 1736. He sued the other heirs in December 1737 asking that they pay for his loss because she and her mother Ann Toyer were freed by the court [W&I 18:191-3; Mihalyka, Loose Papers II:87-8]. She brought suit against George Holt for her freedom on 8 December 1747 and was freed the following month. She was presented for bastardy on 8 May 1750 and 8 May 1753 [Orders 1742-8, 484-5, 491; 1748-51, 207, 230, 265, 324]. She was the mother of

5     i. Peg, born about 1750.

ii. ?Jacob2, born in May 1765, bound to William Floyd on 14 February 1769 [Minutes 1766-71, 277]. He was taxable in Northampton County from 1787 to 1793 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 69, 165]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Northampton County on 8 July 1794 and registered it in Princess Anne County: Jacob Tawyer a free Negro and native of this County...is a free man born. His wife or sister Delitha Tawyer registered in Northampton County the same day and recorded the certificate in Princess Anne County [Tawyer, Jacob (M): Free Negro Certificate, 1794, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA, and Tawyer, Delitha (F): Free Negro Certificate]. He was a "F.B." taxable in Princess Anne County from 1795 to 1801 (in the same district as Henry Bingham of Northampton County [PPTL, 1790-1822, frames 111, 140, 147, 244].

iii. Peter3, taxable in Northampton County from 1793 to 1813: called "son of Rhody" in 1793 and 1796 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 165, 200, 217, 497, 548].

 

4.    Dido Toyer, born about 1734, a two-year-old "Negroe," was bound apprentice in Northampton County to Hannah Roberts on 12 May 1736 with the consent of her mother Ann Toyer [Orders 1732-42, 213]. She was presented for bastardy on 8 May 1753, on 11 June 1755, on 11 May 1756 and on 14 November 1758 [Orders 1751-3, 265; 1753-8, 218, 315, 330; Minutes 1754-61, 170]. She registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 13 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 364]. She was the mother of

i. Solomon2, born August 1752, son of Dido Toyer, bound to Samuel Williams on 12 May 1756 [Orders 1753-8, 320].

ii. Jacob1, born in April 1757, child of "free Negro" Dido Toyer, bound to John Parkerson on 10 April 1759. He was sued by John Swift for a 50 pound debt on 12 April 1780 [Minutes 1754-61, 187; 1777-83, 186, 202, 233].

iii. ?Peter2, born in December 1760, bound to Walter Hyslop in Northampton County on 14 January 1768 [Minutes 1765-71, 162]. He enlisted in the Revolution as a substitute for eighteen months while resident in Gloucester County in August 1780 and was sized in 1781: age 19, 5'2" high, black complexion, a farmer, born in Gloucester County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.31)]. On 26 June 1783 Major Poulson received his final pay of 34 pounds for his service in the Revolution [NARA, M881, Roll 1096, frame 501 of 2087; https://www.fold3.com/image/286702883.

iv. ?John, born about 1764, a five-year-old "Negro" bound to Edmund Glanville on 15 June 1769 [Minutes 1765-71, 300].

 

5.    Peg Toyer, born about 1750, "free Negro daughter of Rhody Toyer," was bound apprentice to Josiah Dowty on 12 May 1762. She was called as a witness for John Daniel (Indian) against a member of the Jacob family on 16 September 1773 but failed to appear [Minutes 1761-5, 28; 1771-7, 177]. She may have been the mother of

i. Daniel, bound to Samuel Atchison on 13 January 1773 [Minutes 1771-7, 117].

ii. Adah, born in September 1771, bound to Richard Savage on 8 September 1778 [Minutes 1777-83, 102]. She was head of a Northampton County household of 1 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:215].

iii. George, registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 13 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 364], a "Negro" taxable in Northampton County from 1798 to 1813 [PPTL 1782-1823, frames 256, 549].

iv. Zerobabel, "free Negro" taxable in Northampton County in 1797 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frame 235].

 

TRAVIS FAMILY

1.    Ann Travis, born say 1744, was living in Isle of Wight County on 4 April 1764 when the court bound her "Molatto orphan" daughter Nan bound out and on 4 July 1765 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Newport Parish to bind out her illegitimate child Jane Travis [Orders 1764-8, 11, 195]. She was the mother of

2     i. Nan, born say 1762.

ii. Jane, born say 1764, bound out in Isle of Wight County on 4 July 1765 and called a "poore child" when she was ordered bound out again on 2 December 1774 [Orders 1772-80, 218].

iii. ?William, born say 1768, a "free Negro" ordered bound out to Till Williams of Elizabeth River Parish by the Norfolk County court on 20 July 1770 [Orders 1768-71, 185].

 

2.    Nan/ Nancy Travis, born say 1762, was the mother of

i. ?Peter, born 25 December 1784, a "free Boy of Color" bound out in Loyns Creek District, Isle of Wight County on 14 July 1803 [Indentures 1782-1833, frames 52-3], a "Free negro" apprentice listed in Isle of Wight County in 1813 [PPTL 1811-1833, frame 122].

ii. Thomas, born say 1790, a "poor child of Nancy Travis," bound out by the Isle of Wight County court on 2 February 1795 [Orders 1795-7, 11]. He was a "free negro" taxable in Isle of Wight County from 1811 to 1815, listed with a slave over the age of 16 in 1815 [PPTL 1811-1833, frames 34, 58, 152, 246].

iii. ?Joseph/ Jow, a "Free negro" taxable in Isle of Wight County from 1812 to 1820 [PPTL 1811-1833, frames 58, 124, 151, 246, 417, 438].

iv. Treasy, a "free negro" above the age of 16 in Isle of Wight County in 1813 [PPTL 1811-1833, frame 95].

 

TUDOR FAMILY

1.    Etheldred Tudor, born say 1765, entered 100 acres on Buck Pond in Robeson County near the Kersey family on 20 January 1789 [Pruitt, Robeson County, North Carolina Land Entries, 1787-1795, no. 344, p.22]. He was head of a Robeson County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 (Dread Tutor), 3 in 1800 [NC:424], 2 in 1810 [NC:146] and 1 free colored man and a white woman in 1820 [NC:318]. He may have been the father of

i. Solomon, head of a Robeson County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [NC:295].

ii. Morris, head of a Robeson County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:146] and 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:295].

iii. William, head of a Cumberland County, North Carolina household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:204].

 

TURNER FAMILY

        Thomas Turner was the servant of Captain Daniel Parke of York County on 26 October 1657 when the court ordered him to do open penance at the next public meeting of St. Martin Church because it appeared by the report of a "Negro woman" as well as by circumstantial evidence that he was the father of her child [DWO 3:2].

Members of the Turner family were

1     i. James, born say 1715.

2     ii. Sampson1 Turner, born say 1740.

iii. Moses, born say 1750, a "Mulato" taxable in Bladen County in 1772 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:78]. He was head of a Richmond County, North Carolina household of 7 "other free" and a slave in 1790 [NC:47] and was taxable in Richmond County on 150 acres and two polls in 1795.

iv. Charles, born about 1759, made a declaration in Pasquotank County court on 4 March 1834 to obtain a pension for his service in the North Carolina Continental Line [NCGSJ XVII:160]. He was head of a Pasquotank County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:29] and 9 in 1810 [NC:933].

v. Sylvanus, "free negro" head of a Pasquotank County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:29].

vi. Dempsey, head of a Pasquotank County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:29]. He was called Demsey Turner of Pasquotank County when he married Sarah Reid, 19 May 1801 Gates County bond.

3     vii. Simon1, born say 1770.

 

1.    James Turner, born say 1715, and his wife Mary were taxable "mollatoes" in the Granville County, North Carolina list of William Person in 1750 and 1751 with their children David and Moll and two slaves [CR 044.701.19]. He recorded a plat for 300 acres in Craven County near the Saluda River on 25 November 1766 and 200 acres in Craven County near Rocky River, adjoining John Winn on 16 March 1766 [South Carolina Archives, series S213184, 17:195; 20:410]. Their children were

i. David, born before 1739 since he was taxable in 1751.

ii. Moll, born before 1739 since she was taxable in 1751.

4     iii. ?John, born say 1740.

 

2.    Sampson1 Turner, born say 1740, was taxable in Edmunds Bridge District of Norfolk County in 1761 and a "F.N." taxable there with his wife Sebra in 1765 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1751-65, 159, 196]. He was taxable with his son Butler in Blackwater Precinct of Princess Anne County, Virginia, in 1784 [PPTL, 1782-1789]. He was head of a Currituck County, North Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:22]. His January 1792 Currituck County, North Carolina will was proved 30 July 1792 [WB 2:2].  He named his wife Sabarey as executor and mentioned his children:

i. Pormenus, head of a head of a Currituck County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [NC:147] and a Norfolk County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:794]. He was probably named for Permenos Smith, a "Molatto" Currituck County taxable in 1755 [SS 837]. On 6 October 1808 he purchased 30 acres in Norfolk County in Saint Brides Parish at the mouth of a branch in the upper Indian Creek adjoining James Old and the Northwest River for $30 [DB 44:96]. He was in a "List of free Negroes and Mulattoes" in St. Bride's Parish, Norfolk County, from to 1812 to 1817, listed with 2 tithables in 1812 and 1814 [PPTL, 1782-1791, frames ; 1791-1812, frames 802; 1813-24, frames 67, 227]. He registered in Princess Anne County on 3 October 1831, but his age and description were left blank [Register of Free Negroes, 1830-62, no. 278].

5     ii. Nicholas, born about 1763.

6     iii. Butler, born say 1765.

iv. Sampson2, a "free" or "F.B." taxable in Princess Anne County from 1801 to 1810 [PPTL, 1790-1822, frames 229, 264, 277, 323, 408], "F.B." head of a Princess Anne County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:477].

v. Frances.

vi. Sabra.

vii. Sinia.

viii. Molley.

ix. Lisha.

 

3.    Simon1 Turner, born say 1770, was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:481], 8 in 1810 [NC:748], and 10 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:264]. Perhaps his descendants were

i. Winny, born 1775-94, head of a Northampton County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:262].

ii. Jerry, born 1775-94, head of a Halifax County household of 4 "free colored" in 1830.

iii. Simon2, born 1794-1806, head of a Halifax County household of 5 "free colored" in 1830.

iv. Burton, born 1794-1806, head of a Halifax County household of 3 "free colored" in 1830. He married Poly Hawkins, 22 December 1820 Halifax County bond.

v. Bedford, born 1794-1806, head of a Halifax County household of 2 "free colored" in 1830.

 

4.    John Turner, born say 1740, was head of a Georgetown District, Prince Georges Parish, South Carolina household of 10 "other free" in 1790 [SC:56] and a Liberty County, South Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [SC:803]. He was granted 100 acres in Craven County near the Saluda River on 16 June 1768, and he recorded a plat for 150 acres in Georgetown District on Catfish Creek on 10 November 1784 [South Carolina Archives, series S2130119, 17:364; S213190, 5:183]. He, William Turner, John Turner, Jr., Mildred Turner, Penelope Turner and Catherine Turner were among the "free persons of Colour" of present-day Liberty and Marlborough counties, South Carolina, who petitioned the legislature to repeal the discriminatory tax against "free Negroes" on 20 April 1794 [South Carolina Department of Archives and History, General Assessment Petition, 1794, no. 216, frames 370-374, Free People of Color ST 1368, series no. 165015, item 216]. He may have been the father off

i. Amy, head of a Marlboro County, South Carolina household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [SC:60].

ii. Rhoday, head of a Marlboro County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [SC:59].

iii. Reuben, head of a Liberty County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [SC:806].

iv. John, Jr., head of a Liberty County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [SC:806].

 

5.    Nicholas Turner,born about 1763, was taxable in Princess Anne County in 1788 and a "F.B." taxable there in 1810 [PPTL, 1782-1789, frame 710; 1790-1822, frames 408]. He was a "F.B." head of a Princess Anne County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:477]. He registered in Norfolk County on 20 May 1811: five feet 10 1/2 In. 48 years of age of a light Complexion, Born free [Register of Free Negros & Mulattos, no.55]. He was in a list of "free Negroes and Mulattoes" in St. Bride's Parish, Norfolk County, from 1812 to 1816 [PPTL, 1791-1812, frame 802; 1813-24, frames 67, 189]. He married Alice Collins, 7 June 1814 Norfolk County bond, Aaron Rogers security. Aaron Rogers married Ann Stewart, "a free woman of colour," 17 March 1814 Norfolk County bond, John Jasper security. Aaron was a cobbler living near Norfolk in a "List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes" in 1801 [PPTL, 1791-1812, frame 384]. Nicholas may have been the father of

i. William1, born about 1786, registered in Norfolk County on 30 June 1812: 5 feet 9 inches 26 years of age, a yellowish complexion ... Born free [Register of Free Negros & Mulattos, no.72]. He married Mrs. Amy Singleton, 15 June 1814 Norfolk County bond, Nicholas Turner security. Amy was probably the widow of Samuel Singleton, head of a Norfolk County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:921].

ii. Ann, born say 1790, married Pleasant Stewart, 27 June 1811 Norfolk County bond, Nicholas Turner security.

 

6.    Butler Turner, born say 1765, was taxable in his father's 1784 Princess Anne County household, and called "Bellar Turner" when he was head of a Currituck County, North Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:22]. He was a labourer in Portsmouth, Norfolk County, in 1801 when he was in a "List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes" with males George and Thomas Turner and females Ascilla (his wife?), Limy and Mary Turner [PPTL, 1791-1812, frame 383]. He was probably the father of

i. George.

ii. Limy.

iii. Thomas.

iv. Mary.

 

Others members of the Turner family in Pasquotank County in 1810 were

i. Winny, head of a household of 7 "other free" [NC:933].

ii. Caleb, head of a household of 6 "other free" [NC:933].

iii. Lovey, head of a household of 8 "other free" [NC:934].

iv. Mary, head of a household of 7 "other free" [NC:933, 934].

v. Patsy, head of a household of 3 "other free" [NC:933].

 

Other members of a Turner family in Virginia were

i. Simon, an "Iindian," died in the Fall of the year 1776 in Revolutionary service before he and Holladay Revell reached the regiment to which they were assigned according to testimony by Revell on 7 April 1831 [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Turner, Simon; Revell, Holladay, 1831, Digital Collections, LVA].

ii. Lewis, head of a Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:666]. He was a slave freed by the 1788 Sussex County deed of James Turner [DB G:133]. He left a Sussex County will [WB H:534].

iii. William2, born about 1791, registered in Princess Anne County on 3 October 1831: 6'1", age 39, a bright mulatto man, born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1830-62, no. 251].

iv. Andrew, born about 1795, registered in Sussex County on 10 November 1817: light complexion, 5'6-1/2", free born, 22 years old [Register, no.316].

 

TWOPENCE FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Twopence, born say 1732, was a "Malato" taxable in the Southam Parish, Goochland County household of Thomas Walker in the list of James Barnes for 1748 [Goochland County Tithables, 1730-1755, LVA film no. 81, frame 130]. She may have been related to John Twopence, born about 1737, a Negro man...square and well set, about four feet 5 or 6 Inches high, 40 Years of Age, of a yellowish Complexion who ran away from Robert Beverley in Blandfiled, Essex County, according to an advertisement in the Virginia Gazette on 25 April 1777 [Virginia Gazette (Purdie), p.4, col. 1, 1:181]. And she may have been the Elizabeth Twopence who was sued by the churchwardens of Brunswick County, Virginia, in a case which was dismissed on 27 August 1765, each party paying costs (no race indicated) [Orders 1765, 421]. She may have been the ancestor of

2     i. James, born say 1750.

3     ii. Mary, born about 1752.

iii. Penelope, born about 1761, a seventy-two-year-old spinster listed in the household of Susan Twopence (a forty-two-year-old hunter and spinster) in St. David's Parish, King William County, in a list of "Free Negroes and Mulattoes" in 1833, [LVA, Auditor of Public Accounts inventory entry no. 757, Reports of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, 1833; transcribed by Selma Stewart].

iv. Ralph, born say 1772, taxable in the lower district of Henrico County from 1789 to 1794 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 186, 244, 261, 297, 310, 322].

4     v. Usley, born about 1772.

vi. David1, born say 1774, taxable in the lower district of Henrico County in 1790 and 1791 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 244, 261], head of a Richmond City household of 4 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:325], a "fn" taxable in Richmond City in 1814 [PPTL 1799-1834].

vii. William, born before 1776, head of a Sumner County, Tennessee household of 10 "free colored" in 1820. He may have been the father of David Twopence, born before 1795, who was head of a Sumner County household of 6 "free colored" and "free person of color" James Tuppence who petitioned the state of Tennessee in 1839 to be allowed to remain in Tennessee. He stated that he had been bound as an apprentice by his father to a man in Granville County, North Carolina, and returned to Sumner County in 1837 to aid his aging father who had resided there upwards of thirty years [Schweninger, Race, Slavery, and Free Blacks, Series 1, 201].

viii. Nancy, head of a Middlesex County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:470].

ix. S., head of a King & Queen County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:179].

x. Randolph/ Randall, born about 1787, a "free Negro" taxable in the lower district of King and Queen County from 1806 to 1807 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1804-23], a "Mulatto" taxable in King William County from 1812 to 1851 [PPTL 1782-1832; 1833-51], a forty-six-year-old shoemaker listed in St. John's Parish, King William County, in a list of "Free Negroes and Mulattoes" in 1833, [LVA, Auditor of Public Accounts inventory entry no. 757, Reports of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, 1833; transcribed by Selma Stewart].

xi. David2, born about 1788, a "Mulatto" taxable in King William County from 1813 to 1851 [PPTL 1782-32; 1833-51], and a forty-five-year-old shoemaker listed in St. John's Parish, King William County, in a list of "Free Negroes and Mulattoes" in 1833, [LVA, Auditor of Public Accounts inventory entry no. 757, Reports of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, 1833; transcribed by Selma Stewart]. He was a "Black" laborer counted in the 1850 census for King William County.

xii. Dandridge, born about 1789, a "Mulatto" taxable in King William County from 1812 to 1845 [PPTL 1782-32; 1833-51], a forty-four-year-old shoemaker listed in St. John's Parish, King William County, in a list of "Free Negroes and Mulattoes" in 1833, [LVA, Auditor of Public Accounts inventory entry no. 757, Reports of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, 1833; transcribed by Selma Stewart].

 

2.    James Twopence, born say 1750, sued Michael Ailstock in Louisa County on 5 November 1773 for a 1 pound, 15 shilling debt due by a promissory note Michael signed in March 1773. James (making his mark) and Joseph Cooper posted bond of 3 pounds, 10 shillings for costs in case he lost the suit [Judgments, 1773-April 1774, frames 227-30]. James was taxable in Louisa County from 1782 to 1791 [PPTL 1782-1814] and was taxable in Pittsylvania County from 1792 to 1803, called a "Molatto" in 1802 and 1803 [PPTL 1792-7, frames 565, 659, 681; 1797-1812, frames 385, 410]. He was the father of

5     i. Patty Teppance, born about 1773.

 

3.    Usley Tuppence, born about 1772, was head of a Campbell County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:853]. She registered in Lynchburg on 10 September 1813: of light complexion, about 41 years old, about 5 feet 2 or 3 inches high, Born free [no.20]. She registered again on 25 June 1819 when she had married Edmund Ellis. Edmund Ellis registered in Lynchburg on 12 December 1817: of light complexion about twenty seven years of age on the 10th September 1814, six feet one or two inches high...was born free [Lynchburg Free Negro Register, 1813-1843, nos. 19, 91, 114]. She was the mother of

i. Eliza, registered in Lynchburg on 25 June 1819: otherwise called Eliza Brown the wife of Henry Brown, daughter of Usley Tuppence a free Woman of Colour, a light mulattto about nineteen years of age, five feet two inches high was born free. Henry Brown registered in Lynchburg on 6 October 1818: a bright mulatto man about twenty years of age the 9th April 1816 five feet seven and a half inches high was born free in the County of Charles City as appears by a certificate of the clerk [Lynchburg Free Negro Register, 1813-1843, nos.101, 117].

 

4.    Mary Tuppence, born about 1752, registered in Lynchburg on 11 September 1813: about sixty one years of age, five feet two inches high, Born free [Lynchburg Free Negro Register, 1813-1843, no.26]. She was the mother of

i. Suckey1, born about 1778, registered in Lynchburg on 10 September 1813: daughter of Mary Tuppence and she now calls herself Suckey Evans, a very bright Mulatto, about thirty five years old about five feet one inch high Born free [Lynchburg Free Negro Register 1813-1843, no. 20].

 

5.    Patty/ Patsey Teppance/ Tuppence, born about 1773, married Joseph Mosby, "Free negroes," 10 September 1804 Campbell County bond, John Going bondsman [Marriage Bonds & Consents, 1782-1853, M-P, frames 471-2]. Patsey Tuppence, born about 1773, registered in Lynchburg on 2 April 1814: Patsey Mosby wife of Joseph) a bright Mulatto about 41 years of age about 5 feet 3 or 4 inches high born free. Joseph Mosby registered in Lynchburg on 9 July 1805: of yellow complexion about Forty one years of age, 5 feet four inches high, was emancipated by Jemima Bowles in April 1805 in the Court of Hanover County [Lynchburg Free Negro Register, 1813-1843, nos. 5, 35]. Patsey was the mother of

i. Roxanna, born in January 1791, registered in Lynchburg on 11 September 1813: daughter of Patsey Tuppence (and who now calls herself Roxanna Fields) a very bright mulatto about twenty three years old in January 1814, five feet five 5 1/2 inches high [Lynchburg Free Negro Register 1813-1843, no.24].

ii. Betsey, born in May 1795, registered in Lynchburg on 11 September 1813: daughter of Patsey Tuppence (and who now calls herself Betsey Gatewood) a mulatto about nineteen years old next May, five feet high, born free [Lynchburg Free Negro Register, 1813-1843, no.25].

iii. Rebecca, born 1798, registered in Lynchburg on 25 June 1819: daughter of Patsy Tuppence a free woman of Colour, dark Mulatto five feet five inches high about twenty one years of age [Lynchburg Free Negro Register, 1813-1843, no.115].

iv. Suckey2, born about 1800, registered in Lynchburg on 25 June 1819: daughter of Patsy Tuppence a free Woman of Colour, dark mulatto, five feet 5 1/2 inches high about nineteen years of age, was born free [Lynchburg Free Negro Register 1813-1843, no.116].

 

TYLER FAMILY

1.    Barbara Tyler, born say 1725, was living in Granville County on 12 April 1758 when her orphan children were bound apprentices to Robert Priddy, Jr., to learn to read and write [Owens, Granville County Notes, vol. III]. Her children were

2     i. Bartlet2, born 18 June 1744.

3     ii. Elizabeth, born 12 April 1746.

iii. ?William, born say 1747, taxable in Moses Going's Goochland County household in 1764, charged with his own tax in 1770 [List of Tithables 1756-1766, frame 281; 1767-1780, frame 156], taxable on two tithes in the Granville County summary list for 1766 and a taxable "free Negro" with his wife Frankey in 1767 [CR 44.701.19].

iv. Jane, born say 1752, called "mulatto Jane" in 1762, a taxable in Gilliam Harris' Granville County household and a "black female" taxable in Harris' household in 1764 (called Jean Taylor) [CR 44.701.19]. She was taxable in the Granville County household of her brother Bartlet in 1768 and married David Mitchell about the same time. She was probably the Jean Tylor who was sued by Olive Bass in March 1770 [WB 1:73].

 

2.    Bartlet1 Tyler, born say 1742, was bound to Robert Priddy, Jr., to learn to read and write on 12 April 1758 [Owen, Granville County Notes, vol. I]. He was probably the "Bartlet" who was one of the "negros & mulattos" taxable in the 1762 Granville County household of Robert Priddy's widow Eleanor [CR 44.701.19]. Bartlet was taxed in his own household in the Granville County summary on two tithes in 1766 [CR 44.701.20]. On 13 January 1767 he was charged in Granville County court with having a bastard child by Lovey Bass [Camin, N.C. Bastardy Bonds, 87]. In 1768 he was taxable in the list of Robert Harris, head of a household with his unnamed wife and sister Jane, and taxable on only one tithe in 1771. On 5 August 1774 Uriah Smith, alias Huckey Smith, was charged with kidnapping several of his children. On 5 August 1778 he complained to the Granville County court that he was forced into Revolutionary War service on the pretence that he was a vagrant [Owen, Granville County Notes, vol. V]. He served in the Revolution [N.C. Archives, State Treasurer Record Group, Military Papers, Revolutionary War Army Accounts, XI:35, Folio 4, Tyler, Bartlett]. He received voucher no. 178 at Hillsboro for 9 pounds specie on 10 June 1783 for military service [North Carolina Revolutionary Pay Vouchers, 1779-1782, https://familysearch.org, Tyler, ___lett]. He was taxed on an assessment of 2,210 pounds in 1780 and 600 acres and one poll in 1785. Perhaps his wife was Sarah Anderson, called Sarah Tyler in the May 1785 will of her father Lewis Anderson. Bartlet sold 325 acres by deed proved in Granville County court on 8 November 1786, and he proved a deed from Hugh Snelling to Samuel Jones on 10 November 1786 [Minutes 1786-87]. He was involved in numerous Granville County court cases, both as defendant and plaintiff:November 1777 - charged with trespass, assault, and battery, but no decision recorded.

May 1780 - charged with false swearing and stealing but was discharged.

November 1782 - presented for horse racing with Thomas Newby.

5 May 1786 - with Drury Pettiford ordered to pay Samuel Walker 16 pounds.

8 August 1796 - awarded one penny and costs in his suit against Isaac Ralph.

7 November 1786 - Court ruled in his favor in John Dock's suit against him.

11 May 1787 - suit against him and Hugh Snelling withdrawn.

November 1789 - ordered to pay George White 5 pounds on appeal.

7 May 1790 - ordered to pay John Cooper 15 pounds, 9 shillings on appeal.

8 February 1791 - awarded one penny and costs for his suit against Jesse Garret.

 

Bartlet was head of a household of 6 free males, five free females, and one female slave for the 1786 state census. He was taxed on 338 acres and one poll in Fishing Creek District of Granville County in 1796 [Tax List 1796-1802, 14], but he had moved to Warren County by 1800 when he was head of a household of 5 "other free," one white woman 26-45 years, and one white boy under ten years of age [NC:836]. In February 1803 he sued the administrator of Thomas Person's estate in Warren County court [Gammon, Record of Estates, Warren County, I:83]. In 1810 he was head of a Warren County household of 5 "other free" and one white woman over forty-five years old [NC:738]. Perhaps his children were

i. Dicey Bass, "base born mulatto child of Lovey Bass," born about 1766. She was bound to Mary Anderson, wife of George Anderson, on 18 July 1770. This was probably the child of Lovey Bass for which Bartlet posted bastardy bond in Granville County in January 1767 with Lewis Anderson, Jr., and Reuben Bass bondsmen.

ii. Pink, born 1776-94, taxed on one white (free) tithe and one black tithe in Oxford District of Granville County in 1802 and 1803 [Tax List 1796-1802, 339; 1802-09, 33]. He married Lucy Bass, 25 September 1797 Granville County bond. He was head of a Chatham County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:192].

 

3.    Elizabeth Tyler, born 12 April 1746, was bound apprentice to Robert Priddy, Jr., on 12 April 1758 [Owen, Granville County Notes, vol. III]. She was probably the "Betty" who was one of the "negros & mulattos" taxable with her brother Bartlett in the 1762 Granville County household of Robert Priddy's widow Eleanor [CR 44.701.19]. She was living in Granville County on 9 August 1766 when her son John was indentured to Samuel Benton [CR 44.101.2]. In 1800 she was in Lenoir County with her son Moses where she was head of a household of 2 "other free" [NC:22]. Her children were

i. John2, born about January 1765, eighteen months old when he was indentured to Samuel Benton on 9 August 1766. He was called Tobias (but christened John) and was five years old on 18 July 1770 when the court ordered him bound to Frances Benton.

ii. Simon, born about 1768, two-year-old "son of Elizabeth" bound to Frances Benton on 18 July 1770.

iii. Moses2, born say 1769, "base born Mulatto child of Elizabeth Tyler bound to Frances Benton on 18 July 1770. He was head of a Lenoir County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:286] and 10 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:290].

 

Barbara Tyler may have moved to Goochland County, Virginia, soon after her children were bound out in Granville County on 12 April 1758. She may have been the Barbery Tyler (no race mentioned) who was living in Goochland County on 17 July 1759 when Bouth Napier brought a suit against her and William Tylor. The suit abated against William because he was no longer an inhabitant of the county, and the court found against her for 5 pounds damages. John Pewit provided her bail, and John Boswell and James Cawthen of Hanover County were witnesses for her. Her son Arthur Tyler was bound to William Pledge in Goochland County in July 1761 [Orders 1757-61, 227, 252, 324, 352-3, 369, 422]. She was taxable in William Pledge's Goochland County household in 1761 [List of Tithables 1756-1766, frame 167]. Other members of the Tyler family in Goochland and surrounding counties were

i. Moses1, born say 1748, taxable in William Pledge's Goochland County household in 1764, taxable in Robert Jordan's household in 1767, charged with his own tax in 1768 [List of Tithables 1756-1766, frame 260, 281; 1767-1780, frames 26, 65, 76].

ii. Richard1, born say 1752, taxable in Goochland County from 1769 to 1777 [List of Tithables 1767-1780, frames 141, 171, 320, 349, 385], taxable in the upper district of Goochland County from 1788 to 1813: taxable on a slave over the age of sixteen and a horse in 1788, 1791, 1792, 1794, 1795, 1800, 1802, 1803; a "Mulatto" planter living on David Ross's land from 1804 to 1811; on William Galt's land in 1812, on John Minor's land with his wife Aggy in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 183, 227, 288, 303, 349, 367, 398, 430, 472, 489, 535, 555, 626, 678, 698, 752, 793; 1810-32, frames 19, 87, 111, 176]. He was head of a Goochland County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:717].

iii. Arthur, born say 1756, son of Barbery Tyler, bound to William Pledge in Goochland County in July 1761 [Orders 1757-61, 422], taxable in William Pledge's Goochland County household in 1773 and 1774, charged with his own tithe in 1776 [List of Tithables 1767-1780, frames 253, 311, 366].

iv. George, born about 1757, taxable in Goochland County in 1776 and 1777 [List of Tithables 1767-1780, 349, 385]. He enlisted in the in the Revolution as a substitute in Goochland County for 18 months on 13 September 1780: age 23, 5'6-1/2" high, black complexion, some of his fingers off, a planter or waiter (in another list), born in Louisa County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.31) and http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.39)]. Thomas Aslin received his final pay of 35 pounds on 27 September 1783 [NARA, M881, Roll 1096, frame 687 of 2087; https://www.fold3.com/image/286702885]. He was taxable in the upper district of Goochland County from 1787 to 1815: a "Mulatto" planter near Charles Watkins' Shop in 1804, living on Joseph Woodson's land in 1811, exempt in 1815 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 157, 184, 227, 349, 367, 626, 698; 1810-32, frames 87, 270]. He was head of a Goochland County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:717]. He registered as a free Negro in Goochland County on 16 December 1814: a free man of color about Sixty years old, about five feet six inches high, yellow complexion, short curled hair intermixed with grey...free born [Register of Free Negroes, p.84, no.159]. He was about sixty-one years old on 20 July 1818 when he applied for a pension in Goochland County for eighteen months service in 1781, stating that he was farming on rented land with his 100 year-old wife Nancy Cooper [NARA, S.41,276, M804-2432, frame 0669].

v. Francis, born say 1769, taxable in the upper district of Goochland County in 1790, 1796, 1797, 1798, 1803, a "Mulatto" planter on Booker Carroll's land in 1804, listed with wife Sally on John Minor's land in 1813 and 1814, taxable on a horse in 1816 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 245, 430, 472, 678; 1810-32, frames 176, 209, 295], perhaps the Francis Tyler "free" who was taxable in Richmond City in 1792 [PPTL 1787-99]. He married Sally Scott, 15 January 1802 Goochland County bond, Henry Cockrum (Cockran) surety, 18 February marriage [Ministers Returns, 88]. He was head of a Goochland County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:717].

vi. John2, born about 1771, married Polly Banks, daughter of Jacob Banks, 23 December 1797 Goochland County bond, Francis Tiler surety. He was taxable in the upper district of Goochland County from 1803 to 1814: a "Mulatto" planter living on Booker Carroll's land in 1804, on William Richardson's land in 1806 and 1807, with wife Polly on John Minor's land in 1813 and 1814 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1809, frames 678, 698, 751, 792; 1810-32, frames 19, 110, 176, 209]. He was head of a Goochland County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:717]. He registered as a free Negro in Goochland County on 18 November 1822: about fifty one years old, about five feet seven & an half inches high of a yellow complexion ... free born, and his wife registered on 18 September 1829: yellowish complexion, about forty four years of age, about five feet three & an half inches high [Register of Free Negroes, pp.136, 204].

vii. Phil, born say 1785, a "Mulatto" planter living on John Thurston's land in Goochland County in 1804 and 1806, living on Wright Moreland's land in 1807 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1809, frames 698, 793, 835].

viii. John3, head of a Henrico County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:994].

ix. Richard2, a "F.N." taxable in the upper district of Henrico County from 1801 to 1807 and in 1811 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 453, 496, 541, 673].

 

Another member of the Tyler family in Virginia was

i. Ann, born say 1756, a "free Molatto" whose "free Molatto" daughter Ann Cross was bound by indenture to Richard Blake by the Norfolk County court on 21 August 1778 [Orders 1776-9, n.p.]. Ann Tyler was head of a Norfolk County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:922] and Ann Cross was head of a Norfolk County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:892].

 

Indian ancestry

1.    Priss, born about 1718, was a fifteen or sixteen-year-old Catawba Indian who was induced by an Indian trader named Captain Robert Hicks to come to Virginia with him about 1733 according to depositions taken in 1768 for her son Joe's trial for his freedom in Louisa County. Hicks sold her as a slave and after changing owners several times, she became the slave of John Thompson of Hanover County. She may have had a relationship with a member of the Tyree and/or Tyler family because she was called Priss Tyree by one deponent, and her son Joseph used the name Tyler [Louisa County Judgments, 1770 Nov.-1772 May, frames 355-69; Abercrombie, Louisa County Judgments, 11-14]. She was the mother of

i. Joseph, born about 1745, a slave called "Indian Joe" when he sued for his freedom from Charles Hutcherson, executor of John Thomson, in Louisa County court on 13 July 1767. The court took depositions from Eleanor Stanley and Samuel Clark and ruled in Joseph's favor on 13 March 1769. He was called "Joseph Tyler alias Indian Joe" on 12 October 1772 when he was charged with stealing a 5 shilling bill from the house of Richard Johnson. George Gibson was his security. On 9 October 1775 he complained to the court that Walter Overton was mistreating Bartlett Tyler, and the court ordered Bartlett bound instead to George Sharp [Orders 1766-72, 50, 74, 122, 196, 214, 248, 249, 260, 265; 1766-74, 60; 1774-82, 132, 136]. He was taxable in John Holland's Goochland County household in 1771 [List of Tithables 1767-1780, frame 197]. He was described as a "Mulatto, or Indian Man" in Gabriel Jones' company of marines in Culpeper County on 2 September 1776 when Jones advertised in the Virginia Gazette that he had recovered a silver spoon which Joseph "had (stolen) from a Negro Boy belonging to Major Carr of Louisa County" [Virginia Gazette, Dixon's edition, p. 3, col. 2].

ii. Nan, born say 1752, an infant under the age of twenty-one in 1770 when she sued for her freedom. She was called "Indian Nan" on 9 April 1771 when she and her sisters "Indian Betty," Indian Priss," and "Indian Bartlett" sued for their freedom from the executors of John Thomson, deceased, in Louisa County court with the assistance of their "next friend Indian Joe." Witnesses on her behalf were James Johnson, William and Jemima Cockerham, and Mary Brown and Ann Smith who traveled about thirty miles to testify in her favor [Orders 1766-72, 389, 431, 451-2].

iii. Betty, born say 1754.

iv. Priss, born say 1756.

v. Bartlett2, born say 1760, ordered bound apprentice in Louisa County by the churchwardens of Trinity Parish on 13 July 1772 [Orders 1766-74, 38]. He may have been the Bartlett Tyler who was deceased on 28 December 1790 when his orphan Jones Tyler was bound to George Jude by the overseers of the poor in the upper district of Henrico County [Orders 1789-91, 378]. Jones Tyler was counted as white in Henrico County.

 

TYNER FAMILY

1.    Lovi Tiner, born say 1728, was the mother of a four-year-old "melato garl," Olif?, who was bound apprentice to Nathan Grimes by the October 1762 Johnston County, North Carolina court [Haun, Johnston County Court Minutes, I:132]. She was the mother of

2     i. ?Asa, born about 1744.

ii. Oliff?, born about 1758.

 

2.    Asa Tyner, born about 1744, was taxable with his unnamed wife in Bute County in 1771 [CR 015.70001]. She was Keziah Chavis, born about 1742, still taxable in the Granville County household of her father William Chavis in 1764 but not in 1766 [CR 44.701.19]. Asa and his wife "Cuzzah" sold 700 acres adjoining William Chavis, deceased, on the county line between Granville and Bute counties on 11 August 1777 [Warren County DB 6:198]. On 10 May 1770 William Chavis appeared in Bute County court complaining that he was afraid Asa planned to do him some bodily harm or damage his estate. Asa had to post 50 pounds bond for his good behavior [Minutes 1767-76, 128]. This was the start of a long series of court cases between him and William Chavis, a wealthy slave owner of Granville County. On 26 April 1775 he was ordered to be put in jail when he was found to be in possession of a slave named Dick who belonged to William Chavis [CR 044.928.25]. This was probably the charge he was acquitted of in May 1775 Granville County court [Minutes 1773-83, August 1775 dockets]. Asa was a buyer at the sale of William Chavis' estate, recorded in February 1778 Granville County court [WB 1:178]. On 10 November 1778 he was brought into Granville County court as a vagrant and "delivered to a Continental Officer and to serve as the Law directs" [Minutes 1773-83, 142]. He was listed among the volunteers for nine months service as a Continental soldier from Bute County on 3 September 1778:

Asea Tyner, Place of Abode Bute County, born N.C., 5'8", 34 years of Age, Dark Fair, Dark Eyes [NCGSJ XV:109 (N.C. Archives Troop Returns, Box 4)].

His wife Keziah was head of a Granville County household of 4 "other free" in 1800. He was probably the father of

3     i. John, born after 1759 since he was not taxed in 1771.

ii. Uriah, born about 1774, bondsman for John Tyner's Granville County marriage, taxable in Petersburg from 1802 to 1813: a "free Black" in 1813 [PPTL 1800-33, frames 58, 125, 298, 414] and head of a Petersburg Town household of 4 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1810 [VA:118b]. He and Major Ellbeck petitioned the Virginia Legislature on 12 December 1810 for permission to remain in Virginia when the Petersburg magistrates ordered them to leave in accordance with the law which prohibited the emigration of free Negroes. Ellbeck said that he was originally from Pennsylvania, moved to Petersburg in 1802, had purchased several lots in Petersburg, had married a woman named Magdelen who was a native of the island of Guadaloupe and had five children. Uriah stated that he had moved to Petersburg from North Carolina in 1800 and purchased a lot there [Inhabitants: Petition, Petersburg, 1810, Legislative Petitions Digital Collections, LVA]. Major Eelbeck was the "mulattoe" slave of Henry Eelbeck who petitioned the Chowan County, North Carolina court in September 1801 for permission to manumit him [Byrd, In Full Force and Virtue, 14]. On 22 September 1801 "free woman of color" Magdelene St. Rigue purchased her husband Major from Henry Elbeck in Edenton and petitioned for permission to free him [Schweninger, Race, Slavery, and Free Blacks, Series 1, 71]. Major Elbeck was head of a Petersburg household of 8 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:120a]. Uriah registered in Petersburg on 14 September 1811: a dark brown free Mulatto man, five feet six 1/4 inches high, thirty seven years old, Imigrated into this state as a free man, permitted to remain by act of assembly 26 Jany(?) 1811 [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 676]. He married Phebe Kennon, 4 May 1816 Petersburg Hustings Court marriage. Uriah and his family emigrated to Liberia aboard the Cyrus in 1824 [https://www.fold3.com/image/46670224].

iii. Anna, married Labon Taborn, 5 August 1799 Granville County bond with Zachariah Mitchell bondsman.

 

3.    John Tyner, born say 1760, married Betsy Bass, 5 July 1796 Granville County bond with Uriah Tyner bondsman. John was taxed on 50 acres and one poll in Fishing Creek District, Granville County, from 1796 to 1808 [Tax List 1796-1802, 14, 65, 112, 163, 214, 268, 323; 1803-09, 15, 219, 275]. He was head of a Granville County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 and 2 "free colored" in Stokes County in 1820 [NC:371]. He died before 3 June 1831 when his Stokes County estate papers were filed [CR 090.508.108]. He may have been the father of

i. Jonathan, born say 1783, married Pheby Bass, 9 July 1804 Granville County bond, Arthur Tyner bondsman. He was taxed on 100 acres and one poll in Fishing Creek District from 1801-07 [Tax List 1796-1802, 268, 323; 1803-09, 15, 219]. He was head of a Stokes County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:372].

ii. Patsy, married Thomas Pettiford, 1 September 1807 Granville County bond with Jonathan Tyner bondsman.

iii. James, married Betsy Bass, 5 January 1805 Granville County bond. Betsy Tiner was an 80-year-old "Mulatto" living with 71-year-old "Mulatto" Milly Bass in the 1850 census for Forsyth County, North Carolina.

iv. Hannah Tinor, head of a Caroline County, Maryland household of 2 "other free" in 1790.

 

TYRE FAMILY

1.    Jane1 Tyre, born say 1702, was living in Christ Church Parish, Middlesex County, on 25 February 1719/20 when her "Mulatto" daughter Rachel was born [NSCDA, Parish Register of Christ Church, 105]. She was the mother of

2     i. Rachel, born 25 February 1719/20.

ii. ?William, born say 1730, a "black" taxable in James Muckelroy's Beaufort County, North Carolina household in 1755 [SS 837].

 

2.    Rachel Tyre, born 25 February 1719/20, was "a Mulatto" baptized in Christ Church Parish, Middlesex County on 3 April 1720. She was probably the ancestor of

i. Milly, born say 1755, taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, on 5 cattle in 1787 taxable on a horse in 1788 [PPTL, 1782-1799, frames 127, 162], perhaps the Milly Tyre who was listed as a "free Negro" on B. Tompkins' land in Caroline County in 1813 [PPTL 1783-1811].

ii. Aggy, born say 1766.

3    iii. Jonathan1, born say 1765.

iv. Acquilla, born say 1765, sued William Pollock and Thomas Hackett for his freedom in Caroline County court on 12 October 1786. The court ruled that he was entitled to his freedom because he was born of a free woman and was over the age of twenty-one [Orders 1785-7, part 2, 367, 383].

v. Priscilla, born in 1766, a "mulatto" ordered set free by the Caroline County court on 10 June 1785 (because she was over eighteen) [Orders 1785-7, part 1, 59], perhaps identical to Lilla Tyre who was a "free Negro" living on John Chiles' land in St. Margaret's Parish, Caroline County in 1813 [PPTL 1800-20].

vi. Richard, born say 1772, taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, in 1788 and from 1797 to 1800 [PPTL, 1782-1799, frame 162, 522, 562, 599; 1800-13, frame 37], perhaps the Richard Tyree who was taxable in James Curd's Goochland County household in 1776 [List of Tithables 1767-1780, frames 373].

vii. James1, born say 1771, taxable in Robert Cobbs's Caroline County household in 1788 and 1789 [PPTL 1783-1811], taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, from 1797 to 1813: called a "Mulatto" from 1811 to 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1799, frames; 1800-1813, frames 261, 445, 488, 531, 576]. He married Caty Gowen, 21 December 1807 Albemarle County bond, head of an Albemarle County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:210].

viii. Winney, born December 1771 according to Mary Hackett, a witness to her 9 October 1793 Albemarle County marriage to Jesse Middlebrook, Jonathan Tyree bondsman.

ix. Moses, born say 1772, taxable in Thomas Hackett's household in Caroline County in 1789, 1790 and 1792 [PPTL 1783-1811].

x. Barnet, born say 1773, taxable in Caroline County in Thomas Hackett's household in 1790 and 1792, a "free Mulatto" tithable in Caroline County in 1800, a "negroe" tithable in 1801, a "Negro Carpenter" in 1802 [PPTL 1783-1811], a "Negro" taxable in Bedford County from 1813 to 1815 [PPTL 1806-16, frames 405, 473, 594].

xi. Joseph, born say 1773, born say 1773, taxable in Caroline County from 1790 to 1816: in Samuel Redd's household in 1790, responsible for his own tax in 1792, taxable from 1801 to 1810: a "negro" taxable in 1801, a "Free negroe" in 1803 and 1804, a "free Negro" in 1810, taxable on 3 tithes in 1811, a slave and 3 "free Negroes" on Samuel Redd's land in 1813 [PPTL 1783-1811]. He was a "Free Man of Colour & resident of Caroline County in 1820 when he petitioned the Virginia Legislature to allow his wife Nancy and children Sally, Mahala, Charles, Joseph, James, Mary and Martha to remain in Virginia. He was a "free black" who petitioned a second time on 11 December 1821 with signatures of sixty-one whites from Caroline and Hanover counties. His petition was rejected [Legislative Petitions of the General Assembly, 1776-1865, Accession no. 36121, Box 49, folder 98; LVA Digital Collection: http://www.virginiamemory.com/collections/petitions accessed 24 November 2015].

xii. Micajah, born say 1774, a "free Negro" taxable in Hanover County in 1800, living with William D. Taylor in 1814 [PPTL, 1792-1803, p. 182; 1804-24], taxable in Caroline County in 1816 and taxable there on 2 tithes, a slave over 16, a slave under 16 and a horse in 1825 [PPTL 1812-20; 1821-6].

xiii. Jonathan2, born before 1776, taxable in Caroline County most years from 1794 to 1820: called a "free Mulatto" in 1800, a "negroe" in 1801, a "Negro planter" in 1802, a "Free negroe" in 1804 and 1810, a "free Negro" on John Hailey's land in 1813 [PPTL 1783-1799; 1800-1811; 1812-20; 1821-6]. He was head of a Rockingham County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820.

xiv. Anderson, born about 1783, taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, with the initials "P.S" (P.'s son) in 1809 [PPTL, 1800-1813, frame 399], a "free Negro" working at Miller's Forge in Rockingham County in 1813 [PPTL 1795-1813, frame 733], registered in Albemarle County on 6 September 1813: a man of Colour Five feet eight and an half inches high, aged Thirty years of a yellow complection [Orders 1813-15, 155], taxable in Augusta County in 1815 [PPTL 1811-20, frame 269].

xv. George, taxable in William Redd's Caroline County household in 1797, a "Free negroe" taxable in Caroline County in 1803, a taxable "Free negro" there in 1815 [PPTL 1783-1811].

xvi. Patsy, mother of Alexander Tyre who registered in Albemarle County on 4 September 1847: M. P. Walton informs the court...Elexander Tyre...his Mother Patsey Tyre were free, and that he were Lawfully Married by the Revd George Bingham to a certain Anney Par a free woman of Colour by whom he had two daughters Marthyann and Genetty [Tyre, Alexander (M): Free Negro Affidavit, 1847, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. He was a "free Negro" working at Miller's Forge in Rockingham County in 1813 [PPTL 1795-1813, frame 733].

xvii. Betty, taxable on a horse in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, in 1803 [PPTL, 1800-1813, frame 169]. She registered in Albemarle County on 8 March 1808: 38 years old, five feet five inches in height [Tryre, Bettey (38): Free Negro Description, 1808, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

xix. Nelson, taxable in the list of "Mulattoes and Free Negroes in Chesterfield County in 1810 [PPTL, 1786-1827, frame 802], perhaps the member of the Tyre family who married Sarah Otter, born 22 December 1783, 5 feet 2-1/2 inches high, brownish yellow. Her daughter Hardenia Tyree obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 6 October 1827: daughter of Sally Tyre who lived in Manchester for many years & that Sally Otter the mother of sd Sally & Grand Mother of Hardenia Tyre also lived in Manchester until her death as a free person [Tyre, Hardenia (F): Free Negro Affidavit, 1827, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

 

3.    Aggy Tyre, born say 1756, was the mother of Samuel Tyree, "a free Mulatto" who bound himself as an apprentice in Caroline County to Benjamin Jacob. She was the mother of

5    i. Samuel, born about 1774.

 

4.    Jonathan1 Tyre, born say 1764, purchased 75 acres in Albemarle County from Thomas Walton in 1785 [DB 9:152]. He married Usly Gowing, 21 October 1786 Albemarle County, Virginia bond, Shadrack Battles bondsman. He was taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, from 1786 to 1813: listed with 2 tithables from 1803 to 1805; called a "Mulatto" in 1811 and 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1799, frames 84, 212, 391, 455, 522, 599; 1800-1813, frames 37, 169, 261, 445, 530, 576] and head of an Albemarle County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:210]. He sold his 75 acres in Albemarle County in 1819 [DB 21:462]. He was the father of

i. Milly, married William Brock, 5 January 1807 Albemarle County bond, with the consent of Jonathan Tyree, Martin Tyree witness.

ii. ?Nancy, married John Brock, 6 January 1807 Albemarle County bond, William Brock bondsman.

iii. ?Martin, taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, in 1810 [PPTL, 1800-1813, frame 445], taxable in Augusta County in 1815 [PPTL 1811-20, frame 269].

iv. ?Elliot, born about 1790, registered in Albemarle County on 6 September 1813: a man of Colour, five feet eight inches and three quarters high, aged twenty three years, dark complexion [Orders 1813-15, 155].

v. Nathaniel, son of Jonathan Tyre, a man of colour, bound out by the Albemarle County court on 1 February 1819 until the age of twenty one [Orders 1818-19, 217].

vi. Jane2/ Jinney, listed as a "Mulatto" in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, in 1813 [PPTL, 1800-1813, frame 576].

 

5.    Samuel Tyree, born about 1774, was taxable in Caroline County in 1797 with L. Hill in his household, called a "free Mulatto"in 1799 [PPTL 1783-1799]. He registered in Caroline County on 22 October 1803: a free Mulatto about five feet ten inches high, twenty nine years of age, of a yellowish complexion...Aggy Tyree is a free person and that the said Samuel Tyree is the son of the said Aggy who bound himself to Benja Jacob and is now free [Tyree, Samuel (M, 29): Free Negro Certificate, 1803, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. He was taxable in Botetourt County in 1805 and 1806 [PPTL 1811-1822, frames 520, 544]. He registered in Lynchburg on 14 February 1811: a Mulatto about 36 years of age, 5 feet 9 inches high, was born free as appears by certificate from the clerk of Caroline and the Hustings Court of Fredericksburg [Free Negro Register, 1805-1813, no.33] and registered in Albemarle County on 6 November 1815: a man of colour...a Mulatto about thirty six years old, five feet nine inches high. On 3 March 1817 the Albemarle County court ordered that some of his goods be sold to pay $45 in back rent he owed Thomas Barton [Orders 1815-16, 198; 1816-18, 184]. He was head of a Louisa County household of 10 "free colored" in 1820. He was living in Louisa County on 13 December 1830 and married to Nancy Tyree when his son James registered as a free Negro. He may have been deceased by 11 February 1843 when (their son?) William Tyree was called son of Nancy Tyree. He and his wife Nancy were the parents of

i. James2, born about 1810, registered in Louisa County on 13 December 1830: son of Sam and Nancy Tyre who was born free, rather a yellowish complexion, 5'8" high about 20 years of age.

ii. ?William, born about 1815, registered in Louisa County on 11 February 1843: free man of color heretofore registered in the clerks office of Hustings Court of Town of Lynchburg...very dark yellow complexion [Abercrombie, Free Blacks of Louisa County, 35, 63].

 

UNDERWOOD FAMILY

1.    Christopher1 Underwood, born say 1723, was a runaway "Mollatto" servant of Henry Nixon of Orange County, Virginia, before 24 August 1744 when Francis Whittle proved his claim in Louisa County for taking him up [Orders 1742-8, 117]. He was taxable in Orange County from 1761 to 1769: taxable on 2 tithes in 1769 [Little, Orange County Tithables, 1734-1782, 63, 65, 74, 77, 82, 93, 101]. John Morgan sued him in Orange County court on 16 January 1761, claiming that he had leased a plantation to Christopher for 300 pounds of tobacco due sixty days after 25 December 1760 (23 February 1761) but believed that he would remove his effects from the county before that date. Morgan, therefore, petitioned the court to attach Christopher's estate for the value of the rent. The sheriff executed the warrant on some hanging tobacco. On 19 August 1762 Christopher sued John Branham for the 300 pounds of tobacco, petitioning the justices as "a molatto servant" (who would not be able to enter testimony against a white man). The court found in his favor. In November 1763 the court dismissed his suit against Berryman Davis for assault and battery, but the same court found Davis guilty of being a common disturber of the peace on testimony of John Branham [Judgments May 1761-March 1762, Papers May 1761, LVA reel 121 (no frame numbers, 108-109 from the start of the reel; Judgments September 1762-July 1763, Papers May 1763, LVA reel 121; Judgments July-November 1763, LVA reel 122]. He was probably the ancestor of

i. William, born about 1762, enlisted in Culpeper County for the length of the war in the Revolution on 19 March 1781 and was sized about a month later: William Wegbare, age 19, 5'2-3/4" high, yellow complexion, born in Loudoun County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.35)]. He was taxable in William Dixon's Culpeper County household in 1784 [PPTL 1782-1802, frame 109], head of a Wilkes County household of 4 persons in the 1787 census for North Carolina, 1 white male over 16, 2 under 16 and 1 white female in 1790 [NC:121] and 9 "other free" in 1800 [NC:66]. He was head of a Haywood County household of 3 "free colored" and 1 white male aged 30-40, including an 80-year-old Revolutionary War pensioner in 1840 [NC:111]. He was called William Wedgebare alias William Underwood when he applied for a Revolutionary War pension at the age of sixty-five while resident in Haywood County on 7 October 1824. He testified that he enlisted for the duration of the war on 19 March 1780 in Culpeper County, Virginia, and he had a wife who was fifty-five years old, a son of full age, a daughter aged twelve and another son aged ten. He had $89.50 worth of property and had contracted for a tract of land of 50 acres at $75 but had paid only $9.75. He married Miss Margaret Wilson in Macon County, North Carolina, on 20 June 1831 and moved to Georgia in 1847 to be with his children. He died on 30 May 1852. In 1853 his only surviving children were Thomas J. and Nelson Underwood. His wife Margaret was about fifty-three years old on 19 March 1855 when she applied for bounty land while resident in Fannin County, Georgia [NARA, W.2292, M804, Roll 2520, frame 35 of 1387; https://www.fold3.com/image/29311044].

ii. Lewis, born say 1763, a 16-21 year-old taxable in William Dixon's Culpeper County household in 1783 and a 21 year-old taxable there in 1784 [PPTL 1782-1802, frames 65, 109], head of a Wilkes County household of 1 "white" male over 16, 3 under 16, and 6 free white females in 1790 (living near William Dickson) [NC:121], and head of a Wilkes County, North Carolina household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [NC:66] and 10 in 1810 [NC:856]. He entered 200 acres in Wilkes County on Moravian Creek on 27 February 1808 [Pruitt, Land Entries: Wilkes County, 2:42]. Perhaps his widow was Nancy Underwood, head of a Wilkes County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:528].

iii. Edy, born say 1760, mother of Micajah Chavis alias Underwood, a seven-year-old "mulatto" orphan boy bound to William Tatham, Esq., in Cumberland County, North Carolina, on 27 July 1787 [Minutes 1784-87], perhaps also the mother of Daniel Underwood, a fifteen-year-old "boy of Colour" bound to Alexander McDaniel in Cumberland County on 16 September 1808 [Minutes 1808-10]. Daniel was charged with carrying firearms without a license in Cumberland County, North Carolina, on Thursday, 8 March 1844 [Minutes 1842-44].

iv. Amanda, born about 1759, a 91-year-old "Mulatto" counted in the 1850 census for Lower Creek, Caldwell County, North Carolina, with John Underwood (age 31).

v. Sally, born say 1770, mother of George Underwood, a base born child (no race indicated) who was two months old on 30 October 1788 when the Cumberland County court bound him apprentice to John Winslow [Minutes 1787-91].

vi. Isham, born say 1778, a "Mulatto" head of an Edgecombe County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [NC:249]. He owned 99 acres when he died in March 1807 leaving a wife Bishop Underwood, and (son?) Silas Underwood [Gammon, Record of Estates Edgecombe County, 97]. Bishop was head of an Edgecombe County household of 2 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1810 [NC:743].

vii. Mary, born say 1785, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:52], perhaps the Mary Underwood who was head of a Richmond County, North Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:206].

viii. Christopher2/ Kitt, a "Mulatto" taxable in Culpeper County (which was formed from Orange County in 1749) from 1787 to 1797 [PPTL 1782-1802, frames 197, 337, 437, 497, 531, 569, 612, 651]. On 10 March 1794 he sold a horse, cow, steer, two sows, and eight shoats left on his "plantation" to John Jameson by Culpeper County deed [DB R:655].

 

VALENTINE FAMILY

Members of the Valentine family born during the colonial period were

1    i. Edward1, born say 1715.

2    ii. Charles1, born say 1718.

3    iii. John1, born say 1721.

4    iv. Sarah1, born say 1722.

5    v. Mary1, born say 1729.

6    v. Lucy1, born say 1730.

7    vi. Elizabeth1, born say 1733.

vii. Terry, born say 1739, a "Mullatto Boy" indentured to Ephraim Garthwright when he left the remainder of Terry's indentured time to his son Ephraim by his undated Henrico County will, proved December 1750 [DW 1750-7, 39-40].

8    viii. Amy1, born say 1740.

9    ix. Mary2, born say 1748.

10   x. Sarah5, born about 1750.

11   xi. Lucy3, born about 1758.

12   xii. Jenny1, born about 1763.

 

1.    Edward1 Valentine, born say 1715, was taxable in Chesterfield County in 1752 and 1756 [Tax List 1747-1821, frames 6, 24]. On 2 March 1753 his suit in Chesterfield County against William Glascock for trespass, assault, and battery was dismissed by consent of both parties. On 5 October 1753 Augustine Claiborne won a suit against him for 30 shillings, and the court ordered the churchwardens of Dale Parish to bind out his children Charles, Peter, Sarah, Elizabeth, Edward, and Susanna Valentine (no race indicated and no reason for the order stated). The sheriff reported that he was not an inhabitant of the county on 7 December 1753 when Claiborne's suit against him came to trial [Orders 1749-54, 315, 404, 428]. He may have been the Edward Valentine, husband of Ann Valentine, whose son Zachariah (no race indicated) was born a year later on 8 October 1754 in New Kent County [NSCDA, Parish Register of St. Peter's, 182]. In August 1758 David Sims testified in Chesterfield County court that Edward had administered poisonous medicines to him, and the court ordered Edward to post bond for his good behavior for a year. On 17 August 1763 he was charged with horse stealing and sent to Williamsburg for trial. Peter Matthews, John Kimbles, Thomas Brentlow, Lewis Andrews, and Moses Granger testified against him. On 6 February 1767 Stephen Dance sued him for a 1 pound, 7 shilling debt, and on 3 July 1767 the court ordered the churchwardens of Dale Parish to bind out his children Matthew and Nanny [Orders 1754-9, 461-2; 1759-63, 440; 1763-7, 62]. His children were

13    i. Charles2, born say 1742.

14    ii. Peter1, born say 1744.

iii. Sarah2, born say 1746.

iv. Elizabeth2, born say 1748.

v. Susanna, born say 1752.

vi. Zachariah1, born 8 October 1754 in New Kent County, taxable in Henrico County on 2 horses in 1790 [PPTL 1782-1814, B, p.35], may have been the father of Richard Valentine who registered in King George County on 4 April 1822: a dark Mulatto, about 34 years of age, 5' 1 Inch high...was born free in the County of New Kent [Register of Free Persons, no.64].

vii. Matthew, born say 1756.

viii. Ann/ Nanny, born say 1758.

ix. Edward3, born about 1761, enlisted in the Revolution from Dinwiddie County as a substitute on 6 June 1782 and was sized on 26 June: age 21, 5'6-1/4" high, black complexion, a planter, born in Dinwiddie County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.33)]. He received $20 pay between 1782 and 1783 [NARA, M881, Roll 1096, frame 721 of 2087].

x. ?Isham2, born about 1766, enlisted in the Revolution from Dinwiddie County as a substitute on 6 June 1782 and was sized on 26 June: age 16, 5'9" high, black complexion [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.33); Eckenrode, Virginia Soldiers of the American Revolution, II:308, citing Revolutionary Army Vol. I:33 at LVA].

 

2.    Charles1 Valentine, born say 1718, sued John Pompey for a one pound, six shilling debt in Brunswick County, Virginia, in October 1741. The case was dismissed in May 1742 because Charles did not prosecute. He was sued for debt in Brunswick County in July 1758 [1737-41, 443; 1741-2, 45; 1757-9, 228; 1760-84, 21]. He may have been the father of

15    i. Howard, born say 1743.

16    ii. John2, born say 1745.

17    iii. Isham1, born say 1755.

 

3.    John1 Vollentine, born say 1721, complained to the Amelia County court in May 1743 that "he being a free person is kept a slave by Charles Irby." The court ordered that depositions be taken from Ann Hunt and Elizabeth Mallory in the adjacent county of Prince George. The suit was dismissed in 1744 when both parties were in agreement [Orders 1735-46, 232, 235, 238, 244, 250, 262, 269, 273, 286, 295]. He was a tithable head of household in the lower part of Nottoway Parish, Amelia County, from 1748 to 1750 [Amelia County Tithables, 1748, 1749, 1750]. He may have been the father of "poor Mulattos" Sarah, Will, Sam, Amy, Vall, Charles, Dorcas, Martha, and Ann Valentine of Nottoway Parish who were ordered bound out by the Amelia County court on 27 January 1763 [Orders 7:5]. His children may have been

18    i. Sarah3, born say 1746.

ii. William1, born say 1748, called William, son of ____ Valentine, in Chesterfield County on 5 November 1756 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Dale Parish to bind him out to a trade [Orders 1754-9, 237]. He may have been the Will Valentine who was bound out in Amelia County on 27 January 1763 [Orders 7:5].

iii. Samuel, taxable in Wm Totty's Dinwiddie County household in 1792 [PPTL, 1782-90 (1792 A, p.16)], a "Mulatto" taxable in Chesterfield County from 1801 to 1803 [PPTL, 1786-1811, frames 455, 493, 531].

iv. Amy2, born say 1752, called a "free Mulatto" on 27 April 1767 when the Amelia County court ordered the churchwardens to bind her and Pat Valentine to Henrietta Irby [Orders 8A:44], listed as a "Free Negro" in Pittsylvania County in 1810, working for Jesse Walton, Sr., in 1813 [PPTL 1797-1812, frame 721; 1813-23, frame 21].

v. Vall, perhaps identical to Vaul Valentine who was a "FN" taxable in Nottoway County in 1796 and from 1811 to 1821 [PPTL 1789-1822, frames 161, 387, 405, 432, 461, 505, 533, 561, 637, 665].

vi. Charles4, born say 1756, married Nancy Chavous, 28 November 1785 Mecklenburg County, Virginia bond, Thomas McLin security. He was sued for trespass on the case in Pittsylvania County in a suit which was dismissed on 17 January 1786 [Orders 1783-7, 272], and he was sued for a 4 pound debt in Mecklenburg County on 8 April 1799 [Orders 1798-1801, 163]. He was taxable on his own tithe and a horse in the lower District of Mecklenburg County from 1795 to 1800, taxable on his son Henry in 1801 [PPTL, 1782-1805, frames 583, 670, 702, 811, 860] and taxable in Pittsylvania County from 1802 to 1806 [PPTL 1797-1812, frames 385, 411, 483, 509, 554].

vii. Dorcas.

viii. Martha1, called Pat Valentine on 27 December 1764 when the Amelia County court ordered the churchwardens of Nottoway Parish to bind her out and called a "free Mulatto" on 27 April 1767 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind her and Amey Valentine to Henrietta Irby [Orders 8:325; 8A:44].

ix. Ann.

x. Peter3, born say 1770, a "Mulatto" taxable in Chesterfield County from 1792 to 1807 (called Peter, Sr.) [PPTL, 1786-1811, frames 127, 238, 273, 306, 344, 379, 531] and taxable on 8 acres from 1804 to 1814 [Land Tax List 1791-1822, A lists]. Peter3, born say 1768, a "Mulatto" taxable in Chesterfield County from 1792 to 1807 (called Peter, Sr.) [PPTL, 1786-1811, frames 127, 238, 273, 306, 344, 379, 531] and taxable on 8 acres from 1804 to 1814 [Land Tax List 1791-1822, A lists]. He and his wife Theney were the parents of Elizabeth Valentine, born 1 March 1801, who registered the birth of her children George, Jane, Peter, Susan, Patsey, Henry and Riley Valentine [Valentine, Elizabeth (F): Free Negro Register, n.d., African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

 

4.    Sarah1 Valentine, born say 1722, was living in Charles City County, Virginia, in August 1746 when her "mulatto" son Caesar Valentine was bound to Edmund Eppes [Orders 1737-51, 420]. Her children were

i. Caesar1, born say 1739, a "Mullatto" indentured to John Wayles on 2 March 1757 when the Charles City County court ordered that he serve additional time for running away for six months [Orders 1751-7, 444]. He was charged with felony in Brunswick County, Virginia court on 23 July 1759 and sent to Williamsburg for trial [Orders 1757-9, 383]. He was a "free Negro" executed near Williamsburg according to the 30 November 1759 edition of the Virginia Gazette [Headley, 18th Century Virginia Newspapers, 347].

ii. ?Anthony, born about 1747, enlisted in the Revolution from Charles City County for 18 months on 22 September 1780: age 33, 5'8" high, planter, born in Charles City County, black complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.22)].

19    iii. ?Charles3, born about 1751.

20   iv. ?Martha2, born say 1758.

21   v. ?Lucy5, born say 1761.

22   vi. ?Phebe, born say 1763.

 

5.    Mary1 Valentine, born say 1729, was living in Charles City County in June 1748 when the churchwardens were ordered to bind her son Edward Valentine (no race mentioned) to Thomas Coley [Orders 1737-51, 477], and she was living in Chesterfield County on 6 April 1753 when the churchwardens of Dale Parish were ordered to bind out her daughter Betty Valentine (no race mentioned) [Orders 1749-54, 333]. Her children were

i. Edward2, born say 1747.

23   ii. Elizabeth3, born say 1752.

 

6.    Lucy1 Valentine, born say 1730, was living in Lunenburg County, Virginia, in October 1751 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Cumberland Parish to bind out her children Lucy and Sarah. The same October court called her a late servant of Matox Mayes when it granted her a certificate proving her freedom [Orders 1748-52, 466, 485]. On 22 November 1753 she was in Halifax County, Virginia, when the churchwardens of Antrim Parish were ordered to bind out her children Nanny and Sarah to George Abney [Pleas 1:324]. In February 1754 the Lunenburg County court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her daughter Cloe [Orders 1753-4, 541]. In February 1761 the Halifax County, Virginia court confirmed the indenture of Sarah and Ann to George Abney [Pleas 3:181, 194]. She was the mother of

24    i. Lucy2, born say 1746.

25    ii. Sarah4, born say 1748.

iii. Ann, born say 1750, bound apprentice to George Abney in Halifax County on 22 November 1753.

26    v. Chloe, born say 1752.

27   vi. ?Luke1, born about 1754.

 

7.    Elizabeth1 Valentine, born say 1733, was living in Chesterfield County on 7 December 1753 when the churchwardens of Dale Parish were ordered to bind out her daughter Nanny Valentine. She was the mother of

28    i. Ann/ Nanny, born say 1753.

ii. ?Abraham, born say 1766, taxable in Dinwiddie County in 1787, 1789, 1790, 1793, 1795, and a "free" tithable in 1796 and 1797 [PPTL, 1782-90 (1787 A, p.14), (1789 A, p.13), (1790 A, p.12), (1793 A, p.13), (1795 A, p.15), (1796 B, p.15), (1797 A, p.16)]. He was taxable in Petersburg in 1803 [PPTL 1800-33, frame 88].

iii. ?William2, born say 1772, over sixteen years of age when he was listed in the Dinwiddie County household of James Valentine in 1790. He was taxable in his own household in 1795 and 1796 [PPTL, 1782-90 (1790 B, p.18), (1795 B, p.16), (1796 B, p.20)]. He was taxable on 20 acres in Dinwiddie County on Whipponock Creek from 1801 to 1814 [Land Tax List 1782-1814, B lists]. He was counted in the list of "free Negroes & Mollattoes" in Dinwiddie County from 1802 to 1819, listed as a sawyer most years, but called a planter in 1813 when he was listed with his wife Polley [PPTL 1800-9; 1810-14; 1814-19, B lists].

iv. ?Archibald, born about 1774, taxable in Dinwiddie County in the household of James Valentine in 1796 and taxable in his own household from 1797 to 1800 [PPTL, 1782-90 (1795 B, p.20), (1796 B, p.20), (1797 B, p.19), (1798 A, p.17) (1799 A, p.17), (1800 A, p.19)]. He registered in Petersburg on 15 August 1800: a dark brown Mulatto man, five feet ten inches high, twenty six years old, born free & raised in Dinwiddie County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 183]. He was head of a Petersburg Town household of 7 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:122a].

 

8.    Amy1 Valentine, born say 1740, was a taxable head of a household in Norfolk Borough in 1768 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1766-80, 86]. She traveled to Cumberland County, North Carolina, in October 1784 to secure the freedom of her daughter Sally who was held there as a slave. About eight years later in August 1792 the Governor of Virginia was asked to help bring to justice Jacob Abrahams, James Bishop and a man named Skinner who had been involved with stealing Sally from Norfolk and selling her in Fayetteville [Calendar of Virginia State Papers 6:185-6]. She was the mother of

i. ?George, born about 1756, "of Lynhaven Parish," married Dinah Sparrow, "of Elizabeth River Parish, mulattoes," 14 November 1787 Norfolk County bond [Minister's Returns, 1787-1790, 2]. They registered in Princess Anne County on 1 April 1794: George Valentine a light Mulatto man five feet seven inches high born free. Dinah Valentine, Wife of George Valentine, a dark Mulatto, five feet three inches high forty six years of age born free [Valentine, George (M, 38): 1794, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA, and Valentine, Dinah (F, 46): Free Negro Certificate]. He was taxable in Princess Anne County from 1787 to 1820: listed in the household of Anna Campbell in 1787, a "blk" taxable in 1788, taxable on a slave 12-16 years of age in 1794 and a slave over 16 in most of the following years. In 1821 (his widow) Dinah Valentine was taxable on a horse [PPTL, 1782-1789, frames 674, 716, 728; 1790-1822, frames 21, 44, 103, 111, 139, 147, 179, 186, 244, 299, 377, 395, 419, 430, 478, 656, 677]. He was a "F.B." head of Princess Anne County household of 3 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1810 [VA:477].

ii. Sally, born about 1761, a "free Negro girl" bound to Samuel Blue of Elizabeth River Parish by order of the Norfolk County court on 20 June 1771 [Orders 1771-3, 1]. She was a "Negro woman" who was sold by Nathaniel Folsom to James McCracking by 11 October 1792 when she sued for her freedom in Cumberland County, North Carolina. The court ordered her released [Minutes 1791-7]. She was a thirty-year-old free-born "Black Woman" who registered in Norfolk Borough on 18 August 1794 and produced her papers in the District of Columbia court in Alexandria in 1805 [Arlington County Register of Free Negroes, 1797-1861, p.14].

 

9.    Mary2 Valentine, born say 1748, was the mother of Boatswain Valentine, an illegitimate child bound to Batt Crowder by the Mecklenburg County court on 13 March 1769. On 14 April 1777 the court bound her son Isham Valentine to Edward Waller [Orders 1768-71, 151; 1773-9, 358]. She was the mother of

i. Peter2, born say 1756, enlisted in the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 20 July 1778 for nine months, but died at Philadelphia Hospital according to the 23 April muster roll of Lieutenant Colonel Wm L. Davidson's Company [NARA, M246, roll 79, frames 143 of 323]. A military warrant was issued to his heirs for 640 acres of bounty land by a field officer according to the application for a survivor's pension which his nephews Daniel and Sarah made while living in Halifax County, North Carolina [NARA, R.10,820, M805-820, frame 0119]. Between 1 September 1784 and 1 February 1785 C. Dixon received Peter's final pay of 41 pounds for service in the North Carolina Continental Line [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1179; XVII:255].

ii. Daniel1, born say 1760, ordered bound apprentice in Chesterfield County in August 1763 (no parent or race mentioned) [Orders 1759-67, 459], the brother of Peter and Polly Valentine according to the declaration of Polly's children on 21 May 1835 in Halifax County, North Carolina court. He enlisted in Captain Bradley's Company in the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 7 June 1779 for 18 months, but nothing more was said of him on the rolls. A military land warrant was issued by a field officer to his heirs for 640 acres [NARA, R.10,820, M805-820, frame 0119]. He left a 1 July 1779 Halifax County, North Carolina will, proved in February 1782, by which he left his brother Joshua all his household furniture and working tools and left his mare to be sold and divided between his mother Mary and sister Mary [WB 1781-1824, 29].

iii. Joshua, born about 1768, a "Mulatto" taxable in Prince George County from 1799 to 1804: taxable on a slave in 1802, a horse in 1804 and taxable from 1809 to 1811: taxable on a horse in 1809 and 1810 and taxable on 3 free males in 1811 [PPTL, 1782-1811, frame 498, 519, 542, 566, 568, 614, 711, 731, 753]. He registered in Petersburg on 31 May 1808: a dark brown Negro man, five feet six inches high, forty years old, short bushy hair, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 425].

29   iv. Mary3/ Polly, born say 1762.

v. Boatswain, bound out on 13 March 1769.

30   vi. Isham3, born say 1774.

 

10.    Sarah5 Valentine, born about 1750, was a "Mulatto" living in Henrico County on 4 December 1752 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Henrico Parish to bind her out [Minutes 1752-5, 23]. On 7 September 1770 the Chesterfield County court ordered the churchwardens of Dale Parish to bind out her daughter Winny. On 13 March 1789 she brought suit in Chesterfield County court against William Tolly for trespass, assault and battery, but the suit abated when the sheriff reported that Tolly was not found in the county The court bound out her sons Jeffrey and John Valentine on 16 May 1789, and she may have been the mother of Sally, Polly and Nancy Valentine who were bound out by the court on 12 October 1786 [Orders 1767-71, 449; 1784-7, 399; 1787-91, 231, 257]. She was taxable on a free male tithe and a horse in Chesterfield County in 1793 and 1794 [PPTL, 1786-1811, frames 167, 207]. She obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 10 July 1810: sixty years old, brown complexioned, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 135]. She was the mother of

i. Winny, born say 1770, bound out in Chesterfield County on 7 September 1770.

ii. ?Mann/ Manuel, born about 1772, head of a Chesterfield County, Virginia household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:70/1062]. He married Nancy Cox (free persons of colour), 13 September 1813 Chesterfield County bond, Jeremiah Ligon security [Marriage Register, 122]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 15 August 1821: forty nine years old, black complexioned, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 412].

iii. Jeffrey, born say 1780, bound out on 16 May 1789.

iv. John6, born about 1782, orphan of Sarah Valentine, bound out by the Chesterfield County court on 16 May 1789. He registered in Petersburg on 9 October 1805: a dark Free Negro man, five feet five inches high, twenty three years old, born free and raised in the County of Chesterfield [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 366].

v. ?Nancy5, born about 1785, bound out by the Chesterfield County court on 12 October 1786, no parent named [Orders 1784-7, 399]. She obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 10 July 1810: twenty five years old, brown complexioned, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53].

vi. ?Polly, born about 1785, registered in Petersburg on 30 December 1808: a brown free Negro woman, five feet one inches high, twenty three years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 437].

vii. ?Sally, born about 1787, bound out by the Chesterfield County court on 12 October 1786, no parent named [Orders 1784-7, 399]. She obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 10 July 1810: twenty three years old, brown complexioned, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 139].

viii. ?William, born about 1789, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 10 July 1810: twenty one years old, brown complexioned, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 240].

 

11.    Lucy3 Valentine, born about 1758, registered in Petersburg on 11 July 1805: a brown Mulatto woman, rather above five feet, about forty seven years old, born free and raised in the County of Chesterfield [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 330]. She was head of a Petersburg household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:122b]. She may have been the mother of

i. Thomas1, born 21 October 1785, registered in Petersburg on 23 July 1806: a dark brown free Negro man, twenty one Oct. next, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 388].

 

12.    Jenny1 Valentine, born about 1763, registered in Petersburg on 9 July 1805: yellow brown Mulatto woman, five feet and a half inches high, forty two years old, born free and raised in the County of Chesterfield [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 313]. She may have been identical to Jinne Valentine whose son Robert was bound by the Hustings Court of Petersburg to Christopher McConnicco on 5 July 1790 [Orders 1784-91, 325]. She may have been the mother of

i. Molly, born about 1778, registered in Petersburg on 11 July 1805: a yellowish brown Mulatto woman, five feet four inches high, twenty seven years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 331].

ii. Patsey, born about 1780, registered in Petersburg on 10 July 1805: a yellow brown Mulatto woman, five feet two and a half inches high, twenty five years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 319].

 

13.    Charles2 Valentine, born say 1742, the son of Edward Valentine, was bound apprentice in Chesterfield County in October 1753 [Orders 1749-54, 404]. He may have been the Charles Valentine who was a "free Negroe" taxable in Bladen County, North Carolina, in 1768 and a chain carrier with Thomas Lowry for a 9 August 1786 Robeson County survey for James Lowry's 150 acres on the north side of Drowning Creek [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:6; 70:396, envelope 4,469], and head of a Robeson County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:48]. He may have been the father of

i. J., head of a Brunswick County, North Carolina household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [NC:232].

ii. Nancy3 Vollintine, born say 1775, head of an Abbeville District, South Carolina household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [SC:35].

 

14.    Peter1 Valentine, born say 1744, purchased 50 acres in Southwark Parish, Surry County, Virginia, from Henry Charity and his wife Sacugoth Charity on 12 January 1768 [DB 8:374]. Peter was taxable on this 50 acres in Surry County in 1784 [Land Tax List 1782-1820]. He was taxable on his personal property from 1782 to 1785 [PPTL, 1782-90, frames 359, 380, 388]. His 21 December 1785 Surry County will was proved on 23 October 1791 [Wills 1792-1804, 13-14]. However, his death was recorded earlier in 1785 [Surry County Property Tax Alterations]. He left his wife Priscilla the use of his plantation during her life and named his sons James and Frederick and his six daughters. Priscilla was taxed on their land from 1786 to 1814 and taxable on personal property from 1786 to 1792: taxable on 2 horses and 5 cattle in 1786; taxable on Frederick Valentine's tithe in 1791 and 1792 [PPTL, 1782-90, frames 398, 461, 559; 1791-1816, frame 18, 68]. Peter was the father of

i. James2, born say 1766.

ii. Mary4, born say 1768, married Benjamin Banks, 12 December 1788 Surry County bond.

iii. Mason, born say 1770.

iv. Mildred, born say 1772, married John Banks, 29 May 1789 Surry County bond, Sampson Walden security.

v. Frederick, born about 1775, taxable in Surry County from 1791 to 1793 [PPTL, 1791-1816, frames 18, 68, 118].

vi. Charlotte, born about 1780, registered in Surry County on 23 June 1810: a mulattoe woman born of free parents of Surry county, rather of a bright complexion aged about 30 years, of a thin visage, and delicate features...and is 5'1/2" high [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 41].

vii. Sarah8.

viii. Hannah.

 

15.    Howard Valentine, born say 1743, was taxable in Dinwiddie County on 2 horses and 7 cattle in 1783, taxable on a slave named Bibiana in 1786, a slave over the age of 16 in 1792, 1794 and 1795, taxable on a slave in 1798 and taxable on 2 horses in 1799 [PPTL, 1782-90, (1783 B, p.53), (1786, p.4); 1791-99 (1792 A, p.17), (1794 A, p.20), (1797 B, p.19), (1798 A, p.17), (1799 A, p.17)]. He died before June 1809 when his 29 December 1807 Dinwiddie County will was proved. He left his whole estate to his wife Winney Valentine and named his children Mimy Scott, Nancy Valentine, Jimmy Valentine and grandchildren John Valentine and Betsy Bibby [Virginia Genealogist 18:95; 16:170-171]. He was the father of

31   i. ?Jemima, born about 1764.

ii. James1, born about 1770, called James Valentine "of Dinwiddie County" when he married Anne Owins, 10 December 1785 Petersburg Hustings Court bond, William Cypress surety, 11 December 1785 marriage. Sarah Owins, mother of the bride, gave her consent. He was taxable in Dinwiddie County in 1787, 1790, 1795, and 1796 [PPTL, 1782-90, (1787 B, p.11); 1791-9 (1790 B, p.18), (1795 B, p.20), (1796 B, p.20)]. He registered in Petersburg on 1 May 1799: a brown Mulatto man, five feet seven inches high, twenty eight in August last, strait & well made with a Bushy head of hair, born free in Dinwiddie County upon the evidence of his mother Winny Volentine & Wm Scott, inspector [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 144].

iii. Nancy1, born say 1774.

 

16.    John2 Valentine, born say 1745, was tithable in Cumberland Parish, Lunenburg County, in 1764, 1769, 1773, and 1774 [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 233, 276, 322, 344], and tithable in Lunenburg County from 1785 to 1806: taxable on 2 horses and 7 cattle in 1785, taxable on 3 tithables most years from 1795 to 1805 [PPTL 1782-1806] and taxable on 70 acres in 1802 [Land Tax List, 1802, by VMHB 92:65]. He was sued in Lunenburg County by Matthew Parham for a debt of 20 pounds on 9 July 1772, and he sold property by deed proved in court on 10 June 1802 [Orders 1769-77, 217; 1802-5, 252]. He was counted in a "List of free Negroes & Mulattoes" in Lunenburg County in 1802 and 1803 with his wife Betty and their children: Nancy, Betsy, John, Polly, Jinsy, Charles, Henry, Tommy, and Patsy [LVA, Lunenburg County, Free Negro & Slave Records, 1802-1803]. He was taxable in the lower district of Mecklenburg County on 2 taxables in 1812, 3 "Mulattos above the age of 16" in 1813, and 2 in 1814 [PPTL, 1806-28, frames 274, 370, 407]. He was the father of

i. Nancy2, born about 1773, counted in her parent's household in a list of "free Negroes & Mulattoes" in Lunenburg County in 1802, counted with her children Bob and Polly in 1803 [LVA, Lunenburg County, Free Negro & Slave Records, 1802-1803] and counted with Polly, Jordan, Elizabeth and Eliza-Ann at the head of Kettlestick Creek in 1814 [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy 33:268]. She registered in Lunenburg County on 11 June 1827: about 54 years of age, dark brown Complexion, about 5 feet 5 inches high. Her son Robert Harrison Valentine, born about 1799, registered on 11 January 1827 [WB 5, after page 89, no.49, 50].

ii. Elizabeth4, born say 1775, perhaps the Lizzy Valentine who was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820.

iii. John5, born say 1776, married Mary McLin, 4 January 1797 Mecklenburg County, Virginia marriage bond, Earby Chavous security. He was taxable in Lunenburg County in 1797 and 1798 [PPTL 1782-1806] and was a "Mulatto" taxable in Mecklenburg County from 1813 to 1816 [PPTL, 1806-28, frames 370, 407, 524, 550].

iv. Polly.

v. Jane, born say 1785, head of a Lunenburg County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:363].

vi. Charles5, born about 1796, registered in Lunenburg County on 8 March 1824: yellow Complexion, his hair rather straight, about 5 feet 10 inches high...about 28 years of age.

vii. Henry.

viii. Thomas2, born about 1796, received a certificate in Mecklenburg County on 13 September 1817: born free and raised in the County of Lunenburg & Mecklenburg & Commonwealth of Virginia of a bright Yellow Complexion, five feet nine inches & three quarters high about Twenty one years old [Free Person of Color, no.13, p.7]. He married Sally Stewart, 18 May 1818 Mecklenburg County bond, Randolph Chavous surety, 21 May marriage by Milton Robertson. He was a "Free" taxable in Mecklenburg County in 1815 and 1818 [PPTL, 1782-1805, frames 524, 660] and head of a Brunswick County, Virginia household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:672].

ix. Patsy.

 

17.   Isham1 Valentine, born say 1755, enlisted in the Revolution for 3 years on 6 September 1777, and was listed in the payroll of Captain Peter Jones' Company in the 14th Virginia Regiment commanded by Colonel William Davis at White Plains in 1778. Hy Williams received his final pay of 55 pounds on 20 December 1784 [NARA, M881, Roll 931, frames 1442-1489 of 1871; https://www.fold3.com/image/22609320]. He was mentioned in William Cabell's Commonplace Book (of Amherst and Buckingham Counties) on 9 March 1780: Sent by Isham Valentine a free Negro, 1 pr. Silver mounted Pistols and Bullet Moulds to Col. Sam. J. Cabell. Also all his Clothes, etc., Consisting of one Blue Broad Cloth Coat, one white ditto Vest & Pr. Breeches with Silver oval buttons, 1 pr. mosquito Curtains Seven shirts 5 of which ruffled at the Hands, 1 pr. Sheets, 2 Towels [McLeRoy, Strangers in Their Midst, 210]. He applied for bounty land and received a certificate from Colonel William Davis on 15 December 1784 that he had been a soldier in his regiment to the Northward, was at Middlebrook in 1779, and was captured at Charlestown. And Colonel William Epes, an officer in Davis' regiment certified that Isham was inducted on 12 September 1777 for three years and was discharged. Isham assigned his bounty land to Henry Watkins on 11 December 1784 [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Digital Collection, LVA]. He was taxable in Dinwiddie County on 2 horses and 2 cattle in 1787 and 1788 [PPTL, 1782-90 (1787 A, p.16), (1787 B, p.14), (1788 A, p.8)] and taxable in Surry County, Virginia, from 1790 to 1800 [PPTL, 1782-90, frames 606; 1791-1816, 68, 170, 275, 349, 428]. He and his wife Caty were the parents of

i. Nancy4, born about 1781, registered in Surry County on 25 May 1818: daughter of Isham Valentine & Caty his wife of Surry County free people of Colour the said Nancy Valentine is about 37 years old of a bright Complexion tolerable straight made...is 5'3-1/2" high [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 68].

ii. ?Elizabeth5, born about 1787, registered in Surry County on 12 August 1812: a mulattoe woman who was born of free parents of Surry County, of a bright complexion aged about 25 years...long bushy hair straight and delicately formd and is 5'5-1/4" high [Hudgins, Register, 48]. She registered in Petersburg on 15 August 1812: Elizabeth Shepherd alias Valentine, a brown Mulatto woman, five feet five inches high, twenty five years old, born free & raised in Surry County, is the wife of Jos. Shepherd of this town Registered in Surry 12 Jany. by name of Valentine [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 725].

 

18.    Sarah3 Valentine, born say 1746, was living in Brunswick County, Virginia, on 25 September 1775 when the court ordered the churchwardens of St. Andrew's Parish to bind out her "Bastard" daughter Lucy Valentine [Orders 1774-82, 91]. She was the mother of

i. Lucy7, born say 1774, bound apprentice in Brunswick County on 25 September 1775. She married Isaac Seward, 25 October 1803 Mecklenburg County, Virginia bond, Isham Valentine security. Isaac, born before 1776, was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 10 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:161a]. He registered in Brunswick County, Virginia, on 23 October 1810: Isaac, a black man of a yellowish Complection, about forty two years of age, about five feet three inches high...appears to have been emancipated by John Seward agreeable to the within deed. He registered again in Brunswick County on 28 July 1828 when he was about sixty years of age [Wynne, Register of Free Negroes, 10, 95].

 

19.    Charles3 Valentine, born about 1751, was listed in a 13 March 1779 offer of a reward in the Virginia Gazette for deserters from the infantry of the Virginia State Garrison Regiment stationed near Williamsburg. The advertisement described him as: a mulatto, born in Surry County, Virginia, 28 years old, 5 feet 9 inches high, well made [Virginia Gazette (Dixon's edition), p. 2, col. 2]. A later edition called him a "free negro" and thought he would be with ihs wife in Surry County [Virginia Gazette (Dixon & Nicolson), p.3, col. 1).  He was sized at the Chesterfield County court house sometime after 1 September 1780: residence: Sussex County, deserted (no age, size or complexion shown) [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.22)]. He was head of a Brunswick County, Virginia household of a "free colored" man over forty-five years of age in 1820 [VA:672]. He may have been the father of

i. James3, born about 1786, registered in Petersburg on 25 June 1807: a dark brown free Negro man, five feet nine inches high, twenty one years old, a carpenter, born free in Sussex County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 427]. He was taxable in Petersburg in 1810 [PPTL 1800-33, frame 298] and head of a Brunswick County, Virginia household of 3 "free colored" in 1830 [VA:272].

ii. William, head of a Brunswick County, Virginia household of 5 "free colored" in 1840.

iii. Patsey, born 1804-16, head of a Brunswick County, Virginia household of 8 "free colored" in 1840.

 

20.    Martha2 Valentine, born say 1758, was living in Surry County, Virginia, on 7 October 1800 when her son John registered as a "free Negro" [Back of Guardian Accounts Book, 1783-1804, no.78]. She may have been the Patsy Valentine who was head of a Richmond City household of 2 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1810 [VA:365]. Her children were

i. ?Nicholas, born say 1774, taxable in Cabin Point district of Surry County from 1794 to 1798 and from 1809 to 1816: listed with Hartwell Carseley in 1794; charged with his own tax in 1795; called Nicholas Scott Valentine starting in 1812; listed with 2 "free Negroes & Mulattoes above the age of 16" in 1813 [PPTL, 1791-1816, frames 158, 245, 308, 349, 639, 677, 697, 715, 761, 832, 869] and taxable in Prince George County in 1805 and 1806 [PPTL, 1782-1811, frames 637, 663]. He was called Nicholas Scott Valentine when he married Keziah Charity, the twenty-four-year-old daughter of Judith Charity, 28 May 1804 Surry County bond, Wright Walden security.

ii. John3, born 25 December 1777, registered as a "free Negro" in Surry County, Virginia, on 7 October 1800: son of Martha Valentine a free Woman of Surry County, he is of a bright complexion, 5'7" high, straight and well made, aged 23 years old next Xmass [Back of Guardian Accounts Book, 1783-1804, no.78]. He was taxable in Surry County from 1793 to 1800: listed with James Bishop in 1793; with Hartwell Carsely in 1795; with James Oney in 1797; charged with his own tithe in 1799 and 1800 [PPTL, 1791-1816, frames 104, 234, 302, 388, 428] and a "Mulatto" taxable in Prince George County from 1801 to 1811 [PPTL, 1782-1811, frames 542, 566, 589, 614, 637, 663, 711, 753].

iv. Randolph, born about 1789, registered in Surry County on 16 June 1809: a Mulatto man son of Martha Valentine, a free mulatto woman of Surry County, has long bushy hair, yellow complexion, thick upper lip, aged about 20 years and is 5'8-1/4" high [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 39]. He married Elizabeth Peters, 21 June 1814 Surry County bond. Nicholas Scott, "Mulatto," testified as to Elizabeth's age and was surety. On 22 May 1820 he was charged with stabbing his wife Elizabeth with a jack knife in the right side of the belly with the intent to kill her. The court sent him to Williamsburg for further trial [Criminal Proceedings Against Free Persons, Slaves, etc., 1742-1822].

 

21.    Lucy5 Valentine, born say 1761, was living in Surry County on 25 January 1785 when the churchwardens ordered her "natural child" Jeremiah bound out [Minutes 1775-85, 392]. She was taxable on a free male tithable in adjoining Prince George County in 1799 [PPTL, 1782-1811, frame 498]. She was the mother of

i. ?Isaac, born say 1778, taxable in Prince George County in 1799 and 1800 [PPTL, 1782-1811, frame 498, 519].

ii. Jeremiah, born about 1781, bound apprentice in Surry County on 25 January 1785 [Minutes 1775-85, 392]. He was listed as one of James Kee's tithables in Cabin Point district of Surry County from 1794 to 1798 [PPTL, 1791-1816, 164, 298, 336]. He registered in Surry County on 24 September 1811: a mulattoe man, a son of Lucy Valentine late of Surry County aged about 30 years, has long hair, flat Nose, is 5'1-3/4" hight of a very bright complexion [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 47].

 

22.    Phebe Valentine, born say 1763, was the mother of Martha Valentine who registered as a "free Negro" in Surry County:

i. Martha3, born about 1790, registered in Surry County on 22 February 1836: (daughter of Phoebe Valentine) aged 46 years dark yellowish complexion 5'6" high born free in the County of Dinwiddie as appears by the certificate of the Clerk of Dinwiddie Court by occupation a spinner [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 123].

 

23.    Elizabeth3 Valentine, born say 1752, daughter of Mary Valentine, was living in Chesterfield County on 6 April 1753 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind her out. She was the mother of

i. William/ Billy, born about 1785, registered in Petersburg on 17 February 1802: a dark brown free Mulatto boy, five feet one inches high, seventeen years old, short hair, now in the service of David Alexander of Petersburg, son of Betty Valentine a free woman of sd. town [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 224].

ii. ?Sally, born about 1787, registered in Petersburg on 30 December 1808: a brown free Negro woman, five feet two inches high, twenty one years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 438].

 

24.    Lucy2 Valentine, born say 1746, daughter of Lucy Valentine, was bound out by the churchwardens in Lunenburg County, Virginia, in October 1751 [Orders 1748-52, 466]. She was a "free Negro" living in Bedford County on 25 May 1773 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind her ten-year-old daughter Lucy to Mrs. Martha Gilbert [Orders 1772-4, 113]. She was taxable in Campbell County on 2 cattle in 1785 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frame 9]. On 29 October 1793 the court rescinded their order to bind Lucy Valentine to David G. Talbot and bound her instead to Lucy Valentine, Sr. [Orders 1791-7, 232]. She was the mother of

32    i. Lucy6, born in November 1762.

ii. Sarah7, daughter of Lucy Valentine bound to Mrs. Lucy Stith in Bedford County on 29 February 1780 [Orders 1774-82, 273].

 

25.    Sarah4 Valentine, born say 1748, was bound apprentice in Cumberland Parish, Lunenburg County, in October 1751 [Orders 1748-52, 466]. She was head of a Lunenburg County household of 11 "white" (free) persons, none of whom were tithable in 1783 [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 390]. She was taxable in Lunenburg County on 3 horses and 10 cattle in 1783, taxable on Didimus Valentine in 1786, taxable on a male tithable 16-21, 3 horses, and 10 cattle in 1787, 2 males in 1788, and 1 male in 1803 [PPTL 1782-1806]. She was head of a household in a list of "Free Negroes and Mulattos" on Kettlestick Creek in the lower district of Lunenburg County in 1802 with (her children?) Zachariah and Jane in 1802 and with Zachariah, Jane, and Molly in 1803 [LVA, Lunenburg County, Free Negro & Slave Records, 1802-1803]. She was the mother of

i. Zachariah2, born about 1767, perhaps identical to Didimus Valentine who was taxable in Sarah's household in 1786. He was taxable in Lunenburg County in 1793 to 1806 [PPTL 1782-1806]. He was a shoemaker living at the head of Kettlestick in a list of "Free Negroes and Mulattos" in the lower district of Lunenburg County in Sarah Valentine's household in 1802 and 1803 [LVA, Lunenburg County, Free Negro & Slave Records, 1802-1803] and was head of a Lunenburg County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:363]. In 1814 he was head of a household with Ritter Lester, Dolly Cordle, and Eddins Cordle [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy 33:268]. He registered as a free Negro in Lunenburg County in 1841: aged about 74 years of age, dark brown complexion, the hair in his head & his beard Grey, 5 feet Ten inches & three quarters high [WB 5, after page 89, no. 109].

ii. ?Elizabeth Jones Volentine, born say 1768, married Isam Lester, 11 December 1789 Lunenburg County bond, Zachariah Valentine surety.

iii. ?Buckner, born about 1772, taxable in Lunenburg County on his own tithe and a horse from 1801 to 1806 [PPTL 1782-1806]. He married Sina Chavous, 21 December 1802 Mecklenburg County bond, Boling Chavous security. He and his wife Cinna were counted as "free Negroes and Mulattos" in the lower district of Lunenburg County in 1803 [LVA, Lunenburg County, Free Negro & Slave Records, 1802-1803]. He made a deed of trust to Thomas Adams which was proved in Lunenburg County on 12 September 1805 [Orders 1802-5, fol. 221]. He registered as a free Negro in Lunenburg County on 8 March 1824: Brown Complexion, hair nearly Straight, some grey hairs in his head, about 52 years of age, 5 feet 10 or 11 inches high [WB 5, after page 89, no. 24]. He was head of a Surry County, North Carolina household of 4 "free colored" in 1830.

iv. Jane, listed in Sarah Valentine's household in Lunenburg County in 1802 and 1803 [LVA, Lunenburg County, Free Negro & Slave Records, 1802-1803], taxable on a horse in 1806 [PPTL 1782-1806].

v. Molly, born say 1776, listed with her children Lively, Biddy, and Polly Valentine in her own household on the Lunenburg County "List of free Negroes & Mulattoes" in 1802 and listed with her children in Sarah Valentines' household in 1803 [LVA, Lunenburg County, Free Negro & Slave Records, 1802-1803], taxable on 2 horses in 1802 [PPTL 1782-1806].

vi. ?Sukey, born about 1780, registered in Lunenburg County on 5 December 1818: about 38, black Complexion, about 4 feet 8 inches high [WB 5, after page 89, no.8].

vii. ?William, taxable in Lunenburg County from 1801 to 1804 [PPTL 1782-1806], counted in the "List of free Negroes & Mulattoes" in Lunenburg County in 1802 and 1803, a hireling for Charles Irby [LVA, Lunenburg County, Free Negro & Slave Records, 1802-1803].

 

26.    Chloe Valentine, born say 1752, daughter of Lucy Valentine, was ordered bound out by the churchwardens of Cumberland Parish, Lunenburg County, in February 1754 [Orders 1753-4, 541]. She was a "free Negroe" living in Bedford County in September 1774 when the court ordered her son Thomas Stewart Valentine bound to Richard Stith, Gentleman. She may have been identical to "free Negro" Chloe Stewart whose daughter Lucy Stewart was ordered bound to Harry Terrill on 23 January 1775 [Orders 1774-82]. She died before 4 July 1793 when the Campbell County court ordered the overseers of the poor to bind out "the youngest child of Chloe Valentine, decd" [Orders 1791-7, 200]. She was the mother of

i. Thomas Stewart, born say 1772, taxable in Luke Valentine's Campbell County household in 1794.

ii. ?Lucy Stewart, born say 1774.

iii. Augustine, bastard child of Chloe Valentine, a "free Negroe," bound to John Clayton in Bedford County on 9 May 1776 [Orders 1774-82]. Augustine Stewart was taxable in the southern district of Bedford County from 1802 to 1809: a "Negroe" in 1807 [PPTL 1782-1805, 531, 559, 602, 660; 1806-16, 101, 153].

iv. ?Harry Stewart, a "Mulattoe" child of Chloe Stewart bound to Samuel Clayton in Bedford County on 28 August 1781 [Orders 1774-82, 324]. Henry Stewart was a "f. negroe" taxable in the southern district of Bedford County from 1803 to 1816: called Harry Valentine in the southern district in 1802, taxable as both Harry Valentine and Henry Stewart in 1803, listed with 2 tithables in 1813 and 1814 [PPTL 1782-1805, frames 560, 602, 659; 1806-16, frames 217, 373, 434, 514, 652].

v. ?Luke Stewart, taxable in the southern district of Bedford County from 1803 to 1816: a "Black" taxable in 1807, a "free Negro" taxable from 1813 to 1816 [PPTL 1782-1805, frames 560, 659; 1806-16, 31, 99, 153, 219, 372, 435, 514, 651].

vi. ?Jesse Stewart, a "free Negro" taxable in the southern district of Bedford County from 1811 to 1816 [PPTL 1806-16, 266, 311, 374, 516, 652].

 

27.   Luke1 Valentine, born about 1754, was in a list of militia marched by Captain Adam Clements from Bedford County to the assistance of General Green in South Carolina on 1 May 1781 [NARA, M246, Roll 114, frame 128 of 492, ancestry.com], called a "free man of Colour" on 13 November 1832 when he made a declaration in Campbell County in order to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he was born on or about Christmas day 1754 or 1753 on Fedlay River in Bedford County and lived in Russell Parish, Campbell County, which was formed from Bedford. His discharge papers were burned when his mother's house was destroyed by a fire [NARA, S.6299, M804, Roll 2438, frame 590 of 811]. He was called a "free Black Man" on 3 November 1785 when he was charged in Campbell County with stealing a horse, the property of John Harvey. He chose to receive 39 lashes rather than be tried at the District Court [Orders 1785-6, 193, 210, 211]. He was taxable in the southern district of Campbell County from 1785 to 1812: called Luke M. Valentine in 1787; charged with Thomas Stewart's tithe in 1794; taxed on 2 free males in 1795 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 9, 46, 295, 323, 646, 843]. He was a "Black" taxable in the southern district of Bedford County in 1807 and 1809 [PPTL 1806-16, frames 103, 154]. He was head of a Campbell County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:848] and 2 "free colored" in 1830, called Luke Valentine, Sr. He was called Luke M. Valentine on 29 August 1825 when he and Mildred Valentine consented to the Campbell County marriage of her daughter Jane Jackson to John Jackson. They also consented to the marriage of her daughter Nancy Jackson to Hezekiah Jackson by 27 June 1827 Campbell County bond [Marriage Bonds and Consents, 1782-1853]. Luke may have been the father of

i. Luke, Jr., born about 1780, taxble in Campbell County in 1805 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frame 627]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Campbell County on 18 November 1806: about five feet Eleven Inches high, about twenty six years of age...of a dark complexion...born free, and registered in Lynchburg on 9 April 1807 [Valentine, Luke (M, 26): Free Negro Certificate, 1806, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

ii. David, taxable in the southern district of Campbell County in 1795 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frame 323, 372, 447, 479, 537, 560, 641].

iii. Winnie, born say 1785, married Harry Moss, "free negroes," 15 June 1806 Campbell County bond, Benjamin Armstrong and Harry Moss bondsmen [Marriage Bonds & Consents, frames 493-4].

iv. Austin2, born in September 1804, registered in Campbell County on 8 January 1839: born Septr. 1804; 5 ft 4-1/2 Inches high, bright Mullattoe...Born free in Campbell [Register of Free Negroes, p.16].

 

28.    Ann/ Nanny Valentine, born say 1753, daughter of Elizabeth Valentine, was ordered bound apprentice in Chesterfield County in December 1753 [Orders 1749-54, 429]. She may have been the mother of

i. Fanny, born about 1772, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 14 May 1810: thirty eight years old, Mulatto complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 130].

ii. Peter4, Jr., born about 1773, a "Mulatto" taxable in Chesterfield County from 1796 to 1811, living on his own land in 1809 [PPTL, 1786-1811, frames 273, 306, 344, 379, 531, 737]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 10 November 1816: forty three years old, brown complexioned, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 308]. He was head of a Chesterfield County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:70/1062].

iii. John5, born say 1778, taxable in Chesterfield County from 1799 to 1805 [PPTL, 1786-1811, frames 379, 455, 493, 531, 607].

iv. William, born about 1789, a "Mulatto" taxable in Chesterfield County from 1801 to 1811, a shoemaker living on Thomas Jones's land in 1809 [PPTL, 1786-1811, frames 568, 607, 738, 824]. He registered in Chesterfield County on 10 July 1810: age twenty one years, color brown, stature five feet eleven & 1/2 inches...was born free [Valentine, William (M, 21): Free Negro Register, 1810, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

 

29.    Isham3 Valentine, born say 1774, son of Mary Valentine, was ordered bound apprentice to Edward Waller by the Mecklenburg County court on 14 April 1777 [Orders 1773-9, 358]. He was taxable in the lower district of Mecklenburg County in the household of Edward Waller from 1790 to 1792, taxable in his own household from 1802 to 1820, called a "Mulatto" in 1805, 1810 and from 1813 to 1820 [PPTL 1782-1805, frames 360, 416, 434, 931, 960, 1040, 1071; 1806-28, frames 47, 148, 175, 245, 274, 370, 407, 660], counted with his wife Peggy in the "List of free Negroes & Mulattoes" in Lunenburg County in 1802 [LVA, Lunenburg County, Free Negro & Slave Records, 1802-1803] and taxable in Lunenburg County in 1802 [PPTL 1782-1806]. Peggy was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:157a]. He was apparently the father of Polly and Wiltshire Valentine who were bound to Tilman Elder by the Mecklenburg County court on 15 March 1813 (no parent named). He petitioned the court on 17 October 1815 setting forth that he was the father of two children bound to Tilman Elder who intended to remove them from the county and commonwealth [Orders 1813-15, 440, 499]. He was the father of

i. Polly, born about 1802, registered in Mecklenburg County on 18 June 1827: a woman of yellow complexion, about twenty five years of age, five feet four inches and a half hight...born of a free woman [Register of Free Negroes, p.35, no.41].

ii. Wiltshire, born about 1804, registered in Mecklenburg County on 17 December 1827: a man of yellow complexion, about six feet one inch high, about twenty three years of age...born of a free woman in this County [Register of Free Negroes, p.39, no.47].

 

30.    Mary3 Valentine, born say 1762, was taxable in Chesterfield County on a horse in 1795 [PPTL, 1786-1811, frame 239]. Mary/ Polly was the sister of Daniel and Peter Valentine according to the 21 May 1835 pension application of her children in Halifax County, North Carolina court [NARA, R.10,820, M805-820, frame 0119]. According to the application, her children were

i. Daniel2, born 1775-94, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 8 "free colored" in 1830, called a "poor man of color" in Halifax County when he applied for a survivor's pension for the services of his uncles Peter and Daniel Valentine during the Revolution.

ii. Sarah9, born say 1784.

 

31.    Jemima Valentine, born about 1764, registered in Petersburg on 31 January 1801: a light Mulatto woman, five feet four inches, thirty seven years old, born free & raised in Dinwiddie County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 211]. She apparently married a member of the Scott family since she was called Mimy Scott in her father's 29 December 1807 Dinwiddie County will. She was the mother of

i. Betsy Stewart, born about 1782, registered in Petersburg on 31 January 1801: (daughter of Jemima Valentine, a free Mulatto woman) a light Coloured Mulatto woman, five feet three and a half inches high, nineteen years old, long bushy hair [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 212]

ii. Sally Bibby, born about 1784, registered in Petersburg on 31 January 1801: (daughter of Jemima Valentine, a free Mulatto woman) a brown Mulatto woman, five feet two inches high, seventeen years old, bushy hair, holes in her ears, born free & raised in Dinwiddie County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 213].

 

32.    Lucy6 Valentine, born in November 1762, was called young Lucy Valentine on 7 November 1782 when the Campbell County court ordered the churchwardens of Russell Parish to bind out her "Mulattoe Bastard" son Luke Valentine to Jones Wynne and called Lucy Valentine, Jr., on 3 February 1791 when the court ordered the overseers of the poor to bind out her children [Orders 1782-5, 113; 1786-91, 333]. She was the mother of

i. Luke2, Jr., born about 1780, a "F.N." taxable in the northern district of Campbell County from 1805 to 1809 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 627, 666, 738], registered as a "Free Negro" in Campbell County on 18 November 1806: Age: 26; 5 feet 11 In., Dark Complexion, Born free in this County [Register of Free Negroes, p.5]. He was head of a Campbell County household of 9 "free colored" in 1830.

ii. Austin1, born say 1782, "child of Lucy Valentine," bound to John Stith by the overseers of the southeastern district of Campbell County on 9 September 1799 [Orders 1797-1801, 283]. Gus Valentine was taxable in the northern district of Campbell County in 1809 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frame 738].

iii. John8, born about 1786, "son of free Lucy" bound out by the Campbell County court to George Cock, Jr., on 7 April 1791 [Orders 1786-91, 351], registered in Campbell County on 25 September 1810: Age: 24; 5 feet 9 In.; Yellowish Complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes, p.5].

iv. Sarah, bound to John Talbot by the Campbell County court in February 1803 [Orders 1801-4, 231].

v. Lucy9, born about 1807, registered as a "Free Negro" in Campbell County on 24 April 1848: Age: 41; 5' 3-7/8"; Bright Mulatto; Born free of Lucy Valentine [Register of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, p.22].

 

Other members of the Valentine family were

i. Jenny2, born say 1772, a "mulatto girl" who ran away from Thomas Brown in Fredericksburg and was lurking around Hannah Maclin's house in Richmond City according to the 12 June 1788 issue of the Virginia Gazette and Weekly Advertiser. The article said her mother was living in Williamsburg [Headley, 18th Century Virginia Newspapers, 347].

ii. Rebecca, born before 1776, a "Negro" head of a Guilford County, North Carolina household of 5 "free colored" in 1830.

iii. Elijah, born say 1780, married Polly Bass, 28 June 1806 Granville County, North Carolina bond. He was head of a Granville County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:10].

iv. William/ Billy, born about 1784, registered in Petersburg on 4 December 1805: a dark brown free Negro man, five feet seven inches high, twenty one years old the 20 March last, very short knotty hair, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 369]. He may have been the Will Valentine who was head of a Petersburg Town household of 5 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:123a], perhaps the Bill Valentine who was head of a Rowan County, North Carolina household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:334].

v. Isham4, born about 1795, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 10 November 1816: twenty one years old, mulatto complexioned, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 309].

vi. John8, born about 1801, registered in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on 20 November 1826: alias Claiborne Volentine a Free Mulatto about 25 Years of age five feet seven inches high...Short black hair...born of a Free Woman in this County [Free Person of Color, no.19, p.22].

vii. Billy Brogden Valentine, born about 1804, registered in Mecklenburg County in 1826: a Free Mulatto about 22 years of age six feet one Inch high [Register, no.18, p.21]. He was probably named for William Brogdon, head of a Mecklenburg County household in 1782 [VA:34] and a "Free Negro" head of a Charlotte County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:1019]. Mary Brogden was listed as a midwife in "A list of Free Negroes and Mulattoes for the Year 1802" in Lunenburg County."

viii. Betsy, born about 1806, registered in Lunenburg County on 12 August 1828: 22 years of age, dark mulatto Complexion, about 5 feet 7 or 8 inches high, tolerable long hair [WB 5, after page 89, no. 26].

ix. Betsy Washington Valentine, born 7 March 1807, registered in Mecklenburg County on 17 October 1825: a woman of Colour, five feet nine Inches and one quarter high...who it appears was born of a free woman in said County on the 7th day of March 1807...registered as a free mulattoe [Free Person of Color, no.14, p.19].

 

VAUGHAN FAMILY

1.    Stephen Vawhon, born say 1688, (a white man) was living in Surry County, Virginia in January 1709/10 when Mary, the "Mulatto" servant of William Thomas, swore that he was the father of her illegitimate child. He posted bond for the maintenance of the child in July 1710 [Haun, Surry County Records VI:124, 129, 139]. They may have been the ancestors of

2     i. Sarah, born say 1735.

3     ii. Elizabeth, born say 1746.

iii. Isaac, born say 1752, one of the "free Negors and Mullatus living upon the Kings Land" who were in Bladen County, North Carolina, on 13 October 1773 [G.A. 1773, Box 7].

iv. John, born say 1775, a "Mulatto" taxable in St. Paul's Parish, New Hanover County, on 2 horses from 1796 to 1800 [Cocke, Hanover County Tax Payers, 135].

 

2.    Sarah Vaughan, born say 1735, was living in Petersburg on 21 November 1806 when her son James was charged with murdering his wife [Hustings Court Minute Book 1805-8, n.p.]. Sarah was head of a Petersburg Town household of 6 "other free" & 7 slaves in 1810 [VA:126a]. She was the mother of

i. ?William, born about 1753, registered in Petersburg on 18 August 1794: a dark brown Mulatto man five feet eight inches high, forty one years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 45]. He was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:749].

ii. ?Benjamin, born about 1755, a sixty-nine-year-old carpenter who emigrated from Petersburg to Liberia aboard the Cyrus in 1824 [https://www.fold3.com/image/46670224].

ii. James, born about 1755, a fifty-one-year-old "free Mulatto" charged in Petersburg on 21 November 1806 with murdering his "supposed" wife Milly Johnston [Hustings Court Minute Book 1805-8, n.p.].

 

3.    Elizabeth Vaughan, born say 1746, was the mother of Faithy, a "base born child" (no race mentioned) who was twelve years old when she was bound out by the Edgecombe County, North Carolina court on 26 August 1776. She was the mother of

i. Faithy, born about 1764, a twelve-year-old child bound out in Edgecombe County in 1776.

4     ii. ?Cherry, born say 1765.

 

4.    Cherry Vaughan, born say 1765, was the mother of an "orphan" child Amey who was bound apprentice to James Burk by the Warren County, North Carolina court in July 1784. Cherry was head of Halifax County, North Carolina household of 2 "free colored" women in 1820 [NC:168]. She was the mother of

i. Amey, born in June 1782, bound apprentice in Warren County to James Burk and his wife Sarah in July 1784 and bound out again in November 1793 [Minutes 1783-7, 48; 1787-93, 259].

ii. ?Henry, born 1794-1806, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 6 "free colored" in 1830.

iii. ?Tempy, born 1794-1806, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 1 "free colored" in 1830. She may have been the mother of Elijah Vaughan, a "colored boy" bound to Elie Lewis by the Halifax County, North Carolina court on 17 November 1823.

 

Halifax County, Virginia

1.    Ann Vaughan, born say 1740, (not identified by race) was living in Halifax County, Virginia, in August 1759 when the county court ordered the churchwardens to prosecute her for living in adultery with James Winford, an Indian slave who belonged to Joseph Mays. He was called a servant or slave of Mays in May 1758 when the court ordered Mays to allow him to attend court in his case against Mays for false imprisonment. Winford lost his case in September 1759. Ann was presented by the grand jury again in November 1760 but the case was dismissed [Pleas 2:333, 478, 502; 3:174, 195].

 

VENA/ VENNER/ VENIE/ VENY/ VINEY FAMILY

1.    William Venners, born say 1701, was the servant of Arjalon Price in September 1732 when he petitioned the Richmond County, Virginia court for freedom from his master, stating that "he is a Mulatto born of a white woman named Elizabeth Venners who at the time of his birth was a Servt. in Northumberland County." The following month the court ordered him set free [Orders 1721-32, 652, 658]. He evidently married an Indian woman named Bess according to the deposition of witnesses for the freedom suit of Bess's daughter Sarah Venie and her children in the District Court in Northumberland County on 5 September 1791 and depositions taken for the freedom suit of Sarah Venie's daughter Rachel in Montgomery County in 1811. Elizabeth Daniel of Richmond County deposed that "Rachel descended from a male branch of the Viney family many of whom...recovered their freedom by suit, on the grounds they were of Indian extraction." John Smith of Richmond County testified that Thomas Hammond, a very old man born about 1701 or 1702, informed him that when he was a lad of ten or twelve years old, a twelve or thirteen-year-old girl named Bess and an old woman named Mary, said to be her grandmother, were brought by ship and had the appearance of Indians with straight black hair hanging down to their waists [Kegley, Free People of Colour, 94-7]. Thomas Hammond, son of Job Hammond, was born 20 April 1702 in North Farnham Parish, Richmond County [King, Register of North Farnham Parish]. Bess was apparently identical to "Betty an Indian Girl belonging to Job Hammond" whose age was adjudged by the Richmond County court as six years old on 6 June 1705 [Orders 1704-8, 65]. Job Hammon, Sr., left a 22 March 1717/8 Richmond County will by which he gave an Indian woman named Bess to his son William Hammon and gave an Indian woman named Mary to his son John Hammon. His inventory included an "Ingen woman" valued at 50 pounds currency and an "Old Ingin woman" valued at 5 pounds currency [WB 4:18-9, 24]. William Venie and Bess were the parents of

i. ?Richard1 Venie, born say 1725, permitted by the Richmond County, Virginia court to sue for his freedom in forma pauperis on 6 July 1747. The court assigned Charles Beale as his attorney, and in April 1749 the court dismissed his suit against William Hammond for 10 pounds damages for trespass, assault and battery [Orders 1746-52, 61, 75, 117, 138, 176].

2     ii. Sarah, born say 1730.

 

2.    Sarah1 Venie, born say 1730, and her children Hannah, Judy, Rachel, Molly, Joe and Daniel were held as slaves by Thomas Smith who was living in Richmond County when Sarah's daughter Rachel was born according to testimony by sixty-year-old Elizabeth Daniel who said she lived in the Smith household at the time. Sarah & als., Indians," sued Thomas Smith for their freedom in the Northumberland District Court on 7 September 1789, and on 7 September 1791 Sarah, Andrew, Ned, Sam, Hannah, Milley, Judy, Sarah, Rachel, Molly, Rachel, Tom, Sukey, Judey, Thaddeous, Winney, Charlotte, Dorcus, and George "Indians" won their case against John Davis, administrator of Thomas Smith who died before the case came to trial [District Court Orders 1789-93, 25, 76, 123, 152; Kegley, Free People of Colour, 94-8]. Sarah was the mother of

3     i. Edward, born say 1760.

4     ii. Hannah, born say 1763.

iii. Samuel, born in December 1764, taxable in the upper district of Henrico County in 1788 [PPTL 1782-1814, frame 152], a "free black" taxable in North Farnham Parish, Richmond County, from 1795 to 1814 [PPTL 1789-1829, frames 102, 112, 122, 133, 145, 159, 169, 189, 271, 293, 302, 329, 335, 365], head of a Richmond County household of 3 "other free" in 1810, perhaps the one who registered as a free Negro in Rockingham County, Virginia, on 9 April 1801: Samuel Viney, a black man...about five feet 7-1/4...36 years old in December last [Register of Free Negroes, no.10]. He was a "free Negro" laborer living on L. Creek in Rockingham County in 1812 and 1813 [PPTL 1795-1813, frame 697, 748].

5     iv. Rachel1, born about 1765.

6     v. Judy1, born about 1766.

vi. ?Humphrey1, born about 1766, called Humphrey Venie, Sr., a "free black" taxable in Richmond County from 1798 to 1817: taxable on his own tithe starting in 1807; taxable on Judah Venie, Daniel Venie and 11 cattle in 1815; in 1816, taxable on Thaddeus Venie's tithe in 1817 [PPTL 1789-1829, frames 159, 169, 271, 329, 335, 365, 415, 433, 446], head of a Richmond County household of 2 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1810. He was a 50-year-old "Free Negro" in the Richmond County List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes in Farnham in 1816, listed next to Humphrey (age 41) and Jude Venie (50) [List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes Richmond County 1816, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

7     vi. Molly, born say 1768.

vii. Joseph1, perhaps the Joseph Venea who was taxable in the upper district of Henrico County in 1787 [PPTL 1782-1814, frame 132]. He was called "Joe an Indian" when he won his suit against Thomas Tarpley, administrator of John Tarpley, deceased, on 7 September 1791 [District Court Orders 1789-93, 164]. He was taxable in North Farnham Parish, Richmond County, from 1800 to 1811: called Joseph Vena, Sr., starting in 1804. His estate was taxable on a slave over the age of 16 in 1812 [PPTL 1789-1829, frames 159, 169, 189, 201, 218, 236, 245, 293, 329, 336]. He was head of a Richmond County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:413].

viii. Daniel1, taxable in the upper district of Henrico County most years from 1787 to 1809, listed as a "free Negro" starting in 1799 [PPTL 1782-1814, frames 132, 205, 280, 453, 542, 604], a "FB" taxable in Richmond City in 1796 [PPTL 1787-99], a "free black" taxable in North Farnham Parish, Richmond County, from 1809 to 1817, listed with (his wife?) Sally Venie in 1813 [PPTL 1789-1829, frames 293, 302, 329, 335, 358, 365, 433, 446].

ix. Winney, born before 1776, head of a Richmond County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830.

 

3.    Edward Vena, born say 1760, was a "Mulatto" taxable on 2 horses in Culpeper County in 1802 [PPTL 1782-1802, frame 869] and was a "free black man" living in Culpeper County on 20 January 1801 when the court ordered the overseers of the poor to bind his daughter Pleasant Vena to Fisher Michell [Minutes 1798-1802, 282]. He was head of a Madison County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:410], taxable in Madison County on his 2 unnamed sons and 2 horses in 1811 and 1812, a "FN" taxable in 1813, taxable on his son in 1815 and 1816 [PPTL 1793-1818]. He was the father of

8     i. ?Mary2, born say 1780.

ii. ?Andrew, born 10 March 1782, an apprentice to Edward Voss in September 1802 when the Culpeper County court rescinded the indenture and instead bound him to Peter Vaughan & Partner to be a farmer [Minutes 1798-1802, 43, 73]. He was called a "free negro man" on 15 April 1805 when he was charged with attempting to break into a storehouse in the town of Stevensburg. He was found not guilty of a felony but ordered to give security of $100 for his good behavior for a year [Minutes 1803-5, 350]. He registered in Culpeper County on 22 August 1803 and produced the certificate in Rockingham County on 31 December 1808: a black man about 5 feet 8 inches high, twenty one years old 10th day of March last and who was bound by the overseers of the poor in this county to William Barbour by indenture bearing date the 25th July 1789 [Vind, Andrew (M, 21): Free Negro Register, 1808, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. He was a "free Negro" taxable in Rockingham County living at John Cathrae's in 1813 [PPTL 1795-1813, frame 733].

iii. ?Tobias, taxable in Madison County in 1812 [PPTL 1793-1818], registered as a free Negro in Augusta County on 13 February 1816: a black man about five feet 4 or 5 inches high, about 29 years of age certified to be free born and served an apprenticeship by Wm Broadus clerk of Culpeper County court the 22 July 1812 [Free Negro Register 1810-64, p.5, no. 13].

iv. Pleasant, born say 1795, a taxable "free Negro" in Madison County in 1813 [PPTL 1793-1818].

v. ?Sally, listed as a "FN" over the age of 16 in Madison County in 1813 [PPTL 1793-1818].

vi. ?Daniel3, a "free Negro" taxable in Madison County from 1814 to 1816 [PPTL 1793-1818].

 

4.    Hannah Vina, born say 1763, recovered her freedom by suit in the Northumberland County District Court in 1791, took five of her children from the house of Thomas Smith and died in Richmond County in 1813 according to the testimony of Elizabeth Daniel who said she lived in Thomas Smith's household at the time [Kegley, Free People of Colour, 96]. She was a "free black" taxable in North Farnham Parish, Richmond County, from 1801 to 1812: taxable on Charles Vina's tithe in 1801, taxable on Ben Vena's tithe in 1809 and 1810 [PPTL 1789-1829, frames 169, 189, 293, 302, 335] and head of a Richmond County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:413]. She was the mother of

i. ?Charles, born say 1784, taxable in Richmond County in 1801 and 1802 [PPTL 1789-1829, frames 169, 189].

ii. George2, "son of Hannah," listed as a "free Negro" in Richmond County in 1813 [PPTL 1789-1829, frame 358].

iii. ?Ben, born say 1792, taxable in Richmond County in 1809 [PPTL 1789-1829, frame 293].

 

5.   Rachel1 Viney, born about 1765, sued for her freedom in the Northumberland County District Court in 1791 but was taken to the "back country" about that time and sold to Henry Patton by Charles Dunnaway of Culpeper County whose wife Jane received Rachel by the division of the estate of her father Thomas Smith. Rachel was allowed to bring suit for her freedom from Henry Patton, Samuel Patton and Andrew Johnston in forma pauperis in Montgomery County, Virginia, in March 1807 for herself and her children Hannah, Santy, Jimmy, Abigail, Joe and Solomon. She registered in Montgomery County on 8 November 1815: age about fifty years and known as Rachel Viney, of dark yellow complexion, five feet one inch, a mold under her right eye...She was emancipated the same way as above (being a descendant of a free Indian woman in the female line) [Orders 1813-5, 330 cited by Kegley, Free People of Colour, 89, 93]. She and her children were listed as "free Persons of Colour" or "free Negroes" living on Newriver at Philip Peters' place in Giles County from 1816 to 1825 [Register of Free Negroes 1816-64, frames 55, 58, 62;  also: List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes with in the County of Giles for the year 1817, 1817, List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes for the Year 1825, 1825, African American Narratives Digital Collection, LVA]. She was the mother of

i. Hannah, born about 1784, registered in Montgomery County on 8 November 1815: a free woman of colour, about 27 years of age, of dark yellow complexion and five feet five inches...emancipated in the same way. Her children Sam and Daniel Viney registered the same day [Orders 1813-5, 331-2 cited by Kegley, Free People of Colour, 89-90]. She was listed as a twenty-seven-year-old spinster in Giles County in 1816 [Register of Free Negroes 1816-64, frame 62].

ii. Marcus, born about 1790, a twenty-eight-year-old laborer listed with Rachel Viney on Newriver at A. Johnston's place in the 1818 list of "free Persons of Colour" for Giles County [Register of Free Negroes 1816-64, frame 58].

iii. Jupiter, born about 1794, registered in Montgomery County on 8 November 1815: a free man of colour is 22 years of age...of black colour and five feet seven and 3/4...a descendant of a free Indian woman in the female line [Orders 1813-5, 330].

iv. Santy/ Santia, born about 1798, registered in Montgomery County on 8 November 1815: a free boy of colour about 19 years of age...of black colour, five feet three...emancipated the same way as above [Orders 1813-5, 330].

v. Jimmy, born about 1799, registered in Montgomery County on 8 November 1815: a boy about sixteen years of age, black colour and five feet one inch...emancipated the same way as above [Orders 1813-5, 331].

vi. Abigail, born about 1802, registered in Montgomery County on 8 November 1815: about fourteen years of age, of black colour, 4 feet ten 1/2 inches...emancipated the same way as above [Orders 1813-5, 331].

vii. Joe, born about 1803, registered in Montgomery County on 8 November 1815: about twelve years of age, black colour and about four feet six inches, emancipated in the same way [Orders 1813-5, 332].

viii. Solomon, born about 1806, registered in Montgomery County on 8 November 1815: a free mulatto colour about nine years old, about four feet two...emancipated by verdict as descended from an Indian woman [Orders 1813-5, 332].

 

6.    Judy1 Veny/ Vena, born about 1766, obtained her freedom by suit against Anna Dobyns in the Northumberland County District Court [Orders 1789-93, 164]. She was a sister of Rachel (who was taken to the "back country" Charles Dunnaway) and Molly Viney sold out of Richmond County. She was a "free black" taxable in North Farnham Parish, Richmond County, from 1798 to 1814: taxable on slave over the age of 16 in 1798: taxable on Humphrey Vena's tithe in 1800, taxable on Humphrey's tithe and a slave over the age of 16 in 1801 and 1802, taxable on a slave over the age of 16 in 1804, taxable on Humphrey's tithe in 1805, taxable on a slave in 1806 and 1807, taxable on Jack Vena's tithe from 1809 to 1811, taxable on a slave over the age of 16 in 1812, taxable on Daniel Venie's tithe in 1814 [PPTL 1789-1829, frames 133, 159, 169, 189, 201, 218, 236, 245, 271, 293, 302, 329, 335, 358, 365]. She was head of a Richmond County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:413] and 3 "free colored" in 1830. She was a 50-year-old "free Negro" in the Richmond County List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes in Farnham in 1816 [List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes Richmond County 1816, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. She may have been the mother of

i. Humphrey2, born about 1775, a 41-year-old "Free Negro" in the Richmond County List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes in Farnham in 1816 [List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes Richmond County 1816, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

ii. Jack, born about 1781, a "free black" taxable in Richmond County from 1809 to 1817: taxable on his own tithe starting in 1811, listed with (his wife?) Betty Venie in 1813 [PPTL 1789-1829, frames 293, 302, 329, 358, 365, 446]. He was a 35-year-old "Free Negro" in the Richmond County List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes in Farnham in 1816 [List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes Richmond County 1816, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

iii. Daniel2, born about 1798, taxable in 1814, an 18-year-old "Free Negro" in the Richmond County List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes in Farnham in 1816 [List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes Richmond County 1816, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

 

7.    Mary1/ Molly Veny, born say 1768, was owned by Catherine Smith of Richmond County in 1791 and was the sister of Rachel (who was sold by Charles Dunnaway) and Judy Viney according to the testimony of Catherine Smith of Richmond County on 5 May 1814 [Kegley, Free People of Colour, 95-6]. She was head of a Richmond County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:413]. She was the mother of

i. Sarah2/ Sally, born about 1787, registered as a "free Negro" in Madison County on 10 November 1812 and again on 28 October 1823 in Augusta County: Sally Veny (daughter of Molly Veny) a yellow woman, with straight black har, now about thirty six years of age five feet three inches high, and born free. Her daughter Charlotte registered the same day: (daughter of Sally Veny) a very bright yellow complexion, fourteen years of age the 27th day of February 1823 [Register of Augusta County, nos. 57, 58, cited by http://valley.lib.Virginia.edu/VoS/govdoc/fblack.early.html].

 

8.    Mary2 Vena, born say 1780, was living in Culpeper County on 17 June 1800 when the court ordered the overseers of the poor to bind out her "Mulatto" child Beverly to Thomas Eldridge, Jr. [Minutes 1798-1802, 211]. Polly was head of a Madison County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:410] and a "FN" taxable on a horse in Madison County in 1813 [PPTL 1793-1818]. She was the mother of

i. Beverly, born say 1799, an illegitimate "Mulatto" child of Mary Vena bound to Thomas Eldridge in Culpeper County on 17 June 1800 [Minutes 1798-1802, 211].

ii. ?Joseph3 Veney, a "free Mulatto" bound out by the overseers of the poor in the district south of "Mo. Run" in Culpeper County on 21 September 1801 [Minutes 1798-1802, 364].

iii. ?Molly, a "FN" over the age of sixteen in Madison County in 1813 [PPTL 1793-1818].

 

Other members of the family were

i. George1, born about 1754, "an Indian," won his suit against Catherine Jasper in the Northumberland County District Court on 7 September 1791 [Orders 1789-93, 164]. He was taxable in North Farnham Parish, Richmond County, in 1790, a "free black" taxable from 1794 to 1816: listed with a slave over the age of 16 in 1794 and from 1813 to 1816, called George Venie, Sr., in 1813 [PPTL 1789-1829, frames 33, 40, 61, 93, 112, 122, 133, 145, 159, 169, 189, 201, 218, 236, 245, 271, 293, 302, 335, 358, 365, 415], head of a Richmond County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:413]. He was listed as a "free Negro" in Richmond County in 1813 [PPTL 1789-1829, frame 358], a 62-year-old "free Negro" in the Richmond County List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes in Farnham in 1816 [List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes Richmond County 1816, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

9     ii. Rachel2, born say 1768.

iii. Simon Viney, taxable in North Farnham Parish, Richmond County, in 1788, listed with a slave over the age of 16 in 1794, taxable from 1795 to 1797 [PPTL 1782-8, frame 759; PPTL 1789-1829, frames 93, 102, 112, 122], perhaps the Simon Vine who was a taxable in Culpeper County in 1801 [PPTL 1782-1802, frame 812].

iv. Lucy, taxable on a horse in the upper district of Henrico County in 1788 [PPTL 1782-1814, frame 152].

v. Susan, born before 1776, a "free black" taxable in North Farnham Parish, Richmond County, in 1813; taxable on horse in 1817 [PPTL 1789-1829, frames 358, 446], head of a Richmond County household of 2 "free colored" in 1830.

vi. Thomas, born say 1780, "an Indian," won his suit against William Jenkins on 7 September 1791 [Orders 1789-93, 164]. He was a "free black" taxable in North Farnham Parish, Richmond County, in 1797, 1803-1805, and from 1812 to 1817: taxable on a slave over the age of 12, another age 9-12 and 5 cattle in 1815; a slave over the age of 16 and a horse in 1816. He was taxable in Lunenburg Parish, Richmond County, in 1811 [PPTL 1789-1829, frames 122, 201, 218, 236, 320, 335, 365, 415, 433, 446] and a "F.N." taxable in Botetourt County in 1809 [PPTL 1787-1810, frame 619].

vii. Hannah, head of a Richmond County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 (called Hannah Vena, Jr.) [VA:413], taxable in Lunenburg Parish, Richmond County, in 1813; taxable on Johnson Venie and 7 cattle in 1815 [PPTL 1789-1829, frame 352, 415].

10   viii. Rachel3, born say 1785.

ix. Isaac, born say 1787, a "free black" taxable in North Farnham Parish, Richmond County from 1804 to 1807 [PPTL 1789-1829, frames 218, 236, 245, 271].

x. Judy2, Jr. head of a Richmond County household of 5 "other free" in 1810.

xi. Dorcas, head of a Richmond County household of 5 "other free" in 1810.

xii. Richard2, head of a Richmond County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:413], a "free black" taxable in North Farnham Parish, Richmond County, from 1810 to 1817: listed with (his wife?) Rachel Venie in 1813, listed with Jesse Venie in 1817 [PPTL 1789-1829, frames 302, 329, 335, 358, 365, 446].

xiii. James, a "free black" taxable in North Farnham Parish, Richmond County, from 1813 to 1817: listed with "free black" Jesse Fryer in 1816 [PPTL 1789-1829, frames 358, 369, 433, 446], head of a Richmond County household of 1 "other free" in 1810.

xiv. John, a "free black" taxable in North Farnham Parish, Richmond County, from 1811 to 1817: listed with "free black" Jesse McGuy in 1817 [PPTL 1789-1829, frames 329, 335, 446].

xv. Solomon, born say 1792, a "free black" taxable in North Farnham Parish, Richmond County, in 1809 [PPTL 1789-1829, frame 293].

 

9.    Rachel2 Vena, born say 1768, "an Indian," won her suit against James Samford in the District Court of Northumberland County on 7 September 1791 [Orders 1789-93, 165]. She was a "free black" taxable on Joseph Vena's tithe from 1804 to 1807 in North Farnham Parish, Richmond County [PPTL 1789-1829, frames 218, 236, 245, 271]. She was probably the mother of

i. Joseph2, born say 1787, a "free black" taxable in Richmond County from 1804 to 1817: taxable on his own tithe starting in 1810, listed with (his wife?) Rachel Venie in 1813 [PPTL 1789-1829, frames 302, 335, 365, 433, 446], head of a Richmond County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 (called Joseph Vena, Jr.) [VA:413].

 

10.    Rachel3 Vena/ Veney, born say 1785, was the mother of several children who registered in Louisa County. They were

i. Edmund, born about 1806, registered in Louisa County in March 1827: son of Rachel Veney who was born free, dark complexion, about 21 years of age.

ii. Joseph4, born about 1808, registered in Louisa County on 10 March 1829: son of Rachel Veney who was born free, dark complexion, 5'9" about 21 years of age.

iii. Esther, born about 1825, registered on 14 July 1829: daughter of Rachael Veney who was born free, girl of dark complexion, about 3' high, about 4 years old.

iv. Polly, born about 1811, registered in Louisa County on 14 July 1829: daughter of Rachel Veney who was born free, dark complexion about 5'1" high, about 18 years old.

v. Rhoda, born about 1816, registered in [Abercrombie, Free Blacks of Louisa County, 32-4].

 

Another member of the family was

i. Thomas Veney, registered in Fauquier County on 29 July 1829: by a copy of the register of Loudoun County, 51 years, 5'10-1/2", Black man, Emancipated by Henry Saunders by deed recorded in the County Court of Loudoun County [Register of Free Negroes, 1817-65, no. 106].

 

Endnotes:

1.     Arjalon Price was also the master of Ann McIntosh, a white woman who had a mixed-race child in 1758.

 

VERTY FAMILY

1.    Ann Verty/ Virtue, born say 1725, servant of Marquis Calmes, Gentleman, was ordered by the Frederick County, Virginia court to pay 15 pounds or be sold for five years on 1 December 1747 for having a "Mulatto" child. She was the mother of an eight-year-old "Mulatto" boy named James Virtue who was bound to William Calmes on 6 July 1756 [Orders 1745-8, 354; 1755-8, 85]. She was the mother of

2    i. James, born 1 October 1747.

 

2.    James Verty, born 1 October 1747, a "Mulatto" son of Ann Virtue, was bound to William Calmes in Frederick County on 6 July 1756. He was listed in the 5 April 1774 inventory of the Frederick County estate of William Calmes: James a Mulatto for one year - 10 pounds [WB 5:284]. He was called James Vartie/ Varty/ Vardey when he was a "free Negro" taxable in Frederick County from 1795 to 1800 [PPTL 1782-1802, frames 599, 657], called James Vardy in 1810, head of a Frederick County household of 5 "other free" [VA:577]. He called himself Tuck (alias James Vartie) when he and his wife Juda manumitted their two slaves, apparently their children, by Frederick County deed on 29 April 1800 [DB 26:368, cited by Jane Ailes in email correspondence]. Judith Verty was head of a Frederick County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:20]. Their children were

i. Luce, born about 1789, eleven years old when she was emancipated.

ii. Tom, born about January 1792, about eight years and three months old when he was emancipated. Thomas Vartie was taxable in Frederick County in 1809 [PPTL, 1803-19]. As Thomas Tuck he was head of a Frederick County household of 4 "free colored" in the Western District in 1830.

 

VICKORY FAMILY

1.    Indian Moll, born say 1700, was the slave of Captain Humphrey Marshall of Isle of Wight County. She had a daughter named Sarah according to depositions taken in Sarah's suit for freedom in Southampton County in 1757. Two of the deponents said that Moll was from Cape Fear (North Carolina). She was the mother of

2     i. Sarah, born say 1725.

 

2.    Indian Sarah, born say 1725, was the slave of Captain Marshall of Nansemond County when she was given by will to Sarah Clark [Byrd, In Full Force and Virtue, 151-3]. Indian Sarah petitioned the court in Southampton County for her freedom from Sarah Clark, and on 11 March 1756 the court appointed Miles Cary as her attorney. The court allowed her to take depositions from witnesses in Nansemond County, Isle of Wight County, and North Carolina. On 11 February 1757 the jury considered the depositions of Mary Hayes, Cornelius Ratcliff, Rachel Norworthy and John Sawyer, but the defendant asked that the jurors be discharged from giving their verdict and the action be quashed. The court ruled against Indian Sarah on 10 March that year [Orders 1754-9, 207, 219, 236, 265-6, 276, 291, 333, 345]. According to a suit heard in Granville County, North Carolina, she was the mother of

3     i. Ben, born say 1760.

 

3.    Ben Vickory, born say 1760, was still a boy when he was sold by John Clark to John Potter. He sued Potter's executors for his freedom and won his case in Granville County on 7 August 1782. He proved his ancestry by the Southampton County court papers in the suit brought by his mother Sarah [Byrd, In Full Force and Virtue, 151-3]. He was head of a Chowan County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [NC:535]. He may have been the father of

i. Nancy, married Henry Harman, 18 December 1818 Chowan County bond.

 

VIERS FAMILY

1.    Mary Via, born say 1734, had a "Mulatto" son named Benjamin who was bound by the churchwardens of Fredericksville Parish, Louisa County, to Andrew Ray on 27 November 1754. She was the mother of

2     i. Benjamin Viers, born 4 June 1754.

ii. ?John Vier, sold for $5 a mare, a yoke of oxen, three cows, two calves, seventeen hogs and household furniture to William Going in Amherst County on 5 April 1838 in consideration for his friendship with Martha Jane Snead, his wife's daughter [DB W:274]. She was probably related to Jane Sneed whose unnamed "Mulatta" daughter was bound to Sherwood Walton and his wife in Lunenburg County on 14 July 1763 [Orders 1762-1763, 87].

 

2.   Benjamin Viers, born 4 June 1754, was bound to Andrew Ray on 27 November 1754 [Fredericksville Parish Vestry Indentures & Processing 1742-87, p. 64 cited by Gill, Apprentices of Virginia, 257]. He voluntarily bound himself to Andrew Ray in Pittsylvania County on 25 May 1775 [Court Records 1772-5, 431]. He was taxable in Amherst County from 1786 to 1795 [PPTL 1782-1803, frames 68, 188, 317, 342], a "F. Negro" taxable in Augusta County in 1797, 1798 and 1805 [PPTL 1796-1810, frames 56, 92, 421] and a "F.N." taxable in Botetourt County from 1809 to 1820: called Ben Wier in 1809 and 1810, counted in the list of "Free Negroes and Mulattoes" with three women over the age of sixteen in 1813: Polly, Patsy, and (his wife?) Betty Vires, not taxable on his own tithe after 1817 [PPTL 1787-1810, frames 620, 653; 1811-1822, frames 13, 48, 90, 92, 269, 310, 356, 391, 443]. He was a "free coloured man" who enlisted in Revolutionary War service in Henry County, Virginia, in October 1775. He married Betsy Long in Amherst County and lived there for five years before moving to Gallia County, Ohio, in September 1827. His pension application states that he was born on 3 September 1752 in Charlotte County, Virginia, but Charlotte was not formed until after 1764 [NARA, S.6313, M804, Roll 2459, frame 1260 of 1360]. On 26 February 1787 John Henderson received his final pay for serving as a wagoner [NARA, M881, Roll 1096, frame 818 of 2087]. He was probably the father of

i. Polly.

ii. Patsy.

iii. William, a "F.N." taxable in Botetourt County from 1818 to 1820 [PPTL 1811-1822, frames 356, 391, 443]

 

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