WEEKS FAMILY

1.    Ann Webb, born about 1713, "a malatto...Born of ye body of Jane Webb ye wife of a Negro man belonging to Captain Thomas Savage," was bound to Savage by the Northampton County, Virginia court on 20 June 1716. She had four more years to serve when she was listed in the inventory of Thomas Savage's estate which was recorded on 12 May 1730 [Orders 1711-16, 255; DW 1725-33, 229-30]. On 9 May 1732 she was presented for bastard bearing and the same day petitioned the court against Sophia Savage who was detaining her children Daniel and Abraham in servitude on the pretense that Ann owed her three years of service for having three bastard children during her servitude. The court ordered that she be set free and ordered Mrs. Savage to deliver her clothes and bedding to her [Orders 1729-32, 143-5; 1732-42, 7, 8, 14]. She may have married or had children by John Weeks, a taxable in Gawton Hunt's household in the Northampton County list of John Forse from 1723 to 1731. He was listed separately from Hunt's "negroes": Eliza, Sarah, and Daniel and called "Weeks" only in 1726, 1728 and 1729 [L.P. 1723; Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 48, 65, 92, 116, 129, 146, 161, 172, 228]. On 12 February 1733/4 she was called Nanny Week, late Nanny Webb, when the court bound out her three-year-old "free Negroe" son Daniel to William Scott with her consent [Orders 1732-42, 92]. She was called Ann Weeks thereafter. She was taxable in Jacob Smith's household in the Northampton County list of John Robins for 1737, taxable in her own household in Captain Ralph Pigot's list for the lower precinct in 1739, taxable in Philip Jacob's household in 1740 and 1742, and taxable in her own household in the list of P. Norly Ellegood for 1744 [L.P. 1737, 1744; Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 254, 295, 305, 342, 361]. She won a suit against Stephen Whitehead for 50 bushels of corn on 14 November 1738 for one year's service. She was called "Anne Weaks, Negro" on 9 October 1739 when Edmund Custis, storekeeper, won a suit against her for payment of 1 pound/ 11 shillings for five yards of material, a gown, and a handkerchief [Orders 1732-42, 338, 371; Mihalyka, Loose Papers, 101, 115]. The court bound her "orphan" son Peter Weeks to John Millard on 28 July 1750 but bound him instead to Alexander Kemp six months later based on her complaint. Her suit against John Frazer was dismissed on 11 February 1757 when the parties agreed [Orders 1748-51, 270, 339, 384]. She was the mother of the following members of the Weeks family:

i. Abraham, born about August 1728, called Abraham Webb, a "poor Negroe child" when he was bound apprentice to Benjamin Johnson by the Northampton County court with the consent of his mother Nanny Webb in June 1733 [Orders 1732-42, 57]. He was called Abraham Weeks Negro" when he was sued in Northampton County court by Samuel Grafton on 15 November 1749 [Orders 1748-51, 148; Orders 1751-3, 89]. He sued Caleb Weeks for trespass, assault and battery on 14 December 1757 and was sued by Hemphill for debt on 14 December 1757. On 14 November 1770 the court presented Isaac Clegg for not listing him as a tithable. He was sued for 8 pounds, 8 shillings on 8 March 1774 [Orders 1753-8, 471; Minutes 1761-5, 159; 1765-71, 399; 1771-7, 231]. He was taxable in Northampton County from 1782 to 1787: called a "Mulatto" in 1787 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 7, 12, 75] and head of an Accomack County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:84].

ii. Daniel1, born 4 May 1731, a "free Negroe" bound to William Scott by the Northampton County court on 12 February 1733/4 with the consent of his mother Nanny Week, late Nanny Webb [Minutes 1732-42, 92]. He was called "Daniel Weeks Negro" when he was awarded his freedom dues based on his suit against Benjamin Scott and John Ellegood in Northampton County on 14 August 1751. And he was called "Daniel Weeks Negro" when he was sued by Peter Hog on 11 July 1753, when he sued Thomas Speakman for trespass, assault and battery on 11 September 1754, and when he sued John Smaw for the same on 15 September 1756 [Orders 1748-51, 425; 1751-3, 8; 1753-8, 138, 361, 373].

2     iii. Esther, born 4 July 1733.

iv. Leah1, born 15 July 1735, two-year-old daughter of Ann Weeks (no race mentioned), bound apprentice to Thomas Church with the consent of her mother on 12 July 1737 [Minutes 1732-42, 270].

v. ?Peggy, born say 1739, presented in Northampton County on 13 July 1757 for bastard bearing [Orders 1753-8, 415, 431-2].

vi. Jerome, born in April 1741, nine-year-old "orphan of Ann," bound apprentice to John Millard on 28 July 1750 [Minutes 1748-51, 270], taxable Northampton County in Josias Willes household in 1765, in Jacob Freshwater's in 1769, and taxable from 1783 to 1800 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 16, 54, 177, 201, 296]. He registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 10 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 354].

3     vii. Jane, born 28 July 1745.

4     viii. Peter1, born 27 November 1746.

5     ix. ?Dido, born say 1750.

6     x. ?Ann2, born about 1752.

xi. Daniel2, born say 1754, "negro son of Anne Weeks," ordered bound to Azariah Hunt on 9 October 1759 [Minutes 1754-61, 202]. He was a "negro" taxable in Northampton County from 1785 to 1800: taxable on 5 slaves and a horse in 1787 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 47, 69, 178, 201, 296].

7     xii. ?Barbara, born say 1756.

xiii. Jacob, born 23 March 1758, orphan of Ann Weeks, ordered bound apprentice to Nathaniel Stratton on 11 September 1759, a three-year-old called "Job Weeks Negro" when he was ordered bound to Thomas Widgeon on 11 August 1761 [Minutes 1754-61, 201, 265]. He registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 10 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 354]. He was taxable in Northampton County from 1790 to 1800 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 119, 149, 201, 295] and head of a Northampton County, Virginia household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:214A].

xiv. ?William, taxable in Northampton

 

2.    Esther Weeks, born 4 July 1733, four-year-old daughter of Anne Weeks, was bound apprentice by the Northampton County court to Joseph Toleman with the consent of her mother on 12 July 1737 and bound to Ebenezer Toleman on 12 February 1744/5 [Orders 1732-42, 270; 1742-8]. On 11 December 1750 the court presented her, a "Mulatto," for bastard bearing, but two months later on 13 February the sheriff reported that she was not found in the county [Orders 1748-51, 306, 333-4, 365-6]. She was called "Easter Weeks a Mullatto Servant woman" on 15 May 1753 when the Princess Anne County court ordered that she serve her master Thomas Garvis an additional year for having a child born during her indenture [Minutes 1753-62, 15]. She registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 12 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 358]. She may have been the mother of

i. Juda, born say 1744, taxable in Norfolk County in 1761 in the district between the west side of Church Street and Town Bridge, called Judith Wicks, free negro" in 1765, and taxable on the west side of Church Street in Norfolk Borough in Edmund Bruce's household in 1767 and 1768 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables 1751-65, 183, 214; 1766-80, 32, 80].

 

3.    Jane Weeks, born 28 July 1745, the five-year-old "orphan of Ann Weeks," was bound apprentice to John Millard on 28 July 1750. The court ordered her whipped for bastardy on 14 September 1763, and on 14 November 1775 the grand jury presented her for entertaining "slave Negros" in her house [Orders 1748-51, 270; Minutes 1761-5, 85; 1771-7, 298]. She registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 12 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 358]. She may have been the mother of

8     i. James1, born say 1763.

ii. Gabriel, born 1 June 1765, three years old when he was bound to William Floyd on 14 February 1769 [Minutes 1765-71, 277].

iii. Ann3, born 11 October 1766, a "free Negro" bound to Luke Smaw on 11 March 1777 [Minutes 1771-7, 357].

iv. Bob, born 1 November 1780, son of Jenny Weeks, bound to John Graves, Sr., on 14 May 1788 [Orders 1787-9, 143].

 

4.    Peter1 Weeks, born 27 November 1746, the three-year-old "orphan of Ann Weeks," was ordered bound apprentice to John Millard on 28 July 1750, bound to Alexander Kemp on 13 February 1750/1, and bound to Robinson Savage, Jr., on 11 July 1758 [Minutes 1748-51, 270, 339; 1753-8, 158]. He was a "free Negro" taxable in Northampton County in 1769 [L.P. 1769]. He was sued for debt on 11 August 1773 and was sued for a debt of 2 pounds, 15 shillings by a member of the Jeffery family on 13 April 1774 [Minutes 1771-7, p.165, 247]. On 10 February 1779 the court ordered his son Daniel bound out. He was the father of

i. Daniel3, born say 1775, son of Peter Weeks, bound apprentice to Mr. Christian on 10 February 1779 [Minutes 1777-83, 144]. He married Nancy Morris, 6 July 1803 Northampton County bond, Abraham Lang security.

 

5.    Dido Weeks, born say 1750, was a "free negro" mother of a child who had contracted smallpox on 23 July 1777 when the magistrates of Northampton County met at the courthouse to approve inoculation of the remainder of her family by Doctor William Foushee. On 14 April 1784 Colonel John Robins received 10 Shillings which was allowed to Dido by the Northampton County court for nursing a man who had smallpox [Minutes 1777-83, 5; Orders 1783-7, 88]. She was the mother of

i. Susanna, daughter of Dida Weeks, bound to Peter Bowdoin on 11 December 1787 [Orders 1787-9, 79].

 

6.    Ann2 Weeks, born say 1752, was presented by the grand jury of Northampton County on 14 November 1775 for entertaining "slave Negros" in her house [Minutes 1771-7, 298]. She was the mother of

i. Betty, born in September 1775, four-year-old daughter of Ann Weeks bound apprentice to William Cable in Northampton County on 11 July 1780 [Minutes 1777-83, 254]. She registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 12 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 358].

ii. Littleton, born about 1785, son of Nanny Weeks, bound to John Graves, Sr., on 14 May 1788 [Orders 1787-9, 143].

 

7.    Barbara Weeks, born say 1756, was the mother of

i. Zerobabel, born in August 1772, son of Barbara Weeks, bound apprentice to Thomas Bullock in Northampton County on 13 December 1780 [Minutes 1777-83, 298]. He married Nancy Beavens, 3 January 1793 Northampton County bond, Reubin Reed security. He registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 12 June 1794 and his wife may have been the Nancy Weeks who registered on 10 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 358, 354]. He was taxable in Northampton County from 1794 to 1800 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 177, 201, 295].

 

8.    James1 Weeks, born say 1763, was a "negro" bound to Savage Cowdry by the Northampton County court on 14 August 1765 [Minutes 1765-71, 8]. He was taxable in Northampton County from 1788 to 1800 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 90, 119, 148, 296]. He and (his wife?) Rachel Weeks registered as "free Negroes" in Northampton County on 12 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 358]. He was head of a Northampton County, Virginia household of 7 "free colored" in 1820, called James Weeks, Sr. [VA:215]. He was the father of

i. Jacob, taxable in Northampton County from 1806 to 1815: called "son of James" in 1806 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 459, 552].

ii. Eli, taxable in Northampton County from 1806 to 1808: called "son of James" in 1808 and 1812 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 420, 438, 459, 521], head of a York County household of 2 "free Negroes and mulattoes above 16" (probably himself and his wife) from 1813 to 1815 [PPTL, 1782-1841, frames 397, 413, 428].

 

Other members of the family in Northampton County were

i. John, born say 1765, taxable in Northampton County from 1786 to 1800: a "Negro" taxable in 1800 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 54, 119, 177, 201, 296], head of a Northampton County, Virginia household of 13 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:214A].

ii. Leah2, born 23 March 1769, a four-year-old (no parent or race mentioned) bound apprentice to Isabella Dunton on 23 May 1773 [Minutes 1771-7, 142].

iii. William, taxable in Northampton County from 1790 to 1792 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 119, 149, 177].

iv. Edmund, born about 1774, a seven-year-old (no parent or race mentioned) bound apprentice in Northampton County in December 1781 [Minutes 1777-83, 336].

v. Simon, born before 1776, head of a Northampton County household of 9 "free colored" in 1830.

vi. Thomas, taxable in Northampton County from 1792 to 1795 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 148, 201]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Northampton County on 8 July 1794: a free Negro and native of this county. a free man born. He recorded the certificate in Princess Anne County [Weeks, Thomas (M): Free Negro Certificate, 1794, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. He was taxable again in Northampton County starting in 1805 [PPTL, 1782-1814, frame 399].

vii. Jeremiah, born before 1776, head of a Northampton County, Virginia household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:215A].

viii. Meriah, born before 1776, head of a Northampton County, Virginia household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:214A].

ix. James2, born in September 1775, a four-year-old (no parent or race mentioned) bound apprentice to James Smith on 15 September 1779 to learn the shoemaker's trade [Minutes 1777-83, 196]. He registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 13 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 364]. He was taxable in Northampton County from 1800 to 1815 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 295, 553]. He married Peggy Stephens, 8 May 1810 Northampton County bond, Richard Johnson security. He was head of a Northampton County, Virginia household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:214A].

x. Lucy, married Peter Wakefield, 7 September 1794 Northampton County bond, Nathaniel Holland security. Peter may have been related to Mary Wakefield, head of a Petersburg household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:125b].

xi. Comfort, married George Pool, 10 May 1793 Northampton County bond, Abraham Lang security.

xii. Levi, married Peggy Stephens, 6 January 1809 Northampton County bond, James Travis security.

 

Other members of the family were

i. Peter2, born say 1758, ran away from Accomack County, apparently in company with John Thompson before 28 June 1775 when the York County jailer placed an ad in the 7 July 1775 issue of the Virginia Gazette: committed to York jail, the 28th ult. a MULATTO LAD 5 feet 4 inches high, thin made, who says his name is Peter Weeks and that he belongs to John Parker of Accomack County; has on an old dusfil jacket, striped Virginia cloth breeches, and an old ragged shirt--Likewise, on the 1st of this instant (July) a BLACK LAD 5 feet 3 inches and a quarter high, thin made, has the wool on his crown cut close, say his name is John Thompson, and that he belongs to William Hack of Accomack county, has on a new osnabrug shirt, old purple coloured breeches, and a sustian or jeans coat with metal buttons [Virginia Gazette; http://www.accessible.com]

ii. Haley, head of a Dinwiddie County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:166].

 

WELCH FAMILY

1.    Mary Welch, born say 1710, was the servant of Thomas Harwood on 13 November 1728 when she admitted to the Prince George's County, Maryland Court that she had a "Malatto" child. The court bound her for an additional seven years and bound her two-month-old son Henry to her master until the age of thirty-one [Court Records 1728-9, 346-7]. She may have married a former slave named Robert Banneker by March 1736 when the Baltimore County court declared that they were levy free during the lifetime of their "crippled mulatto" daughter Julian [Barnes, Baltimore County Families, 1659-1759]. See the Banneker family history: http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/Adams-Butler.htm]. Mary was the mother of

2     i. Henry1, born 28 September 1728.

ii. ?Dan, a "Mulatta boy" listed in the 3 February 1748/9 inventory of the King George County, Virginia estate of Thomas Bartlett [Inventories, 1745-1765, 36].

iii. ?Sarah, a "Mulatta girl" listed in the 3 February 1748/9 inventory of the King George County, Virginia estate of Thomas Bartlett [Inventories, 1745-1765, 36].

 

2.    Henry1 Welch, born 28 September 1728, son of Mary Welch, may have been the ancestor of

i. Henry2, born about 1762, enlisted in the Revolution from Culpeper County for 18 months on 19 March 1781 and was sized about a month later: age 19, 5'3-3/4" high, yellow complexion, born in King George County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.35)].

 

Other members of a Welch family in Maryland and Virginia were

i. Thomas, head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:168].

ii. James, head of a Charles Town, Cecil County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

iii. Rebecca, head of a Loudoun County, Virginia household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:291].

iv. Clary, head of a Stafford County, Virginia household of 2 "other free" in 1810.

 

WELLS FAMILY

1.    Ann Wells, born say 1750, was a Northampton County, North Carolina taxable on an assessment of 105 pounds in 1780. She received a grant for 128 acres in Northampton County on Corduroy Swamp on 9 October 1783 [DB 7:274]. She was head of a Northampton County household of 1 "Black" person 12-50 years old and 3 "Black" persons less than 12 or over 50 years old in Elisha Webb's District in 1786 for the state census, 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:75], 5 in 1800 [NC:483], 6 in 1810 [NC:753], and 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:266]. She was probably the mother of

i. King, born 1776-94, head of a Northampton County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:266].

ii. Anthony, charged with bastardy in Northampton County court by Amey Allen, on 7 June 1820 [Minutes 1817-21, 281]. He may have been the Anson Wells of Columbia County, Ohio, who gave Henry Deberry his power of attorney to sell 79 acres in Northampton County to King Deberry on 12 February 1838 [DB 28:257, 258].

 

WEST FAMILY

1.    Mary West, born say 1690, left Accomack County before 7 July 1718 when William Wise petitioned the court to bind to him a "Mullatto boy" named William West, six-year-old son of Mary West who had left the boy with him [Orders 1717-9, 15a]. She was in York County on 15 January 1721/2 when the court presented her for having an illegitimate "Mullatto" child. She failed to appear at the next session of the court in March, and in August 1722 the court directed John Holloway, Esq., and Henry Tyler, Gent., to examine witnesses relating to the cause. The case was decided against her on 21 January 1722/3 when the court ordered her to pay the churchwardens 15 pounds sterling for having a "Mullatto" child. On 17 May 1736 the court presented her for having a bastard child by a "Molatto" [OW 15, pt. 2, 10, 120, 134, 153, 179; W&I 18:279]. She was the mother of

2     i. ?Martha, born say 1710.

ii. William1, born about 1712.

 

2.    Martha West, born say 1710, was a "Mollato" woman living in Yorkhampton Parish, York County, on 17 July 1732 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind her two "Mollato" boys Charles and James to her mistress Sarah Walker until the age of thirty-one, "being the time their mother was bound for" [OW 17:295]. She was the mother of

i. Charles, born say 1730.

ii. James1, born say 1732, born say 1732, perhaps the James West who was head of a Fredericksburg household of 9 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:111a]. He may have been the James West who was listed as one of the seamen aboard the galley Dragon during the Revolution, received pay on 20 January 1779, was entitled to bounty land for three years service, but had not received the land by 7 January 1835 [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 7, 13, 72, 277, 608].

 

Other members of the West family were

i. Will2, born say 1765, head of a Bladen County, North Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1790.

ii. James2, born say 1767, head of a Spotsylvania County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:102a].

iii. Benjamin, head of a Middlesex County household of 2 "other free" in 1810.

iv. Susanna, head of a Nelson County household of one "other free" in 1810.

v. Peter, head of a Nelson County household of one "other free" in 1810.

 

Brunswick County, Virginia

1.    Anne West, born say 1729, (a white woman?) was living in Brunswick County, Virginia, in April 1747 when the churchwardens of St. Andrew's Parish were ordered to bind her "Mulatto" daughter Frances West to Richard Berry [Orders 1745-49, 156]. Her child was

i. Frances, born say 1747.

ii. Benjamin, head of a Middlesex County household of 2 "other free" in 1810.

iii. Susanna, head of a Nelson County household of one "other free" in 1810.

iv. Peter, head of a Nelson County household of one "other free" in 1810.

 

WHARTON FAMILY

Members of the Wharton family of North Carolina were

1     i. Daniel, born say 1730.

ii. Jacob, born say 1750, a free "Mulatto" taxable in Bertie County in Martha Hinton's household in the list of Josiah Harrell in 1769 [CR 10.702.1, box 2]. He enlisted in Blount's Company on 20 July 1778 for 9 months [Clark, State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1188]. His heirs received military warrant no. 132 for 640 acres on 12 December 1806 [North Carolina and Tennessee, Revolutionary War Land Warrants, 1783-1843, Roll 13: William Hill Warrants, 1811-1837 (Survey Orders: Nos. 1-3992) http://www.ancestry.com].

 

1.    Daniel1 Wharton, born say 1730, was a "Mulato" taxable in Bladen County with his wife and son Richard in 1768 and with his wife and son Daniel in 1771 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:7, 17, 36, 58]. He was the father of

i. Richard, born say 1750, a "Molato" taxable in Bladen County in his father's household in 1768 and taxable with his wife and Jacob Braveboy in 1771 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:7, 62].

ii. Daniel2, born say 1755, a "Molato" taxable in Bladen County in his father's household in 1771 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:58].

 

WHISTLER FAMILY

1.    Mary1 Whistler, born say 1697, was fined 500 pounds of tobacco by the Middlesex County court on 2 June 1719 for having a bastard child (no race indicated) [Orders 1710-21, 427]. She was the mother of Anne, "an illegitimate mulatto daughter," born in Christ Church Parish, Middlesex County, on 12 April 1715. On 2 May ____ (1720?) Mary was called a "mulatto in ye Service of John Price" when the birth of her daughter Betty was recorded in Christ Church Parish. Mary died on 14 December and was buried on 19 December 1720 [NSCDA, Parish Register of Christ Church Parish, Middlesex County, 92, 310, 177]. She was the mother of

2     i. Anne, born 12 April 1715.

ii.Betty, born 2 May ___ (1718?), a "Molatoe" servant valued at 12 pounds in the inventory of the Middlesex County estate of John Price, Gent., recorded on 1 June 1731 [WB B:379-80].

iii. Will, born 26 April ___ (1720?), "son of Mary Whistler a mulatto in ye Service of John Price." He was a servant boy living in Essex County when he was valued at 18 pounds in the inventory of the Middlesex County estate of John Price, Gent., recorded on 1 June 1731 [WB B:379-80].

 

2.    Anne Whistler, born 12 April 1715, "mulatto" daughter of Mary Whistler, was baptized in Christ Church Parish, Middlesex County on 4 November 1715. She was a "Molatoe" servant valued at 12 pounds in the inventory of the Middlesex County estate of John Price, Gent., recorded on 1 June 1731 [WB B:379-80]. She was the mother of

3     i. Mary2/ Molly, born 18 December 1736.

 

3.    Mary2 Whistler was born 18 December 1736 in Christ Church Parish, Middlesex County [NSCDA, Parish Register of Christ Church Parish, Middlesex County, 144]. She was living in Essex County on 16 June 1789 when John Clarke complained to the court that he was deprived of the indenture of Mary's children Milly and Tom by a former order of the court. The court ordered Mary to appear at the next court to show cause why they should not be bound to Clarke [Orders 1788-90, 198]. She registered in Middlesex County on 27 May 1801: born free; 60 years of age; 5'1-1/2"; Dark complexion [Register of Free Negroes 1800-60, p.15]. She died before 27 June 1803 when her orphan Mary Whistler was bound out by the Middlesex County court [Orders 1799-1803, 493].She was the mother of

i. ?Alexander/ Sawney, born about 1762, enlisted as a substitute for a year in the Revolution from Middlesex County on 11 February 1782 and was sized the same day: age 20, 5'4-1/2" high, black complexion, a farmer, born in Middlesex County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.91)]. He received a warrant for 200 acres in 1784 which he assigned to Richard Smith on 30 July 179_ [NARA, BlWt 12683, M804-2549, frame 0028; Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Whistler, Sawny, Digital Collection, LVA]. He was a "Black" taxable in the lower district of King and Queen County in 1801 [PPTL, 1782-1803]. He registered in Middlesex County on 26 June 1805: born free; 40 years of age; Black complexion [Register of Free Negroes 1800-60, p.15].

ii. Philip, born about 1768, a twelve-year-old "mullato" boy, "son of Mary Whistler," bound by the church wardens of the parish of Christ Church in Middlesex County to be an apprentice and servant to Clement Nicholson until the age of twenty-one on 25 September 1780 [DB 9a:428], registered in Middlesex County on 2 June 1802: born free; 32 years of age; 5'7"; Black complexion [Register of Free Negroes 1800-60, p.15].

iii. Thomas, born about 1780, registered in Middlesex County on 27 May 1801: born free; 21 years of age; 5'2"; Dark complexion [Register of Free Negroes 1800-60, p.15].

iv. Millie, born about 1780, registered in Middlesex County on 27 May 1801: born free; 21 years of age; 4'11"; Dark complexion [Register of Free Negroes 1800-60, p.15].

v. Mary3, orphan of Mary Whistler, dec., bound out by the Middlesex County court on 27 June 1803 [Orders 1799-1803, 493]. Molly was head of a Richmond City household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:365].

 

WHITE FAMILY

1.    Eleanor White, born say 1695, was living in Princess Anne County on 1 June 1715 when the court ordered the churchwardens to sell her for five years as punishment for having a "Molatto" child [Minutes 1709-17, 186]. She was probably the mother of

2     i. Jane, born say 1715.

 

2.   Jane White, born say 1715, was a "mollatto servant girl" valued at 10 pounds in the inventory of the Princess Anne County estate of William McClonahan on 29 April 1731 [D&W 1724-35, 351]. She was among nine persons who were presented by the Norfolk County, Virginia court on 16 November 1744 for not paying the discriminatory tax on free African American and Indian women [Orders 1742-46, 108]. She was probably the mother of

i. John1, born say 1744, taxable with (his wife?) Lucy White in the Borough of Norfolk in 1765 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1751-65, 218].

 

York County

1.    Mary White, born say 1696, was a "free Mulatto Woman" living in York Hampton Parish, York County, on 20 August 1716 when the grand jury presented her for having a bastard child. She was ordered to pay 500 pounds of tobacco or suffer corporal punishment. She paid the fine on 16 September 1717 and Charles Haynes was her security for indemnifying the parish for the child's support [OW 15, pt. 1, 23, 30, 162]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Ben, head of a York County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:886].

 

Stafford County

1.    Moll White, born say 1680, was the servant of Mr. Hart of Stafford County in 1700 when the court presented her for having a "Mulatto" child [WB Liber Z:51]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. David, a "Molato Bastard" bound to George McCormuck by order of the Fairfax County court on 17 June 1772 [Orders 1772-4, 85].

ii. Nancy, born about 1777, registered in Fauquier County on 30 August 1817: age 40, 5'1", yellow complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1817-65, no. 5].

iii. Harvey, "F.Negroe" head of a Fauquier County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:417].

iv. Milly, head of a Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:111b].

v. Juday, born about 1790, "F. Negroe" head of a Fauquier County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:420]. She registered in Fauquier County on 26 June 1820: age 30, 5'4-1/2", dark Mulatto, born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1817-65, no. 26].

 

North Carolina

1.    ____ White, born say 1726, was the unnamed mother of Susannah White, the "Mulatto" child of a white woman, who was bound apprentice in New Hanover County, North Carolina court to Moses John Derosset on 5 September 1756 [Minutes 1738-69, 166, 185]. She was the mother of

2     i. ?Cato, born say 1750.

ii. Susannah, born about 1756.

 

2.    Cato White, born say 1750, was head of a Craven County, North Carolina household of 7 "other free" in 1790 [NC:130], 5 "other free" in the town of Washington, Beaufort County, in 1800 [NC:23], and head of a Beaufort County household in 1810 [NC:141]. He may have been the father of

i. Mona, whose four-year-old "Mullattoe" child Polly was bound apprentice to Daniel L. Woolard by the June 1810 Beaufort County court. She was called Moning White in June 1812 when Polly was bound to Alligood Woolard [Minutes 1809-14, n.p.].

ii. William, whose son William, a free boy of Color, was bound to John Wolfkencon to be a mariner in June 1813 Beaufort County court [Minutes 1809-14, n.p.].

 

Other members of the White family were

i. Jesse, head of a Robeson County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:241].

ii. Dick, head of a Pasquotank County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [NC:939].

iii. Randolph, head of a Norfolk County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:814].

iv. John2, born circa 1790, head of an Edgecombe County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:715] and 4 "free colored" in Halifax County in 1830. On 17 May 1841 the Halifax County court permitted him to carry a gun in the county.

 

WHITEHURST FAMILY

1.    Sarah Whitehurst, born say 1722, was a "free" head of a Princess Anne County household of 3 "Black" persons in 1783 [VA:61]. She was a "Mulatto" taxable in the Eastern Branch Precinct of Princess Anne County on a horse and 3 cattle from 1782 to 1788 [PPTL, 1782-1789, frames 547, 592, 637, 664, 682, 711]. She was the mother of

2    i. ?James, born say 1740.

ii. Jesse, born about 1752, a "free negro" head of a Princess Anne County household of 6 "Black" persons in 1783 [VA:61] and a "F.B." head of a Princess Anne County household of 8 in 1810 [VA:480]. He was a "free Negro" taxable in Little Creek District of Princess Anne County from 1783 to 1796, taxable on a slave in 1796 and on 3 slaves over 16 from 1809 to 1811 [PPTL, 1782-1789, frames 567, 606, 661, 682, 719, 728; 1790-1822, frames 112, 141, 148, 179, 186, 206, 244, 252, 299, 377, 397]. He registered in Princess Anne County along with the Anderson family on 20 October 1794: son of Sarah Whitehurst, born free, abt 42 years old, 6 feet 1 inch high, a light Mulatto [Anderson, Morwell (M, 20), 1794, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. He married (second?) Mrs. Lavery, "a free mulatto," 7 December 1815 Norfolk County bond, Armistead Willis security, married the same day by Thomas T. Jones, Methodist Elder. Mrs. Lavery may have been related to the Munlavery family. See the Mongon history.

iii. ?Joseph, born about 1760, a "free Negro" taxable in Isaac Anderson's Princess Anne County household in 1782, taxable in Marshall Anderson's household in 1783, listed in his own household from 1784 to 1798, called a "blk" or "F.B." taxable some years [PPTL, 1782-1789, frames 542, 572, 605, 665, 687, 719, 728; 1790-1822, frames 148, 179]. He registered in Princess Anne County on 31 March 1794: a Dark Molatto Man, five feet seven Inches high, aged thirty four years. Born free [Whitehurst, Joseph (M,34): Free Negro Certificate, 1794, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

iv. ?Nancy, born say 1763, married Marvel Anderson, 7 January 1791 Princess Anne County bond, Charles Whitehurst surety.

v. ?Courtney, born say 1764, mother of Betsy Whitehurst who registered in Princess Anne County on 7 September 1835: daughter of Courtney, 4'4", age 51, a light mulatto woman, born free in Princess Anne County. Betsy may have been the mother of Sally Whitehurst, born about 1813, who registered in Princess Anne County on 7 July 1834: 5'8", age 21, a bright Mulatto woman with bushy hair, born free in Princess Anne County [Register of Free Negroes, 1830-62, nos. 333, 367].

 

2.    James Whitehurst, born say 1740, was a "Mulatto" taxable with his wife Violet in the Norfolk County district from Ferry Point to Great Bridge from 1761 to 1771, the year he was called a free Indian [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1751-65, 181, 204; 1766-80, 43, 63, 102, 140]. He sued Marshall Anderson in Princess Anne County court for four pounds on 10 May 1782. Isaac Anderson testified in his favor [Minutes 1782-4, 67]. The summons read, "for Marshall Anderson a free Negro to answer the petition of James Whitehurst a Free Mulatto for Pounds 4.10 due by account. 1 July 1781, account of Marshal Anderson to James Whitehurst, Molato. Debit, to hier of his Son Charles Six months, pounds 4:10. Witness Jonathan Whitehurst, Wm. Whitehurst Brother of Christopher, & Isaac Anderson. On 5 January 1782 Magistrate James Kempe of Princess Anne County issued a peace warrant against Dingley Grey because he was informed that Grey had threatened the lives of James Whitehurst, a "free Mulatto & likewise Doratha Semple & Sabathra her Daughter" and had taken Sabathra into his custody. The warrant was dismissed in July 1782. James was called a "free mulatto" when he sued Bagwell Moore for 3 pounds, 16 shillings due by account dated 1786 and for "28 days work of my son Henry from 5th July at 2/" [Princess Anne County Loose Papers, Box A 24, Box A 35, cited by Creecy, Virginia Antiquary, 108, 111, 147].He was a "free negro" head of a Princess Anne County household of 7 "Black" persons in 1783 [VA:61]. He married, second?, Dorothy Sample, 4 October 1786 Princess Anne County bond, George Smyth surety. He was called a "free Mulatto" on 14 April 1787 when he sued Ragwell Moore, Jr., in Princess Anne County court and on 13 September 1787 when the court bound Christian Sample, son of Dorothy Sample, to him to learn the trade of shoemaker [Minutes 1787-8, 55, 159]. He was taxable in Little Creek District of Princess Anne County from 1782 to 1786: in 1782 a "Molatto" taxable on slave George; in 1784 an "Indian" taxable; in 1785 and 1786 a "Mulatto" taxable on his son Henry [PPTL, 1782-1789, frames 547, 592, 600, 637, 665]. His wife Dorothy registered in Norfolk County on 24 March 1794: This is to certify that Dorothy Whitehurst was sold until she was Twenty one years of age by my granmother Sarah Gaskeys unto my Father Benjamin Dingly Gray and I have often heard my father say and also the said Gray said that her the said Daritha Whitehurst Maden name was Sample and also that her Granmother was a white woman and I myself know that during the time the said Daritha was apprentice to my Father she bor and had the following children to with Reas, Carrity, Sabro, Doratha and Christopher and has been Clear and all of her children free for many years. Joseph Gray [Whitehurst, Dorothy (alias Daritha Whitehurst; Darith Sample, F): Free Negro Certificate, 1794, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. James's first wife may have been Violet Anderson judging by the certificate of freedom of (his son?) Charles Whitehurst. He was the father of

i. Charles, born about 1763, registered in Princess Anne County on 20 October 1794: Grand son of Sarah Whitehurst Violet Anderson born free abt 6 feet high about 31 years old [Anderson, Morwell (M, 20) Free Negro Certificate, 1794, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. He was head of a household of 4 "whites" in Upper Precinct of the Eastern Shore District of Princess Anne County in 1783 and 1785 [VA:61, 104]. He married Sally Anderson, 8 February 1788 Princess Anne County bond, Joseph Whitehurst surety. He was taxable in Marshall Anderson's Princess Anne County household in 1782 and 1783, taxable in Dempsey Anderson's household in 1786, a "blk" taxable in his own household from 1787 to 1796. His widow Ann was a "F.B." taxable on a horse from 1797 to 1801, taxable on Thomas Holden's tithe in 1801 [PPTL, 1782-1789, frames 542, 572, 682, 711, 719, 728, 744; 1790-1822, frames 69, 141, 148, 179, 186, 244].

ii. ?Sarah, born about 1774, Daughter of Violet Anderson born free abt 20 abt 5' 3 inches high, light mulatto [Anderson, Morwell (M,20) Free Negro Certificate, 1794, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

iii. ?Nathaniel, born say 1765, married Anne Weaver, 1 April 1789 Princess Anne County bond, Charles Whitehurst surety, 4 April 1789 marriage. He was a "blk" taxable in Princess Anne County from 1787 to 1789 [PPTL, 1782-1789, frames 682, 719, 728].

iv. Henry.

 

WHITMORE FAMILY

1.    Charles Whitmore, born about 1764, was called the "natural son of Agathy Whitmore" on 22 December 1777 when the Brunswick County, Virginia court ordered the churchwardens of Meherrin Parish to bind him out as an apprentice [Orders 1774-82, 177]. He was taxable in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, in the same district as the Guy family in 1795 [PPTL, 1782-1805, frame 585] and taxable in Nutbush District of Warren County, North Carolina, in 1798 [Tax List 1781-1801, 364]. He was counted in the 1810 Orange County census with 7 whites in 1810 and 4 "free colored" in 1820. In 1830 he was head of an Orange County household of 2 "free colored" adjoining Jesse Whitmore (age 24-36) who had 4 "free colored" in his household. He was deposed in Orange County, North Carolina, on 22 November 1832 and 27 May 1833 for the Revolutionary War pension application of John Jeffries. He stated that he was born in Brunswick County, Virginia, in 1765, moved to North Carolina about 1798, and was acquainted with John Jeffries in 1780 when he left home to serve in the war [NARA, S.8754, M804-1409, frames 0406, 0425]. He was about seventy two years old when he appeared in Orange County court on 25 May 1836 to apply for a pension for his service in the Revolution. He stated that he entered the service in the militia of Greensville County, Virginia. He was at the time bound to one Parr and substituted for his son Thomas Parr when he was drafted. He served in Captain Andrew Jeter's Company and Colonel James Moore's Regiment and helped guard Norfolk. He was born in Greensville County and remained there for about five years after the war, then moved to Orange County. John Jeffreys, aged seventy six, and Drury Jeffries testified that they were neighbors of Charles in Greensville County during the war and confirmed that he served [NARA, S.11739, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/28017759]. He was probably the father of

i. Aggy, married John Guy, 21 February 1814 Orange County bond.

ii. Jesse, born about 1796, a "Mulatto" listed in the 1850 census for the northwestern district of Orange County with Sally, age 52, also counted as a "Mulato," and nine others in their household.

 

Other members of a Whitmore family were

i. Benjamin, born about 1764, enlisted in the Revolution in Fairfax County on 22 December 1782 and was sized on 8 April 1783: aged 19, 5'5-1/2" high, dark complexion, Mulatto, baker in Alexandria, born in Fairfax County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.117)].

 

WIGGINS FAMILY

1.    Anne1 Wiggins, born say 1682, was the servant of the estate of Captain Spencer Mottrom on 20 January 1702/3 when she was convicted by the Northumberland County court for having an illegitimate child by a "Negroe." According to testimony at her trial, her "Mulatto" son was begotten by a one of Mottrom's slaves named Billy about December 1700. On 6 July 1708 she bound her three-year-old son John (no race indicated) to Richard Tulles of St. Stephen's Parish until the age of twenty-two. Tulles agreed to pay James Magow eight hundred pounds of tobacco for keeping the boy for fourteen months. Ann recorded the indenture in court five years later on 16 September 1713 [Orders 1699-1713, pt. 1, 231, 235, 236, 238; pt. 2, 841; Record Book 1706-20, 204]. She was the ancestor of

i. John, 25 February 1705, bound as an apprentice cooper to Richard Tulles on 6 July 1708. He was a "Molatto" of St. Stephens Parish who was presented in Northumberland County court on 10 November 1746 for being a "common swearer" [Orders 1743-49, 133].

2     ii. ?Sarah1, born say 1725.

3     iii. ?Violet, born say 1726.

iv. ?Isaac, born say 1730, was called the "waiting man" of Ann Fauntleroy when she freed him by her 12 December 1760 Northumberland County will, proved 9 February 1761. He purchased an old bay mare at the sale of the Northumberland County estate of William Taite, Gentleman, deceased, in July 1767. Isaac died before 12 March 1771 when his own estate was valued at 2 pounds, 10 shillings [RB 1758-62, 311; 1766-70, 468; 1770-2, 354].

4     v. ?Elizabeth, born say 1735.

vi. Charles1, born about 1740, enlisted in the Revolution from Isle of Wight County, Virginia, for 18 months on 1 October 1780: age 40, 5'7-1/2" high, a farmer, born in Isle of Wight [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.66)].

 

2.    Sarah1 Wiggins, born say 1725, was a "free Mulatto" taxable in James Morris' household in the 1764 Bertie County list of Thomas Pugh and in the household of her son Edward in the 1766 list of Arthur Brown [CR 10.702.1, box 1]. She was head of a Hertford County household of 8 "other free" in 1790 [NC:26], 7 in 1800, and 8 in 1810 [NC:106]. Her children were

5     i. Edward, born say 1745.

ii. ?Judah, born say 1748, mother of Sarah2, a ten-year-old child bound an apprentice in Bertie County in 1774. Sarah2 Wiggins was head of a Bertie County household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:116].

iii. ?Samuel, born say 1750, head of a Bertie County household of 13 "other free" in 1790 [NC:15]. He may have been living in the part of Bertie County which became Hertford County after 1759 since he was not taxed in the colonial Bertie County lists. He was head of a Hertford County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 and 11 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:182].

iv. ?Charles2, born about 1753, a taxable "molato" in Bertie County in 1769 in Cullen Pollock's list, a taxable "Molattow" in 1772 in the household of Jethro Kitterell in James Churchwell's list, and taxable with his unnamed wife in the list of Samuel Granberry in 1774.

v. ?Ann2, born about 1757, a taxable "molattow" in the Bertie County list of Jonathan Standley in 1769.

vi. ?Matthew, born about 1757, a "free Mulatto" taxable in the Bertie County list of Cullen Pollock in 1769 and taxable as Matthias in the 1774 list of Samuel Granberry. He enlisted in Bailey's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment for 18 months on 10 September 1782 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1191]. He was called Mathias Wiggins (a Mulatto) when he married Prissey Tabert (Taborn?), 3 January 1786 Bertie County bond. Matthew was head of an Edgecombe County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:55]. He was deceased on 13 February 1833 when his brother Arthur applied for a pension in Bertie County court. His widow Prissey was probably identical to Prisey Wiggins who married Robert Corn, 12 December 1802 Wake County bond.

vii. ?Arthur, born in Bertie County about 1758 but not listed in the tax records. He enlisted for 18 months in Bailey's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 10 September 1782 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1192]. He was seventy-five years old on 13 February 1833 when he appeared in Bertie County court to make a declaration for a pension for his service in the Revolution. He stated that he was living in Bertie County in 1779 when he was drafted in the town of Winton, Hertford County. He had served six months when he enlisted for 18 months under Captain Bailey and served until the end of the war. He marched to Charleston, South Carolina, where he was taken prisoner along with Captain Bailey. He had a brother Matthew Wiggins who was also in Charleston, but was then deceased [NARA, S.7952, M804-2572, frame 0377]. He was head of a Bertie household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:86], 4 in 1810 [NC:163], and 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:114].

viii. ?James, born about 1760, a taxable "free Molatto" in Solomon Pender's Bertie County tax list in 1772.

ix. ?Major, born say 1761, a "Molato" taxable (with Bud Chavers) in the Bladen County household of Archibald McKissak, Jr., in 1776 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:68].

x. ??Michael, born about 1762, a taxable in the list of Samuel Granberry in Derias(?) Brimage's Bertie County household in 1774. He received voucher no. 2438 for 7 pounds specie in Edenton District on 26 August 1783 for military service to the Revolution [North Carolina Revolutionary Pay Vouchers, 1779-1782, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2WT-G56J, Wiggen?, Michael]. He was head of a Bertie County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:15].

xi. ?Jean, born about 1763, a taxable "molatto" in the list of David Standly in Luke Smithwick's Bertie County household in 1775.

xii. William, born about 1764, orphan of Sarah bound to Josiah Goddens by the June 1769 Bertie court [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, III:864].

 

3.    Violet Wiggens, born say 1726, was a "Free Mullo Woman" whose children were ordered bound to Peter Matthews of Craven County, North Carolina, by the March 1750 court [Haun, Craven County Court Minutes, IV:26]. Her children were

i. Dolphin, born April 1745.

ii. Flora, born October 1747.

 

4.    Elizabeth Wiggins, born say 1735, was a "Mullatto Woman" freed by the Northumberland County will of Griffin Fauntleroy. Griffin's widow Ann Fauntleroy left a 12 December 1760 Northumberland County will, proved 9 February 1761, by which she left a slave named David to her grandson on the condition he not intermeddle with or claim the right to Betty Wiggins. Ann also freed her waiting-man Isaac Wiggins on condition he pay a yearly tribute of 50 shillings but bequeathed "negro" children Nanny and Moses Wiggins as slaves. Elizabeth was paid 5 shillings by the estate of Captain John Williams in May 1772 [Record Book 1758-62, 311; 1772-6, 26]. She was taxable in Northumberland County from 1792 to 1794: taxable on a slave and 2 horses in 1790, 2 slaves in 1791, a slave in 1792, a horse in 1793 and 1794 [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 360, 376, 389, 403, 420]. She may have been the mother of

i. Ann3, born about 1775, registered in Lancaster County on 18 July 1803: age 28, dark color, 4'11-1/2. Her children Hannah Kelly, Polly Kelly, Betsey Weaver, Janetta Valentine Wiggins, and John Kelly were registered on 18 March 1807 [Burkett, Lancaster County Register of Free Negroes, 1, 3, 4].

ii. Nancy, listed as a "free Negro" in Lancaster County in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1839, frame 385].

iii. Hannah, listed as a "free Negro" in Lancaster County in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1839, frame 385].

 

5.    Edward Wiggins, born say 1745, was a "free Mulatto" taxable in James Moore's household in the 1763 Bertie County, North Carolina tax list of John Hill [CR 10.702.1, box 1]. By 1766 he was head of his own household with his "Wife Sarah" and "Mother Sarah Wiggins" in the 1768 list of Arthur Brown. In 1774 he was head of a Bertie County household with his wife and (his brother-in-law?) James Price, a "Molato," in the list of Samuel Granberry [CR 10.702.1, box 3]. The November 1774 Bertie County court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions ordered Jemima Wiggins, eight years old, and Mary Beth Wiggins, ten years old, "bastard Mulattos of Sarah Wiggins," bound to John Skinner. However, this order was reversed in the May 1775 court session when Edward Wiggins, the children's father, convinced the court "of the said Skinners ill & deceitful Behavior procuring sd Order" [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, III:113; IV:157]. He enlisted in Blount's Company on 20 July 1778 [Clark, State Records, XVI:1188]. Edward was head of a Northampton County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [NC:483] and 4 in 1810 [NC:751]. Their children were

i. Mary Beth, born about 1764, ordered bound an apprentice by the Bertie court in November 1774 [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, III:113], perhaps the Mary Wiggins who was head of a Sampson County household of 6 "other free" in 1790, listed near Patty Wiggins, head of a Sampson County household of 5 "other free" [NC:53].

ii. Jemima, born about 1766, ordered bound an apprentice by the Bertie court in November 1774 [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, III:113].

 

Another member of the Wiggins family of Northumberland County was

i. John, born about 1741, a thirty-nine-year-old "mulatto slave," a carpenter and sawyer by trade, who ran away from Elizabeth Kenner of Northumberland County, Virginia, according to an ad placed by her in the Maryland Gazette of 8 December 1780 [Maryland Gazette (Green); http://www2.vcdh.virginia.edu/gos/explore.html].

 

WILKINS FAMILY

Members of the Wilkins family were

1     i. Thomas1, born say 1720.

2     ii. Olive, born say 1725.

 

1.    Thomas1 Wilkins, born say 1700, was granted 225 acres on the south side of the Nottoway River in Isle of Wight County on 5 June 1736. He (making his mark) sold this land while resident in Edgecombe County, North Carolina, to his son William Wilkins on 27 August 1746 with James Wilson (also making his mark) as witness [Isle of Wight County DB 7:372]. He sold 300 acres in present-day Halifax County, North Carolina, on the south side of the Roanoke River, joining Quankey Pocosin about 1726 to Paul Bunch [Halifax County DB 8:283]. He, or perhaps his son Thomas Wilkins, was one of fourteen people sued for tax evasion in Southampton County by William Bynum (quitam) on 13 June 1754, apparently for not listing their wives as tithables. The case against him was dismissed [Orders 1754-9, 500]. He made a 25 April 1759 Halifax County, North Carolina will, proved March 1762, by which he left 5 shillings each to his son Thomas Wilkins, daughter Elizabeth Lamleth, son William Wilkins, son Robert Wilkins, son John Wilkins, daughter Jemima Davis with the remainder of his estate divided among James Wilkins, Lucy Wilkins and Sarah Wilkins. His son James Wilkins was his executor [WB 1:53]. He was the father of

i. James, born say 1728, executor of his father's will, grandfather of Robert Wilkins who was born about 1799 according to his 17 October 1818 Dinwiddie County free papers which he recorded 27 March 1821 in Ross County, Ohio: grandson of James Wilkins, aged about 19 years, black complexion, 5 ft, 9 in., occupation waggoner, was born free [Turpin, Register of Black, Mulatto, and Poor Persons, 23].

ii. Thomas2, born say 1730.

iii. Elizabeth Lamleth.

iv. William, born say 1740, a "Mulato" taxable in Bladen County, North Carolina, in the household of Benjamin Odoms from 1768 to 1770 and a taxable with his wife Constant in Daniel Mills' household in 1776 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:4, 16, 35, 78; II:68]. He was head of a Bladen County household of 2 "other free" in 1800.

v. Robert.

vi. John1, head of a Halifax County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [NC:350/1], 7 in 1810 [NC:54] and 12 in 1820 [NC:170].

vii. Jemima Davis.

viii. Lucy.

ix. Sarah.

 

2.    Olive Wilkins, born say 1725, was living in Southampton County on 8 November 1750 when she was charged with having an illegitimate child. The case was dismissed for want of prosecution [Orders 1749-54, 96, 111]. She may have been the mother of

2     i. Jonas, born say 1750.

 

3.    Jonas Wilkins, born say 1750, was granted 400 acres of land in Halifax County, North Carolina, adjoining Benjamin and William Richardson on 7 October 1783 and sold this land on 11 June 1788 [DB 16:272; 17:442]. He moved to Robeson County where he entered 150 acres on the south side of Jacobs Swamp including the plantation then occupied by James Moore on 5 September 1787 [Pruitt, Land Entries: Robeson County, 1787-1795, 7]. He was head of a Robeson County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:428] and 4 in 1810 [NC:234]. He sold two tracts of land in Robeson by deeds proved on 6 October 1801 [Minutes I:171] and sold personal property to Solomon Locklear by Robeson County deed proved in 1808 [DB P:46]. Perhaps his children were

4     i. Matthew, born say 1765.

5     ii. Tamer, born say 1767.

iii. Nancy, born say 1770, head of a Northampton County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:750].

iv. Nancy, born say 1770.

v. John2, born before 1776, head of a Halifax County household of 10 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:170].

vi. David, born before 1776, head of a Halifax County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:58] and 8 "free colored" in 1820.

vii. Priscilla, head of a Halifax County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:58].

viii. Sophia, head of a Halifax County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:58].

ix. Mildred, head of a Halifax County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:58].

 

4.    Matthew Wilkins, born say 1765, was head of a Robeson County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [NC:429]. He sold land to Elijah Hammons by deed proved in Robeson County on 6 April 1801 [Minutes I:142]. He may have been the father of

i. Jesse, head of a Robeson County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:428].

 

5.    Tamer Wilkins, born say 1767, was the mother of Eli Wilkins who was bound as an apprentice to John Edwards of Bertie County. His indenture was transferred to John Acrey of Cumberland County from whom he ran away in 1802. He was taken up in Edenton Town and was bound for his appearance in Chowan County court to be sold as a slave until his mother Tamer and her surety, E. Slade of Martin County, certified that Tamer was free born and the mother of Eli [Byrd, In Full Force and Virtue, 31-2]. She married William Demmery, 31 January 1816 Northampton County marriage bond with Wright Demmery bondsman. William and Tamer were found dead six years later on 5 March 1822 when a coroner's jury was appointed by the Northampton County court to determine the cause of death [Minutes 1821-25, 84]. She was the mother of

i. Eli, born 7 July 1785 according to his mother's testimony, obtained free papers in Northampton County on 8 March 1834 and registered in Logan County, Ohio: yellow complexion, 6 feet tall [Turpin, Register of Black, Mulatto, and Poor Persons, 12].

 

Endnotes:

1.     The date of Jonas Wilkins' Halifax County deed for the sale of his land was abstracted as 11 June 1778, but this land was still called Jonas Wilkins' line in a 19 June 1787 deed [DB 16:405] and was located near Haw Swamp [DB 18:540]. The original deed book was destroyed. Only the abstract remains.

 

WILKINSON/ WILKERSON FAMILY

Members of the Wilkinson/ Wilkerson family were

i. John Wilkinson, born say 1760, head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:485] and head of a Halifax County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:169]. Perhaps he was the John Wilkinson of Northampton County who gave Presly Prichard his power of attorney to receive his final settlement certificate for his services in the Revolution [NCGSJ XVIII:99].

ii. Edward Wilkerson, born say 1760, said to have been a soldier from Chesterfield County in the Revolution [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 46]. He was listed as a "Free Negro and Mulatto" taxable in Chesterfield County in 1813 on his own tithe and a female who was probably his wife. And a Nancy Wilkinson was listed there with her three unnamed children in 1812 [PPTL, 1812-27, frames 44, 83].

1     iii. Miles, born before 1776.

2     iv. Peggy, born about 1782.

 

1.    Miles Wilkinson, born before 1776, was head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:169]. Perhaps his child was

i. John, born about 1800, married Ann Peters, 7 February 1820 Halifax County bond, Jeremiah James bondsman. He was head of a Halifax county household of 4 "free colored" in 1830.

 

2.    Peggy Wilkerson, born about 1782, registered as a free Negro in Louisa County on 7 September 1832: a mulatto woman who was free born, yellowish complexion, 5'2-1/2" high, about 50 years old, hair inclined to be straight. She was the mother of

i. Maria Wilkinson, born about 1798, registered in Louisa County on 7 September 1832: daughter of Peggy Wilkinson who was free born, dark mulatto woman about 34 years old, 5'2-1/2" high, low forehead, bushy head of hair.

ii. ?Cyrus, born about 1804, registered in Louisa County on 7 December 1832: a free man of colour, 5'8-1/2" high, light complexion, good countenance, age 28 years.

iii. ?Peggy2, registered in Louisa County on 7 September 1832: free born, mulatto woman about 24 years old, 5'3-1/2" high, hair inclined to be straight ... light complexion, thick lips.

iv. Tom, born about 1814, registered in Louisa County on 25 July 1837: (son of Peggy Wilkerson, persons of colour born free) stout made man, 5'8" high, age 23, copper colour.

v. Edward, born about 1821, registered in Louisa County on 7 December 1844: son of Peggy Wilkersons (both mother and son were born free), dark mulatto man aged 23 years.

vi. Henry, born about 1816, registered in Louisa County on 11 January 1839: son of Peggy Wilkerson who was free born a man of darkish complexion, regular features, age 23 [Abercrombie, Free Blacks of Louisa County, 41-3, 53, 56, 66]

 

WILLIAMS FAMILY

1.    John Williams, born say 1654, was the "Molatto" servant of Mr. Martin Gardner on 26 April 1675 when the York County court ordered that he receive thirty lashes for stealing a hog. The court also prohibited his master from furnishing him with powder and shot or allowing him to carry a gun [DWO 5:110]. He may have been the ancestor of

i. Faith, born say 1720, presented by the Surry County, Virginia court on 18 May 1739 for having a "Malato bastard Child" by information of Capt. John Ruffin [Deeds, Wills #9:54].

2     ii. William1, born about 1723.

3     iii. Mary, born say 1725.

iv. Hannah1, born say 1734, a "free negro" taxable in Norfolk County from 1752 to 1765, taxable in her own household in 1752, in Ann James's household in 1757, in her own household in 1759, and taxable with (her husband) Till/ Tully Williams from 1765 to 1767 and with Tell and (their daughter?) Mary Williams in 1768 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1751-66, 33, 120, 147, 165, 213; 1766-80, 39, 86]. Hannah may have been the mother of Fanny Williams, a "free Mullatto" bound by the Princess Anne County court to Anthony Walke on 17 June 1760 to learn to read, sew and knit [Minutes 1753-62, 384]. A suit brought by James Anderson against Till Williams and Hannah his wife was dismissed by the City of Norfolk Hustings Court on 23 November 1767, and Till was sued in the same court by John Calvert on 25 October 1773 [Orders 1761-9, 156; 1770-82, 206a]. A deed from Tully Williams and his wife Tamer to William Capps was proved in Princess Anne County court on 4 July 1791, and on 3 July 1792 the overseers of the poor of the upper district of the Eastern Shore were ordered to bind his orphan Anne Williams to Ann Whitehead [Minutes 1790-2, 121, 292].

v. Polly, born about 1785, registered in York County on 18 March 1833: a bright Mulatto about 48 years of age ... light gray Eyes, long hair which is a little gray ... Born free [Free Negroes Register 1831-50, no. 345].

 

2.    William1 Williams, born about 1723, was a thirty-three-year-old, 5'6" Virginia "Negro" planter who was listed in the 13 July 1756 roll of Captain Henry Harrison's Company, drafted in Surry County, Virginia [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 390]. He may have been the father of

i. William2, born say 1758, called "Billy Williams a Mulatto" on 15 April 1760 when the Surry County court ordered the churchwardens of Southwarke Parish to bind him out [Orders 1757-63, 236]. He was taxable in Surry County in 1783 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frame 367].

4     ii. James2, born about 1762.

 

3.    Mary Williams, born say 1725, was living in Warwick County on 1 May 1760 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Warwick Parish to bind out her children Davy, James, Godfrey, Matt, Sarah, Jack, Mary and Will "for reasons appearing to the court." Her children were described as "Mulattoes" when the indentures were certified in court on 3 July 1760. On 7 August 1760 the churchwardens charged her with bearing a bastard child, but the case was dismissed at the next session of the court on 4 September [Minutes 1748-62, 322, 325, 334, 337]. She was the mother of

i. David, born say 1743, bound to Harwood Jones in Warwick County on 3 July 1760. At the next session of the court on 7 August, Moses Collikin testified that David had absented himself from the service of Jones for twenty eight days. And on 4 September Jones reported that David had absented himself another nine days [Minutes 1748-62, 325, 334, 335]. He was probably the David Williams who died before 15 April 1793 when John Williams was granted administration on his York County estate with John Wright and Edward Cuttillo as his securities [Orders 1788-95, 548].

5     ii. James1, born say 1745.

6     iii. Godfrey, born say 1747.

iv. Sarah, born say 1752.

7     v. John, born say 1754.

8     vi. Matthew, born about 1755.

vii. Mary, born say 1756.

9     viii. William3, born say 1759.

 

4.   James2 Williams, born about 1762, was taxable in Surry County from 1783 to 1816: charged with Solomon Williams' tithe from 1801 to 1803; called a "Man of Color" in 1805; a "Mulatto" from 1806 to 1812; listed with 2 "free Negroes & Mulattoes above the age of 16" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 373, 398, 606; 1791-1816, 18, 170, 275, 349, 429, 466, 504, 546, 602, 618, 659, 677, 716, 762, 871]. He registered as a "free Negro" in Surry County, Virginia, on 17 February 1797: a mulattoe man pretty dark complexion born of free parents resident of this County, aged about 35, thin visage and rather slender made - 5'10-1/2" [Back of Guardians Accounts Book, no.22]. He was counted in the 1803 census of "Free Negroes and Mulattos" in Surry County with his wife Molly and their children: Sollomon, (a labourer), Caty, Samuel, James, Hannah, and Elijah on Mrs. Marston's land. He married, second, Pamelia Debrix, thirty-five years old, 6 November 1813 Surry County bond, Nicholas Scott, surety. His children were

i. Solomon, born about 1782, registered in Surry County on 24 October 1804: a mulatto man of complexion more bright than otherwise, short hair, aged 21 years the 31 day of December, 1803, 5'6-1/2" high ... by occupation a Laborer, was born of free parents, residents of Surry county to wit James Williams and Mary his wife [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 24].

ii. Caty, born say 1791, "daughter of James Williams," married Samuel Blizzard, 28 December 1807 Surry County bond, David Charity surety, 7 January 1808 marriage.

iii. Samuel.

iv. James3, Jr., born say 1795, married Keziah Blizzard, 25 October 1819 Surry County bond, James Williams, Sr., surety, 28 October marriage.

v. Hannah2.

vi. Elijah, born about 1801, registered in Surry County on 23 June 1823: a mulatto man, the son of Jas. Williams and Polly, his wife, he was born free supposed to be 22 years old, is of a bright complexion, pretty stout made, 5'5-3/4" high ... has a large flat Nose [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 77].

 

5.    James1 Williams, born say 1745, a "Mulatto," was bound to William Harwood, Gent., in Warwick County on 3 July 1760 [Minutes 1748-62, 325]. He was taxable in York County from 1782 to 1810: on 2 free tithes in 1790, 1796, and 1797. Perhaps his widow was Faith Williams who was taxable on 2 free tithes in 1811 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 69, 166, 186, 224, 259, 300, 344, 357, 368] and head of a York County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:886]. James may have been the father of

i. William5, born say 1783, called "William Williams, Jr." when he was taxable in York County from 1804 to 1813: called a "free Negro" in 1805 and head of a household of 2 "free Negroes & mulattoes over 16" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 300, 310, 331, 357, 368, 397].

ii. Henry, born about 1791, taxable in York County in 1812 and head of a household of 2 "free Negroes & mulattoes over 16" in 1813 (probably himself and his wife) [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 379, 397]. He registered in York County on 17 September 1810: about 19 years of age, 5 feet 8-1/2 Inches high, fine hair, tawny complexion (rather dark), flat nose, long visage and pleasant countenance ... born free [Register of Free Negroes 1798-1831, no. 51].

iii. Sarah, born about 1793, registered in York County on 17 September 1810: a dark mulatto, about 17 years of age, 5 feet 5 Inches high ... born of free parents [Register of Free Negroes 1798-1831, no. 49].

 

6.    Godfrey Williams, born say 1747, was head of a Warwick County household of 5 persons in 1782 [VA:45], taxable in Warwick County on a horse in 1782, 2 cattle in 1783, called a "free Negro" in 1785, a "Mulatto" in 1789 [PPTL 1782-1820, frames 215, 219, 226, 229, 238, 246], taxable in York County from 1790 to 1812 and head of a York County household of 2 "free Negroes & mulattoes over 16" in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1841, frames 166, 186, 214, 224, 259, 290, 397]. He may have been the father of

i. Polly, born about 1785, registered in York County on 18 March 1833: a bright Mulatto about 48 years of age, 5 feet 6-1/2 Inches high, has light grey Eyes, long hair which is a little grey. Born free [Free Negroes Register 1831-1850, no. 346].

ii. Hannah, born about 1790, registered in York County on 17 September 1810: a bright mulatto, about 20 years of age, 5 feet 4 Inches high ... long hair. Born of free parents [Register of Free Negroes 1798-1831, no. 48].

iii. Maria, born about 1791, registered in York County on 17 September 1810: a tolerably bright mulatto, about 19 years of age, 5 feet 2-12 Inches high ... she is very freckled. Born of free parents [Register of Free Negroes 1798-1831, no. 49].

 

7.    John Williams, born say 1754, was a "Mulatto" bound to William Harwood, Gent., in Warwick County on 3 July 1760. He was taxable in Nottoway Parish, Southampton County, from 1784 to 1800: charged with Jesse Ash's tithe, 2 horses and 6 cattle in 1784, called a "black" in 1788 when he was taxable on 3 free persons over the age of 16, a "free Negro" with 3 persons over 16 and 3 horses in 1795 and 1800, 1 person in 1801 and 1802, and 3 free tithables, 2 slaves and 2 horses in 1803, 2 free persons and 2 slaves in 1804, perhaps identical to John Williams "Preacher" who was taxable on 3 tithes in 1791 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92, frames 554, 697, 860; 1792-1806, frames 149, 461, 497, 603, 674, 745]. His estate was administered in Southampton County before 1808 when his daughter Aira Byrd sued his son-in-law and executor Lemuel Clark over her part of the estate [LVA, Southampton County chancery suit 1814-017]. His widow may have been the Mary Williams who was a "F.N." taxable on a horse in Nottoway Parish, Southampton County, from 1805 to 1811, a free male tithable in 1811 [Personal Property Tax List 1792-1806, frames 787, 896; 1807-21, frames 35, 117, 153, 235] and head of a Southampton County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:78]. His children were

i. ?Jerry, born about 1782, registered in Southampton County on 14 May 1828: age 46, Yellow Bright, 5 feet 4-1/4 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 1721]. He was a "F.N." taxable in Nottoway Parish, Southampton County, in 1805, 1806 and 1810 [Personal Property Tax List 1792-1806, frames 787, 896; 1807-21, frame 154].

ii. Arry/ Aira, married John Taylor, 25 December 1797 Southampton County bond and second, Aaron Byrd, 19 February 1803 Southampton County bond.

iii. Mary, married Lemuel Clark, 29 January 1795 Isle of Wight County bond, David Jones surety.

 

8.   Matthew Williams, born about 1755, was a "Mulatto" bound to Servant Jones by the Warwick County court on 3 July 1760. He was called a "free person of colour" on 16 November 1818 when he made a declaration in Southampton County court setting forth that he was a soldier in the Revolutionary War by voluntary enlistment [Minutes 1816-9, unpaged]. And he was a seventy-seven-year-old "Free Man of colour" who appeared in Southampton County court on 17 September 1832 to make a declaration to obtain a pension. He stated that he was living in Southampton County when he enlisted at Cabin Point for eighteen months. He died on 29 July 1833 [NARA, S.6414, M804, roll 2592, frame 857 of 967; https://www.fold3.com]. He was probably the Matthew Williams who married Susan n ah Tan, "both of Isle of Wight County," 22 December 1783 Southampton County bond. He registered in Southampton County on 12 July 1810: age 55, Blk, 5 feet 7-1/2 inches, free born. His wife was probably the Sally Williams who registered the same day: age 40, Blk., 5 feet 5 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, nos. 589, 590]. He was taxable in Nottoway Parish, Southampton County, from 1787 to 1800: called a "Black" in 1787, a "free Negro" from 1789 to 1802, listed with 3 free male tithables from 1802 to 1804, 2 male tithables in 1805, 1810 and 1811, listed with his wife Sally, daughter Sally and son Jack in 1813, taxable on his son Jack in 1814 [PPTL 1782-92, frames 627, 698, 747; 1792-1806, frames 19, 38, 149, 253, 361, 479, 604, 747, 787, 896; 1807-21, frames 35, 154, 238, 404]. He was the father  of

i. John, born about 1785, registered in Southampton County on 30 June 1806: age 21, Blk., 5 feet 9-1/2 inches, free born in York [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 389, 413]. He was head of a Southampton County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:78]. He was a "F.N." taxable in Nottoway Parish from 1807 to 1812 [Personal Property Tax List 1807-21, frames 35, 117, 153, 235, 277].

ii. Sally.

 

9.  William3 Williams, born say 1762, served three years as a soldier in the 2nd Virginia State Regiment for the term of his enlistment according to a certificate from Colonel William Brent on 12 June 1780 in James City County. James McClung, a Justice of York County, certified that William Williams made oath before him that he had never before proved his right to land for his military service [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Williams, William, 1780, Digital Collections, LVA]. He and his wife Rachel, "Free Mulattoes," registered the birth of their daughter Lydia in Bruton Parish, James City and York counties on 5 January 1783 [Bruton Parish Register, 35]. He was taxable in Warwick County from 1783 to 1798: taxable on 2 horses and 10 cattle in 1783 and 1786, called a "free Negro" in 1785, a "Mulatto" starting in 1789, taxable on 4 horses in 1793, 2 tithes in 1795, 1797 and 1798 [PPTL 1782-1820, frames 219, 226, 229, 233, 238, 243, 246, 250, 253, 255, 257, 267, 271, 274, 279]. He was taxable in York County from 1792 to 1806: called "William Williams, Sr." in 1804 and thereafter, called "free Negro" in 1805. In 1813 (his widow?) Rachel Williams was counted in a York County list of "free Negroes & mulattoes over 16," taxable on a horse [PPTL, 1782-1841, frames 186, 214, 280, 300, 320, 397]. William and Rachel were the parents of

i. Lydia, born 5 January 1783 [Bruton Parish Register, 35].

 

Other members of the Williams family were

i. William4, taxable in Elizabeth City County from 1801 to 1817: taxable on 2 tithes and 3 horses in 1801, 3 tithes and 3 horses in 1802, listed as a "Free Negro & Moll" in 1813 and 1814 [PPTL 1782-1844, frames 183, 196, 217, 225, 247, 272, 297, 318, 337, 350, 362], head of an Elizabeth City County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:185].

ii. William7, born about 1792, obtained a certificate of freedom in Gloucester County on 7 December 1822: a free tawny Coloured man about 30 years of age, 5 feet 8 inches high ... born of free parents, and registered it in York County on 17 October 1831 [Register of Free Negroes 1798-1831, no. 326].

iii. William6, a "F.N." taxable in York County in 1807 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frame 331]. He may have been the Billy Williams who registered in York County on 21 February 1814: of dark complexion, about (blot) of age, 5 feet 6-3/4 Inches high, has high cheek bones, very short wooly hair. Born free. He renewed his registration in 1822 and 1826 [Register of Free Negroes, 1798-1831, no. 75].

 

Middlesex County, Virginia

1.    Mary Williams, born say 1660, a "Negroe Wooman," was sued in Middlesex County court by Christopher Robinson on 3 September 1688 for a debt of 3,866 pounds of tobacco [Orders 1680-94, 371].

 

Westmoreland County, Virginia

1.    Mary Williams, born say 1685, was the white servant of Willoughby Allerton, Gent., of the Parish of Copely, on 25 April 1705 when she was convicted by the Westmoreland County court of having a "mulatto" child by a "Negro man" [Orders 1698-1705, 256a]. She was probably the mother of

2     i. William1, born say 1704.

 

2.    William Williams, born say 1704, was a "free Mulato" who petitioned the Westmoreland County, Virginia court for his freedom from Isaac Allerton on 31 July 1733. On 27 March 1753 the court ordered "his several Children" bound out as apprentices. And on 25 March 1755 he sued John and Spencer Ayris for detaining his children, but the court stood by its original order [Orders 1731-9, 99a; 1752-5, 60, 227, 249]. He may have been the father of

i. George, born about 1731, a soldier from Richmond County in the French and Indian War, age 26, a mulatto, 6'1", when he was listed as a deserter on 2 September 1757 [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy 31:95].

 

Northampton County

1.    Anne Williams, born in September or October 1686, was the child of Daniel Webb, a Northampton County, Virginia slave, and Ann Williams, a white servant woman. See further the Webb History. She was called a thirteen-year-old "maletto childe" on 29 November 1699 when she was bound to Hamond Firkette until the age of eighteen years in Northampton County, Virginia [OW&c 1698-1710, 30]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Daniel, born about 1757, a "Colourd" man about seventy eight years old on 4 May 1835 when he appeared in Philadelphia County court to apply for a pension. He stated that he was born in Accomack County, Virginia, where he was drafted into the army as a wagoner and had charge of a wagon and two horses until the end of the war. He returned home to Accomack County after the war and remained there for several years, then moved to Maryland for thirteen years and came to Philadelphia where he had resided for twenty seven years. On 28 April 1835 John Blake, a "Colourd man," who was about seventy-six years old, testified that he was born in Accomack County and lived near and was well acquainted with Daniel Williams, a "Colourd" man who was drafted into the army to drive teams, that he was a free-born man and was gone for four or five years. He had resided in Philadelphia about fifteen years past, where he again met Williams and "has frequently seen him engaged in driving the team" [NARA, R.11569, M804, Roll 2586, frame 736 of 751; https://www.fold3.com/image/246/28467470]. He may have been the Daniel Williams for whom Mr. Broadhead received final pay of 11 pounds on 30 July 1784 [NARA, M881, Roll 1096, frame 1560 of 2087].

 

Richmond County, Virginia

1.    Hannah Charlton, born say 1685, was released from servitude and "given" her daughter Ann by Francis Williams, Sr., of Sittenbyrne Parish in Richmond County. She recorded the document in court on 6 December 1710. She was called "Hannah, a Mulato belonging to Francis Williams" on 6 March 1711/2 when she appeared in Richmond County court on the complaint of her master's wife, Alice Williams, that Hannah was threatening and abusing her. Hannah was ordered to give security for her good behavior for one year. On 7 July 1715 Francis Williams was presented by the Richmond County court for living in adultery with "a Mulatto Woman." And on 1 August 1716 he recorded a paper in court which set free her children: Catherine, Mary, and John Charlton [Orders 1708-11, 220; 1711-6, 8; 1716-7, 28]. Hannah was the mother of

i. Ann Williams, born say 1710, ordered to be given twenty-five lashes in March 1735/6 by the Orange County, Virginia court [Orders 1734-9, 61].

ii. Catherine Charlton, born say 1712, called Catherine Carleton alias Williams in November 1735 when the churchwardens of Orange County, Virginia, presented her for having a bastard child. John Becket agreed to pay her fine, and Francis Williams and John Haddocks provided security for the child. In March 1738 John Becket was accused in Orange County court of failing to pay tax on "Kate Williams, a Mulattoe woman" [Orders 1734-9, 42, 290].

iii. Mary Charlton, born say 1714.

iv. John Charlton, born say 1716.

 

Lunenburg County

1.    Zedekiah Williams, born say 1775, was living with his wife Anna, daughter Lucy and (wife's niece?) Ritter Lester on Bears Element Creek in the lower district of Lunenburg County in 1802 and 1803 when they were counted in a "List of all free Negroes & Mulattoes" [LVA, Lunenburg County, Free Negro & Slave Records, 1802-1803]. Zedekiah and Anna were the parents of

i. Lucy, born 1795-1800, registered in Lunenburg County on 10 October 1825: aged about twenty five or thirty years, yellow complexion, very corpulent ... born free [WB 5, after page 89, no. 40].

 

Members of the Williams family in North Carolina were

1     i. James1, born about 1748.

ii. William, head of a Beaufort County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [NC:20], 4 in 1810 [NC:113], and 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:42].

2     iii. Charles, born before 1776.

 

1.    James1 Williams, born about 1748, was a thirteen-year-old "Mullatto Boy" ordered bound an apprentice to William Armstrong in Cumberland County, North Carolina, on 19 August 1761 [Minutes 1759-65, 70]. Perhaps his children were

i. Joseph, head of a Sampson County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:53].

ii. Crecy, head of a Sampson County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:53] and may have been the C. Williams, head of a Cumberland County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [NC:627].

iii. Hannah2, head of a Sampson County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:53], perhaps the H. Williams who was head of a Cumberland County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:623].

 

2.    Charles Williams, born before 1776, was head of an Ashe County household of 12 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:3]. He may have been the father of

i. Charles Williams Loyd, born about 1787, registered in Petersburg on 11 March 1817: a free man of colour, five feet three and a half inches high, thirty years old, a waggoner, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 837].

ii. James Williams Loyd, born 1810, son of Charles Williams and Sally Lloyd, resided in Chillicothe, Ross County, Ohio, on 28 September 1818 [Turpin, Register of Black, Mulatto, and Poor Persons, 25]. Sally Lloyd may have been related to "Indian" Robin Loyd, a "person of color" residing in Jennings County, Indiana, about the age of eighty on 12 February 1838 when he made a declaration to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted at Dinwiddie County courthouse and had resided in Dinwiddie for many years after the war, went to North Carolina for a few years, and had been living in Indiana for more than twenty years. John Grimes of Ripley County, Indiana, testified for him that Indian Robin, "a negro man," had served as a footman and also as a soldier in the light horse service. Bartholomew Turner of Jennings County testified that he had seen a "Negro man" named Indian Robin as a soldier on horseback and armed for battle [NARA, R.6501, M804, Roll 1596, frame 0594].

.   

WILLIS FAMILY

1.    Edith Willis, born say 1730, was taxable in Charles City County on a horse in 1788 [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814] and taxable with Betty Willis on 110 acres near the Quaker Meeting House from 1788 to 1799 [Land Tax List, 1782-1830]. She left a 24 November 1791 Charles City County will, proved 18 December 1794, by which she left a shilling to each of her children Rodger, London, David, Limos, Doctor, and Billy Willis and left her children Jesse and Betty Willis the use of her land during the life of her son Jesse, and then all of it to go to Betty [WB 1:197-8]. She was the mother of

i. Betty, taxable in New Kent County on 2 horses in 1788 and 2 horses and a slave in 1789 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1800, frames 121, 135], taxable in Charles City County with Eady Willis on 110 acres from 1788 to 1799, taxable with Jesse Willis on 110 acres from 1800 to 1815 [Land Tax List, 1782-1830] and taxable on one tithe in 1804 and 1805 [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814]. On 14 April 1813 she was living in Henrico County when she and Jesse Willis of Charles City County made a deed of trust for 56 acres adjoining Joseph Crew, Francis Dixon and John Crew's estate to secure a debt of $34 they owed Ann Ladd, and on 21 April 1815 they made a deed of trust for the same land to secure a debt of $77 they owed George Hubbard. On 27 September 1815 Elizabeth sold 53 acres adjoining the land of John Crew, deceased, to Jesse Willis for $125, explaining in the deed that this was land devised to her by the wills of Thomas Ladd and Edith Willis, deceased [DB 5:568, 594]. She was head of a Richmond City household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:364].

ii. Roger.

iii. London.

iv. David, born about 1751, taxable in Lower Westover District of Charles City County in 1784, taxable on slaves Nanny, David and Charles in 1785, taxable on a horse in 1788, 2 tithes in 1789 and 1 in 1792 [PPTL, 1788-1814]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Henrico County on 17 October 1794: age 43 years colour Black; Stature 5 feet 6 inches; set free by Thos Ladd in Charles City County [Willis, David (43): Free Negro Certificate, 1794, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. He was a "free Negro" taxable in the lower district of Henrico County from to 1807 to 1814: taxable on son James Willis from 1809 to 1811 [PPTL 1782-1814, frames 562, 582, 625, 691, 710, 777, 795]. He was head of a Henrico County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:1010] and 1 "free colored in Charles City County in 1820 [VA:3].

v. Limos.

vi. Jesse, born say 1762, taxable in Charles City County from 1785 to 1805 [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814] and taxed with Betty Willis on 110 acres in Charles City County in 1800 [Land Tax List, p.13]. He was taxable in the lower district of Henrico County in 1802 and taxable on his son Jesse Willis, Jr., in 1807 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 470, 562]. On 28 September 1815 he made a Charles City County deed of trust for 53 acres adjoining John Crew's estate to secure a debt of $125 he owed George Hubbard [DB 5:607]. And on 20 December 1817 he sold 56 acres which had been devised by Thomas Ladd to the Willises excepting his and his wife Letty's right to live on a certain part during their natural lives. (The account of Thomas Ladd's Charles City County estate includes a payment to John Evans in 1786 for digging his grave, but Ladd's will has not survived [WB 1:563]). Jesse was called a "free man of colour" on 20 April 1820 when he manumitted his wife Letty whom he had purchased from Henry Dick of Caroline County for $100 [DB 6:175, 351]. He was head of a Charles City County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:15].

vii. Doctor, born about 1756, taxable in Charles City County in 1784 [PPTL, 1788-1814], taxable in New Kent County in 1785 [PPTL 1782-1800, frame 78], a "FN" taxable in the northern district of Campbell County from 1797 to 1813 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 427, 465, 892]. He registered in Campbell County on 18 August 1812: age 56, 5 feet 9 inches, Black Complexion, set free by Thomas Ladd in Charles City County [Register of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, p.6].

viii. Billy.

 

Other members of the family were

i. Moses, a "free Negro" taxable in the lower district of Henrico County from 1801 to 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 470, 562, 581, 624, 690, 709, 776], head of a Henrico County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:1009].

ii. Nancy, born before 1776, head of a Charles City County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:959] and 3 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:14]. She was the mother of William Willis who obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 18 October 1827: son of Nancy Willis, a bright mulatto man, born free in this county [Minutes 1823-9, 255].

iii. Samuel, a "free Negro" taxable in the lower district of Henrico County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frame 777] allowed to keep a gun in Charles City County on 20 May 1824 [Minutes 1823-9, 52].

iv. Edy2, registered in Charles City County on 2 June 1800 and recorded her registration in Henrico County: Charles City County: Edy Willis black woman set free by Thomas Ladd of Charles City County five feet seven inches high and nineteen years of age [Willis, Edy (F, 19): Free Negro Certificate, 1800, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

 

WILSON FAMILY

1. Mary1 Wilson, born say 1673, the servant of Captain Thomas Thorpe, was convicted by the York County court on 24 March 1692/3 of having a "molatto" child on information of the churchwardens of Bruton Parish [DOW 9:200, 209]. She may have been the ancestor of

2     i. Samuel1, born say 1693.

3     ii. Mary2, born say 1724.

4     iii. Mary3, born say 1725.

5     iv. Isaac1, born say 1730.

v. Stephen, born say 1732, purchased property by indenture proved in Halifax County, Virginia, on 15 March 1781 [Pleas 1779-83, 181]. He left a 4 October 1780 Halifax County will, proved 20 June 1782, in which he named his wife Elizabeth as his executrix. Peter Wilson, David Going, and Shadrack Going were witnesses [WB:1:404].

vi. John, born say 1733, jailed in King William County with Zachariah Johns (a white man) on suspicion of murder. They made their escape from the sheriff when he was transporting them to Williamsburg for trial. Lieutenant Governor Robert Dinwiddie issued a proclamation on 31 October 1754 offering a reward for their capture, describing John as: a Mulattoe, about Six feet high, and speaks good English; had on when he made his Escape, a blue double-breasted wastecoat with Metal Buttons, an old yellow Wig, old Shoes and Worstead Hose [Hillman, Journals of the Council, VI:586].

vii. Edward2, born say 1755, a "Mulatto" living in Henrico County on 3 August 1767 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind him out as an apprentice [Orders 1767-9, 93], perhaps the same Edward Wilson who was a "Mulatto" apprenticed to Philip Mallory of Mecklenburg County, Virginia, when he ran away according to the 5 September 1771 Virginia Gazette. Mallory described him as "an apprentice lad named Wilson, a clear mulatto, a carpenter and joiner by trade" when he offered to hire him out. He may have been the Edward Wilson who was head of a Norfolk County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:837].

 

2.    Samuel1 Wilson, born say 1693, was a "Mulatto" servant indentured to Charles Chiswell of York County on 24 July 1708 when the court ordered that he serve additional time for running away. Chiswell asked that the court also add a penalty for Samuel's riding three of his horses in his absence, but the court ruled that there was no law "that relates to or gives any penalty for unlucky boys rideing horses but that they are subject to their master's correction." He may have been the father of

6     i. William1, born say 1713.

 

3.    Mary2 Wilson, born say 1724, was the mother of an illegitimate child named Anne Wilson who was born 14 January and baptized 5 May 1745 in Charles Parish, York County [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 195]. She was called a "Molatto" on 20 May 1745 when the York County court presented her for having an illegitimate child and fined her 500 pounds of tobacco [W&I 19:365, 372, 381, 398]. She may have been the Mary Wilson who was living in Elizabeth City County when she was accused of concealing the death of her bastard child by secretly burying it on 13 January 1757 [Orders 1755-7, 86]. She was the mother of

7     ii. Anne, born 14 January 1744/5.

 

4.    Mary3 Wilson, born say 1725, was the "free Mulatto" mother of Charles, Peter, and Samuel Wilson who were bound apprentices in Halifax County, Virginia, on 20 August 1754 [Pleas 1:388]. She was head of a Halifax County, Virginia household of 2 "white" (free) persons in 1782 [VA:24]. She was taxable in Halifax County on 2 horses and 8 cattle in 1783 and was charged with Robert Wilson's tithe in 1786, taxable on a horse in 1788 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1799, frames 26, 71, 86, 210]. She sold property by deed proved in Halifax County on 21 September 1786 [Pleas 1786-8, 3]. Her children were

i. Charles, born say 1747, taxable in Halifax County in 1786, taxable on Martin Wilson's tithe in 1790, taxable on 2 horses in 1798 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1799, frames 86, 358, 381, 713, 843], perhaps the Charles Wilson, born before 1776, who was head of a Stokes County household of 2 "free colored" males and a white woman in 1820 [NC:377].

8     ii. ?Milly, born say 1748.

9     iii. Peter, born say 1750.

iv. Samuel2, born say 1752.

10    v. Robert2, born about 1762.

 

5.    Isaac1 Wilson, born say 1730, was head of a Halifax County, Virginia household of 1 "white" (free) person in 1782 [VA:23]. He married (second?) Susanna Matthews, 18 August 1785 Halifax County bond. He was taxable in Halifax County from 1785 to 1799, called a "Mulo" from 1792 to 1799 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1799, frames 71, 86, 149, 202, 427, 453, 548, 614, 686, 931]. He left an undated Halifax County, Virginia will, proved 27 December 1802 on $2,000 security. He left his property to his wife Susanna and named his sixteen children [WB 6:422]. They were

i. Sary.

ii. Judy.

iii. Billy (Betty?), perhaps the William Wilson who married Milly Wilson, 18 April 1812 Halifax County bond, Robert Wilson surety.

iv. Samuel3.

v. Solliman (Solomon), born about 1787, registered as a "free Negro" in Halifax County on 26 October 1812: aged 25 years about 5 11-1/2 of a yellow Colour [Register, no.35]. He married Rhoda Wilson, 18 April 1812 Halifax County bond, Robert Wilson surety.

vi. Vina.

vii. Polly.

viii. Richard2.

ix. Mathaw, perhaps the Martha Wilson who married Pleasant Wilson, 29 August 1812 Halifax County bond, surety Martin Wilson. Pleasant, born about 1786, registered as a free Negro in Halifax County on 24 August 1812: aged twenty Six years, about five feet, Seven inches and a quarter high, of a dark mulatto Colour [Register, no.33]. Martha, born about 1793, registered as in Halifax County in 1831.

x. Isack2.

xi. Susanna.

xii.Mastan, apparently identical to Martin Wilson, born about 1766, registered as a "free Negro" in Halifax County, Virginia, on 28 January 1806: aged about forty years, five feet seven Inches high, yellow complexion [Register of Free Negroes 1802-31, no.25]. He married Syller Matthis, 10 January 1804 Halifax County bond, John Wilson surety. The Halifax County court awarded him 15 pounds in his suit against Luke Williams for false imprisonment on 17 November 1787 [Pleas 1786-8]. He was taxable in Halifax County from 1788 to 1799: called a "Mulo" in 1792 and 1793 [PPTL, 1782-99, frames 210, 284, 427, 453, 614, 931]. Martin was head of a Halifax County household of 7 "free colored" in 1830.

xiii. Elasabeth/ Betty, married James Wilson, 31 January 1818 Halifax County bond, Richard Matthews surety. He may have been the James R. Wilson, born about 1796, who registered in Halifax County on 26 February 1827 and 22 November 1830: born free, dark Mulatto man about 31 years old, 5 feet 8 inches and a half high, long wooly hair [Registers of Free Negroes, 1802-1831, no. 95, 124].

xiv. Luke, born about 1799, registered as a "free Negro" in Halifax County on 23 November 1829: a bright Mulatto man about thirty years old, five feet 11 inches, long straight hair, born of a free woman [Registers of Free Negroes, 1802-1831, no. 122].

xv. Luzereous (Lazarus), born about 1799, registered in Halifax County on 22 December 1823: aged about 24 years, five feet nine and a half inches high, of a bright complexion...born of a free woman of Colour [Registers of Free Negroes, 1802-1831, no. 72]. He was called the minor son of Isaac in Halifax County court in 1809 [Pleas 26:421]. He married Catherine Goen, 27 December 1829 Surry County, North Carolina bond, Willis Wilson bondsman.

xvi. Franky, born about 1800, registered as a "free Negro" in Halifax County in 1832.

 

6.    William1 Wilson, born say 1713, may have been the husband of Margaret Wilson who was named in the 19 September 1749 York County will of her mother Mary Roberts [DOW 13:151; W&I 20:163-4]. He was living in Elizabeth City County on 13 January 1757 when the court ordered his children bound out because he was neglecting to educate them and bring them up in a Christian-like manner [Orders 1755-7, 87]. He was living in Bruton Parish on 16 January 1764 when the York County court ordered the churchwardens to bind out his children because he was neglecting to maintain and educate them. On 18 March 1765 he was a witness for John Poe in his York County suit against Anthony and Jasper Peters. On the same day Anthony Peters sued William for a 31 shilling debt he owed by account proved in court [Judgments & Orders 1762-5, 137, 358, 361]. On 15 July 1771 the court presented him for failing to list himself as a tithable [Orders 1770-2, 337]. He may have been the father of

i. John, born say 1750, presented by the York County court on 15 July 1771 for failing to list himself as a tithable [Orders 1770-2, 337]. He was head of a York County household of 7 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:885].

ii. Robert1, born say 1760, taxable in Petsworth Parish, Gloucester County, on his own tithe and 3 cattle in 1783, a "mulatto" taxable from 1801 to 1816, over forty five years of age in 1815 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20], head of a household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:677]. He may have been the father of Robert Wilson, Jr., who was a "mulatto" taxable from 1814 to 1820 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20].

iii. Cary, born say 1769, called Wilson Wilson when he was taxable in Gloucester County from 1790 to 1801, a "mulatto" taxable called "Wilson C. Wilson" in 1802 and 1803, and a "mulatto" called Cary Wilson from 1804 to 1820, over forty-five years of age in 1815 [PPTL, 1782-99; 1800-20]. Cary was a "Mulatto" taxable in Gloucester County on 53 acres in 1805, 30-1/2 acres from 1810 to 1815 [Land Tax List 1782-1820] and head of a Gloucester County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:677].

 

7.    Anne Wilson, born 14 January 1744/5, was baptized 5 May 1745 in Charles Parish, York County. She was the common-law wife of Thomas Combs on 10 October 1766 when he was presented by the York County court for not listing her as a tithable [Orders 1765-68, 161]. Thomas left a 29 June 1777 York County will, proved 15 September 1777, which left a heifer to each of his "old" children: William, Thomas, Edmund, and George Combs and left Ann Wilson and her children "had by me" the remainder of his estate [W&I 22:374-5]. Ann died before 15 September 1777 when Mead Wood was granted administration on the estate [Orders 1774-84, 151]. Thomas and Anne were the parents of

i. Sally Wilson, born 24 June, baptized 28 July 1765, daughter of Thomas Combs and Anne Wilson.

ii. Anne Combs, born 22 April 1769, baptized 25 June, daughter of Thomas and Anne Combs.

iii. Martha Combs, daughter of Thomas and Anne, born 17 February, baptized 22 March 1772.

iv. Willis Combs, son of Thomas and Anne born 4 May 1774, baptized 12 June.

v. Frances Combs, daughter of Thomas and Anne, born 17 March 1776, baptized 14 April [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 67, 68, 195].

 

8.    Milly Wilson, born say 1748, was living in Halifax County, Virginia, in January 1769 when the court bound out her children Richard and Mary [Pleas 6:270]. She was head of a Halifax County, Virginia household of 5 "white" (free) persons in 1782 [VA:24]. She was taxable in Halifax County from 1783 to 1799: charged with David Wilson's tithe in 1786, a "Mulo taxable on a free male tithe and a horse from 1795 to 1798 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1799, frames 26, 71, 86, 210, 614, 711, 841, 931]. Her children were

i. Richard1, born say 1766.

ii. Mary3, born say 1768.

iii. ?David, taxable in Halifax County in 1787, a "Mulo" taxable from 1792 to 1799 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1799, frames 86, 149, 427, 453, 548, 614, 686, 931].

iv. John, born about 1777, illegitimate son of Milley Wilson, bound by the Halifax County court to Henry Hopson on 23 February 1789 [Pleas 1788-9, 103]. He registered as a "free Negro" in Halifax County, Virginia, on 15 March 1812: aged about 35 years, 5 feet 11-1/2 inches high - of a yellow complexion - Straight haire [Halifax County Register, no.31]. He was head of a Stokes County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:376].

v. Tabitha, born say 1778, illegitimate daughter of Milley Wilson, bound by the Halifax County court to Dudley Glass on 23 February 1789 [Pleas 1788-9, 103]. She married Obadiah Wilson, 30 December 1811 Halifax County bond, Martin Wilson surety.

vi. Henry, born say 1780, bound out by the Halifax County court in 1789 [Pleas 13:128], head of a Monroe County, Virginia household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:583].

 

9.    Peter Wilson, born say 1750, was a witness to Stephen Wilson's 4 October 1780 Halifax County, Virginia will [WB:1:404]. He was head of a Halifax County, Virginia household of 4 "white" (free) persons in 1782 [VA:24]. He was taxable in Halifax County from 1782 to 1800: listed with 2 tithables in 1785, called a "Mo" from 1792 to 1799 [PPTL, 1782-1799, frames 7, 58, 79, 202, 427, 614, 686, 711, 931]. He married Dicey Combee (Cumbo), 18 May 1798 Campbell County bond (both signing), Samuel Wilson bondsman and Samuel and Joseph Wilson witnesses to Dicey's statement that she was above twenty four or twenty five years of age. The bond does not mention race, but Peter may have been related to Joshua Wilson who married Lucy Davis "free malattoes" by 25 October 1804 Campbell County bond with Joseph and Samuel Wilson as witnesses [Marriage Bonds & Consents, W-Y, frames 664-7, 658-9]. In 1810 he was a "F.B." head of a Giles County household of 10 "other free" and a white woman [VA:643, 1021]. He may have been the Peter Wilson whose final pay of 36 pounds for service in the Revolution was received by Sam Matthews on 16 April 1784 [NARA, M881, Roll 1096, frame 1727 of 2087]. He died near Albany, Indiana, in 1817 according to Dicey's application for a widow's pension for his services in the Revolution on 21 November 1847 while a resident of Cincinnati. She stated that Peter served under Captain George Walton and was in the Virginia and Georgia Line. The application also included a statement by Mary Bird, fifty-year-old daughter of Peter's brother Isaac Wilson. Dicey named their children in her application [NARA, R.11662, M804, Roll 2609, frame 231 of 1437]:

i. McCradock, head of a Cincinnati, Ohio household of 6 "free colored" in 1840.

ii. Patience.

iii. Prudence.

iv. Patsy.

v. Henry.

vi. Thomas

vii. Rebecca.

viii. Rebecca (second).

ix. Peter.

x. Clarissa.

xi. Samuel.

 

10.    Robert2 Wilson, born about 1762, was head of a Halifax County, Virginia household of 1 "white" (free) person in 1782 [VA:23]. He was taxable in Halifax County from 1783 to 1799: listed as Mary Wilson's tithe in 1786, called a "Mulo" from 1794 to 1796, a "FN" in 1799 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1799, frames 26, 71, 79, 149, 210, 358, 548, 615, 686, 933]. He married Patience Cumbo, 16 April 1787 Halifax County, Virginia bond, Robert Smith surety; and married, second, Salley Talbott, 27 April 1789 Halifax County bond, surety Richard Walne. He registered as a "free Negro" in Halifax County on 24 September 1802: aged about forty years, five feet nine inches and three quarters high, black colour, - who it appears was born free. He registered again on 26 September 1814 at the age of fifty-two [Halifax County Free Negro Register, nos.17, 46]. He was head of a Stokes County, North Carolina household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [NC:602]. He may have been the father of

i. Jeremiah, head of a Stokes County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:376].

ii. Willis, born about 1790, registered as a "free Negro" in Halifax County, Virginia, on 23 November 1813: aged twenty three years, five feet 8 inches high, of a bright yellow complexion [Halifax County Register, no.39]. He was head of a Stokes County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:376].

iii. Rhoda, married Solomon Wilson, 18 April 1812 Halifax County bond, Robert Wilson surety.

iv. Milly, married William Wilson, 18 April 1812 Halifax County bond, Robert Wilson surety.

 

Members of the Wilson family in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, were

i. Humphrey, born say 1778, married Sally Stewart of Dinwiddie County [Chancery Orders 1832-52, 1], purchased land in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, from his father-in-law Thomas Stewart by deed proved in Mecklenburg County in 1800 [DB 10:268]. He and his wife Sarah sold their land by deed proved in Mecklenburg County court on 11 February 1805 [Orders 1803-5, 320]. He was head of a Chatham County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [NC:203].

ii. Drury, born say 1788, a Mecklenburg County taxable from 1809 to 1817, counted with his unnamed wife as "free Negroes and Mulattoes over 16" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1806-28, frames 123, 224, 317, 584, 628, 694]. He married Ann Chavis, daughter of James Chavis [Mecklenburg County chancery suit 1832-026, LVA].

 

Westmoreland County, Virginia

1.    Ann Wilson, born say 1675, an English servant woman, appeared in Westmoreland County, Virginia court on 26 July 1693 and "made confession she was lately delivered of a bastard mulatto child begott on her body by Jack a Negro slave to Youel." On 26 May 1697 she petitioned the court for her freedom, but the court ruled that she still had considerable time to serve for having bastard children. In February 1699/1700 she confessed to having an illegitimate child by a white man [Orders 1690-8, 102, 242; 1698-1705, 71, 73a].

 

Bertie County, North Carolina

1.    Thomas1 Wilson, born say 1715, purchased 183 acres on the north side of the Cashie River in Bertie County, North Carolina, from William Leviner on 26 April 1756 [DB H:326]. He was called a shoe maker when he sold 80 acres of this land to (his son?) Edward Wilson on 10 July 1759 for 1 pound 10 shillings [DB I:364]. He died before August court 1783 when the Bertie court assigned Edward Wilson administrator of his estate on a bond of 50 pounds [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, V:462]. Perhaps his children were

i. Edward1, born say 1738, purchased 80 acres in Bertie County at the mouth of Plumtree Branch of Cashie Swamp from Thomas Wilson by deed of 10 July 1759 witnessed by Embry Bunch [DB I:364]. He was a "free male molattor" in Jonathan Standley's 1764 Bertie tax list, taxed with his "Molattor Servant" John Cobb [CR 10.702], and taxed with (his brother?) James Wilson in Jonathan Standley's 1767 list. Embry Bunch was also taxed in Standley's list in a household nearby. He purchased 20 acres on the north side of the Cashie Swamp between his own line and Bunch's from David Standley on 22 May 1786 and another 56 acres between Connaritsa Swamp and Mill Branch in Bertie near Jonathan Standley on 8 September 1795 [DB N:333; Q:454]. He was counted as white in 1790, head of a Bertie County household of 5 males and 5 females [NC:15].

 

Surry and Isle of Wight counties

1.    Thomas2 Wilson, born say 1737, was among fourteen free African Americans who were presented by the Surry County, Virginia court on 21 November 1758 for failing to pay tax on their wives [Orders 1757-64, 135]. He may have been the Thomas Wilson, Jr., who purchased 200 acres on the south side of Cypress Swamp bounded by Spratleys Branch and Great Branch in Surry County on 20 November 1759 and sold this land on 19 January 1762 [DB 7:483; 8:96]. He was taxable in Surry County on a horse in 1785 but not subject to personal tax [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frame, 391]. His children were

i. ?Armstead, born about 1762, registered as a "free Negro" in Surry County on 29 October 1795: a free man of a pretty dark cast, born of free parents aged about 33 years, about 5'5 or 6" and pretty stout made [Back of Guardian Accounts Book 1783-1804, no.11]. He was taxable in Surry County from 1787 to 1790 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 436, 510, 586].

ii. Thomas3, born about 1768, registered as a "free Negro" in Surry County on 5 January 1796: son of Thomas Wilson a Mulattoe man aged about 28 years, pretty well made, 5'9" high, born of free parents [Back of Guardian Accounts Book 1783-1804, no.13]. He was taxable listed as Nicholas Faulcon's Surry County tithable in 1788 and 1789 and charged with his own tax in 1791 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 495, 525, 607; 1791-1816, frames 49]. He may have been the Thomas Wilson who was head of a Granville County, North Carolina household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:861] and 4 "free colored" in Stokes County in 1820 [NC:376].

iii. ?James1, born say 1765, a "poor mulatto" ordered bound apprentice in Isle of Wight County on 4 December 1777 [Orders 1772-80, 408]. He married Faithy Banks, "daughter of John Banks," 31 May 1786 Surry County bond, Joseph Roberts surety, 1 June 1786 Isle of Wight marriage. He was taxable in Surry County from 1786 to 1793 (called a free Negro in 1792), 1800, 1805 (called a "Mulatto" in 1805 and in 1806 when he was crossed off the list) [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 404, 436, 510, 541, 586; 1791-1816, 97, 603, 619]. He was a "F.N." taxable in Isle of Wight County in 1794 and 1795, called James Wilson, Sr., in 1801, 1802, 1803, 1806, 1809 and 1810, 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1810, frames 325, 370, 469, 551, 569, 627, 741, 820, 838].

 

Members of the Wilson family in Isle of Wight County were

i. William3, born say 1769, a "F.N." taxable in Isle of Wight County from 1790 to 1810 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1810, frames 203, 219, 370, 627, 643, 744, 823, 838]. He married Sarah Blizzard, 29 July 1797 Surry County bond, Peter Blizzard surety.

ii. Randolph, born say 1769, a "F.N." taxable in Isle of Wight County from 1790 to 1810: taxable on a slave in 1803 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1810, frames 203, 219, 267, 325, 370, 384, 413, 453, 517, 627, 643, 741, 765, 838]. He married Milly Charity, October 1809 Isle of Wight County bond, Hartwell Charity bondsman.

iii. Angelina, born say 1773, mother of "free negroes" Thomas and Edy Wilson who had been bound apprentices to William Hardy, deceased, and were bound instead to George Hardy in Isle of Wight County on 2 February 1795 [Orders 1795-97, 7].

iv. Judith, born say 1774, a "poor mulatto" ordered bound apprentice in Isle of Wight County on 7 October 1779 [Orders 1772-80, 490].

v. Simon, born say 1775, a "poor mulatto" ordered bound apprentice in Isle of Wight County on 7 October 1779 [Orders 1772-80, 490]. He was a "F.N." taxable in Isle of Wight County from 1793 to 1810 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1810, frames 266, 304, 325, 413, 469, 517, 567, 627, 764, 821, 839].

vi. Michael, born say 1776, a "poor Mulatoe" ordered bound apprentice in Isle of Wight County on 3 February 1780 [Orders 1772-80, 506]. He was a "F.N." taxable in Isle of Wight County from 1793 to 1802 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1810, frames 304, 384, 413, 567, 627].

vii. Willis, born say 1785, a "F.N." taxable in Isle of Wight County from 1802 to 1810 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1810, frames 568, 627, 643, 741, 821, 839].

viii. James, Jr., born say 1785, a "F.N" taxable in Isle of Wight County in 1801 and 1806, listed as Henry Harrison's tithable in 1807 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1810, frames 551, 569, 756].

 

Members of the family in Granville County, North Carolina were

i. Lucy, born say 1740, a "black" taxable in 1762 in the Granville County household of "black" taxable John Portee, Sr., in the list of Phil Pryor. Portee's other taxables were John, Jr., Uriah, Rachel, and Milley Portee [CR 44.701].

ii. John, born say 1745, a "Mulattoe" taxable in Michael Gowen's Granville County, North Carolina household in 1759 and 1761 in the list of John Pope [CR 44.701.19]. He was a "Mulato" taxable in Bladen County from 1768 to 1772 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:7, 16, 79].

iii. Sarah, born say 1746, a "black" taxable in 1762 in the Granville County household of "black" taxable John Portee, Sr., in the list of Phil Pryor [CR 44.701].

iv. William2, born say 1747, a "Mulattoe" taxable in Michael Gowen's 1771 Bute County household in the list of Philemon Hawkins [CR 15.70001, p.11]. Michael Gowen moved to Prince George Parish, Craven County, South Carolina, before 3 June 1778 [Granville Co., N.C., WB 1:193], and William may have moved there with him. William was head of a Charleston District, St. Bartholomew's Parish, South Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1790 and an Abbeville District household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [NC:12]. His neighbor, William Bryan/ Bryant, head of a St. Bartholomew's Parish household of 5 "other free" in 1790, was a taxable "free Mulatto" neighbor of the Wilsons in the 1769 and 1770 Bertie County list of Jonathan Standly [CR 10.702.1].

v. Basil, born say 1750, a "black" taxable in the 1762 Granville County list of Phil Pryor in the household of "black" taxable John Portee, Sr. [CR 44.701], perhaps identical to Brazwel Wilson and wife, "free negroes" taxable in the district between Broad and Catawba Rivers in South Carolina in 1784 [South Carolina Tax Returns 1783-1800, frame 37]. Edey Wilson, Elizabeth Wilson, Rachel Portie and Sarah Portie were residents of Richland District in 1806 when they petitioned the South Carolina legislature to be exempted from the tax on free Negro women [S.C. Archives, General Assembly Petitions ND 1796, frames 786-92].

 

Other members of the Wilson family in Virginia were

i. Forrister, a "Mulatto" child bound apprentice to Charles Littleton in Frederick County on 4 March 1761 [Orders 1760-2, 269].

ii. Mary, born say 1776, "a free Mulato girl" brought to Surry County, North Carolina, by John Martin. On 14 May 1782 the court ordered her delivered to Elizabeth Chavis so she could return her to her parents [Absher, Surry County, North Carolina, Court Minutes, 38]. She may have been the Mary Wilson who was head of a Rockingham County, North Carolina household of 1 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:652].

iii. John, born about 1786, registered in York County on 17 September 1810: a dark Mulatto about 24 years of age ... wooly Hair ... born free [Free Negro Register 1798-1831, no. 52]. He was head of a York County household of 7 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:885].

iv. Meshac, born about 1764, registered in Princess Anne County on 29 October 1794: a black Man about six feet high about thirty years old, Born Free [Wilson, Michael (M,30): Free Negro Certificate, 1794, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

v. Samuel, head of a Norfolk County household of 8(?) "other free" in 1810 [VA:837]. He may have been the husband or brother of Abia Wilson, Sr., who registered in Princess Anne County on 7 November 1831: 5'4-1/2", age 41, a mulatto woman, born free in Princess Anne County [Register of Free Negroes, 1830-62, no. 291].

vi. Sally, head of a Petersburg Town household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:125a].

vii. Sally, head of a Richmond City household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:370].

 

Petersburg

1.    Isbell Wilson, born say 1765, was a slave who recovered her freedom by a suit in the General Court of Virginia on descent from an Indian [LVA, Petersburg Chancery suit 1816-003]. She was head of a Petersburg household of 12 "other free" in 1810 [VA:127b]. She was the mother of

2     i. Aggy, born say, 1786.

ii. Mary, born say 1800, registered in Petersburg on 28 May 1821: Mary or Mary Wilson...yallow brown complection, 5 feet high, supposed about 20 yrs old, has holes in her Ears. She is the daughter of Isabel descendant of an Indian, and set free by a Judgment & decree of the Richmond Superior Court of Chancery in June 1815 in a suit against Maraime Church & others & her two children Jane and Angeline [Register of Free Negroes 1819-33, no. 1107].

iii. Lilly, born about 1802, registered in Petersburg on 20 June 1821: five feet two & a half inches high, of a dark complexion, 19 years of age, was raised in Petersburg & is the daughter of Isabel who is the descendant of an Indian & was set free by a Judgment & Decree of the Superior Court of Richmond in June 1815 in a suit against Mariam Church & others is now registered at the request of her said mother. She was the mother of Essex who registered the same day: 12 months old of a light brown complexion with bushy curly hair [Register of Free Negroes, 1819-33, nos. 1111-2].

 

2.    Aggy Wilson, born say 1786, was the mother of

i. Caroline, born about 1804, registered in Petersburg on 26 April 1826: daughter of Aggy Wilson who was a daughter of Isbell Wilson who recovered her freedom in the General Court and was a descendant of an Indian, about 22 yrs old, 5 feet 6 in. high of dark complection or nearly black...was born free in Pocahontas as appears by the oath of Peggy Pichot of said town. He daughter Elizabeth registered on 13 June 1831: Infant daughter of Caroline Wilson...(wife of Jack Booker a slave) 3 yrs old Septr last, brown complexion...born free. Jack Booker the slave was the son of a free man of Colour by the same name. His daughter Priscilla registered on 13 June 1831: infant of daughter of Jack Booker decd, a free man of Colour, supposed about 7 yrs old, born free of brown Complection...now under the charge of Caroline Wilson wife of Jack Book (a slave son of the deceased) [Register of Free Negroes, 1819-33, no. 1394, 1742, 1746].

 

South Carolina

1.    Jenney Wilson, born say 1770, was living with Henry Glencamp, State Superintendent of the Santee Canal, on 13 December 1823 when he made his St. Stephen's Parish, Berkeley County, South Carolina will, proved 2 March 1824. He called her a "free Woman of Colour" and left his plantation called Pine Hill to her and her six children: Isaac, Christiana, Nanny, Henry, Mary, and Harriet. He named her son Isaac his executor [WB 36:985-7]. Henry Glencamp was head of a St. Stephen's Parish household of 1 "other free" and 4 slaves in 1810, and there was also a Mustafa Glencamp who was head of a St. Stephen's Parish, Berkeley County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [SC:464]. Henry and Jenney's children were

i. Isaac, born say 1800.

ii. Christiana, born say 1802.

iii. Nanny, born say 1804.

iv. Henry, born say 1806, not yet twenty-one years old when Henry Glencamp made his will.

v. Mary, born say 1808.

vi. Harriet, born say 1810.

 

WINBORN FAMILY

1.    Thomas1 Winborn, born say 1750, was head of a Halifax County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:65], and 2 in 1800 [NC:354]. He was probably the same person as Thomas Winmon who was head of a household with his wife Patience, counted as "free molattows" in the Bertie County list of Josiah Harrell for William Vann's District adjacent to Benjamin James in 1770 and 1771 and in the list of Samuel Granberry adjacent to Benjamin James in 1774 [CR 10.702.1, box 2]. Thomas Winborn was counted in the 1790 census for Halifax County living in a household nearby Benjamin James [NC:65]. Thomas' 15 March 1829 Halifax County will, proved August 1829, left 148 acres in Halifax to his heirs who were his wife Easter, his brother David, his grandnephew John Henry Winborn (son of Thomas, Jr.) and Willie Winborne (son of Nancy Winborne) [WB 4:52]. His children may have been

i. William, born before 1776, head of a Halifax County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:170].

ii. Benjamin, born say 1785, married Sarah Jones, 26 May 1804 Bertie County bond with Frederick James bondsman. He was head of a Bertie County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:142].

 

2.    David Winborn, born before 1776, was head of a Halifax County household of 11 "other free" in 1810 [NC:56] and 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:170]. He received 50 acres by the 15 November 1815 Halifax County will of (his mother-in-law?) Lucy Murray, proved in August 1816 [WB 3:587]. He may have been the father of

i. Thomas2, father of John Henry Winborne who was mentioned in the will of Thomas1 Winborn.

 

The family moved to Ripley township, Rush County, Indiana, where John, Lewis, David, Hardy, and Benjamin B. Winborn were heads of "free colored" households in 1840.

 

WINTERS FAMILY

Members of the Winters family in Virginia and Maryland were

i. Henry, head of a Baltimore City household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:396].

ii. James, head of a Loudoun County household of 12 "other free" in 1810 [VA:293].

iii. Lydia, head of a Baltimore City household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:396].

iv. Rachel, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:73].

1    v. William, born say 1770.

 

1.    William Winters, born say 1770, was living in Amherst County, Virginia, and married to Nancy when she registered on 15 November 1843: wife of William Winters bright coloured mulatto 71 years old 5 feet 5 inches high...born free. She may have been the Nancy Winters who was head of a Nelson County household of 7 "free colored" in 1830. They were the parents of

i. ?Thomas, born about 1792, registered in Amherst County on 18 March 1844: a free man of colour 5 feet nine inches high, dark complexion 52 years old .. born free. He married Elvira Ann Arnold in Amherst County in 1833. His wife Elvira registered the same day: wife of Thomas Winters, free woman of colour 29 years old bright mulatto, born free.

ii. Lucy, born about 1802, registered in Amherst County on 15 November 1843: daughter of William and Nancy Winters ... about 41 dark complexion ... born free.

iii. Jane, born about 1812, registered in Amherst County on 15 November 1843: daughter of William & Nancy Winters dark complexion ... about 31 years of age ... born free.

iv. Edward, born about 1808-1818, registered in Amherst County on 18 November 1843: about 25 years old of black complexion ... son of William & Nancy Winters ... born free. He married Elizabeth Arnold, daughter of Robert Arnold, in Amherst County in 1839. His wife Elizabeth registered the same day: wife of Edward Winters bright mulatto ... 24 years old ... born free. Edward registered again in January 1851: born in the County of Nelson ... age 43 years [McLeroy, Strangers in their Midst, 65, 67, 112].

 

WYNN/ WINN FAMILY

Members of the Wynn/ Winn family were

1     i. George1, born say 1720.

2     ii. Gloucester, born say 1727.

 

1.    George1 Wynne, born say 1720, was the "Mulatto Man Servant" of Colonel Benjamin Harrison before 4 September 1740 when he was taken up as a runaway in Brunswick County, Virginia [Orders 1732-41, 351]. On 4 May 1759 the Chesterfield County court ordered the churchwardens of Dale Parish to bind out his daughter Sarah [Orders 1754-9, 516]. He was the father of

3     i. Sarah, born say 1750.

4     ii. ?Mary Caroline, born about 1763.

 

2.    Gloucester Winn, born say 1727, may have been identical to Gloster Wynn whose "Negro" slave Bernett was adjudged by the Caroline County court on 8 July 1748 to be ten years old [Orders 1746-54, 96]. Gloucester was taxable in King William County from 1782 to 1788: taxable on 200 acres from 1782 to 1787; taxable on 2 free tithes and 11 slaves in 1782; taxable on a free tithe, 3 slaves over 16 (named Wagg, Siller and Bett), 8 slaves aged 12-16, and 11 "white" (free) souls in 1783; taxable on 4 slaves over 16 (named Wog, Silla, Bet, and Rachel) and 6 slaves aged 12-16 (named Lewis, Randol, Suck, Bernard, Frank and Silloho) in 1784 and 1785; 12 slaves, 2 horses and 14 cattle in 1787; and 2 free tithables and 7 slaves in 1788 and 1789 [Land Tax List 1782-1832; PPTL 1782-1811]. He died before 1791 when his land was surveyed in order to divide it among his wife and sons Seaton, Curtis and George Winn [Record Book 3:441]. "Gloucester Winn's orphans" were taxable in King William County on 77-1/2 acres from 1792 to 1799. His widow Sarah Winn was taxable in King William County from 1790 to 1811: taxable on 5 slaves in 1790, 8 in 1791, 4 slaves from 1792 to 1810 but not listed in 1811, taxable on 179-1/2 acres (which had been transferred to her by Gloster Winn) from 1792 to 1811 and also taxable on 46-1/2 acres as guardian to Nancy, Charity and Hamm Winn in 1800 [PPTL 1782-1811; Land Tax List 1782-1832]. Sarah was in Natchez, Mississippi, on 22 August 1815 when she gave power of attorney to Philip Aylett and John Roane, Esquires, of Virginia to release the dower lands and slaves she received at the death of her husband Glocester Winn to her children William, Armstead, Curtis, Elizabeth, Oney, Polly and Nancy Winn and her grandchildren who were the children of her deceased son Seaton Winn whose names she could not recollect [King William County Record Book 6:429]. Gloucester was the father of

i. William, born about 1761, taxable in King William County from 1784 to 1817: taxable on his own tithe and a slave under the age of 16 in 1784, taxable on his own tithe in 1791, taxable on 4 slaves over the age of 16 in 1797, taxable on 4 slaves in 1809, 3 in 1810, 6 in 1811, listed as a "Mulatto" in 1813 and taxable on 25 acres in 1798, 15-1/2 acres in 1800 and 1801 [PPTL, 1787, p.30; 1797, p.16; Land Tax List 1782-1832]. On 3 December 1798 he purchased from Curtis Winn 15-1/2 acres in the parish of Saint David in King William County as well as Curtis's rights to his mother's dower land for 15 pounds. On 4 January 1800 he (signing) and his wife Caty (making her mark) sold 15-1/2 acres allotted to him in the division of his father's estate to Oney Winn for 30 pounds [Record Book 3:441; 5:321]. He was a seventy-two-year-old farmer living with Betty (44), Polly (42), Patrick (28), and William Winn, Jr. (17) in St. David's Parish, King William County, when he was included in the list of "Free Negro and Mulattoes" for 1833 [LVA, Auditor of Public Accounts inventory entry no. 757, Reports of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, 1833; transcribed by Selma Stewart]. He was about 75 years old on 23 December 1833 when he appeared in King William County court and applied for a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated (signing) that he was born in King William County and enlisted under Captain John Catlett and joined the regiment under Colonel Holt Richardson [NARA, S.11699, M804, roll 2616, frame 485 of 1296; https://www.fold3.com/image/246/28362798].

ii. Seaton, born say 1768, taxable in King William County from 1784 to 1814: listed in Gloster Winn's household in 1784, taxable on his own tithe and a slave in 1794; taxable on 4 slaves in 1797, a "Mulatto" taxable in 1813. He was taxable on 15-1/2 acres in 1800, 1801, and from 1804 to 1811 [PPTL 1782-1811; 1812-50; Land Tax List 1782-1832]. On 6 December 1810 he made a deed of trust to John Lord for the purpose of securing his rental of a tract of land, "part of Penn's tract of land called foamly," from Christopher Johnson for $120 per year for five years. His security was a slave woman named Frankey, a girl Eliza, a boy Barnett, four horses, cows, three beds and all his household furniture. On 24 March 1812 he sold (signing) 15-3/4 acres which he received by the division of his father Gloster Winn's estate to Elizabeth Winn for 15 pounds, 15 shillings and sold the residue of the land coming to him out of his mother's dower rights to Oney Winn for 7 pounds, 10 shillings [Record Book 5:476; 6:131-2].

iii. Armstead, born say 1773, taxable in King William County on 1-3 slaves from 1794 to 1807, taxable on his own tithe in 1809 [PPTL, 1782-1811] and taxable on 15-1/2 acres from 1800 to 1811 [Land Tax List 1782-1832]. On 5 December 1811 he sold all his estate, including his tenth part of 86-1/4 acres of land due him at the death of Sarah Winn, the land allotted to him at the division of the estate of Gloster Winn, deceased, his tenth part of her dower slaves: Bett, Randolph, Hannah, Patt, Reben, Squire, and Margery, and all his household furniture to Oney Winn [Record Book 6:137].

iv. George2, born say 1774, taxable in King William County on his own tithe and a slave in 1795 and 1796. He owned a tract of land in King William County on 3 December 1798 which he received by division of the land of his father Gloucester Winn [Record Book 3:441]. He was taxable on 15-1/2 acres from 1800 to 1811 [Land Tax List 1782-1832]. He was in Natchez, Mississippi, on 22 August 1815 when he gave Philip Aylett and John Roane power of attorney to sell his land and slaves bequeathed to him by his father Glocester Winn, deceased, to his sisters Elizabeth and Polly Winn [King William County Record Book 1806-1810, 427]. On 4 November 1815 he purchased 500 acres on the Mississippi River for $1000 [DB H:460]. In June 1818 he was the plaintiff in a suit heard by the Supreme Court of Mississippi against the heirs of James Cole for his right to lot 4 in square no. 12 in the city of Natchez [ftp://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/ms/adams/court/winn5wl.txt. He was taxable in Adams County in 1810 and 1818 and head of an Adams County household of 8 whites, 12 slaves and 5 "free colored" in 1820 [MS:9]; 1 free colored man aged 55-100 and 16 slaves in 1830 [MS:23].

v. Oney, taxable on 31 acres in King William County from 1800 to 1810, taxable on 46-1/2 acres in 1811, taxable on a horse from 1809 to 1811, taxable on a slave in 1811, listed as a "Mulatto" in 1813 [PPTL 1812-50]. She married a Pamunkey Indian [Rountree, Pocahantas's People, 343].

vi. Polly, taxable in King William County on 15-1/2 acres from 1800 to 1811, taxable on a horse in 1809 and 1810, taxable on a slave in 1811, listed as a "Mulatto" in 1813 [Land Tax List 1782-1832; PPTL 1782-1811; 1812-50]. On 27 July 1812 she purchased 46-1/2 acres adjoining Elizabeth Winn, Oney Winn, and George Winn from Henry Wheley for 58 pounds which was land his wife received by her father's estate, and on 20 December 1813 she purchased 113 acres adjoining Winn's corner from Larkin Cotterell for $121.50 [Record Book 6:163, 299-300].

vii. Curtis, born say 1777, taxable in King William County from 1800 to 1820: taxable on a slave from 1800 to 1811, listed as a "Mulatto" taxable in 1813 [Land Tax List 1782-1832; PPTL 1812-50]. On 3 December 1798 he and his wife Clary Winn sold to William Winn for 15 pounds 15-1/2 acres of land in Saint David's Parish, King William County, which he had received by the division his the estate of his father Gloucester Winn's as well as his rights to a third of his mother's dower land. This land adjoined the lots drawn by (his brothers) Seaton Winn and George Winn [Record Book 3:441].

viii. Betty, taxable in King William County on 15-1/2 from 1802 to 1811, taxable on a slave and 3 horses from 1809 to 1811, listed as a "Mulatto" in 1813 [Land Tax List 1782-1832; PPTL 1782-1811; 1812-50].

ix. Nancy, taxable in King William County on 15-1/2 acres from 1802 to 1811, taxable on a slave in 1811 [Land Tax List 1782-1832]. She married a Pamunkey Indian [Rountree, Pocahantas's People, 343].

x. Charity, taxable on 15-1/2 acres in King William County from 1802 to 1811 [Land Tax List 1782-1832].

xi. Hamm, born about 1784, taxable in King William County on 15-1/2 acres from 1802 to 1811 [Land Tax List 1782-1832]. Meshac Ham was a forty-nine-year-old farmer living with forty-five-year-old Nat Ham in a list of "Free Negroes and Mulattoes" in St. David's Parish, King William County in 1833 [LVA, Auditor of Public Accounts inventory entry no. 757, Reports of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, 1833; transcribed by Selma Stewart].

 

3.    Sarah Winn, born say 1750, was bound apprentice in Chesterfield County on 4 May 1759. In August 1782 the court ordered the churchwardens of Dale Parish to bind out her son Lewis [Orders 1754-9, 516; 1774-84, 369]. She may have been the Sarah Winn who was said to be deceased on 4 November 1789 when the Hustings Court of Petersburg bound her son George Winn to David Alexander. On 6 February 1792 the court bound her "poor girl daughter" Patience to Judith Moratta, and on 7 October 1793 the court ordered Thomas Kane to post bond of 5 pounds to keep the peace toward her [Orders 1784-91, 212; 1791-7, 23, 94]. She was the mother of

i. ?Jincy, born about 1774, registered in Petersburg on 25 August 1794: a brown Mulatto woman, five feet seven inches high, twenty one years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg. She was married to a member of the Elliott family by 8 June 1810 when she registered again: Jane Elliott a light brown Mulatto woman formerly registered as Jiney Winn, five feet seven inches high, thirty seven years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, nos. 83, 550]. She was head of a Petersburg Town household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:125a].

ii. Lewis, born say 1780.

iii. ?Anna, born about 1778, registered in Petersburg on 25 June 1810: a light brown Mulatto woman, five feet three inches high, thirty two years old, long strait black hair, born free and raised in the County of Chesterfield [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 628].

iv. Patience, born about 1782, bound apprentice to Judith Moratta in Petersburg on 6 February 1792. She registered in Petersburg on 30 June 1804: a brown Mulatto woman, five feet five and a half inches high, twenty two years old, straight & rather spare made with short wooly hair, born free and raised in the County of Chesterfield [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 277]. She was a 22-year-old spinner living with (her daughter) Sally in Petersburg in 1803 [List of People of Colour in Petersburg 1803, 1803, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. She was head of a Petersburg Town household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:124a].

v. ?Sally, born about 1783, registered in Petersburg on 15 August 1800: a brown Mulatto girl, five feet five inches high, seventeen years old, short thick hair, born free and raised in the County of Chesterfield [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 182].

 

4.    Mary Caroline Wynn, born about 1763, was living in Chesterfield County on 9 January 1809 when she obtained a certificate of freedom: forty six years old, yellow complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 102]. She may have been identical to Molly Wynne who was a 50-year-old washer in Petersburg in 1803 with her children Polly (26), and Amy (24), Eliza (22) and Peggy Wynne (20) in the same household as Abby Corn and Hagar Jumper [List of People of Colour in Petersburg 1803, 1803, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. She was the mother of

i. Polly, born about 1777.

ii. Amy, born about 1779.

iii. Elizabeth, born about 1783, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 9 January 1809: twenty six years old, brown complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 99].  _et_y C. Wynn was head of a Petersburg household of 6 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1810 [VA:118a].

iv. Peggy, born about 1786, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 9 January 1809: twenty three years old, yellow complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 99].

 

North and South Carolina

1.    Martha Winn, born say 1750, was living in Anson County, North Carolina, on 12 January 1769 when her eight-year-old son Zachariah Winn was bound apprentice to Solomon Gross. On 21 March 1806 Daniel McDaniel testified in Darlington District, South Carolina, that Zachariah's mother was a free white woman [DB G:209]. She was the mother of

2     i. Zachariah, born about 1761.

 

2.    Zachariah Winn, born about 1761, was eight years old on 12 January 1769 when he was bound apprentice until the age of twenty-one. He received voucher no. 500 for 14 pounds specie in the counties of Anson, Montgomery and Richmond on 3 September 1782 for military service in the Revolution [North Carolina Revolutionary Pay Vouchers, 1779-1782, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2WT-GTYR, Winn, Zach]. He was head of an Anson County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 [NC:35] and was counted as white in 1800: head of a Darlington District, South Carolina household of 1 male 26-45, 2 males under 10, 2 females 26-45, and 3 females under 10. He was granted 77 acres in Darlington District on 2 September 1805 and purchased another 95 acres there on 11 March 1807. He recorded his indenture papers with the deed to prove that he was free. On 13 May 1820 he used his land as security for a loan of $413 from Alexander Sparks [DB G:207-9, 386-8]. He was head of a Darlington District household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [SC:654] and 7 "free colored" in 1830. He and his wife Lucy were the parents of

i. Letitia, married Isaac Weatherford, head of a Darlington District household of 4 "free colored" in 1820. In 1859 their son James Weatherford of Marlboro District sued the tax collector and sheriff to avoid paying the capitation tax on free persons of color. Deponents from Darlington District testified that James was the grandson of Zachariah Wynn and his wife Lucy who had a son David and a daughter Letitia. Letitia and her husband Isaac Weatherford were said to have been members of the Methodist Church at Society Hill where they sat with whites and were visited by the ministers. Isaac was considered to be a white man, Letitia a "Coloured" woman, but she was buried in the white cemetery [South Carolina Archives, Marlboro County, Mixed Provenance Papers, circa 1800-1860, L-35247, Weatherford vs. Stanton, by The Darlington Flag, Fall 1999, 131-7].

ii. David D., born 1794-1806, head of a Darlington District household of 4 "free colored" in 1830.

iii. ____, married first a white man and second, a member of the Mumford family according to testimony in James Weatherford's case in 1859.

 

WISE FAMILY

1.    Mary Wise, born say 1714, was the servant of Robert Wells on 21 August 1732 when she appeared in Prince George's County, Maryland court and admitted that she had given birth to an illegitimate "Malatto" child. The court bound her nine-week-old child Becky to serve for thirty-one years and sold her and the child to her master for 1,500 pounds of tobacco [Court Records 1732-4, 14]. She was the mother of

i. Becky, born in June 1732.

 

They may have been the ancestors of

i. Agnes, head of an Accomack County, Virginia household of 4 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1800 and 11 "other free" in 1810 [VA:35].

ii. Thomas, head of an Elizabeth City County, Virginia household of 5 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:185].

iii. Peter, head of a Norfolk County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:839], perhaps the Peter Wise, born before 1776, who was head of a Dagsboro Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:380].

 

WOMBLE FAMILY

1.    John Womble, born about 1755, was a carpenter who enlisted in the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 1 June 1779 in Halifax County. He was captured in the siege of Charleston and remained on parole for the remainder of the war. He married his wife Catherine in Edgecombe County in 1798 [NARA, S.42083, M805, reel 883, frame 836]. He purchased land in Edgecombe County by deed proved on 30 May 1799 and sold land there by deed proved in February court 1800 [Minutes 1797-1800, n.p.]. His wife Catherine was one of the siblings of Jacob Greene, deceased, who petitioned the Edgecombe County court to divide 91 acres of his land in November 1804 [Gammon, Record of Estates Edgecombe County, 85]. John was head of an Edgecombe County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 and 11 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:112]. He owned 75 acres on 25 August 1818 when he made his pension application in Edgecombe County court, listing his family then living with him: wife Catherine (forty-one years old), Nathaniel (eighteen), Finnety (fourteen), twins Jacob and Ajax (ten), Benjamin (eight and one-half), Enos (seven), John Washington (five and one-half), and Catherine (two and one-half). He was granted a pension of $96 per year but died soon afterwards, about 1820 [M805, reel 883, frame 836]. In 1835 his wife Catherine petitioned the Edgecombe County court for dower, stating that her husband died in 1821 and listing their children: Doctor Warren Womble, Nathaniel G. Womble, Mary Ann Proctor, Celia P. Sorey, and Jacob, Benjamin, Enos, John, and Catherine Womble [Gammon, Record of Estates Edgecombe County, 105]. Catherine moved to Fayette County, Tennessee, and died on 2 February 1843 according to the 19 October 1853 survivor's pension application of her son Benjamin in Carroll County, Tennessee [M805, reel 883, frame 836]. According to his pension and estate files, his children were

i. Warren.

ii. Nathaniel G., born about 1800, perhaps the Nathaniel G. Womble who married Celia Sorrell, 9 January 1823 Edgecombe County bond and Martha Frier, 3 December 1823 Edgecombe County bond.

iii. Mary Ann Proctor, died before 1835.

iv. Finneyty, born about 1804.

v. Cealy Pollard Sorey, born about 1806.

vi. Jacob Y., born about 1808.

vii. Ajax, born about 1808, Jacob's twin brother.

viii. Benjamin F., born about 1810, living in Carroll County, Tennessee, on 19 October 1853 when he applied for a survivor's pension for his father's services.

ix. Enos G., born about 1811.

x. John Washington, born about 1813.

xi. Catherine, born about 1816.

 

Endnotes:

1.     John Womble may have been related to Celia Wumble, a base born child bound to John Brown, Jr., by the 11 February 1773 Bute County court [Minutes 1767-76, 259].

 

WOOD FAMILY

1.    Rebecca Wood, born say 1686, was the white servant of Mingo Ingles on 24 June 1707 when the York County court convicted her for having a "mulata female child." The court ordered that she serve her master an additional year and that she be sold by the churchwardens of Bruton Parish at the completion of her indenture for five years. On 4 May 1708 and 24 January 1709/10 she was convicted for having other "Mulatto" children [DOW 13:72, 115, 127, 137, 216, 235, 263]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Frank, born say 1707, a "malatto" taxable in Northampton County, Virginia, in 1728 in Ralph Pigot's list for the Lower Precinct [L.P. 1728].

ii. Ann, born say 1730, sued for debt on 15 May 1752 by the churchwardens of Nottoway Parish, Southampton County (for having a bastard child). On 22 September 1752 and 13 December 1753 the court ordered the churchwardens of Nottoway Parish to bind out her unnamed "Mulatto" child [Orders 1749-54, 239, 250, 278, 430].

2     iii. Esther, born say 1737.

3     iv. Thomas, born say 1758.

 

2.    Esther Wood, born say 1737, was a "mulatto girl" bound out by the churchwardens of Henrico County in October 1741 [Orders 1737-61, 158]. She may have been the mother of

i. Robert, born about 1758, a man of Colour, enlisted in the 3rd Virginia Regiment in the early part of the war,  then enlisted in the State Artillery Regiment commanded by Colonel Marshall and served during the war according to an affidavit by J. Marshall, former captain of the 11th Regiment. He enlisted in Fauquier County and applied for a pension in Washington, D.C., on 6 August 1818 [NARA, S.39909, M804, roll 2629, frame 1281 of 1290].

ii. Charles, taxable in Lancaster County from 1795 to 1814: taxable on 2 tithes from 1800 to 1802, 3 in 1803, 2 in 1806, in the list of "free negros & Mulattoes above the age of sixteen" in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1839, frames 134, 192, 244, 292, 385, 399], head of a Lancaster County household of 5 "other free" and a white male under ten years old, probably identical to the Charles Wood who was a "free Mulatto" head of a Northumberland County household of 5 "other free" in 1810. He may have been the Charles Wood who was a soldier in the infantry during the Revolution and assigned his right to payment of 25.12.0 to Mr. Brodhead on 3 August 1784 [Creel, Selected Virginia Revolutionary War Records, I:118].

iii. Philip, born say 1759, a soldier in June or July 1778 in Colonel Marshall's Regiment, re-enlisted and served until the end of the war according to an affidavit from Captain Christopher Roane on 25 April 1783. He was a seaman aboard the Tempest according to testimony by James Jennings [Wood, Phillip; Jennings, James (pp.8-10): Revolutionary Bounty Warrants, Digital Collections, LVA]. Captain Rd Taylor received his final pay of 6 pounds as a seaman on 16 June 1786. Captain Taylor also reveived the final payment of seaman John Wood of 20 pounds on the same date [M853, Roll 22; https://www.fold3.com/image/286702539]. However, Philip is not found in the early census or tax records.

iv. John, born say 1762, paid 6 pounds as a seaman on 16 June 1783, the payment received by Captain Richard Taylor on the same day he received Philip Wood's pay [Creel, Selected Virginia Revolutionary War Records, I:120]. He was a seaman aboard the Tempest according to testimony by James Jennings, listed before Philip and Thomas Wood and after Joseph Ranger [Wood, John; Jennings, James (pp.8-10): Revolutionary Bounty Warrants, Digital Collections, LVA]. John was taxable in Northumberland County from 1795 to 1812, called a "Black" man from 1805 [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 439, 448, 461, 480, 495, 508, 518, 568, 578, 605, 627, 661, 676]. He married Nancy Thomas, "daughter of Spencer Thomas, 13 January 1807 Northumberland County bond, Spencer Thomas security. John was a "free mulatto" head of a Northumberland County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:1000].

v. Jesse, born about 1764, enlisted in the Revolution from King William County on 8 September 1780: age 16, 4'10" high, a planter, born in Hanover County, yellow complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.23)]. He was a 73-year-old "free man of color" living in Fluvanna County, Virginia, on 26 November 1822 when he applied for a pension. He stated that he enlisted in King William County in 1778 and was discharged in Fluvanna County in 1782 and remained there [NARA, S.7962, M804, Roll 2637, frame 1005 of 1213; https://www.fold3.com/image/246/28480466]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in the upper district of Goochland County from 1804 to 1813: a groom at George Holman's in 1804, a farmer on David Ross's land in 1810, charged with Jack Wood's tithe in 1812, a carpenter at James Cockran's in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 698; 1810-32, frames 20, 88, 112, 177]. He was head of a Goochland County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:722].

 

3.    Thomas Wood, born say 1758, and Abel Spriggs were "mulattoes" listed among the deserters from the ship Dragon who were allowed until 20 July 1779 to return without punishment according to the 3 July 1779 issue of the Virginia Gazette [Dixon's edition, p. 3, col. 2]. They apparently returned since Abm Sprigg and Thomas Wood were seaman aboard the Dragon according to an affidavit by a fellow seaman aboard the ship, John Davis, who testified for the bounty land claim of James Jennings on 7 February 1834 and named five of the officers and fifty-two members of the crew who served faithfully for three years and were discharged at the Chickahominy Ship Yard [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Jennings, James (p.8), Digital Collection, LVA]. He was paid for serving on the Dragon between 21 April 1778 and 20 January 1779, was listed as a seaman aboard the Dragon on 2 September 1779, and qualified for bounty land by serving three years [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 8, 13, 72, 218]. He married Sally Bee, 20 January 1813 Lancaster County bond. He was a "free Negro" taxable in Lancaster County in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1815, frame 385]. He may have been the ancestor of

i. Holland, born say 1800, married Jane Haw, 15 October 1821 Lancaster County bond.

ii. Polly, married Robert Rich, November 1813 Lancaster County bond.

iii. Charlotte, born before 1776, "free mulatto," head of a Northumberland County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:1000], perhaps the Charlotte Wood who was head of a Richmond County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:407] and 8 "free colored" in Northumberland County in 1830.

iv. John, married Nancy Thomas, "daughter of Spencer Thomas, 13 January 1807 Northumberland County bond, Spencer Thomas security. John was a "free mulatto" head of a Northumberland County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:1000].

 

Warwick County

1.    Anne Wood, born say 1730, a widow, was presented by the Warwick County court on 1 May 1760 for having a "Mulatto" bastard child. On 3 July the jury found her guilty and ordered her to pay a fine of 15 pounds currency [Minutes 1748-62, 330]. She may have been the mother of

i. Jonathan, born about 1750, "a Free negroe," applied for a pension in Isle of Wight County on 6 January 1835. He stated that he was drafted into the militia in Surry County, Virginia, in 1776 and served several tours of six weeks each. James Johnson, a captain in the militia during the war, certified that Jonathan had served at least two tours of six weeks each [NARA, R.11793, M804, roll 2628, frame 1018 of 1371].

 

Frederick County

1.    Elizabeth Wood, born say 1726, was presented by the churchwardens of Frederick Parish, Frederick County, on 5 November 1746 for having a "Mulatto" child [Orders 1745-8, 195, 253]. She may have been the mother of

i. Agnes, mother of Betsey Bell, a "mullatoe" child bound out by the Frederick County court on 15 February 1785 [Orders 1783-5, 350].

 

WORRELL FAMILY

1.    Martha Worrell, born say 1735, was living in Southampton County on 10 December 1756 when the churchwardens sued her for 15 pounds for having an illegitimate child and the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her unnamed "mullatto" child. Sarah Turner and Christopher Wade were witnesses for the churchwardens. The court issued the same order two years later on 14 December 1758 [Orders 1754-9, 316, 323, 474]. She was probably the ancestor of

i. Sally, born 1794-1806, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 5 "free colored" in 1830.

ii. Lucy, born 1806-1820, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 3 "free colored" in 1830.

 

WORSHAM FAMILY

1.     "Negro Nan," born say 1758, sued John Worsham for her freedom in Pittsylvania County on 22 June 1785. The court ruled that she ought to be free and emancipated. She apparently won her freedom based on descent from an Indian woman because the court then ordered the churchwardens to bind out Sucky, Randal, Rachel, Anthony and Chany, the children of "Indian Nan" to John Worsham. Jesse Carter, Abia Cheatham and George Sutherland were her witnesses. On 21 August 1787 (written as 1797) "Nan a free Negro" sued John Worsham for trespass, assault and battery and false imprisonment. The case was dismissed but Worsham was ordered to pay her costs [Orders 1783-7, 196; 1787-91, 163]. She was the mother of

i. Sucky, born say 1779, probably identical to Susa Worsham who was head of a Caswell County, North Carolina household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:511].

ii. Randal.

iii. Rachel.

iv. Anthony.

v. Chany.

 

WOOTEN FAMILY

1.    Tom Wooten, born say 1700, a "mulatto boy," ran away from Cutbert Hubberd of Warwick County, before 26 July 1715 when Philip Lightfoot preferred his claim in York County court for taking him up [OW 14:404]. He may have been the ancestor of

2     i. Lucy, born say 1750.

ii. Patty, head of a Wilkes County household of a white male under 16 and 2 white females in 1790 [NC:121], perhaps the mother of Abner Wooten, born before 1776, head of a Wilkes County, North Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [NC:67], 6 in 1810 [NC:859] and 9 "free colored in 1820 [NC:491].

iii. Alimer, head of a Wilkes County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830.

iv. Elizabeth, head of a Wilkes County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [NC:67].

v. Stephen, taxable in Meherrin Parish, Greensville County, in 1791, 1800 and 1802 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 130, 263, 290].

vi. Benjamin, born before 1776, taxable in Meherrin Parish, Greensville County, from 1792 to 1820: listed in 1813 with (wife) Frances, "Mulattos" [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 143, 165, 195, 207, 225, 250, 263, 290, 341, 376, 417, 450, 466, 489, 610] and head of a Greensville County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:266].

vii. Fanny, head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:753].

viii. Tilley, married Edmund Guy, 8 September 1813 Orange County, North Carolina bond, Jesse and Buckner Guy bondsmen.

ix. Icy, head of a Wilkes County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:859] and 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:506]. She married Isaac Harris, 22 September 1832 Wilkes County bond.

x. Polly, born 1776-1794, head of a Wilkes County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:529].

 

2.    Lucy Wooton, born say 1750, was the mother of an illegitimate "Mulattoe" boy named Reuben Wooton who was bound out by the Orange County, Virginia court on 25 October 1770. She was the mother of

i. Reuben, born say 1770.

 

WRIGHT FAMILY

1.    Jane Wright, born say 1732, the servant of Richard Vernon, confessed to the Orange County, Virginia court on 22 November 1752 that she had a "Mullato bastard Child begot by a Negro" [Orders 1747-54, 392]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Henry, head of a New Hanover County, North Carolina household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [NC:311].

ii. Caroline, born before 1776, head of a Cumberland County, North Carolina household of 1 "other free" in 1820 [NC:222].

iii. Silvy, head of a Campbell County, Virginia household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:871].

 

Other members the Wright family were

i. John, a "Mulatto" counted in the 1786 North Carolina State Census for the Caswell District of Caswell County, listed adjacent to "Mulattoes" Arthur Toney and Charles Hood.

ii. Sawney, born say 1728, a "mulatto servant man" who was bound to Anthony Sydnor, Gent., in April 1749 when the Richmond County, Virginia court ordered that he serve another four months for running away [Orders 12:162].

 

YOUNG FAMILY

1.    Mary Young, born say 1668, was the servant of Mrs. Ann Farmer of Northumberland County on 17 April 1689 when the court ordered her to serve her mistress additional time for having a child by a "negro" [Orders 1678-98, pt. 2, 461]. She may have been the mother of

2     ii. Elizabeth, born say 1700.

 

2.    Elizabeth Young, born say 1700, was a "free Mulatto" woman of Norfolk County who purchased her husband Abraham Newton, a "Mulatto." She died in November 1743 and left a will (not recorded) which gave him his freedom. The Council of Virginia ordered him set free [McIlwaine, Executive Journals, Council of Colonial Virginia, V:196, 215]. She may have been the ancestor of

3     i. Isaac, born say 1730.

4     ii. Jane, born say 1736.

 

3.    Isaac Young, born say 1730, was living in Southampton County on 13 June 1754 when he failed to pay the discriminatory tax on his wife Jane. He was found not guilty. On 14 August 1755 the court ordered the churchwardens of Nottoway Parish to bind out his children [1749-54, 500, 512; 1754-9, 24, 33, 121; Judgment Papers 1752-5, frames 882-91]. He may have been the Isaac Young who was head of a Nansemond County household of 5 persons in 1783 [VA:57] and 4 "other free" in Norfolk County in 1810 [VA:816]. He may have been the father of

i. Aaron, born say 1762, head of a Nansemond County household of one "white" (free) person in 1783 and a "Mulatto" listed in Buxton's List for Nansemond County in 1783 [VA:57].

ii. Jacob, head of a Nansemond County household of 4 persons in 1783 [VA:57].

iii. Peggy, born say 1764, a "free Negro" who married Peter Elliott on 20 August 1785 in Norfolk County.

 

4.    Jane Young, born say 1736, was the mother of a "mulatoe orphan," William Young, bound as an apprentice bricklayer to Samuel Milburn in Bertie County, North Carolina, on 28 December 1769 [NCGSJ XIV:34]. Perhaps she had the child by a member of the Demery family since Wiley and Micajah Demery sometimes used the name Young. She may have been the Jane Young who purchased 50 acres in Northampton County, North Carolina, jointly with Philip Byrd on 16 March 1778 [DB 6:262]. Jane was the mother of

i. William, born about 1755, fourteen years old when he was bound apprentice on 28 December 1769, perhaps the same person as Wiley Demery, head of an Anson County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [NC:207], and counted a second time in 1800 as Wiley Young [NC:203], called William Demery in 1810, head of a Marion District, South Carolina household of 3 "other free" in [SC:80].

ii. ?Robert, born say 1759, purchased 150 acres in Franklin County, North Carolina on 2 November 1780 [DB 5:14]. He was head of a Franklin County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:825].

iii. ?Charity, born say 1768, married Solomon Bibby, 25 December 1789 Franklin County bond.

iv. ?Micajah1 Demery, born say 1770, a "Black" person 12-50 years old living alone in Captain Dupree's District of Northampton County, North Carolina, in 1786 for the state census. He called himself Micajah Young on 30 April 1794 when he married Elizabeth Evans, Wake County bond. He was head of a Wake County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 (abstracted as Micajah Dempsey) [NC:106]. He was head of an Anson County household of 5 "other free" in 1800, counted as Micajah Young [NC:203] and counted a second time as Micajah Demery [NC:207], 7 in 1810 (as Micajah Demery) [NC:44], and 11 "free colored" in 1820, called "Micajah Demery alias Young" [NC:12].

 

Other members of the Young family were

i. Nancy, born about 1756, registered in Middlesex County on 23 August 1801: born free; 45 years of age; 5'2-1/4"; Dark complexion [Register of Free Negroes 1800-60, p.15].

ii. Tony, "Free Negro" head of a Charlotte County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:69].

iii. David, head of a Charles City household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:939].

iv. Powers, head of a Charles City household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:939].

v. Lucy, head of a Charlotte County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:67].

vi. Sall, head of a Westmoreland County household of 2 "other free" in 1810.

 

Accomack  County

1.    Catherine Young, born say 1698, was a "Free Negro Woman" who complained to the Accomack County court on 5 March 1728 that John McAlester was detaining her against her will as a slave. The court ordered her released [Orders 1724-31, 148, 154]. In 1731 she was a taxable "negro" in Richard Haise's Northampton County, Virginia household in the list of Thomas Marshall [L.P. 1731]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Ned, head of an Accomack Parish, Accomack County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:85].

 

Augusta County

1.    Lodowick Young, born say 1730, was a "Negro slave" who had a son named James Young by Jane Colligen in Augusta County about 1755. He was the father of

i. James, born about 1755, a two-year-old "Mulato" boy living in Augusta County on 17 August 1757 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Augusta Parish to bind him out [Orders 1753-5, 428].

ii. ?Julia, born say 1758, "Molatto" mother of Kitty Young who was ordered bound to Jacob Doran by the Augusta County court on 20 February 1781. She may have been identical to Julia (no last name), the "Mulattoe" mother of James Charles who was bound out by the court on 13 June 1782 [Orders 1779-83, 325, 414].

 

Endnotes:

1.    The other Southampton County householders who were sued for failing to pay tax on their wives were John Porteus, John Demery, Isaac Young, Thomas Wilkins, James Brooks, Jr. and Sr., John Byrd, Jr. and Sr., Abraham Artis, Lewis Artis, William Brooks, Ann Brooks, and William Tabor.

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