Free African Americans in the Revolution

Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Maryland and Delaware

by Paul Heinegg on  http://www.freeafricanamericans.com

Abbreviations:

PPTL are the Personal Property Tax Lists, microfilm copies of the originals, available on interlibrary loan from the Library of Virginia (LVA).

Orders and Minutes are the court order and minute books for each county at the state archives.

NARA is the National Archives Record Administration Revolutionary War records on microfilm. M804 are the pension and bounty land warrant application files and M246 are the Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783.

S.S. are the Secretary of State files at the North Carolina State Archives.

T&C are the Treasurer and Comptroller's Records at the North Carolina Archives.

NCGSJ is the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal

C.R. are county records at the North Carolina Archives.

Mil. are the Military Collection at the North Carolina Archives

Sources:

Southern Campaigns Revolutionary War Pension Statements & Rosters, http://www.revwarapps.org

 

More than 350 African Americans who were born free during the colonial period served in the Revolution from Virginia. Another 325 served from North Carolina, 40 from South Carolina, 50 from Maryland, and 17 from Delaware.

VIRGINIA

Absalom Ailstock, born in Louisa County, appeared in Rockbridge County, Virginia court to make a declaration to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution [NARA, S.6475, M804, roll 21, frame 519; https://www.fold3.com/image/1/11056431].

William Ailstock was a "free" taxable in Richmond City in 1784 [PPTL 1787-99]. He received approval for bounty land on 29 May 1783 for serving three years in the Virginia State Artillery commanded by Colonel Thomas Marshall. He was discharged on 22 August 1780 [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Ailstock, William, 1783, Digital Collection, LVA].

Michael Ailstock, Junr., was living in Louisa County on 9 March 1773 when his suit against William Johnson, Gent., was dismissed by the Louisa County court [Orders 1766-74, 92, 97, 115, 177]. He served in the Revolution in Captain Michael Gilbert's 11th Company as a drummer from October 1778 to October 1779 [NARA, M246, roll 131, frames 497, 507, 509; roll 132, frames 207, 218, 718]. He was taxable in Amherst County in 1782 [PPTL 1782-1803, frame 9], taxable in Louisa County from 1783 to 1794 [PPTL, 1782-1814] and was taxable in Albemarle County from 1795 to 1807, probably related to Patience Alstock who was counted in a "list of Free Negroes & Mulattoes" in Albemarle County in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1799, frames 445, th477, 584; 1800-1813, frames 22, 66, 111, 135, 154, 200, 290, 337, 553]. On 6 January 1800 he was ordered to remain in the Albemarle County jail for a breach of the peace until he posted bond of $100 and his securities James Going and Shadrack Battles posted bond of $50 each for his good behavior [Orders 1798-1800, 380, 393].

James Ailstock was said to have been a son of Michael Ailstock, Sr., served in the 3rd Virginia Regiment and failed to return to Louisa County [Revolutionary War Rejected Claims, Louisa County, 1834, Ailstock, Charles, Digital Collections, LVA].

Charles Ailstock was said to have been a son of Michael Ailstock, Sr., and served in the 3rd Virginia Regiment. On 3 August 1832 Abraham H. Davis, a pensioner in Louisa County, testified that he had enlisted in 1776 in the 3rd Virginia Regiment in the company commanded by Thomas Johnson and that James and Charles Ailstock enlisted with him and were with him in the engagements which took place at Harlem Heights in New York as well as the battles of Trenton and Princeton. They did not return to Louisa County, and he had no idea what had become of them. John Thomason of Louisa County certified that two sons of Michael Alesocke, whose Christian names he could not recollect, enlisted with him in the company commanded by Captain Thomas Johnson [Revolutionary War Rejected Claims, Louisa County, 1834, Ailstock, Charles, Digital Collections, LVA]. Charles Ailstock was head of a King George County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:203].

Lewis Ailstock was living in Caroline County on 12 August 1756 when the court ordered the churchwardens of St. Mary's Parish to bind him to Thomas Roy, Gentleman [Orders 1755-8, 191]. He was on the payroll of the 10th Virginia Regiment from 28 March 1777 to November 1779 and was at Valley Forge from May to June 1778 [NARA, M246, roll 103, frames 591, 638; roll 104, frame 316; roll 108, frames 789; M881, https://www.fold3.com/image/1/22954787].

Emmanuel Alvis was a soldier serving in the Revolution on 15 June 1778 and 21 June 1779 when the York County court allowed his wife Mildred Alvis pay for her subsistence [Orders 1774-84, 163, 219]. He was called Emanuel Olvis on his discharge which stated that he enlisted on 25 September 1777 under Captain Samuel Timson, decd., to serve in the State Regiment of Artillery for three years and he served that time [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Olvis, Emanuel, Digital Collections, LVA]. He was taxable in York County on 4 cattle in 1785, taxable on 2 tithes in 1797, 1798, 1802, 1803, 1805, and a tithe in 1806 and 1807. Perhaps Mildred was the Milly Alvis who was head of a household of 1 "free Negro & mulattoes over 16" in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1841, frames 106, 180, 199, 209, 227, 235, 274, 284, 304, 314, 325, 384].

William Ampey was in the list of men in the service of the Amherst County Militia with John Redcross in 1781 [William & Mary Digital Archives, Swem Library's Special Collections, Cabell Papers Box 2, Folder11.pdf; https://digitalarchive.wm.edu/handle/10288/16244]. He was head of an Amherst County household of 5 persons in 1783 [VA:48]. He was taxable in Amherst County from 1782 to 1786 [PPTL 1782-1803, 9, 43, 70] and taxable in Rockbridge County from 1788 to 1795: called William Empy in 1788, William Aimpty (Negroe) in 1790, William Ampey in 1791 and 1792, William Ampy (Negro) in 1793 and taxable in 1800, 1803, 1805, 1806 and from 1809 to 1818 [PPTL 1787-1810, frames 33, 87, 100, 120, 147, 178, 202, 347, 437, 464, 491, 515, 593, 606; 1811-1822, frames 22, 46, 183, 332, 375, 486, 535].

Nathaniel Anderson was a "free negro" ordered bound by the churchwardens of Elizabeth River Parish to John Dennis in Norfolk County on 16 January 1755 [Orders 1753-5, 105]. He was a resident of Princess Anne County when he enlisted in the Revolution and was sized in 1780: age 39, 5'4-1/2" high, a carpenter, born in Norfolk County, black complexion, deserted [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.33)].

Adam Armstrong, the "Mulatto" son of Frances Armstrong, was bound out in Henrico County on 3 May 1762 [Orders 1755-62, 585]. He served in the Revolution in Virginia [NARA, M881, https://www.fold3.com/image/23344857]. He received bounty land based on his discharge on 1 March 1780 by Colonel Porterfield after three years service [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Armstrong, Adam, Digital Collections, LVA].

Tobias Armstong, the "Mulatto" son of Frances Armstrong, was bound out in Henrico County on 3 May 1762 [Orders 1755-62, 585], perhaps the Tobias Armstrong who enlisted in the Revolution in Virginia in May 1779 and served for the war according to an affidavit from Lieutenant N. Darby of the 1st Virginia Regiment on 30 June 1783 [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Armstrong, Tobias, Digital Collections, LVA].

Burrell Artis was born in Southampton County and was living there in September 1780 when he enlisted: planter, black complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.70)]. John Taylor received his final pay for service in the infantry on 13 May 1783 [NARA, M881, https://www.fold3.com/image/23344935].

John1 Ashby was married to Sarah Ashby, "Free Mulattoes," in 1765 when the birth and baptism of their children Matthew and Philemon were recorded in Bruton Parish, James City County [Bruton Parish Register, 26, 32]. He died before 21 October 1776 when the York County court ordered the churchwardens of Bruton Parish to bind out his unnamed orphans and also (his son) Matt Ashby. On 15 June 1778 the court allowed (his widow) Sally Ashby, "wife of ___ Ashby" 12 pounds for the subsistence allowed wives, children and aged parents of poor soldiers serving in the Revolution. She was called the mother of a soldier when she received an allowance on 21 June 1779 and 17 July 1780 [Orders 1774-84, 127, 163, 219, 273].

James Ash, "orphan of Rachel," was bound apprentice in Norfolk County on 4 April 1764 [Orders 1764-68, 11]. He was a soldier born in Isle of Wight County and residing there on 28 September 1780 when he enlisted in the Revolution for 1-1/2 years: age 18, black complexion, 4'9-3/4" high, a farmer by trade [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.70)]. He was a "Mulatto" head of a Nansemond County household in Buxton's list for 1784 [VA:74]. In 1784 he was called James Ash of Isle of Wight County when he petitioned the Virginia Legislature for payment due him for eighteen months service as a Continental soldier in one of the Isle of Wight County divisions [Virginia State Library Legislative Petitions, 23 November 1784].

Humphrey Baine was presented by the grand jury in York County on 21 December 1772 for not listing himself as a tithable [Judgments & Orders 1772-4, 172]. He received bounty land based on his discharge by Lieutenant D. Mann which stated that he enlisted in the State Garrison Regiment on 23 September 1778 and served until 23 September 1781 [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Bane, Humphrey, Digital Collections, LVA].

John Banks registered as a free Negro in Goochland County on 3 September 1823: a man of colour, was 74 years of age the 25th day of last February, about six feet high [Register of Free Negroes, p.152]. He enlisted in Goochland County about 1779, served for two years, and was discharged at the barracks in Albemarle County [NARA, W.5763, M804, roll 134, frame 329; https://www.fold3.com/image/1/10996332].

Jacob Banks registered as a "free Negro" in Goochland County on 21 September 1818: a free man of color aged 64 years about five feet Six inches high [Register of Free Negroes, p.106, no.221]. He was a "free man of Color" of Goochland County who served 18 months as a wagoner [NARA, M804, S.8056, roll 134, frame 271; https://www.fold3.com/image/1/10996056].

Godfrey Bartley, born 29 November 1764, was the son of David Bartley and his wife Lucretia, "free mulattoes," who registered his birth in Bruton Parish, James City and York counties [Bruton Parish Register, 27]. Godfrey Bartlett was a soldier born in York County and residing there in September 1780 when he enlisted in the Revolution: age 15, 5'3-1/4" high, Mulattoe complexion, a farmer [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.56)].

James Bass was taxable on a free tithe in Norfolk County in 1787 and from 1798 to 1810: a labourer in a "List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes" on Deep Creek 1801 [PPTL, 1782-90, frame 562; 1791-1812, frames 243, 295, 351, 427, 461, 479, 555, 572, 674, 720]. He appeared in Bedford County, Tennessee court to apply for a pension for his services as a private in the Virginia Militia. He stated that he was born in Norfolk County, Virginia, enlisted in 1778 and had moved to Bedford County thirteen years previous [NARA, S1745, M804, roll 169, frame 102; https://www.fold3.com/image/11695258]. He was head of a Bedford County household of 9 "free colored " in 1820.

Shadrack Battles enlisted in the Revolution in Louisa County on 14 December 1781, and was sized the following day: age 26, 5'10-1/2" high, yellow complexion, a planter [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.99)]. He registered in Albemarle County on 10 March 1810: a man of Colour, a black man, aged about fifty seven years, five feet 10-1/2 inches high. He was "a man of colour" who appeared in Albemarle County court and testified that he enlisted while resident in Amherst County in 1777 and served for three years [NARA, S.37713, M805-63, frames 183-9].

Solomon Beckett was a "Mulatto" taxable in Northampton County from 1782 to 1789 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 3, 73, 94]. He served in the Revolution from Northampton County [Nottingham, Soldiers and Sailors of the Eastern Shore of Virginia in the Revolutionary War, 47].

George Beckett was sued in Northampton County court for a 4 pounds, 8 shilling debt on 13 April 1774 [Minutes 1771-5, 247]. He was listed as one of the men aboard the Accomac who was entitled to bounty land for three years service in the Revolution [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 5, 67, 407]. He was a seaman from Accomack County who served in the Revolution and died intestate leaving no children. His estate was divided in Accomack County among his four sisters, Nancy, Betty, Rebecca, and Mason [Orders 1832-36, 251]. Their claim for his service aboard the galley Accomac was allowed on 9 December 1833 [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Tunnel, William, Digital Collections, LVA]. Rebecca Beckett registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 12 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 358]. Mason Beckett was head of an Accomack County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:129].

James Berry was one of the members of Captain Joseph Spencer's 7th Virginia Regiment who did not return from furlough in Gloucester Town. Spencer advertised a reward for their return in the 8 August 1777 issue of the Virginia Gazette, describing James as a mulatto fellow, about 30 years old, 5 feet 8 or 9 inches high; enlisted in Fredericksburg but served his time with Mr. Thomas Bell of Orange County [Virginia Gazette, Purdie edition, p.4, col. 3].

Charles Beverly was listed as deceased in the 12 November 1777 muster of Captain John Nicholas' 1st Virginia Regiment [NARA, M246, frame 43 of 742]. He died before 7 May 1784 when the clerk of Buckingham County court certified that Priscilla and Jane Beverly were his only heirs. The affidavit was filed with the bounty land warrant for his services in the Revolution [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Beverly, Charles, Digital Collections, LVA]. Priscilla and Jane were "Mulatto" taxables in Buckingham County from 1783 to 1788 [PPTL, 1782-1797]. Priscilla was head of a Buckingham County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 and Jane was head of a Buckingham County household of 12 "other free" in 1810 [VA:776].

Sylvester Beverly was listed in the payroll of the 1st Virginia Regiment from November 1777 to December 1779 [NARA, M246, roll 94, frames 43, 59, 91, 113, 121, 725 of 742; https://www.fold3.com/image/10068722]. He was a Revolutionary War soldier from Franklin County, Virginia, who enlisted in 1776 and served until the end of the War. He was eighty years old and owned 126 acres of land in 1822 when he petitioned the Legislature for a state pension [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 30; LVA petition dated 25 February 1823, reel 235, box 296, folder 103]. He was on a list of soldiers in the Revolution who had not yet received bounty land by 25 November 1834 [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 199]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Buckingham County in 1783 and 1784 [PPTL 1782-97] and head of a Fluvanna County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:493]

Peter Blizzard was called a "poor Mulatto" on 21 January 1772 when the Surry County court ordered him bound out [Orders 1764-74, 81, 276; 1775-85, 80]. He was called Peter Blizzard of Surry County on 29 October 1788 when he sold 100 acres in Prince George County which Edward Newell had sold to him in the year 1782 for serving as a soldier in the Continental Service for eighteen months in place of John Newell [DB 1787-92, 232]. He was taxable in Surry County from 1788 to 1816: listed with 4 "free Negroes & Mulattoes above the age of 16" in 1813; taxable on 2 free tithes in 1812 and 1813, 3 in 1815, and 2 in 1816 [PPTL, 1782-90, frames 469, 594; 1791-1816, 105, 232, 282, 361, 439, 514, 588, 628, 666, 704, 726, 847]. He was head of a Surry County household of 2 "free colored" in 1830.

Jacob Boon was a yellow complexioned soldier, 5'5-1/2" high, a farmer born in Isle of Wight and living in Nansemond County when he enlisted in the Revolution for 1-1/2 years on 28 September 1780 [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.61)].

Stephen Bowles was listed as dead in the November 1777 muster of the 4th Virginia Regiment [NARA, M881, the Revolutionary War, https://www.fold3.com/image/22717393].

James Bowman was a soldier in the Virginia Line who died before 6 October 1783 when an affidavit by Betty Morris, a "free Mulatto woman," that William Bowman was his brother and only surviving heir was certified by the Henrico County court [Orders 1781-4, 439].

James Bowser was born in Nansemond County and enlisted in the Revolution there for 1-1/2 years on 28 September 1780: 50 years of age, 5'6-3/4" high, a farmer, yellow complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.61)]. He was taxable in Isle of Wight County from 1782 to 1800: a "free Mulatto" in 1782, a "F.N." from 1793 to 1795 [PPTL 1782-1810, frames 4, 61, 89, 135, 181, 241, 331, 346, 418, 428, 491]. Nathaniel Bowser, Sr., and Thomas Bowser, heir at law of James Bowser, testified on 17 October 1833 that Nathaniel Bowser, Thomas Bowser, and Betsy Bowser, Moses Ash, Caroline Ash, Lydia Ash, Thomas Ash, and Curtis Ash were the only heirs of James Bowser who had served in the Revolution in 1782. In 1835 they received bounty land scrip for his service [NARA, BLWt. 2001-100, M804-306, frame 0123].

James Bowser was a native and resident of Nansemond County on 1 January 1782 when he enlisted in the Revolution for the duration of the war. He was sized in June 1782: age 19, 5'1-3/4" high, yellow complexion, marked from pox [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.81)]. He was eligible for military bounty land in 1803 [NARA, M246, roll 114, frame 448]. He was a "Free Negro" over the age of 45 in 1815 when he was taxable on a slave over the age of 16, 2 cattle, and 17 horses in "S. Hole" in Nansemond County in 1815 and 1816 [PPTL 1815-1837, frames 10, 51].

Augustine Boyd was among a group of Revolutionary War seamen who deserted from the ship Tartar and for each of whom a $100 reward was offered by Thomas Grant of the Chickahominy Shipyard in the 11 September 1779 issue of the Virginia Gazette: ...George Day, and Augustine Boyd, all of Wicomico parish, Northumberland county [Virginia Gazette, http://www.accessible.com]. He was a "Mulatto" sailor, born in Northumberland County, drafted there on 21 March 1781 and sized in 1781: yellow complexion, Mulatto, age 25, 5'11-1/4" high [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.47)]. He was a "free mulatto" head of a Northumberland County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:973]. He was entitled to bounty land for his service as a seaman [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, Virginia, 215].

Nathaniel Branham was living in Louisa County on 14 February 1780 when he received a land office warrant for service in the French and Indian War as a soldier in Captain William Phillips' company of volunteer rangers in 1763 [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy, 31:199]. He was taxable in Louisa County from 1782 to 1814, listed as a "free Negro & Mulatto" in 1813 and 1814 [PPTL, 1782-1814].

John Brandom, son of Mary Brandom, was born 4 October 1760. He and Rhode Brandom were on the pay roll of Captain Dudley's Company of the 2nd Virginia Regiment from 1 May to September 1778 [NARA, M246, roll 96, frames 326, 3530, 536, 541].

Thomas Brannum/ Brandom/ Brandon, "Son of Elenor Brandon, was bound to Jacob Chavis in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on 13 July 1764 [Orders 1763-4, 35, 91; 1764-5, 108]. He was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820. He was living in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, when he applied for a pension for his services in the Revolution, stating that he was born in Hanover County and moved to Mecklenburg County after the Revolution [NARA, W.4643, M804, roll 323, frame 507 of 1136; https://www.fold3.com/image/13730023].

James Brandom was a soldier born in Goochland County and living there in June 1779 when he enlisted in the Revolution. He was sized on 4 April 1781: yellow Negro, age 23, 5'5-1/4" high, a planter, made his escape from Ch'stown [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.90)].

Rhode Brandom was called the son of Mary Brandom when he was bound out by the churchwardens of Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on 11 August 1766 and called a "Molotto Boy" on 12 October 1772 when the court ordered him bound to someone else. He was listed in the payroll of Captain Dudley's 2nd Virginia State Regiment commanded by Colonel Gregory Smith from July to December 1778 [NARA, M246, Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783, https://www.fold3.com/image/10081826, 10081833, 10081873]. He was on a list of soldiers in the Revolution who had not yet received bounty land by 25 November 1834 [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 199].

Freeman Brown was head of a Charles City County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:959]. He was a man of color from Charles City County who served in the Revolution [Charles City County Historical Society Newsletter 6:10-14 cited by NSDAR, African American Patriots, 148].

Edward Brown was head of a Charles City County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:957] and was a man of color from Charles City County who served in the Revolution [Charles City County Historical Society Newsletter 6:10-14 cited by NSDAR, African American Patriots, 148].

Isaac Brown was born in Charles City County and enlisted there in the Revolution for 1-1/2 years on 12 September 1780: complexion black, 5'2-1/2" high, a farmer [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.45)]. He was taxable in Lower Westover Precinct of Charles City County in 1786 [PPTL, 1783-7], and head of a Charles City County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:959] and 4 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:13]. He applied for a pension in Charles City County, stating that he enlisted in Charles City County in 1780 and served eighteen months [NARA, S.39,214, M804-366].

James Brown was a native and resident of Dinwiddie County on 6 June 1782 when he enlisted in the Revolution and was sized the same month: age 18, 5'6" high, yellow complexion [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.99)].

George Brumagam enlisted in the Revolution as a substitute in Fairfax County on 16 March 1781: Brumma, Geo., age 23, 5'8-1/2" high, yellow complexion, a tailor, born in Australia [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p. 55)].

George Burk enlisted in the Revolution in Shenandoah County for two years in 1779 in Captain Abraham Tipton's Company of Colonel Joseph Crockett Virginia Regiment. He applied for a pension in Jefferson County, Indiana, in 1831. He spent his time in the service guarding British prisoners at Albemarle Barracks and repulsing the Indians in Kentucky [NARA, S.32152, roll 413, frame 436 of 548]. He was head of a Ripley Township, Johnson County, Indiana household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 and 7 "free colored" in 1830.

Francis Bunday was a soldier born in Caroline County and living there on 30 March 1781 when he enlisted in the Revolution: age 18, 5'2-1/2" high, Negro [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.90)]. On 9 July 1783 he received his discharge papers and a certificate from the War Office that he had only received four months pay since 1 January 1782 [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Bundy, Francis, Digital Collections, LVA]. He was a "Free Negro" head of a Culpeper County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:7]. He was a resident of Culpeper County when he applied for a pension for his services in the Revolution [NARA, S.37719, M805-139, frames 554-7].

William Bunday served in the Revolution but had not received bounty land due him by 7 January 1835 [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 223]. He was taxable on a tithe and a horse in Essex County in 1787 (called Willm. Bond) and taxable in Essex County from 1809 to 1816 [PPTL, 1782-1819, frames 155, 425, 510, 528, 616].

Charles Barnett enlisted in the Revolution for 1-1/2 years from Albemarle County, Virginia, on 18 September 1780 and was sized at Chesterfield County court house about the same time: age 18, 5'5" high, yellow complexion, a farmer, born in Albemarle County [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.61)]. He lived in Albemarle County until 1800 according to his Revolutionary War Pension application. He was a "mulatto" who enlisted in Charlottesville in the 7th Virginia Regiment. Sharod Going testified that he was with him at Chesterfield Courthouse [NARA, S.8048, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/1/11000781].

Benjamin Bartlett was a "poor child" bound apprentice to John Byrd in Southampton County on 14 May 1772 [Orders 1768-72, 470, 532]. He registered as a free Negro in Southampton County on 12 June 1794: Age 39, Colour Black, born of free parents in Southampton [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 27]. He was a "free Negro" taxable in Prince Edward County in 1802, 1803 and 1811 [PPTL 1782-1809, frames 598, 619; 1809-31, frame 47] and he was a "fn" taxable in Charlotte County from 1806 to 1813 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 688, 722, 755, 851, 893], a "F.N." head of a Charlotte County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:68]. He was called Benjamin Bartlett of Prince Edward County on 16 April 1796 when he sold Aaron Smith his bounty land due him for serving for three years as a soldier in Lieutenant David Walker's Company of Colonel Febiger's Regiment and recorded the sale in Richmond [Revolutionary Bounty Warrants, Bartlett, Benjamin, Digital Collections, LVA].

Joe Butler was a "mulatto" listed among seven deserters, drafted out of Prince George County, Virginia, for whom a reward was offered in the 28 November 1777 issue of the Virginia Gazette [Virginia Gazette (Purdie edition), p.3, col. 3; also on http://www.accessible.com].

Reuben Byrd applied for a pension in Powhatan County on 15 June 1820 at the age of fifty-six years. He testified that he enlisted in Hillsborough, North Carolina, and served in Captain James Gunn's regiment of dragoons. Benjamin Sublett testified that he met Reuben, a sixteen or seventeen-year-old "Mulatto boy," while serving in the Revolution in May 1780. Gabriel Gray testified that Reuben served as "Boman" for his brother Lieutenant William Gray [NARA, S.37776, M804-243, frame 0362]. He was head of a Petersburg household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:121b]. He registered in Petersburg on 9 June 1810: a brown Mulatto man, five feet seven inches high, forty seven years old, born free in Essex County, a stone mason [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 576].

John Caine enlisted for 18 months on 23 September 1780: age 23, 5'3-1/2" high, born in Fairfax County, Yellow complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.62)].

William Cannady was presented for not listing his wife as a tithable in York County on 21 November 1765. He was a soldier in the Revolution on 17 August 1778 and 21 June 1779 when the York County court allowed his wife Frances Kennedy a subsistence payment [Judgments & Orders 1763-5, 90, 126; 1768-70, 299; Orders 1774-84, 170, 219].

William Carter enlisted in the Revolution for 18 months from Charles City County on 12 September 1780: age 22, 5'9" high, yellow complexion, a sawer, born in Charles City [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.41)].

James Carter was a six-year-old "negro" bound to Thomas Pettit on 14 August 1765 and bound to Anne Pettit, widow, on 13 January 1778 in Northampton County, Virginia [Minutes 1765-71, 8, 33]. He was a "Mulatto" or "free Negro" taxable in Northampton County from 1787 to 1805 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 64, 125, 207, 345, 408, 447, 467, 530]. He was a resident of Northampton County when he appeared in court to apply for a pension for his services in the Revolution, stating that he enlisted from Northampton County for 18 months early in the war to garrison a fort on Kings Creek in Northampton County and served the time. Six months after his discharge he crossed the Chesapeake Bay and enlisted in Portsmouth in the 2d Virginia Regiment of Artillery commanded by Colonel Thomas Marshall. He received bounty land of 200 acres for the five years of service [NARA, S.9162, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/12845878].

William Case, a "Mulatto," died while serving in the Revolution [National Archives Bounty Land Warrant 1826-100, https://www.fold3.com/image/12751811].

John Case, a "Mulatto," and brother of William Case, died while serving in the Revolution according to the 11 June 1807 deposition of John Cropper, Jr., of Accomack County, former Lieutenant Colonel of the 9th Virginia Regiment. He stated that William and John had no wives or children, and Betty Case "of this county," who was an infant during the war, was their only legal representative [LVA, Digital Collections, Case, John, Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants].

William Cassidy was taxable in Norfolk County in 1801 and 1803, counted in a list of "free Negroes and Mulattoes" on Tanner's Creek in Norfolk County in 1801 [PPTL, 1791-1812, frames 383, 462]. He appeared in Princess Anne County court on 6 October 1811 when he testified for the Legislative Petition of Aaron Weaver. He stated that he was born in Northumberland County and served with Aaron for three years aboard the galley Protector under captains Conway and Thomas [Legislative Petitions of the General Assembly, 1776-1865, Accession no. 36121, Box 309, folder 62, Weaver, Aaron, Digital Collections, LVA]. He registered in York County on 16 December 1822: a dark mulatto about 65 years of age 5 feet four Inches high...born free [Register of Free Negroes 1798-1831, no.163]. He received bounty land based on his discharge from Captain John Thomas of the Galley Protector which stated that he served in the Navy from 6 January 1777 to 26 January 1780 [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Casity, William, Digital Collections, LVA].

James Causey served as a seaman in the Revolution for three years, received a discharge from James Markham, captain of the ship Dragon, on 16 February 1780, and assigned (signing) his bounty land on 23 August 1783 to Mr. Joseph Sanders [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Causey, James, Digital Collection, LVA]. He was taxable in Northumberland County from 1785 to 1813 [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 283, 603, 621, 653, 668, 682] and a "free mulatto" head of a Northumberland County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:975].

Charles Charity enlisted in the Revolution on 2 September 1780 for 1-1/2 years: age 24, 5'6-1/2" high, a planter, born in Surrey, black complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.26)]. He enlisted in the Revolution at Hampton, Virginia, was discharged in Winchester, and applied for a pension in July 1827 in Newby District, South Carolina, at the age of 70 years [NARA S.39317, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/12804208].

Randolph Charity was recruited for 3 years in Captain Nathan Fox's 6th Virginia Regiment on 24 March 1777 and died 10 July 1777 [NARA, M246, roll, frames 154, 157, 160, 178, 180 of 756].

Edward Chavis was "a free Negro Boy" bound out by the Amelia County court [Orders 1746-51, 192; 1757-60, 36, 45; 1760-3, 44]. He and Samuel Chavous enlisted in the Revolution on 28 August 1777. He was in the payroll of the 14th Virginia Regiment in March 1778 and in June 1778, sick at Valley Forge, and he and Samuel were in the payroll of the 18th Regiment in April 1779, mustered at Middlebrook on 7 May 1779 [NARA, M246, roll 109, frames 163, 175, 209; roll 112, frame 714].

Samuel Chavis, a "Melatto boy," was bound out in Lunenburg County in April 1751 [Orders 1748-52, 396]. He enlisted in the Revolution on 28 August 1777. He was in the payroll of the 14th Virginia Regiment in March 1778 and in the payroll of the 18th Regiment in April 1779, mustered at Middlebrook on 7 May 1779 [NARA, M246, roll 109, frames 163, 175, 209; roll 112, frame 714, 723]. On 14 August 1789 he assigned his rights to his land warrant for services in the Revolution [Revolutionary Bounty Warrants, Chavis, Samuel, Digital Collections, LVA]. He was a "free Negro" taxable in Dinwiddie County in 1801 and a "free" taxable in 1802 [PPTL, 1790 A, p.3; 1790 A, p.3; 1801 B, p.25; 1802 A, p.4]. He was counted the "list of free Negroes and Mulattoes" in Mecklenburg County from 1813 to 1815 [PPTL, 1806-28, frames 307, 417, 435].

John Chavis enlisted in the Revolution while resident of Mecklenburg County, Virginia, in 1780: age 26, 5'9-1/2" high, a planter, born in Brunswick County, black hair, swarthey complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.26)]. He was called John Shivers on 16 November 1818 when he made a declaration in Southampton County court setting forth that he was a soldier in the Revolutionary War by voluntary enlistment [Minutes 1816-9, unpaged]. He was called Jack Chavis in 1810 when he was head of a Southampton County household of 3 "other free" [VA:77].

George Chavis was the son of Margaret Chaves, a "Mulatto Girl," bound out in Charles City County in 1750. He was bound out in 1761 [Orders 1737-51, 574; 1758-62, 302, 313]. He was listed in the 3rd Virginia Company commanded by Major Samuel Finley from 1 September 1782 to 1 May 1783, called George Chavour, listed with John Chavour [NARA, M246, roll 113, frames 672, 674].

Isaac Chavis enlisted in the Revolution on 3 February 1777, a pioneer listed in the muster of the 14th Virginia Regiment commanded by Colonel Charles Lewis from 29 April 1777 to December 1777, paid a bounty of $20 to enlist in Charlotte County for 3 years between July and November 1778 [NARA, M246, roll 112, frames 111, 613, 619, 631, 637, 642, 649]. He was head of a Granville County household of 3 "other free" in 1800, 3 "other free" and one white woman in 1810 [NC:858], and 1 "free colored" in Mecklenburg County in 1820. His heirs Jacob Chavos, William Chavos, Sally Brandom and Patsy Scott applied for a land grant for his services in the Revolution, stating that he was a "free man of color of Charlotte County" who enlisted in the 14th Virginia Regiment in March 1777 and was included in the muster roll of Captain Michaux. Their petition was rejected [Chavos, Isaac: Petition, 1837, Revolutionary War Rejected Claims Records, Digital Collections, LVA].

James Chavis, son of "Rebecca Chavis a Free Negro," was bound out in Amelia County on 28 August 1760 [Orders 1751-5, 149; 1760-3, 44]. He was listed in the payroll of Captain Dudley's 2nd Virginia State Regiment commanded by Colonel Gregory Smith from 1 July 1778 to November 1779, in the same list as John and Rhode Brandom and Elias Pettiford [NARA, M246, roll 96, frames 532, 535, 541, 545, 547; https://www.fold3.com/image/10081826, 10081833, 10081873]. He received bounty land for his service [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Chavis, James, Digital Collection, LVA]. He was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 10 "free colored" in 1820.

John Chavis enlisted in the 5th Virginia Regiment in December 1778 and served for three years. Captain Mayo Carrington, in a bounty warrant written in March 1783, certified that Chavis had "faithfully fulfilled [his duties] and is thereby entitled to all immunities granted to three year soldiers" [Mecklenburg County Legislative Petition of 14 December 1820]. He was listed in the payroll of Captain Mayo Carrington's Company for the month of July 1779 [NARA, M246, https://www.fold3.com/image/9946464]. He was taxable in Mecklenburg County in 1785 and 1786 [PPTL 1782-1805, frames 99, 127, 211]. On 20 April 1818 his sons John, Charles, and Randolph Chavis of Mecklenburg County gave their power of attorney to Melchizedek Roffe to collect money due to them from the State Treasurer for their father's service in the Revolution [Virginia Genealogist, p.153; Mecklenburg County DB 17:218-9]. William O. Goode, former member of the General Assembly from Mecklenburg County, wrote a letter in support of the petition to the Legislature made by his son Randall. Goode stated that John and his brother Anthony Chavis were wagoners in the Revolution who were issued certificates of public debt at the end of the war, about 21 pounds for Anthony (signed by Captain Young) and 89 pounds for John (signed by Captain Carrington). [Mecklenburg County Legislative Petitions of 14 December 1820 and 19 January 1836, LVA].

Shadrack Chavis enlisted in the Revolution on 1 August 1778 for 3 years and was listed in the roll of Captain William Taylor's Company of the 2nd Virginia Regiment commanded by Christian Febiger, Esquire, for July 1778 to August 1779, sick at Valley Forge in July 1778 [NARA, M246, roll 96, frames 136, 176, 180, 182 of 736 also https://www.fold3.com/image/10069450, 10079300]. He was called Shadrach Shavers when he appeared in Stafford County court on 14 December 1818 and on 12 February 1821 to apply for a pension for his service in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted for three years in the Spring of 1778 at Valley Forge in the 2nd Virginia Regiment commanded by Colonel Febecker and injured one of his ankles which rendered him incapable of service, so he came to Virginia with Captain Cunningham. Captain George Burroughs deposed that he knew Shadrack in the service and that he was acting as bowman to Captain John P. Harrison of the 2nd Virginia Regiment [NARA, S.38368, M804, 2159, frame 1393 of 1408 also https://www.fold3.com/image/246/16443948]. Shadrack Shavers was a "B.M." taxable in Stafford County from 1810 to 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1813, frames 737, 800, 858] and head of a Stafford County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820.

Anthony Chavis was a taxable "Blackman" in Island Creek District, Granville County in 1803 [Tax List 1803-09, 42] and head of a Granville County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [NC:858]. He died in Granville County in May 1831 according to the survivor's pension application of his son Peter [NARA, R.1889-1/2, M805, reel 180, frame 145; http://www.fold3.com/image/246/12037220; [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Chavers, Anthony, 1840, Digital Collection, LVA].

Allen Chavis was listed in the Pay Roll and Muster of Captain James Lucas in the 4th Virginia Regiment commanded by Colonel Thomas Elliot from 1 April 1777 to 1 June 1777, listed as dead or deserted in July 1777 [NARA, M246, roll 99, frame 619, 653, 656, of 760].

William Clark was in the list of men in the Amherst County Militia in 1781 [William & Mary Digital Archives, Swem Library's Special Collections, Cabell Papers Box 2, Folder11.pdf; https://digitalarchive.wm.edu/handle/10288/16244]. He was taxable in Amherst County from 1782 to 1820: a "man of color" in 1811, 1812, and 1815, a "Mulatto" in 1813, a planter over the age of 45 in a list of "Free Negroes & Mulattoes" in 1816 and 1818 [PPTL 1782-1803, frames 9, 23, 44, 54, 70, 97, 136, 195, 225, 257, 326, 347, 370, 393, 419, 450, 479; 1804-23, frames 21, 62, 103, 144, 165, 188, 209, 230, 253, 326, 403, 537, 551, 584].

William Clark was a "Mulatto" taxable in Culpeper County from 1797 to 1801 [PPTL 1782-1802, frames 640, 684, 818] and a "Free Mulatto" head of a Culpeper County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:18]. On 7 December 1816 he obtained "free papers" in Culpeper County which were recorded later in Ross County, Ohio: William Clerke, a Mulatto man, 50 or 60, 5'7", served in the Revolutionary War in 1780 and 1781...is a free man, who has a wife and several children, and wishes to visit his mother in law in Frederick Co., at Charles Carter's place. William was 64 years old on 22 August 1820 when he appeared in Culpeper County court to apply for a pension for his services in the Revolution [Madden, We Were Always Free, 191-199; NARA, W.6687, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/1/13747831].

John Cockran was a "FN" taxable in the northern district of Campbell County in 1807 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frame 693], and head of a Campbell County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:853]. He appeared in the  Hustings Court of Lynchburg on 4 March 1828 to apply for a pension. He stated that he enlisted for 18 months in March 1781 in Captain Bohannon's Company of Colonel Davis' Virginia Regiment and served until August 1782 [NARA, S.39353, M804, roll 592, frame 16 of 559].

Francis Cole enlisted in the Revolution on 1 August 1780: age 23, 5'10" high, a waggoner, born in Fairfax County, residing in Prince William County, black complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.62)].

Thomas Cole was listed among seven deserters from Thomas W. Ewell's Company of State Troops in a 20 June 1777 advertisement in the Virginia Gazette, described as: a dark mulatto, about 5 feet 7 inches high living in Prince William County [Purdie edition, p.1, col. 3]. He was a fifer in Captain Thomas W. Ewell's Muster Roll of July 1780 [NARA, M246, roll 94, frame 729 of 742]. He enlisted for three years in the 1st Virginia Regiment on 15 March 1780 and received a discharge from Lieutenant J. Harper on 2 May 1783 [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Cole, Thomas, Digital Collections, LVA]. He was taxable in the lower district of Prince William County in 1786, 1787, 1792, and from 1794 to 1798, called a "free Black" in 1798 [PPTL, 1782-1810, frames 71, 95, 203, 254, 309, 362].

John Collins was taxable in King William County as a "Mulatto" in 1813 and 1814 [Land Tax List 1782-1832]. In June 1837 his widow Jane Collins applied for a pension for his services in the Revolution, stating that they were married in Williamsburg in April 1780, that her maiden name was Richeson (Richardson) and that he died in August 1821, leaving no children [NARA, W.6736, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/12861980].

Mason Collins enlisted in the Revolution for 1-1/2 years while residing in King William County on 8 September 1780: age 21, 5'11" high, a sailor, born in King William County, yellow complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.26)]. He was taxable in King and Queen County from 1804 to 1820: taxable on 2 tithables from 1807 to 1812, called a "Mulatto" in 1807, a "free Negro" from 1809 to 1812, listed with 4 "Mulattos" (male and female) over age sixteen in 1813, over the age of forty-five in 1815 [PPTL, 1804-23]. He made a declaration in King and Queen County court to obtain a pension for his services in the 11th Virginia Regiment. He declared that he had traveled north as bowman to an officer named Holt Richeson in 1777 and enlisted while in the state of Pennsylvania [NARA, S.39355, M804-614, frame 373]. He was head of a King William County household of 5 "free colored" in 1830.

William Combs was a thirty-nine-year-old James City County "Mulatto" planter, 5 feet 6 inches tall, listed in the August 1757 Size Roll of Captain Thomas Waggener's Company at Fort Holland [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 463].

John Cooper was a black complexioned soldier, 5'5-1/4" high, a waggoner, born in Albemarle County and residing there when he entered the Revolution as a substitute in Goochland County on 24 March 1781 for 1-1/2 years [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p. 43)].

James Cooper was a "Black" or "person of color" taxable in Augusta County from 1800 to 1819 [PPTL 1796-1810, frames 192, 238, 337, 383, 434, 485, 530, 579, 622; 1811-20, frames 31, 76, 97, 118, 163, 250, 311, 427, 588]. He was a seventy-year-old "free man of color" who applied for a pension while residing in Augusta County, Virginia, on 26 June 1820. He stated that he had enlisted in Goochland County and that his family consisted of himself and Sukey Orchard, a free woman of color upwards of fifty years old, who lived with him. His application included a certificate dated October 1787 from a justice of the peace in Goochland County, describing him as a "molatto Free man," which was to be used as a pass to travel to North Carolina and Georgia. He had been a waiter under Colonel Bluford and continued until his time was out [NARA, S.39362, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/12703900; [Revolutionary War Pensions, Cooper, James, Digital Collections, LVA]. He was head of an Augusta County household of 2 "other free" and a white woman over 45 in 1810 [VA:371]. His son Pleasant received a warrant for bounty land for his father's services [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Cooper, James, Digital Collections, LVA].

James Cousins enlisted in the Revolution from Goochland County on 1 April 1782 and was sized the following day: age 23, 5'6" high, black complexion, Negro, planter, born in Goochland County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.97)]. He was taxable in the upper district of Goochland County in 1790 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frame 235].

Gustavus/ Travis D. Croston appeared in Hampshire County court to make a declaration to obtain a pension for his service in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted in Alexandria and served for three years. He made a second declaration in court on 18 July 1820, stating that he enlisted in Newport (Charles County), Maryland, served as a private from 1778 to 1783 and was discharged in Alexandria, Virginia [NARA, S.39379, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/1/13009229]. He was head of a Hampshire County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:833], 11 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:281] and 2 "free colored" in 1840 [VA:8].

Thomas Creco enlisted for 18 months on 2 January 1782: age 24, 5'7-1/2" high, black complexion, residing in Northampton County, Virginia, born in Hispaniola [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.101)].

William Cuff, a "free man of Colour," appeared in Botetourt County court on 11 December 1826 to apply for a pension for his services in the first Virginia Regiment commanded by Colonel Campbell in Captain Stribling's Company in the Revolution. He enlisted in 1780 and served until 1782 [NARA, S.39347, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/12853986]. He was a "free Negro" taxable in Botetourt County in 1794 and from 1810 to 1813: taxable on two tithes in 1813 and 1814 [PPTL, 1783-1822, frames 223, 665; 1811-22, frames 59, 103, 147] and head of a Fluvanna County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:474].

John Cuff was listed in the payroll of Captain Joseph Scott's Company of the 1st Virginia Regiment commanded by Colonel James Hendricks for November 1777 [NARA, M246, https://www.fold3.com/image/9093909]. He was head of a Gates County, North Carolina household 9 "other free" in 1790 [NC:23], 8 in 1800 [NC:264], and 2 in 1810 [NC:835].

William Cuffee was head of a Norfolk County household 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:794], a "free Negro" taxable in St. Bride's Parish in 1812 and 1813 [PPTL, 1791-1812, frame 802; 1813-24, frame 11]. He was apparently identical to William McCuffy who was residing in Norfolk County when he enlisted in the Revolution in August 1780. He was sized on 3 March 1781: age 18, 5'8-1/2" high, farmer, born in Norfolk County, Black complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.85)].

Charles Cuffee was called the son of "free Negro" Sarah Coffe when he was bound apprentice to Nathaniel Sikes in Norfolk County on 19 May 1763 [Orders 1763-65, 15]. He registered in Norfolk County on 16 April 1799: Born free as is of age & his hight five feet six inches 3/4 [Cuffee, Charles (M, 37): Free Negro Certificate, 1799, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. He enlisted in the Revolution in 1780 for eighteen months, and he applied for and was granted a pension while a resident of Princess Anne County on 7 June 1830 when he was seventy-five years old [NARA, W.9402]. One of their children was

Cannon Cumbo was listed in the Edgecombe County Muster Roll of Captain William Haywood in the 1750s [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 677].

Richard Cumbo was a soldier from Charles City County who served in the infantry during the Revolution [Gwathmey, Historical Register of Virginians in the Revolution, 198].

Gibson Cumbo received pay for serving in the Bladen County militia [Haun, North Carolina Revolutionary Army Accounts, Journal A, I:9, VII: 931], called Gilbert Cumbo in 1784 when he was taxable in Captain Regan's District of Bladen County on 250 acres and one poll. He was head of a Robeson County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 [NC:50], 5 in 1800 (called Gibby) [NC:372], and 6 in 1810 (called Gibby) [NC:231].

Daniel Cumbo was living in Charles City County on 29 September 1768 when there was an ad in the Virginia Gazette offering a reward for the capture of a "mulatto" slave named Daniel who was passing as a freeman named Daniel Cumbo [http://www.accessible.com]. Daniel  a solider from Charles City County who served in the Revolution [Gwathmey, Historical Register of Virginians in the Revolution, 198]. He was taxable in James City County in 1813: counted with 1 male and 1 female in a list of "Free Persons of Colour above 16 years" in 1813 [PPTL, 1800-15].

Michael Cumbo enlisted in the 6th Virginia regiment on 12 September 1777, sick in the hospital in the August 1778 muster commanded by John Gibson, and listed as deceased in the September 1778 muster [NARA, M881, https://www.fold3.com/image/22849278].

Richard Cumbo enlisted in the 6th Virginia Regiment for three years on 5 September 1777 [NARA, M881, https://www.fold3.com/image/23306256].

John Cumbo died before 26 July 1791 when the overseers of the poor of Charles City County bound his orphan daughter Mourning Cumbo to George Hubbard until the age of eighteen [DB 4:61]. He may have been the John Cumbo who served in the Revolution from Charles City County [Gwathmey, Historical Register of Virginians in the Revolution, 198].

Peter Cumbo was a soldier from Charles City County who served in the Revolution [Gwathmey, Historical Register of Virginians in the Revolution, 198].

Stephen Cumbo was a soldier from James City County who served in the Revolution [Gwathmey, Historical Register of Virginians in the Revolution, 198]. He was taxable in James City County from 1782 to 1814: taxable on 3 horses and 4 cattle in 1782, a "Mulatto" taxable in 1785, taxable on 2 horses and 6 cattle in 1787 and 2 tithes and a horse in 1800. He was counted with a male and a female in a list of "Free Persons of Colour above 16 years" in James City County in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-99; 1800-15].

Abraham Cuttillo served three years in Colonel Marshall's Virginia Regiment of Artillery according to an affidavit from Captain James W. Bradley on 31 March 1784 [Revolutionary Bounty Warrants, Kertiller, Abra., Digital Collections, LVA]. He was head of a York County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:873]. On 21 May 1838 Henry Buchanan, aged seventy-seven, of York County, deposed that Abraham Cottiler, a "free man of color" from York County, enlisted in the Revolution in 1779, served at the Battle of Yorktown, and died about thirty years previous [Revolutionary War Rejected Claims, Cottiller, Abraham, Digital Collections, LVA].

Frank Cypress was bound apprentice in Surry County in 1754, bound apprentice in Lunenburg County in November 1760 [Orders 1759-61, 191] and listed in the Surry County account of the estate of Dr. Patrick Adams in 1771 [WB 12:248]. He enlisted in the Revolution on 13 October 1780: age 30, 5'6-1/4" high, a taylor, born and residing in Surry County, yellow complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.75)].

Henry Dalton, a "mulatto" and apparently the son of white woman, was bound to Samuel Pruitt until the age of thirty-one years in Frederick County, Maryland court in August 1750 [Rice, Frederick County, Maryland Judgment Records 1748-65, 49]. He was a "Mulatto" who petitioned the Frederick County court on 23 November 1775 stating that he had been bound to Samuel Pruitt in 1750 but that Pruitt had since died and that his present master John Randle had no other claim to him than his marrying the widow of the deceased. The court ordered that he be at his liberty [Minutes 1773-5, 420]. He was head of a Eastern District, Monongalia County census of 12 whites for 1810 [VA:495], 8 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:169] and 8 "free colored" in 1830 [VA:344]. He was granted a pension for his service in the Revolution, stating in his application that he was born in Bladensburg, Maryland, in 1748, enlisted in 1777 at Redstone settlement near Brownsville, Pennsylvania, resided in Prince George's County for nine years after the Revolution and then moved to Monongalia County [NARA, S.5362. M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/1/16979121].

Stephen Davenport was said to have been a soldier in the Revolution from York County [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 34], but Jackson did not cite the source for this.

John Davise, appeared in Westmoreland County court on 30 June 1818 and testified that he enlisted with Captain Elisha Callender, commander of the ship Dragon, for three years. Captain Eleazer Callender commander of the ship Dragon, certified that John Davise entered on board the ship on 3 September 1777 as a landsman and was paid until 20 January 1779. Ambrose Lewis, "a Blackman" and pensioner, testified that he found Davise on board when he first boarded the ship. John died on 9 March 1838, and his widow Amy Davis, nee Griffis, applied for a survivor's pension [NARA, W.19138, M804, roll 770, frame 15 of 717]. John was listed as a private aboard the Dragon on 2 September 1779 [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, Virginia, 8]. He and his wife Amea were "Molattoes" farming in Westmoreland County in 1801 with two children of the Locus family in their household [Virginia Genealogist 31:40]. Amea Griffin was a "Molatto" girl valued at 100 shillings in the 21 November 1766 Northumberland County estate of Stephen Chilton [RB, 1766-70, 56-7].

Daniel Davis, "a mulatto," born in Lancaster County, enlisted for the war and deserted from the ship Gloucester near Warwick with William Smith, a Creole born in Barbados, according to an advertisement in the 2 August 1780 issue of the Virginia Gazette [Virginia Genealogist 4:136]. Daniel Davis was listed as a private aboard the ship Dragon on 2 September 1779 and a seaman who served for three years and was entitled to bounty land [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, Virginia, 8, 68].

George Day was among a group of Revolutionary War seamen who deserted from the ship Tartar and for each of whom a $100 reward was offered by Thomas Grant of the Chickahominy Shipyard in the 11 September 1779 issue of the Virginia Gazette: ...George Day, and Augustine Boyd, all of Wicomico parish, Northumberland county [Virginia Gazette, http://www.accessible.com]. George apparently returned to his ship and served out his term because Captain John Thomas certified in February 1780 that George Day enlisted in February 1777, served three years, and discharged his duty truly and faithfully [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants; Day, George; Sailor, 1780, Digital Collection, LVA]. He was a "free negro" head of a Northumberland County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:976]. 

Charles Dobbins was living in Dinwiddie county when he enlisted in the Revolution as a substitute on 6 June 1782 and was sized the same month: age 20, 5'6-2/4" high, yellow complexion, a planter [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.101)]. He was listed in the roll and muster of the 3rd Company commanded by Major Samuel Finley from 1 December 1782 to 1 May 1783, perhaps the same Charles Dobbins who was serving in June 1778 [NARA, M246, roll 113, frames 674, 752; roll 102, frame 419]. He was taxable in Powhatan County in 1794, 1795 and a "Mo" taxable there from 1802 to 1806 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frames 105, 117, 239, 255, 277, 293, 316]. Henry Skipwith of Cumberland County, Virginia, placed an ad in the 19 April 1783 issue of the Virginia Gazette claiming that "a tall slim mulatto man named Tom, about twenty years of age, five feet six and three quarters high...and resembles an Indian from whom he is descended," had run away and been received as a substitute in Dinwiddie County, brought to Cumberland Old Court-house with the recruits of that county, re-inlisted for the war the previous Fall, went by the name of Charles Dobbins, then cut off his forefinger in order to marry a free woman, near Fine Creek Mill in Powhatan County, who had determined never to have a husband in the continental army, and supposed this mutilation would procure him a discharge [Virginia Gazette (Hayes); http://www2.vcdh.virginia.edu/gos/explore.html].

Elijah Donathan was most likely the son of William Donathan, a "Mullatto," who petitioned the Spotsylvania County court for his freedom in 1734 [Orders 1734-5, 285]. William Donathan was living in present-day Henry County, Virginia, when he sold his land to Jacob Chavis. Elijah Donathan owned land in Henry County, Virginia, and was drafted from Wilkes County, Georgia, in 1776 or 1777 [NARA, R.3004, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/17545326, accessed October 1, 2015]. His descendants were listed as white in the census.

Emanuel Driver was listed in the pay roll of Peter Bernard's 2nd Virginia Regiment from 1778 to 1779 (in the same list as William Driver) [NARA, M246, https://www.fold3.com/image/10081035]. He received a discharge from Captain Machen Boswell on 8 April 1784 for serving three years and received bounty land [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Digital Collection, LVA]. He was head of a Kingston Parish, Gloucester County household of 5 free persons in 1783 [VA:53], taxable in Kingston Parish on his own tithe and 2 horses in 1784, 4 cattle in 1787, taxable on his own tithe from 1788 to 1790 [PPTL, 1782-99]. In July 1835 his heirs William Driver and John Driver, son of John Driver, testified that Emanuel enlisted in the 2nd Virginia Regiment in 1776 and was discharged in 1780 or 1781. The claim was rejected [Revolutionary War Rejected Claims, LVA, Virginia Memory Collections].

John Driver deposed that his father John Driver enlisted in the 2nd Virginia Regiment and resided in Mathews County. He was taxable in Kingston Parish, Gloucester County, from 1783 to 1790: taxable on 4 cattle in 1783, 3 in 1785, 5 in 1787 [PPTL 1782-99]. And he was a "Mulatto" taxable in Gloucester County from 1801 to 1803 [PPTL 1800-20]. A John Driver was due bounty land for service in the Revolution as a seaman but had not received it by 25 November 1834 [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 215].

Solomon Duncan enlisted in the Revolution on 22 September 1780: age 39, 5'8" high, a blacksmith, born in Pasquotank County, North Carolina, residing in Princess Anne County, yellow complexion, deserted [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.44)]. He was a "Free Black" head of a Princess Anne County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:450].

Luke Duncan enlisted in the Revolution for 18 months while resident in Norfolk County on 23 September 1780: age 40, 5'8" high, a farmer, born in Norfolk County, Black complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.69)].

James Dungee completed three years service in the Virginia State Artillery, was discharged on 12 September 1780, and received bounty land [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Dungy, James, Digital Collections, LVA; Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, Virginia, 336]. He was head of a Prince Edward County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:562].

Bartholomew Dungee served in the Revolution according to a statement made by his older brother William [LVA chancery file 1803-002]. He was listed in the Company of Captain William Cherry in the 4th Virginia Regiment commanded by Major Isaac Beall from March to May 1778, sick at Valley Forge and died on 16 July 1778 [NARA, M881, Revolutionary War Rolls, https://www.fold3.com/image/22629177].

William Dungee served in the Revolution as a matross in the artillery and was eligible for bounty land [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, Virginia, 202]. In April 1799 stated in Cumberland County, Virginia court that he was the "oldest brother and heir at law of Bartholomew Dungee who departed this life in the year [blank] being a soldier in the American Army in the late Revolutionary War [LVA chancery files 1799-003; 1803-002]. He was head of a Cumberland County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:114].

Wallace Dunstan was a soldier from Halifax County, Virginia, who deserted Captain Shem Cook's Second Georgia State Battalion. On 27 October 1777 Cook placed an advertisement in the Virginia Gazette offering "mulattoes" Wallace Dunstan and James Smith of Halifax County (and 10 other soldiers, including a sergeant) a pardon if they returned [Virginia Gazette, Purdie edition, p.3, col. 1].

Charles Dunston, son of Patience Dunston, was bound apprentice in to John Howell in Cumberland Parish, Lunenburg County, in April 1751. He was called "a poor soldier in the service of the United States" on 8 May 1780 when the Mecklenburg County, Virginia court allowed his wife Elizabeth Dunston a barrel and a half of corn and 50 pounds of bacon for the support of herself and two children [Orders 1779-84, 34, 53]. He was living in Orange County when he received his final settlement for his service in the Revolutionary War [The North Carolinian VI:755].

Joseph Dunstan was a soldier who was born in James City County and enlisted there in the Revolution on 1 September 1780: age 15, 5'3/4" high, a farmer, yellow complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.44)]. He was taxable in James City County from 1783 to 1812 [PPTL 1782-99; 1800-15].

Thomas Evans was a wagoner living in the lower district of Lunenburg County in 1802 and 1803 when he was counted in the "List of free Negroes & Mulattoes" [LVA, Lunenburg County, Free Negro & Slave Records, 1802-1803]. He was a "free man of Colour" about sixty-three years of age on 23 December 1819 when he applied for a pension in Lunenburg County for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted in September 1777 while resident in Mecklenburg County and served until 1780 [23 December 1819 Lunenburg County Legislative Petition, LVA]. He was listed in the payroll of Captain Dudley's 2nd Virginia State Regiment commanded by Colonel Gregory Smith from July to December 1778 [NARA, M246, https://www.fold3.com/image/10081826, 10081833, 10081847, 10081851, 10081867, 10081873].

Charles Evans enlisted for eighteen months in the Revolution in Mecklenburg County as a substitute on 2 October 1780 and was sized on 18 March 1781: age 19, 5'4-1/4" high, yellow complexion, a farmer, born in Petersburg [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.7)].

Philip Evans, the "Mulotto" son of Ann Evans, was bound apprentice to the Rev. Robert Fergeson in Bristol Parish on 10 November 1748 [Chamberlayne, Register of Bristol Parish, 134]. He was a "mulatto" who was listed among seven deserters, drafted out of Prince George County, Virginia, for whom a reward was offered in the 28 November 1777 issue of the Virginia Gazette [Virginia Gazette (Purdie edition), p.3, col. 3; also on http://www.accessible.com]. His widow Aggy was a "Mulatto" taxable on 2 free male tithes in Prince George County in 1804, 1806, 1810 and 1811 [PPTL, 1782-1811, frames 602, 652, 721, 742] and was head of a Prince George County household of 11 "other free" in 1810 [VA:537].

Benjamin Evans was in the list of men in the service of the Amherst County Militia in 1781 [William & Mary Digital Archives, Swem Library's Special Collections, Cabell Papers Box 2, Folder11.pdf; https://digitalarchive.wm.edu/handle/10288/16244]. He was head of an Amherst County household of 6 "Mulattoes" in 1785 [VA:84].

John Evans enlisted in the Revolution from Cumberland County, Virginia, on 12 March 1781 and was sized a year later: age 18, 5'4" high, yellow complexion, a shoemaker, born in Cumberland County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.7)].

John Evans died in the Revolutionary War after serving three years. Testimony in Wake County court on 1 August 1820 proved that his immediate heirs and brothers Morris, Gilbert and William Evans (all Sr.) who lived in Wake County, were entitled to 640 acres for John Evans's service, and warrant no. 507 was issued to his heirs on 29 August 1820 [North Carolina Archives SS Military papers, folio 355 cited by Martha Evans in email correspondence].

John Farrow enlisted in the Revolution from Goochland County on 9 March 1781 for 18 months and was sized about the same time: age 21, 5'2-1/2" high, yellow complexion, a waggoner, born in Richmond City [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.9)]. John Farrar was a "Mulatto" taxable in Powhatan County from 1788 to 1792 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frames 18, 32, 46, 60, 77]. He and Benjamin Farrow were on a list of soldiers who had served in the Revolution but had not received bounty land by 7 January 1835 [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 237].

Benjamin Farrow enlisted in the Revolution as a substitute in Goochland County on 20 March 1781 for 18 months and was sized in April the same year: age 21, 5'3-3/4" high, yellow complexion, a waiter, born in Goochland County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p. 9)]. He was a "Free Negro" taxable in the northern district of Campbell County from 1800 to 1805 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 484, 544, 622].

John Fields was a "Mulatto" taxable in Buckingham County in 1774 [Woodson, Virginia Tithables From Burned Counties, 39]. He was living in Amherst County on 18 May 1781 when he enlisted in the Revolution for 18 months. He was sized on 22 June the same year: age 48, 5'7-1/2" high, black complexion, a farmer, born in Charles City County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.65)]. He was head of a Buckingham County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:806] and was a taxable "man of color" in Amherst County in 1811 and 1812 [PPTL 1804-23, frames 211, 233].

Burwell Flood enlisted in the Revolution in Williamsburg, while residing in Mecklenburg County in January 1780 after serving three years with the 15th Virginia Regiment and was sized in 1781: age 24, 5'6-1/2" high, yellow complexion, a cooper, born in Sussex County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.9)]. He registered in Petersburg on 19 August 1794: a brown Mulatto man, five feet seven and a half inches high, thirty eight years old, born free & raised in Mecklenburg County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 49].

Michael Flood enlisted in the Revolution for two years in July 1779 in Petersburg while residing in Sussex County and was sized in 1781: age 15, 5' high, yellow complexion, a planter, born in Sussex County, served Colonel Buford for 1 year [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.9)].

William Flora was counted in a list of "free Negroes" as a pedlar living in Portsmouth, Norfolk County in 1801 [PPTL, 1782-91, frames 392, 485, 567, 613, 643, 682; 1791-1812, frames 22, 82, 138, 172, 248, 354, 383, 463, 560, 646, 689, 742; 1813-24, frames 101, 251]. He was listed in the payroll of Captain William Grimes in the 15th Virginia Regiment under Lieutenant Colonel James Innes from 1776 to 1779 [NARA, M881, https://www.fold3.com/image/22938237]. He received bounty land based on his application from Norfolk County on 16 July 1806 which stated that William Floray, a man of colour, served in the 16th Virginia Regiment until the close of the war and was held in high esteem as a soldier [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Floray, William, Digital Collections, LVA]. He fought in the battle at Great Bridge, Norfolk County, in the Revolution, prying loose the last board in the bridge to prevent the British from attacking his retreating comrades [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 34; WPA, The Negro in Virginia, 23].

Lewis Fortune enlisted in the Revolution on 20 September 1780 for 1-1/2 years: age 16, 5'7" high, a planter, born in Caroline County, residing in Essex County, black complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.67)]. He was a "Mo" or "free Black" taxable in Powhatan County from 1792 to 1813 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frames 76, 92, 105, 118, 132, 162, 184, 206, 239, 256, 294, 341, 362, 438].

Samuel Fortune enlisted in the Revolution from Powhatan County for eighteen months on 29 August 1781 and was sized the same day: age 32, 5'4-1/4" high, black complexion, a planter, born in Caroline County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.65)].

Shadrack Fortune enlisted in the Revolution in Accomack County in April 1782 for 18 months as a substitute and was sized: age 24, 5'2-1/2" high, black complexion, a gardner, born in Accomack County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.65)].

Christopher Francis received Virginia state pension no. 3468 for 3 years service in the Revolution [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, Virginia, 430]. He was taxable in York County on a free tithe and a slave in 1784, taxable on slave Nanny in 1786, taxable in Yorktown in 1792 [PPTL, 1782-1841, frames 78, 122, 187].

George Francis was resident of South Carolina who enlisted in the Revolution for the duration of the war in Virginia about 1781: age 28, 5'4" high, black complexion, born in South Carolina [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.65)].

Charles Freeman was a "Mulatto Boy" living in Nottoway Parish, Amelia County, on 28 June 1759 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind him as an apprentice to John Howsing [Orders 1757-60, 224]. He enlisted in the Revolution for 18 months from Amelia County on 11 September 1780: age 21, 5'6" high, planter, black complexion, born in Amelia County [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p42)].

Anthony Freeman enlisted in the Revolution from Amelia County on 11 September 1780: age 19, 5"3-1/4" high, a planter, born in Amelia County, black complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.42)].

Stephen Freeman and his brother John Freeman were soldiers in the Revolution whose heirs received bounty land. Jane Collins, a free woman of Colour, testified on 14 May 1840 that their heirs were Molly Holt, Rhody Arnold, Billy Sampson and Squire Osborn, free persons of Colour. Stephen received 103 pounds for his services prior to January 1782 according to an Auditor's certificate [NARA, B.LWt. 2393-100, M804, roll 1024, frame 312 of 952]. He may have been the Stephen Freeman who was a wagoner in the Muster of Major Stephenson's Company of the 5th and 11th Virginia Regiment commanded by Colonel Russell from June 1779 to November 1779 [NARA, M246, frames 668, 677, 683 of 774]. Squire Osborn was a "F.N." tithable in New Kent County from 1799 to 1815: taxable on 2 slaves over 16 and a horse in 1799, a slave 12-16 in 1801, listed with his unnamed wife in 1813 [PPTL, 1791-1828, frames 332, 345, 359, 433, 444, 455, 466, 477, 488, 494, 500, 503, 516]. Molly Holt, Rhody Arnold and Billy Sampson lived in King William County on or near the Pamunkey Indian Reservation.

John Freeman enlisted in the 15th Virginia Regiment in December 1776 for three years, served as a waiter to Captain Samuel Hogg, and died as a prisoner of war on Haddril's Point according to a certificate from Captain Hogg on 8 June 1787. His heirs Squire Osborne, a free person of Colour, and others applied for his bounty land [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Freeman, John, Digital Collections, LVA].

Nathan Fry was a man of color who was born free in Westmoreland County. He was a "coloured man," aged about sixty eight or nine on 2 June 1823, and living in Richmond when he stated that he enlisted in the Minute Service with Daniel Duval of Henrico County in 1775, went to Savannah, Georgia, and served under Captain Mosby in Colonel Elbert's Regiment against the Creek Indians as a drummer until he was taken as a waiter to Major Duval, batman to Baron Steuben and was discharged in Richmond in 1781 or 1782. He also stated that he was born free in Westmoreland County [NARA, S.39545, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/1/22758110]. He was a "F.N." taxable in the upper district of Henrico County from 1790 to 1813 [PPTL 1782-1814, frames 376, 402, 444, 486, 532, 593, 636, 661, 757, 823; Land Tax Lists 1799-1816].

Dennis Garner enlisted in the Revolution for 18 months from Isle of Wight County on 28 September 1780: age 26, 5'6-1/4" high, a farmer, born in Isle of Wight County, yellow complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.72)]. He was listed as having deserted in July 1777 [NARA, M246, M246, roll 113, frame 189; https://www.fold3.com/image/9639784].

Samuel Goff enlisted in the Virginia Continental Line on 15 September 1777 and was killed at Paulus Hook on 16 August 1779 according to a certificate signed by Captain Mayo Carrington and presented by Samuel's brother Abraham Goff in Cumberland County court [Orders 1779-84, 496; Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Goff, Samuel, Digital Collections, LVA].

Daniel Goff made a declaration in Boone County, Kentucky, on 4 February 1833 in order to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution. He was living in Chesterfield County when he enlisted in the 15th Virginia Regiment for three years. James Taylor testified that Daniel, a "poor colored man," came to live with him in Campbell County, Virginia, in 1793 as a gardener and laborer [NARA, S.15586, M805-362, frame 97].

Abraham Goff was a "Mulatto" taxable in Buckingham County in 1790 [PPTL 1782-97] and head of a Botetourt County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:625]. He was a "free man of Colour" who testified in Bedford County, Virginia court to obtain a pension for his service in the Revolution, stating that he enlisted in Cumberland County, Virginia, in 1778 and served for four years [NARA, S.39596, M805-362, frames 56-65]. He registered in Bedford County on 26 October 1820: aged 77, Mulatto, 5 feet 11 inches, Born free [Register of Free Negroes 1820-60, p.3].

Zachariah Goff was taxable in Prince Edward County in 1784 and 1785 [PPTL 1782-1809, frames 130, 145] and a "Melatto" taxable in Campbell County from 1788 to 1792 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 84, 150, 212]. He was called a "free mulatto" on 19 August 1793 when the Campbell County court found him not guilty of poisoning Micajah Moorman [Orders 1791-7, 219]. On 28 February 1796 the Cumberland County court ordered the clerk to issue him a certificate of freedom "it appearing to the court that the said Zachariah by birth and parentage is intitled to the same" [Orders 1792-7, 613]. He was a Revolutionary War pensioner from Bedford County who enlisted in Cumberland County in 1777 and served for three years [NARA, W.2730, M805-362, frames 288-295].

Moses Goff was a soldier in the Revolution from Cumberland County. Abram Goff received his final pay of 56 pounds [NARA, M881, https://www.fold3.com/image/23346264]. He was a "f. Mo" taxable in the upper district of Cumberland County [PPTL, 1782-1816, frames 33, 89, 122, 155, 257, 294, 353, 428, 486, 523, 559]. He was a "M"(ulatto) taxable in Buckingham County from 1810 to 1821 [PPTL 1810-26].

Philip Going was taxable in Goochland County in 1767 and 1769 [List of Tithables 1767-1780, frames 18, 52, 109], married Judith Potter and had a daughter named Molly who was born 4 March 1770, baptized 27 May [Jones, The Douglas Register, 87]. He was in the list of men ordered into service in the Amherst County Militia in 1781 [William & Mary Digital Archives, Swem Library's Special Collections, Cabell Papers Box 2, Folder11.pdf; https://digitalarchive.wm.edu/handle/10288/16244]. He was head of an Amherst County household of 13 persons in 1783 [VA:48] and 12 in 1785 [VA:83]. He and his descendants were counted as white in the 1810 Virginia census.

Moses Going testified in Henry County court on 27 April 1780 that he had served as a soldier in Captain James Gunn's Company in Colonel Byrd's Regiment in 1760 (in the French and Indian War) but had not received bounty land [Orders 1778-82, 86; 1782-5, 75].

William Going was in a list of "free Negroes & Mulattoes" in Henry County in 1813 and 1814 [PPTL, 1782-1830, frames 150, 177, 207, 234, 288, 343, 369, 396, 455, 515, 553, 598, 616]. He appeared in Hawkins County, Tennessee court on 20 May 1819 and applied for a pension for his service in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted in the Spring of 1780 at Halifax County, Virginia courthouse under Captain Tilman Dixon in the 18th Regiment commanded by Henry Dixon [NARA, W.7546, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/22778397, accessed 10 October 2015].

Charles Going was taxable in Henry County from 1783 to 1790 [PPTL, 1782-1830, frames 302, 352], taxable in Patrick County from 1791 to 1795 [PPTL, 1791-1823, frames 151, 177, 207]. He was about seventy years old on 22 October 1833 when he applied for a Revolutionary War pension, stating that he had been born in Henry County, lived there until 1797, then moved to Kentucky and moved to Gallatin in 1815 [NARA, S.31072, M805, reel 368, frame 0144].

David Going was a "Mulo" taxable in Halifax County, Virginia, from 1792 to 1806 and a planter in the list of "free Negroes & Mulattoes" in 1801 [PPTL, 1782-1799, frames 7, 71, 302, 417, 442, 732, 819; 1800-12, frames 59, 187, 517, 676]. He registered in Halifax County on 11 October 1802: aged about forty eight years, six feet and a half inch high, light yellow Colour, inclining to white, straight hair...born free [Register of Free Negroes, no.20]. He was head of a Wythe County household of 8 "other free" in 1810. He appeared in Hamilton County, Tennessee court and testified that he entered the service in Halifax County, Virginia, moved to Grayson County, Virginia, for three years, then to Wythe County for ten years, then to Grainger County, Tennessee [NARA, S.3406, M805-362, frames 27-30].

Zephaniah Going was head of a Roane County, Tennessee household of 6 "free colored" in 1830. He was about seventy-six years old and living in Hawkins County, Tennessee on 18 December 1834 when he applied for a Revolutionary War pension, stating that he had entered the service in Henry County [NARA, R.4165, M805, reel 368, frame 0134].

Frederick Goen was head of a Sumner County, Tennessee household of 10 "free colored" in 1820 and a "free man of Color" who appeared in Lawrence County, Alabama court to apply for a pension for services in the militia during the Revolution. He stated that he was born on the Meherrin River in the part of Brunswick County, Virginia, from which Greensville was formed after the war, and he was about sixteen years old when drafted [NARA, R.4167, M805-362, frames 14-24].

Joshua Going was drafted into the Revolution from Louisa County for 18 months on 17 April 1781 and was sized on 14 May: age 28, 5'7-1/4" high, yellow complexion, born in Louisa County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.55)]. He was a "Mula" taxable in Albemarle County in 1813 [PPTL, 1800-1813, frames 29, 117, 208, 297, 435, 522, 567].

Sherrod Going enlisted in the Revolution for three years in the 14th Virginia Regiment and enlisted again for 18 months in Albemarle County on 20 March 1781. He was sized on 19 April 1781: age 21, 5'8-1/2", yellow complexion, born in Louisa County, former service: 14th Va. Regt, 3 yrs [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.11)]. He was head of an Albemarle County household of 12 "other free" in 1810 [VA:196] and 9 "free colored" in 1820. He was a "man of colour" who appeared in Albemarle County court to apply for a pension for 3 years service in the 14th Regiment and another service of 18 months [NARA, W.7545, M804, roll 1087, frame 234; https://www.fold3.com/image/246/22778244].

Raverly Going enlisted in the 6th Virginia Regiment and died in the army according to an affidavit by Lieutenant Bell of the regiment who was living in Charles City County on 21 March 1818. Freeman and James Brown of Charles City County deposed that Nancy Smith, wife of Michael Smith was the only heir of Raverly Going, deceased. She received land warrant no. 5484 for 100 acres and was living in Charles City County in 1808. [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Going, Raverly, Digital Collections, LVA].

Oliver Griffin enlisted in the Revolution as a substitute from Northampton County, Virginia, for 18 months on 8 September 1780 and was sized on 14 May 1781: age 34, 5'7-3/4" high, yellow complexion, Indian features, a sailor, born in Northampton County, old 18 mo man [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.55)].

Moses Grimes was a "mulatto" who served in the Virginia Regiment commanded by Colonel Gibson and waited on Colonel Brent during the Revolution. He was married to a forty-five-year-old "mulatto" woman named Jane Wilson on 2 October 1779 when Cuthbert Bullitt of Dumfries, Virginia, placed an ad in the Maryland Journal and Baltimore Advertiser which stated that she had run away, perhaps to her husband or to the plantation of her former master Colonel George Mason or to Mrs. Page, among whose slaves she had a number of relations [Windley, Runaway Slave Advertisements, II:232-3]. He was listed as a wagoner in the July 1779 muster of Captain Thomas Ewell's Company in the 1st Virginia Regiment commanded by Colonel George Gibson [NARA, M246, roll 93, frame 565].

Peter Hackett was in a list of soldiers of the Virginia line whose names were on the register but had not received bounty land by 7 January 1835 [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 246]. He was a "Free Negro" taxable in the northern district of Campbell County from 1787 to 1807, listed the same day as Peter Hacket, Jr., in 1807 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 85, 119, 331, 459, 697]. He was head of a Campbell County household of 11 "other free" in 1810 [VA:869].

Peter Haley received a land warrant for Revolutionary War service as a seaman on 9 December 1783 based on his discharge from Captain William Saunders in 1780 [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Sallard, Eliphalet, Digital Collections, LVA; Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 345, 604]. He registered as a "free Negro" in York County on 28 April 1802: a bright mulatto with woolly hair high forehead...5 feet 6-1/2 Inches high...about 45 years of age...addicted to the intemperate use of ardent Spirits [Register of Free Negroes 1798-1831, no.19]. He was head of a York County household of 4 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:875].

George Harmon was head of an Accomack County household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:153] and 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:29]. On 3 June 1807 late Lieutenant Colonel John Cropper, Jr., certified that George Harman "Mulatto" served until the end of the Revolution [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants; Oldham, George, Digital Collections, LVA]. His only heirs Betsy, Comfort, Leah and Sarah Harmon applied for a pension for his service in Accomack County court on 25 September 1832 [Orders 1832-36, 16].

Stephen Harmon was head of an Accomack County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:100]. Scarborough Bloxam, a midshipman aboard the Accomac testified that Stephen Harmon, Tire Harmon and Joshua Perkins enlisted in the war, served on board the vessel during the Revolution and were discharged [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants; Bayly, Robert, Digital Collections, LVA]. (Stephen's wife?) Fanny Harmon received bounty land warrant no. 7251 for his service and no. 7252 for the service of Tire Harmon [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 292]. Fanny Harmon was head of an Accomack County household of 8 "free colored" in 1830.

William Harris was listed in the Pay Roll of Captain Thomas Massie's 6th Virginia Regiment for the months of November 1777 and January 1778 [NARA, M246, roll 103, frames 346, 348 of 756]. He was a deserter from Captain Thomas Massie's new recruits for the 6th Virginia Regiment according to the 21 November 1777 issue of the Virginia Gazette which offered a reward for his return, describing him as: a mulatto fellow about five feet eleven inches high, the veins in his leg much broke, appear in knots, he was enlisted in New Kent, but expect he is lurking about Charles City [Virginia Gazette, Purdie's edition, p.3, col. 3].

John Harris was born in Prince George County and residing in Dinwiddie County when he enlisted on 6 June 1782 for 3 years in the Revolution: age 21, 5'4-1/2" high, yellow complexion, hasel eyes [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.103)]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Dinwiddie County in 1790 and 1792 and a "free" taxable from 1794 to 1801 [PPTL 1801 B, p.7]. He was a "free man of Colour" on who made a declaration in Prince George County to obtain a pension for his services, stating that he enlisted in 1777 in the 15th Virginia Regiment. He was taken from the regiment and made a servant to President Monroe who was then the major of horse and aide-de-camp to Lord Sterling. He made a second declaration on 18 May 1821 in Petersburg court while residing in Dinwiddie County in the immediate vicinity of Petersburg [NARA, S.37997, M805-401, frame 0640].

Edward Harris registered in Chesterfield County on 9 January 1809: color yellow, age 40 years, stature 5 feet 7 inches born free [Jesper, Archer (M, 30): Free Negro Register, 1809, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. He was head of a Charles City household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:959] and a "Mulattoe" taxable in Chesterfield County from 1810 to 1827, living on James Scott's land with his 6 children in 1811 [PPTL, 1786-1811, frames 782, 824; 1812-27, 67, 338, 434, 471, 507, 552, 584, 619, 651, 685]. He appeared in Chesterfield County court to apply for a pension for his service in the Revolution, stating that he enlisted in Amelia County in Colonel Richard Campbell's Regiment in 1780 and was discharged in January 1782. He owed Mr. James B. Scott, on whose land he lived, two years rent of 40 pounds [NARA, S.37992, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/23204526].

James Harris was head of a Charles City County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:958]. He was a resident of Charles City County on 17 August 1820 when he appeared in court to apply for a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted in February 1778 in Charles City County, was marched to Valley Forge under Captain Callohill Minnis, entered the company under the command of Colonel Richard Parker of the 1st Virginia Regiment, and was discharged in Middlebrook, New Jersey [NARA, S.38006, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/22990334].

James Harris was born on 14 January 1748 in Dinwiddie County and was a "free man of Color" residing in Patrick County, Virginia, when he appeared in court there to make a declaration to obtain a pension for service in the Revolution as a drummer [NARA, W.11223, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/1/22990952]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Patrick County in 1799 [PPTL, 1791-1823, frames 269, 398, 428, 460, 538, 598] and head of a Patrick County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830 [CR 104.923.2 by NCGSJ V:251-2].

Peter Hartless made a declaration in Amherst County court to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution, stating that he was born in Caroline County, enrolled in the militia in 1777 or 1778, was drafted in 1781, and returned to Caroline County until 1787 when he moved to Amherst County. Bounty land was issued to Lawrence Mason for his services in the North Carolina Militia during the War of 1812 [NARA, S.5740, M804-1210, frame 0249]. He was head of an Amherst County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:288].

James Hartless was in a list of men in Amherst County called into militia service in 1781 [William & Mary Digital Archives, Swem Library's Special Collections, Cabell Papers Box 2, Folder11.pdf; https://digitalarchive.wm.edu/handle/10288/16244].

William Hartless made a declaration in Amherst County court on 17 September 1832 to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he was born in Caroline County, moved to Amherst County when he was twenty-three years old, entered the militia in Albemarle County in 1779, and was drafted from Amherst County in 1781 [NARA, S.5498, M804-1210, frame 0260]. He was head of an Amherst County household 13 "other free" in 1810, and 6 "free colored" and a 26-44 year old white woman in 1820.

John Hawkins enlisted in the Revolution from Frederick County on 7 June 1781 and was sized on 7 December 1781: age 22, 5'4" high, yellow complexion, born in Frederick County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.57)].

James Hawkins was about fifty-seven years old with no family living with him on 14 October 1820 when he made a declaration in Fluvanna County to obtain a pension for his service in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted for two years in 1779 or 1780 in the regiment commanded by Colonel Harris. "Being a Coloured man," he was taken as a waiter to Major Chrogham. He received a land warrant for three years service and die don 21 January 1824 [NARA, S.37991, M804-1227, frame 0576].

William Haws was a seaman aboard the Dragon according to an affidavit by a fellow seaman aboard the ship, John Davis, who testified for the bounty land claim of James Jennings on 7 February 1834 and named five of the officers and fifty-two members of the crew who served faithfully for three years and were discharged at the Chickahominy Ship Yard [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Jennings, James (p.9), Digital Collection, LVA]. He was listed aboard the ship Gloucester on 5 July 1779 and aboard the Dragon on 2 September 1779. He served three years and was entitled to bounty land [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 8, 14, 68].

Peter Haw(s)/How and William Hawes were serving aboard the galley Gloucester on 4 November 1777 when the Keeper of the Public Store was ordered to deliver them articles of clothing, "on their paying for the same" [U.S. Government Printing Office, Naval Documents of the American Revolution, 11:160; http://www.ibiblio.org/anrs//docs/E/E3/ndar_v11p05.pdf]. He was head of a Lancaster County, Virginia household of 9 "Blacks" in 1783 [VA:56] and 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:349]. On 1 November 1834 Peter's heirs applied for bounty land for his and his brother William's services in the Revolution. They stated that William Haw entered the State Navy in 1776, was on board the Dragon in 1777 under the command of Captain James Markham, and died in the service. William was from Lancaster County and had only one brother Peter Haw. Their petition included an affidavit that Peter Haws' name was on the army register as receiving 60 pounds, 10 shillings as the balance of his pay as a seaman on 9 March 1787 [Revolutionary War Rejected Claims, Haw, William, Digital Collection, LVA]. Peter was listed on 25 November 1834 as a seaman who served three years and was due bounty land [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, Virginia, 216].

Ephraim Hearn enlisted in the 1st Virginia Regiment in January or February 1778 and served until the regiment was taken prisoner in Charleston in May 1780. They were placed on board prison ships until the general exchange in 1781 according to an affidavit by Colonel Mennis on 22 March 1796 when Ephraim received bounty land [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Hern, Ephraim, Digital Collections, LVA]. He was a "man of colour" about eighty-four years old on 8 August 1829 when he made a declaration in Gloucester County court to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution [NARA, 38020, M804-1242, frame 0662]. He was head of a Gloucester County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:657]. 

Caleb Hill enlisted for 18 months in the Revolution from King William County on 8 September 1780 and was sized about the same time: age 31, 5'7" high, born in King & Queen County, yellow complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.27)].

John Hobson was a soldier who served three years in the 2nd State Regiment and received a discharge on 27 February 1780 which was certified by Captain Augustine Tabb and Lieutenant J. Hardyman on 2 July 1783 [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Hopson, John, Digital Collection, LVA]. His son James registered as a "free Negro" in York County on 21 October 1805: a bright Mulatto about 22 years of age 5 feet 7-3/4 Inches high, long curly black Hair, Hazle eyes, thick Eye brows [Register of Free Negroes, 1798-1831, no. 32; Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 106]. He was head of a York County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:876].

Bartholomew Holmes enlisted in the Revolution from King William County in 1778 and was sized in 1781: age 23, 5'7-1/4" high, yellow complexion, a farmer, born in James City, served in the 15th V.R. [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.79)]. He received an affidavit from Lieutenant Giles Raines of the 15th Regiment that he enlisted on 21 December 1776 and served for three years and a certificate from Captain Samuel Jones of the 11th Regiment that he enlisted on 23 December 1778 and served for the war [Revolutionary War Bounty Warants, Holmes, Bartlett, Digital Collection, LVA]. He was about sixty four years old on 1 August 1820 when he applied for a pension in Washington County, Maryland, stating that he enlisted in December 1776 and served for a time under Lieutenant Samuel Jones [NARA, S.34926, M804, roll 1313, frame 102 of 947].

William Holmes was a "Mulatto" living in Henrico County in August 1744 when he complained to the court that he had not received payment for taking up a runaway Negro slave who belonged to Nicholas Davies of Goochland County [Orders 1737-46, 277]. On 28 February 1755 he was listed as a soldier from King William County in the French and Indian War who had deserted: a mulatto, age 45 years, 5'11" [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy 31:93].

William Holmes enlisted in the Revolution for 1-1/2 years while residing in King William County on 2 September 1780: age 40, 5'10-1/2" high, a planter, born in King William County, yellow complexion. He was probably identical to the William Holms who was sized about a year later: age 43, 5'10" high, Negro complexion, farmer, residing in King William County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (pp. 13, 34)].

Samuel Howell was a twenty-five year old "mulatto" sawyer from Charles City County, Virginia, listed in the 1757 size roll of Captain Robert Spotswood's Company in Fort Young [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 570].

Isaac Howell was a black complexioned soldier, 5'5-1/4" high, born in Powhatan County, who entered the service on 24 March 1781 for 1-1/2 years, and had previously served as a waiter for a year in the 7th Virginia Regiment when he was sized at the Powhatan County court house on 27 April 1781 [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p. 41)]. He was head of a Buckingham County household 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:810].

David Howell enlisted in the Revolution on 3 January 1777 for three years, but he was discharged after serving two years and eight months "on account of his inability's" according to his 6 October 177_ discharge from Captain Robert Woodson of the 9th Virginia Regiment [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Howel, David, Digital Collection, LVA]. He registered in Powhatan County on 19 December 1822: Age: 59; Color: Dark Brown; Stature: 5'6-1/2"; Born Free. (His wife) Patsy Howell registered the same day: Age: 47; Color: Yellow; Stature: 5'6"; Born Free [Register of Free Negroes, nos. 64, 65].

Robert Howell and his wife Mary were the parents of several "Free Mulatto" children baptized in St. Peter's Parish, New Kent County [NSCDA, Parish Register of St. Peter's, 162]. He was a "Freeman of Colour" who enlisted in New Kent County under Captain Peter Wright in the artillery and died in the service a year or two afterwards according to testimony by Henry Maderias on 8 February 1809. Benjamin Crump testifed that Thomas Howell was Robert's heir at law and that his parents were lawfully married [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Howel, Robert, Digital Collections, LVA]. His son Thomas was was taxable in New Kent County from 1790 to 1807: listed as a "M"(ulatto) in 1806 and 1807 [PPTL 1782-1800, frame 146; 1791-1828, frames 229, 268, 307, 344, 370, 395, 420, 431].

William Hughes enlisted in the Revolution from Caroline County on 26 March 1781 and was sized about a month later: age 33, 5'7" high, yellow complexion, a shoemaker, born in Caroline County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p. 57)]. He was head of a Spotsylvania County household of 2 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:113b].

Luke Hughes was listed among the slaves in Cadwelder Dade's estate inventory which was proved in Stafford County on 14 July 1761 "Luke...to serve till 31" [Wills, Liber O, 1748-63, 400]. He was listed in the pay roll of Captain Robert Powell and Captain Reubin Briscoe in the 3rd Virginia Regiment in August 1778 [NARA, M246, https://www.fold3.com/image/9680894]. He registered in King George County on 27 October 1800: a dark molatto man with long grey hair, about sixty years, was born in this County, served Cadwellder Dade untill he was thirty one years of age [Register of Free Persons, no.16]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Culpeper County from 1798 to 1802 [PPTL 1782-1802, frames 687, 781, 820, 865] and a "free Mulatto" head of a Culpeper County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:40].

Hardy Hunt enlisted from Southampton County for the duration of the war and was sized about the same time: age 16, 5'3-1/4" high, planter, born in Southampton, Negro complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.27)]. He appeared in Southampton County court and petitioned for pay for his services in the Revolution. John Haithcock testified that he served together with him, and Samuel Tinsley testified that he remembered a "Mulatto man by the name of Hardy Hunt" who served with him [Hunt, Hardy, 1795-11-19, Legislative Petitions Digital Collection, LVA]. He was a "F.N" or "M" taxable in Southampton County in 1803 and 1806 [PPTL 1782-92, frames 639, 658, 710, 758, 873; 1792-1806, frames 63, 91, 171, 382, 415, 518, 625, 694, 809, 844].

William Jackson enlisted in the Revolution in King William County for 18 months on 3 September 1780: age 26, 5'5-1/2" high, a groom, born in Hanover County, yellow complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.9)].

William Jackson was a "free man of Colour" or "blackman" who was about 65 years old in October 1825 when he appeared in Bedford County to apply for a pension for his service in the Revolution. He stated that he entered the war in 1780 or 1781 at Amherst Court House and served for three years as a waiter [NARA, W.7877, M804, roll 1401, frame 1064; https://www.fold3.com/image/24144820].

Thomas James was a soldier in the Revolution, residing in Albemarle County in 1780 when he entered the service, deserted in Goochland County on the way to Chesterfield County court house: age 25, 5'4" high, born in Chesterfield County, yellow complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.63)].

Charles Johnston enlisted as a substitute from Essex County for 18 months in October 1780 and was sized on 5 April 1781: Age 18, 5'6" high, yellow complexion, a farmer, born in Essex County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.15)].

James Jones, born say 1716, was a soldier who enlisted in the expedition against the Spaniards at Carthagena and died in Jamaica. His "Mulatto" widow Rebecca Jones petitioned the Virginia House of Burgesses for a pension and was granted an allowance of five pounds on 26 May 1742 [McIlwaine, Journals of the House of Burgesses, 21, 37].

William Jones served as a seaman in the Revolution. He was a free Negro taxable in Fredericksburg from 1794 to 1815: taxable on 3 horses in 1803, 2 slaves and 3 horses in 1804 [PPTL 1787-1815, frames 348, 453, 466, 477, 559], head of a Spotsylvania County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:100] and 4 "free colored" in Fredericksburg in 1820. On 6 September 1827 he received a pension for his services in the Revolution [Revolutionary War Virginia State Pensions, Jones, William, Digital Collections, LVA]. His heir Staunton Jones received 100 acres, bounty land warrant no. 10,311 [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 312, 348].

Britton Jones was head of a Greensville County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:262]. He petitioned the legislature on 26 October 1793 that he was drafted in the militia in Greensville County in 1782, performed a tour of duty for six months, and received a discharge in Portsmouth from his commanding officer Captain Armstead which he was able to produce [Jones, Britton: Petition, 1793-10-26, Southampton County, Legislative Petitions Digital Collections, LVA]. He registered as a "Free Negro" in Greensville County on 1 April 1825: free born of a Yellowish Complexion about Sixty-two years old, 5 feet 10-1/4 inches high...a planter [Register of Free Negroes, 1805-32, no. 140].

Burwell Jones was a "man of colour" hired by Daniel McKie of Lunenburg County to take his place in the Revolution. Burwell went together with McKie to Brunswick County court house where Colonel Davie accepted him as a substitute. McKie was later informed that Burwell died in the service [National Archives pension file R.6750, M804, roll 1690, frame 420 of 891 and https://www.fold3.com/image/246/24220878].

John Key appeared in Lunenburg County, Virginia court to petition for a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he entered the 1st Virginia Regiment as a substitute for Christopher Carlton. His widow was Faithy Lester [NARA W.10163, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/24200551].

Jesse Kelly was bound to serve Lewis lee as an apprentice for thirty one years when John Crittendon and Luke Cannon, officers of the 15th Virginia Regiment, recruited Jesse Kelly to serve in the Revolution. Lee brought a suit against them in King William County court that lasted almost nine years and awarded him 35 pounds for the loss of his servant. Crittendon and Cannon's King William County petition to the General Assembly of Virginia for reimbursement was rejected [Crittendon, John & Cannon, Luke: Petition, 1791-10-26, Legislative Petitions, Digital Collections, LVA]. Jesse registered in Surry County as a free Negro on 11 April 1799: a free born - mulatto man of a bright complexion...has a bushy head of hair [Hudgins, Register of Free Negroes, 6].

George Kendall was taxable in Prince William County from 1796 to 1810: called a "Free Molatto" in 1799, a "yellow" man in 1806 and 1809, taxable on 3 tithes in 1809 and 1810 [PPTL, 1782-1810, frames 313, 402, 462, 643, 707, 736]. He appeared in Prince William County court on 3 November 1834 at the age of ninety three and stated that he entered the service in Captain Drew's Company of Colonel Charles Porterfield's Light Infantry Regiment and was at the battles of Guilford and York Town where he was under Colonel Dabney. He was born in King George County, had his indentures showing his age, and enlisted in the town of Falmouth about three years before the termination of the war [NARA, R.5859, roll 1470, frame 469 of 1069]. He received a discharge stating that he enlisted for the war on 5 January 1780 and served his time [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Kendall, George, Digital Collections, LVA].

Gideon Langston was an Indian boy attending William & Mary College in 1754 [William & Mary College Quarterly VI:188]. He was one of the headmen of the Pamunkey Indians who petitioned the Virginia Legislature on 4 December 1812 [Pamunkey Indians: Petition, King William County, 1812-12-04, Legislative Petitions Digital Collection, LVA]. He was an Indian taxable on a slave in King William County in 1809 [PPTL, 1782-1832]. He and William Samson were living in King William County in 1818 when they received bounty land for three years service in the Revolution under Captain Holt Richeson in the 7th Virginia Regiment [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Froman, Temple, 1818, Digital Collection, LVA].

George Langston served three years in the Revolution from King William County in the 7th Virginia Regiment under Captain Holt Richeson and received bounty land for his services [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Langston, George, 1817, Digital Collection, LVA].

Henry Lattimore enlisted in the Revolution in Fairfax County and was sized on 15 March 1781: age 22, 5'8" high, yellow complexion, planter, resident of Fairfax County, born in Charles County, Maryland [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.91)]. He was listed in the roll and muster of Captain Claugh. Shelton's 1st Virginia Battalion from 1 September to 1 May 1783 (with William Wedgebare and Sawney Whistler) [NARA, M246, roll 113, frames 709, 712]. He received his discharge from the 1st Virginia Regiment on 6 July 1783 [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Latimer, Henry, Digital Collections, LVA].

Drury Lawrence petitioned the Amelia County court on 26 June 1755 asking to be discharged from his indenture to Charles Irby [Orders 1754-8, n.p.]. On 9 November 1769 the Lunenburg County court presented Richard Claiborne, Gentleman, for not listing him as a tithable [Orders 1769-77, 5]. He was apparently identical to Jury Larrance, an "Indian" taxable in Cumberland Parish, Lunenburg County, in Henry Blagrave's list for 1772 [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 291, 293, 339, 361]. (The original tax lists have not survived). Drury enlisted in the Revolution in Brunswick County, Virginia, on 20 August 1780 and was sized in 1781: born in Prince George County, residing in Dinwiddie County, 5'3-1/2" high, grey hair, yellow complexion, a farmer [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.19)].

Charles Lewis was a "Mulatto" child living in King George County on 5 April 1771 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Brunswick Parish to bind him and his brother Ambrose Lewis to William Buckham [Orders 1766-90, 158]. He was paid for serving as a seaman aboard the Dragon in the Revolution from 15 April 1778 to 20 January 1779, was on a list of seamen on the Dragon on 2 September 1779, and was on a list of seamen who had served in the navy for 3 years. Fanny Lewis and others received his bounty land warrant no. 8083 [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 8, 12, 69, 352]. The pension application of Ambrose Lewis includes an affidavit from a soldier that Charles and Ambrose were brothers who both served in the Revolution. Also, John Davis, a seaman aboard the Dragon, made a deposition for the bounty land claim of James Jennings on 7 February 1834 and named Charles and Ambrose Lewis as 2 of 52 members of the crew [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Jennings, James (p.9), Lewis, Charles, Digital Collections, LVA].

Ambrose Lewis was a "Mulatto" child bound out in Spotsylvania County with Charles Lewis on 5 April 1771. He was paid for serving as a seaman aboard the Dragon in the Revolution from 30 March 1778 to 20 January 1779, was on a list of seamen on the Dragon on 2 September 1779, and was on a list of seamen who had served in the navy for 3 years. Fanny and Hannah Lewis received his bounty land warrant no. 8082 for his service as a seaman, but he also received bounty land warrant no.2503 as a soldier [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 8, 12, 69, 352, 462]. On 4 May 1787 the Spotsylvania County court called him "a soldier who got wounded in General Gates' defeat" when it ordered that he receive a pension. The order was renewed each year through 1795 [Minutes 1786-7, 102, 158; Orders 1787-92, 48, 236; 1792-5, 78, 240]. He stated that he enlisted on 15 April 1776 as a seaman aboard the galley Page until 30 March 1778, then aboard the Dragon until 15 April 1779 and then as a soldier in the 2nd Virginia Regiment commanded by Colonel George Stubblefield until August 1780 when he was wounded at the battle of Camden [NARA, S.36041, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/25072024; Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Lewis, Ambrose, Digital Collections, LVA].

Jeremiah Liggon served three years as a soldier in the Revolution [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 252]. He registered in Chesterfield County on 10 October 1800: son of William Liggan and Hanah Liggan were free persons at his birth, A Blak man aged between thirty five and forty years, about five feet nine inches high, stout made, the son of Hanah Ligon a Black woman now living in this county. The said Hanah Ligon lived with a certain Thomas Smith as an apprentice or servant about forty five or forty eight years past. From the expiration of her service with said Smith has lived in this county as a free woman, that she intermarried with William Ligon a melatow who served his time as an apprentice with John Branch of this county. They raised several children [Ligon, Jeremiah (M, 35): Free Negro Affidavit, 1800, and Liggan, Jeremiah (M): Free Negro Certificate, 1800, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 26 August 1816: fifty four years old, brown complexioned, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, 261].

James Lines enlisted for 18 months in Amherst County while residing in Cumberland County in 1781: age 50, 5'10" high, yellow complexion [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.19].

Thomas Lively was a "Mulatto" living with his 2 children on James Scott's land in Chesterfield County in 1809 and 1811 [PPTL, 1786-1811, frames 162, 198, 268, 301, 374, 563, 689, 738]. His daughter Sally obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 14 January 1833: a free mulatter woman, lived on my plantation some years ago. Whilst there gave birth to a boy called Dick. I knew Sally Lively's father and mother forty years ago and they have always been reputed to be free. Her father is at this time receiving annually a pension for his services in the revolutionary war. Robt. Clarke [Lively, Sally (F): Free Negro Affidavit, 1833, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. He was a "man of Colour," who enlisted in Chesterfield County in the 5th Virginia Regiment in 1777 [NARA, S.38144, M804-1573, frame 0042].

Claude Lomanaintrom enlisted for the war as a substitute in Fairfax County on 19 February 1781 and was sized the same day: age 19, 5'8" high, yellow complexion, a taylor [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.19].

Charles Lucas received a certificate of freedom in Loudoun County on 13 May 1816: This day Robert Sears appeared and made Oath before me that Charles Lucas a Man of Colour Aged Upward of Seventy Years is a free man (& was born free) & Served Capt. Howsen Hoe of Prince William County--Untill he was thirty one years of Age, Agreeable to a former Law of the State of Virginia. He and his wife Nancy were identified in the 29 October 1811 Loudoun County certificate of freedom of their son William Lucas: I do certify that Charles Lucas and Nancy Lucas his wife has live near me for twenty odd years two mulattos I always believed them free born consequently the Bearer William Lucas being the son of the above must be born free...Henry Washington [Lucas, Townsend M., Loudoun County, Virginia, Records of Free Negroes, 1778-1838 (bound book at Thomas Balch Library in Loudoun County)]. He was a seaman aboard the galley Henry in an undated muster taken before 8 April 1778. He was entitled to bounty land since he served as a seaman for three years [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 15, 69, 252]. He was head of a Prince William County household of 15 "other free" in 1810 [VA:523].

Joseph Lucas enlisted in the Revolution from Powhatan County for 18 months as a substitute on 11 March 1782 and was sized the same day: age 21, 5'9-1/4" high, yellow complexion, born in Powhatan County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.83)]. He was a "free Bk" taxable in Powhatan County in 1790 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frame 48]. He registered as a free Negro in Goochland County on 18 July 1809: five feet nine and an half inches high, about forty five years of age, short curled hair intermingled with Grey...free born [Register of Free Negroes, p. 32]. He was head of a Henrico County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:998].

James Lucas was listed as a seaman who had served three years in the Revolution and was due bounty land [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 69, 216]. He was taxable in King George County from 1786 to 1793, called "free Jim Lucas" [PPTL, 1782-1830, frames 28, 48, 100, 111, 118]. He registered in King George County on 1 May 1800: a dark Mulatto man aged about ___ years, and about five feet ___ Inches, was bound to Thomas Massey, Senr. of this County to serve till the age of thirty one years [Register of Free Persons 1785-1799, no.12].

John Lucas received pay from 10 September 1777 to 20 January 1779 for service as a seaman aboard the Dragon [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 12]. He was also named as a seaman aboard the Dragon an affidavit by a fellow seaman, John Davis, aboard the ship, who testified for the bounty land claim of James Jennings on 7 February 1834 and named five of the officers and fifty-two members of the crew who served faithfully for three years and were discharged at the Chickahominy Ship Yard [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Jennings, James (p.9), Digital Collection, LVA]. He was a "free Neg" or "Black" taxable in Stafford County from 1783 to 1792: listed by John DeBaptist in 1787 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 106, 151, 218, 226, 263].

Joseph Longdon enlisted for the war on 12 September 1780: age 27, 5'7" high, a blacksmith, born in Fairfax County, residing in Alexandria, black complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.35)].

John Macklin was described as a "free mulatto" who lived near the lower Mecklenburg County store of Dinwiddie, Crawford, & Company and owed them 3 pounds on 1 September 1775 [Virginia Genealogist 15:291]. He was "poor soldier in the service of the United States," whose wife Frances was living in Mecklenburg County on 13 March 1780 when the court ordered Reuben Morgan to supply her with 2 barrels of corn for her support [Orders 1779-84, 19].

____ McGee enlisted in the Revolution as a substitute in King George County in August 1780 for 18 months and was sized on 15 April 1781: age 22, 5'9-1/2" high, sandy colored hair, hazel eyes, yellow complexion, a weaver, born in King George County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.21)], perhaps identical to George1 McCoy who also served in the Revolution.

George McCoy married Elizabeth Nickens, twenty-four-year-old daughter of Nathaniel Nickings, 10 March 1788 Orange County, Virginia bond. He was a "B.M." (blackman) taxable in Augusta County in 1796 and 1797 [PPTL 1796-1810, frames 32, 69] and a "free Negro" or "Melatto" taxable in Rockingham County in 1798, 1800, 1804, 1809 and a laborer taxable on 2 horses at Sam McWilliam's in 1810 [PPTL 1795-1813, frames 143, 199, 294, 460, 634]. He was head of a Rockingham County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:130b] and 2 "free colored" persons over the age of 45 in 1820. He appeared in Rockingham County court on 26 February 1821 and signed an affidavit to give his attorney in Richmond power to petition the Virginia Legislature in his name for compensation on 24 February 1821 for wounds he received at Buford's defeat in the Revolutionary War. He received a warrant for $30 [Virginia Revolutionary War State Pensions, McCoy, George, 1822, Digital Collection, LVA].

James McKoy was listed as a "free Molatto" farmer living on his own land in Westmoreland County in 1801 ["A List of Free Mulattoes & Negroes in Westmoreland County" Virginia Genealogist, 31:40] and head of a Westmoreland County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:778]. He appeared in Westmoreland County, Virginia court to apply for a pension for his services in the Revolution, stating that he was born in Saint Mary's County, Maryland, and moved with his father to Westmoreland County when he was about eight years of age. He entered the war in the year 1778 and was placed on guard at a place called Sandy Point on the Potomac River under the command of Lord Dunmore and then to a place called Hamilton Hall under command of Captain Rochester, then to several other locations for a month or two at a time. In 1781 he was drafted to go down to Yorktown for a total enlistment time of about fifteen months [NARA, S.5750, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/24327054]. He was listed in the 1840 census for Westmoreland County as an 80-year-old pensioner, "free colored" man living by himself, called James C. McKoy, Sr.

Bennett McCoy/ McKey was a "free Molatto" farmer with Hannah McKey and child Nancy McKey, living on their own land in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:40]. He was head of a Westmoreland County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:780]. He appeared in Westmoreland County court and made an affidavit (signing) to apply for a pension for his services in the Revolution. He was drafted in Westmoreland County in September 1777 for three years and served in the 15th Regiment as a bowman to Captain Robert Bealein. General Alexander Parker testified for him that he served for at least nine months, was taken prisoner with him in Charlestown and acted as a bowman or cook for Captain Beeles(?) [NARA, S38197, M804, http://www.fold3.com/image/246/24220794].

Thomas Mahorney, a "free man of colour," enlisted in the Revolution in January 1777 in Westmoreland County. He appeared in Westmoreland County court to apply for a pension, declaring that his family consisted of his wife Mima and son Jack, both slaves [NARA, S.38166, M804-1615, frame 0568].

Nanney Major, a widow, was allowed payment to widows and orphans of soldiers in the Revolution from King William County on 23 June 1779 and 6 November 1779 [Quarles, John: Petition, 1779-11-06 and 1779-11-23, Legislative Petitions of the General Assembly, 1776-1865, Accession Number 36121, Box 134, Folders 4 & 6, Digital Collections, LVA].

Sarah Major was allowed payment to widows and orphans of soldiers in the Revolution from King William County on 23 June 1779 and 6 November 1779 [Quarles, John: Petition, 1779-11-06 and 1779-11-23, Legislative Petitions of the General Assembly, 1776-1865, Accession Number 36121, Box 134, Folders 4 & 6, Digital Collections, LVA].

William Martin enlisted in the Revolution for the length of the war while resident in Pittsylvania County in March 1778 and was sized on 15 April 1781: age 19, 5'5-1/2" high, yellow complexion, born in Cumberland County, former service: 11th Va. Regt 1 year [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.21)].

Littlebury McKinny enlisted in the Revolution for the length of the war in Sussex County, Virginia, about 27 July 1782 when he was sized: age 16, 5'1-1/2" high, yellow complexion, born in Sussex County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://rLevwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.107)].

James Mealy registered as a free Negro in Goochland County on 18 December 1822: about fifty eight years old, about five feet ten inches high...yellowish complexion and was free born. He was drafted from Goochland County in May 1781 and was attached to the company of Captain Tolls [NARA, S.9408, M804, http://www.fold3.com/image/246/27177003].

James Milton enlisted in the Revolution and died of smallpox at Bunker Hill [Brown, Genealogical Abstracts, Revolutionary War Veterans Script Act, 1852, 139; Gwathmey, Historical Register of Virginians in the Revolution]. He received a discharge for three years service on 18 August 1780 from Captain Wm Spiller by order of Lieutenant Colonel Edmunds. He was the brother of Ann Melton who married Thomas Bowser [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Melton, James, Digital Collections, LVA].

John Milton received a discharge for three years service as a soldier in Colonel Marshall's Regiment of State Artillery on 23 August 1780 from Captain Wm Spiller by order of Lieutenant Colonel Edmunds [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Melton, John, Digital Collections, LVA]. He was head of a Hertford County household of 3 "other free" in 1800.

Ambrose Month received a pension for his services in the Revolution based on his application from Knox County, Tennessee, on 7 January 1834, at the age of sixty nine. He stated that he was born at the Hawfields in Spotsylvania County. He stated that he was of mixed blood, part Shawnee and part Negro and was born free. His widow and his former slave Daphney, "a free Negro of full blood," received a widow's pension [NARA, W.7477, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/24864672].

Adderson Moore enlisted in the Revolution from Chesterfield County in August 1780: age 16, 4'9" high, a planter, born in Chesterfield County, Yallow Mulatto complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.28)].

Thomas Morgan was a soldier from Suffolk, Virginia, in the French and Indian War who deserted from the Virginia Regiment in September 1757 and was described as: age 26, 5'7", mulatto [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy 31:96].

Francis Morris enlisted in the Revolution from Petersburg on 11 September 1780: age 28, 5'5-1/4" high, S. carpenter, born in Henrico County, yallow complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.12)].

Charles Morris enlisted in the Revolution on 12 September 1780 for the duration of the war from Charles City County: age 17, 5'2" high, planter, born Charles City County. He was sized again in April 1781 when his height was listed as 5'4" and his complexion black [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (pp.21, 36)]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Chesterfield County from 1798 to 1810 [PPTL, 1786-1811, frames 358, 543, 620, 662, 717, 753, 799] and head of a Chesterfield County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:70/1062]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 8 August 1814: about forty eight years old, brown complexioned, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 224].

Jack Morris, born say 1746, an orphan, no race indicated, was bound apprentice in Chesterfield County on 7 September 1750 [Orders 1749-54, 77]. He was a soldier in the Continental Line on 7 February 1778 when the Chesterfield County court ordered that his wife Mary receive 6 pounds public money [Orders 1774-8, 158].  His wife may have been the Mary Morris who registered in Petersburg on 19 August 1794: a brown Mulatto woman, five feet one inches high, forty eight years old, born free & raised in Chesterfield County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 57].

Nathaniel Morris served in the 5th Virginia Regiment from 1777 until the end of the war according to an affidavit from former Captain John Henry Fitzgerald on 18 August 1796 that Nathaniel Morris, a "black man," served with him [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Morris, Nathaniel, Digital Collections, LVA].

Anthony Morrison was listed as a seaman aboard the ship Gloucester on 4 November 1777 [U.S. Government Printing Office, Naval Documents of the American Revolution, 11:160, http://www.ibiblio.org/anrs//docs/E/E3/ndar_v11p05.pdf], and on 5 July 1779. He was listed among the seamen entitled to bounty land for three years service. Sarah Morrison received bounty land warrant no. 8048 for his service [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 14, 70, 358]. He was head of a Lancaster County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820. Sarah appeared in Lancaster County court on 7 April 1834 to state that she was the only heir of Anthony Morrison, deceased, who was a seaman in the State Navy [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants; Morrison, Anthony, Digital Collections, LVA].

Ezekiel Moses enlisted in the Revolution from Northampton County on 12 March 1781 for 18 months: age 18, 5'2" high, yellow complexion, T smith, born in Northampton County. On 23 July 1782 he was listed as a silversmith in the size roll as having been sentenced to serve 3 years and 3 months by a court martial [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (pp.21, 107)]. He was a "Mulatto" delinquent taxable in Northampton County in 1786 [Virginia Genealogist 20:269] and taxable in Northampton County from 1792 to 1796 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 140, 182]. He was taxable in York County from 1803 to 1814 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 288, 297, 307, 341, 392, 409].

Henry Moss was ordered bound out by the churchwardens of Raleigh Parish in Amelia County on 24 March 1757 [Orders 1754-8, n.p.]. He enlisted in the Revolution on 28 August 1777 and was in the muster of the 4th Virginia Regiment from March 1778 to December 1779 [NARA, M246, roll 99, frames 250, 430, 544, 546, 548; roll 100, frames 665, 830]. He received a certificate from Major Charles Pelham that he served from 18 August 1777 to July 1781 [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Moss, Henry, Digital Collections, LVA]. He was taxable in Powhatan County from 1789 to 1791 and from 1803 to 1817: called a "Mullo" in 1790, called a "F.B." from 1813 to 1815 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frames 36, 48, 63, 262, 280, 321, 366, 443, 463, 488, 538]. He was about forty-two years old on 1 July 1796 when he was described by the 1 July 1796 issue of a Virginia newspaper as: born a free Negro in one of the lower Counties of this state...his father was a black and his mother a mulatto, but he has turned white; he was in the Virginia Line in the last war [Headley, 18th Century Newspapers].

Isaac Needham, enlisted in the Revolution on 15 September 1780: age 17, 4'9-1/2 " high, a farmer, born in Annapolis, Maryland, residence: Westmoreland County, yellow complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.13)].

Benjamin Newell enlisted as a substitute while resident in Culpeper County on 20 September 1780 and was sixed on 18 March 1781: age 28, 5'7-1/4 " high, yellow complexion, born in Gloucester County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.23)].

Richard Nickens was listed as a seaman aboard the ship Tempest during the Revolution on 7 December 1779 [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 32]. He registered in Lancaster County on 17 October 1803: Age 52, Color mulatto...born free [Burkett, Lancaster County Register of Free Negroes, 1]. He made a deposition (signing) in Lancaster County court on 14 December 1819 for a pension for his services, stating that he enlisted in the Revolution for three years, went to Hampton with Captain Pollard and was placed on board the galley Hero, commanded by Captain Barrett, where he served eighteen months, then on board the ship Tempest under command of Captain Celey Saunders where he also served eighteen months and was honorably discharged at Chickahominy Ship Yard by Lieutenant Steel when the ship was laid up. His final pay as a seaman of 69 pounds was drawn by Colonel Heath on 2 August 1783 [NARA, M881, https://www.fold3.com/image/286914564]. He received Virginia State pension no. 307 [Legislative Petitions, Nicken, Richard, Digital Collection, LVA]. He appeared in Lancaster County court to apply for a pension on 17 December 1832 [NARA, S.5830, M805, reel 0615, frame 0187]. He received bounty land warrant no. 1477 [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 360].

William Nickens was called William Neakins, when he, Nathaniel and James Neakins were seamen aboard the Dragon according to an affidavit by a fellow seaman, John Davis, who testified for the bounty land claim of James Jennings on 7 February 1834 and named five of the officers and fifty-two members of the crew who served faithfully for three years and were discharged at the Chickahominy Ship Yard [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Jennings, James (p.9), Digital Collection, LVA]. He received bounty land warrant no. 337 for service in the Virginia State Line [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 360]. He enlisted early in the Revolutionary War as a drummer [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Nickins, William, Digital Collections, LVA; NARA, M881, https://www.fold3.com/23282720].

James Nickens was taxable in Lancaster County in John Nicken's household in 1775 and 1776 [Tithables 1745-95, 14, 18]. He may have been the James Nickens who was a seaman belonging to the ship Dragon and received a discharge for three years service in the Revolution on 24 June 1780. He assigned (signing) his right to his land warrant to Joseph Landers on 4 July 1783 [Revolutionary War Rejected Claims, Nickens, James, Digital Collections, LVA; NARA, M805-0615, frame 0192]. He was head of a Lancaster County household of 9 "Blacks" in 1783 [VA:55]. He obtained a certificate of freedom for himself, his wife and children in Lancaster County on 4 December 1786 which he recorded in Fauquier County on 29 April 1806. He was a "F. Negroe" head of a Fauquier County household of 8 "other free" in 1810, called James Nickens, Sr. [VA:368] and 11 "free colored" in 1820. On 3 September 1834 James Nickens, Elizabeth Nickens, and Judy Watkins appeared in Frederick County court to apply for the survivors' pension of their father James Nickens and their brother Hezekiah Nickens, a seaman in the Virginia State Navy who died during the war. The application of his heirs for bounty land was denied based on the fact that a James Nickens of Stafford County had already received bounty land and was receiving a pension [Revolutionary War Rejected Claims, Nickens, James, Digital Collections, LVA; NARA, M805-0615, frame 0192].

Hezekiah Nickens was serving as a seaman aboard the Gloucester in the Revolution on 5 July 1779 and served for three years. James Nickins and others drew his warrant no. 8396 [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 14, 70, 361]. His final pay of 57 pounds was drawn by Captain Sanders on 31 January 1787 [NARA, M853, https://www.fold3.com/image/286702512].

Nathaniel Nickens was listed aboard the Tempest on a 7 December 1779 return of spirits provided to the ship [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 32, 70, 371]. He served as a seaman aboard the ship Tempest under Captain Celey Saunders for three years ending in July 1780 according to an affidavit he received from Captain William Saunders on 25 July 1786. He assigned his right to his bounty land to William Bigger [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Nicken, Nathl, Digital Collections, LVA]. He was also listed as a seaman aboard the Dragon (listed with James and William Neakins) according to an affidavit by a fellow seaman aboard the ship, John Davis, who testified for James Jennings on 7 February 1834 and named five of the officers and fifty-two members of the crew [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Jennings, James (p.8), Digital Collection, LVA]. He was head of a Lancaster County household of 3 "Blacks" in 1783 [VA:55].

Edward Jones Nicken enlisted as a seaman in the Virginia State Navy on 1 August 1777 for three years, served aboard the Tartar, and received bounty land [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Nicking, Edward, Digital Collections, LVA]. He assigned his final pay of 84 pounds to James Allen on 5 August 1786 [NARA, M881, https://www.fold3.com/image/286914548]. He was serving aboard the Gloucester on 5 July 1779 and drew bounty land warrant no. 2427 [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 14, 217]. He was taxable in the lower end of New Kent County on the south side of Warrenny Road from 1782 to 1815: taxable on a slave named Roger in 1785; taxable on a slave in 1792; removed to Richmond in 1794; taxable in New Kent County on a slave in 1796 and 1804; called a "FN" in 1806; taxable on 2 free males in 1809; listed as a "Person of Colour" with his unnamed wife in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1800, frames 36, 100, 190, 213; 1791-1828, frames 372, 409, 432, 455, 476, 491, 503, 516, 574].

James Nickens enlisted in the Revolution for the length of the war while resident in Lancaster County and was sized in April 1781: age 18, 5'1-1/2" high, yellow complexion, a planter, born in Princess Anne County, engaged Mar 80 in Essex County, former service: served for 18 months in Buford's detacht [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.23)]. He was serving in the Revolution in July 1781 when forage was delivered to him at Prince Edward County courthouse on several days in July 1781 for the wagon and riding horses used in the Revolution [NARA, M853, https://www.fold3.com/image/286751367]. He was taxable in Prince William County from 1796 to 1798 and from 1806 to 1813: called a "Dark" man in 1805 and 1806, a "yellow" man in 1809 and 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1810, frames 315, 341, 368, 598, 645, 709], taxable in Essex County in 1795 [PPTL, 1782-1819, frame 266] and head of an Essex County household of 3 "other free" in 1810. He was about fifty-nine years old and living in Falmouth on 27 April 1818 when he made a declaration in court to apply for a pension. He stated that he served as a seaman for three years on board the ships Tempest Revenge & Hero which were then commanded by Captains Muter and Westcott, but he had forgotten the name of the captain of the Tempest. He then enlisted in the land service at Lancaster courthouse, was marched by Nicholas Currell to he headquarters of Baron Steuben at Cumberland courthouse, remained there some time and was then placed under Captain Drury Ragsdale and Fleming Gains of Colonel Harrison's Regiment of Artillery which was marched to join the Southern Army under General Green in South Carolina where he was in the battle of Eutaw Springs. After the war he returned to Virginia and had resided there ever since. He was a sixty-two-year-old "Free Man of Color," said to be living alone in Stafford County on 16 August 1820, when he repeated much of what he had stated in his 27 April 1818 declaration, did not mention any sea service, but added that he was stationed in the rear at the battle of Eutaw Springs, in charge of baggage belonging to Fleming Gains and John T. Brooke, officers in Harrison's Regiment. His pension for service in the artillery commenced on 27 April 1818. On 27 April 1818 Charles West testified before Judge William Dade of Stafford County that James Nickens enlisted on board the sally Norfolk Revenge and served aboard that vessel with him for two years and three months, and on 13 October 1818 John T. Brooke certified that James Nickens was a soldier in the First Regiment of Artillery under Colonel Charles Harrison [NARA, S.38262, M805, reel 615, frame 0192]. James Nickers private, was issued bounty land warrant no. 7391 for 200 acres which he assigned to John Metcalf. And James Nickins received warrant no. 1716 for service in the state navy [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 8, 312, 360]. He was head of a Stafford County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820, 1 "free colored" over the age of 55 with a white woman aged 30-40 in 1830, and a pensioner living in Stafford County, age 85, head of a household of 1 "free colored" man and woman 55-100 years of age in the 1840 census. He was about seventy-two on 7 November 1831 when he appointed an agent in Washington to apply for bounty land for his service under Corporal Lieutenant Gains at the battle of Eutaw Springs. His deposition said nothing about service as a seaman, but it included the discharge by (Captain) James Markham of James Nickens, a seaman belonging to the ship Dragon, on 24(?)th June 1780 for three years in the service and his assignment of his right to the bounty land to Mr. Joseph Landers on 4 July 1783 [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Nicking, James, Digital Collections, LVA].

James Nicken sued Edward Ingram for freedom from his indenture on 11 September 1764 in Northumberland County court. He was called James Nicken alias Bateman when the court ordered him to serve Ingram for four more years [Orders 1762-66, 411, 435]. James Bateman, James, Edward and Hezekiah Nicken were serving aboard the Gloucester on 4 November 1777 when the Keeper of the Public Store was ordered to deliver them articles of clothing, "on their paying for the same" [U.S. Government Printing Office, Naval Documents of the American Revolution, 11:160, http://www.ibiblio.org/anrs//docs/E/E3/ndar_v11p05.pdf]. They were listed on board the Gloucester shortly before it was dismantled on 5 July 1779 [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 14]. And James Wicking or Nicking was listed as one of the seamen aboard the galley Dragon who were wanting provisions for 30 days on 2 September 1779. He was called a seaman belonging to the ship Dragon when he received his discharge for three years service as a seaman in the Revolution on 24 June 1780. He assigned (signing) his right to his land warrant to Joseph Landers on 4 July 1783 [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Nickens, James, Digital Collections, LVA]. On 10 April 1835, about the same time as the Fauquier County branch of the family applied for bounty land for the service of James Nickens, Jemima Bass of Norfolk County applied in Norfolk County court which certified that she was the widow of Willis Bass and only heir of her father James Nickens and his brother Nathaniel Nickens [Court Minutes 24:139]. She was sixty-six years old when she deposed that she was a resident of the county of Norfolk, that during the Revolution James Nickens and his brother Nathaniel Nickens served on board a vessel named the Caswell and were regularly discharged after the war. Nathaniel Nickens died leaving no wife or child, the nearest relative he left was James Nickens who was also a seaman, and that James Nickens died leaving her as his only child and heir [Revolutionary War Rejected Claims, Nickens, James, Digital Collections, LVA; NARA, M805-0615, frame 0192].

Robert Nickens enlisted in the Revolution while resident in Lancaster County as a substitute for 18 months in 1780 and was sized in April 1781: age 18, 5'8" high, black complexion, a farmer, born in Frederick County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.23)]. Doctor Ball received his final pay of 14 pounds on 5 April 1785 [NARA, M881, https://www.fold3.com/image/23282733]. He was in a list of soldiers whose name appeared on the army register but had not received bounty land by 7 January 1835 [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 259].

Bazabel Norman was taxable in the same list as James Norman in a list of "free Negroes" in Frederick County, Virginia, in 1802 frame [PPTL 1782-1802, frame 856] and head of a Frederick County, Virginia household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:569]. He made a declaration in Washington County, Ohio court to obtain a pension, stating that he enlisted in Maryland in 1777. He served in the 7th Maryland Regiment His widow stated that they were married near the Montgomery County, Maryland courthouse in September 1782 [NARA, W.5429, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/1/25355603].

William Oats was a drummer listed in the payroll of Captain Nathaniel Morris's Company of the 9th Virginia Regiment commanded by Colonel George Matthews in May and October 1777 [NARA, M246, https://www.fold3.com/image/9682293 and 23225254]. He was a "free mulatto" head of a Northumberland County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:991].

Evan Payne was taxable in Fauquier County from 1802 to 1806: a "free Negro" in 1804, a "Mulatto" in 1805; a "free negro" in 1806 [PPTL 1782-96, frames ; 1797-1807, frames 413, 632, 659, 768, 791]. He was a "mulatto" listed among fourteen deserters from Lieutenant John Tankersley's troops. Tankersley offered a reward for their delivery to King George courthouse in the 3 October 1777 issue of the Virginia Gazette [Purdie edition, p. 3, col. 1].

Benjamin Payne enlisted in the Revolution as a substitute from Buckingham County in 1782 and was sized about the same time: age 20, 5'6" high, yellow complexion, born in Buckingham County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.61)].

Joshua Payne was a black complexioned soldier, 5'4" high, a farmer born in Westmoreland County who entered the war as a substitute in King George County on 4 April 1781 to serve for two years in the Navy [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p. 25)]. He was head of a Rockingham County, North Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:491].

Charles Payne, black complexion, was a planter born in Westmoreland County, who entered the Revolution in King George County as a substitute for three years on 4 April 1781 [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p. 25)]. He registered in King George County on 10 November 1801: a dark mulatto man aged about thirty five years, about five feet six inches high, rather spare...born in this County of free parents [Register of Free Persons, no.36].

Andrew Pebbles appeared in King and Queen County to apply for a pension, stating that he was a Mulatto who served under Captain George Lee Turberville of Westmoreland County who was a recruting officer. He joined the camp at Valley Forge under Captain Lewis Booker of the 15th Virginia Regiment for two years. He was a miller with a wife who was a slave [NARA, S.38297, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/25981200].

Joshua Perkins was a member of Captain Windsor Brown's Virginia Company of troops when Brown advertised in the 6 June 1777 issue of the Virginia Gazette that he had deserted. Brown described him as: a mulatto, about 5 feet 6 or 7 inches high, 24 or 25 years old, and is a straight made fellow; had on a short striped jacket, a felt hat bound round with French lace [Virginia Gazette, Purdie edition, p. 3, col. 3]. Scarborough Bloxam, a midshipman aboard the Accomac testified that Joshua enlisted in the war, served on board the vessel during the Revolution and was discharged [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants; Bayly, Robert, Digital Collections, LVA]. He received 100 acres bounty land warrant no. 93 and Sally Perkins received no. 8241 for his services [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 193, 363]. His only heir Sally Perkins applied for his pension in Accomack County on 29 March 1834 [Orders 1832-36, 21, 313].

Nimrod Perkins was bound an apprentice shoemaker to William Sacker James in Accomack County on 28 August 1765 [Orders 1764-65, 489]. He was taxable in Accomack County in 1785 and 1790 [PPTL, 1782-1814, frames 154, 347], a "Mulatto" taxable in Northampton County in 1787 and 1788 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 74, 81], and head of an Accomack County household of 2 "other free" and a white woman in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:13]. Zadock Bayley testified in Accomack County court on 1 July 1830 that he frequently went on board the Navy vessel Accomac and saw Nimrod Perkins ("b.m") serving as a drummer [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants; Perkins, Nimrod, Digital Collections, LVA]. He enlisted as a drummer on board the galley Diligence from 1777 until 1781, and he had received a Virginia Military Land Warrant for 100 acres [Orders 1828-32, 537; NARA, S.5904, M804, roll 1912, frame 356 of 988; https://www.fold3.com/image/246/27174273].

James Peters was a seaman on the payroll of the galley Henry in the Revolution in an undated list before 8 April 1778. He received warrant no. 4368 [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 15, 371]. Lieutenant Joshua Singleton certified on 16 August 1787 that he had served aboard the galley Henry from January 1777 until January 1780. He assigned his rights to the land to William Reynolds on 21 June 1787 with Philip Brownley as witness [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Peters, James, Digital Collections, LVA].

Anthony Peters served three years as a soldier in the Revolution and received bounty land warrant based on the affidavit of Lieutenant Wyatt Coleman of Dabney's Legion on 2 March 1786. He assigned his rights to the warrant to Jones Allen in the presence of William Eaton, a magistrate of York County [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Peters, Anthony, Digital Collections, LVA]. He was taxable in Simon Gillett's York County household in 1784 and 1786 and head of a household of 2 "free Negroes & mulattoes over 16" in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1841, frames 91, 107, 130, 394, 410]. He was head of a York County household of an "other free" man, 7 slaves and a white woman aged 26-45 in 1810 [VA:304].

Jesse Peters registered as a "free Negro" in Surry County on 9 January 1796: son of Lucy Peters a free mulattoe, a resident of the county, a dark mulattoe man aged about 32 years, pretty well made short hair, 5'11" high [Back of Guardian Accounts Book 1783-1804, no.17]. Jesse was called a "Free man of Color" in his application for a pension in which he stated that he fought at the Battle of Guilford Courthouse under Captain John Lucas [NARA, R.8146, M804].

____ Phillips was a black complexioned soldier, born in Fauquier County, entered the service in Culpeper County, 5'6-1/2' high, a planter, enlisted on 29 April 1781 for 1-1/2 years [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p. 25)].

Joseph Pierce enlisted in the Revolution from New Kent County about 1780: age 45, 5'6-1/4" high, a planter, born in Nansemond County, Molatto complexion, for 5 years by order of a court martial Decr 9th 1780 [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.80)].

Francis Pierce, a "free man of Colour," appeared in Boone County, Missouri, on 1 May 1837 to apply for a pension of his service in the Revolution. He was born free near Port Royal in Caroline County and enlisted there at the age of seventeen with Captain Philip Buckner for five years. He served under Colonel Samuel Haws and acted as his servant [NARA, R.8235, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/27214473]. He was head of a Spotsylvania County household of 1 "other free" and 6 slaves in 1810 [VA:100].

John Pinn enlisted aboard the galley Protector as a mariner on 8 February 1777 and served until 8 February 1780 according to his discharge from the ship's Commander John Thomas [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Pinn, John, Digital Collections, LVA]. He was a "Free" head of a Northumberland County household of 3 "Blacks" in 1782 [VA:37].

John Pinn was living in Boston, Massachusetts on 28 October 1842 when he applied for a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that his father Robert Pin was a Mustee and his mother a Cherokee who were inhabitants of Lancaster County, Virginia, at a place called Indian Town near Carter's Creek. He and his father served in Captain William Yerby's Company of Artillery, he as a powder boy. He had moved to Boston about 1792 and married Nancy Coffin about ten years later. She died about 1820. He testified that his brothers Jim and William also served and that Jim died in the service. He was described as "a coloured man - apparently of Indian Origin and is a person of good report amongst our mercantile community both here and at Salem" [NARA, R.6264, M804-1938, frames 0637-51].

William Pinn was named in the Revolutionary War pension application of his brother John Pin, perhaps the William Penn who was head of a Maryland household of one "other free" in 1790 [MD:52].

Rawley Pinn was a "Mulatto" taxable in Buckingham County in 1774 [Woodson, Virginia Tithables From Burned Counties], head of an Amherst County household of 7 persons in 1783 [VA:47], and 8 "Mulattos" in 1785 [VA:84]. He was in the list of men in the Amherst County Militia in 1781 [William & Mary Digital Archives, Swem Library's Special Collections, Cabell Papers Box 2, Folder11.pdf; https://digitalarchive.wm.edu/handle/10288/16244].

John Pipsico appeared in the District of Columbia court on 16 June 1818 to apply for a pension for this service in the Revolution. He enlisted in Fairfax County in Captain Snead's Company of Colonel Campbell's 3rd Virginia regiment in 1780 or 1781 [NARA, S.36230, M804, roll 1939, frame 1028 of 1351]. He was head of an Alexandria household of 3 "free colored" in 1820.

Obediah Plumly was listed in the Pay Roll of the 3rd Georgia Battalion commanded by Lieutenant John McIntosh from 1 November 1779 to 1 February 1780 [NARA, M246, roll 32, frame 65 of 117]. He enlisted in the Revolution as a substitute for 18 months while resident in New Kent County on 6 June 1782 and was sized on 26 June: age 20, 5'6-3/4" high, yellow complexion, born in New Kent County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p. 61)]. He was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina, household of 7 "other free" in 1790 [NC:76], 11 in 1800 [NC:469] and 3 in 1810 [NC:739].

James Pompey was a "Negro planter" from Sussex County, Virginia, listed in the Size Roll of Captain Thomas Waggener's Company at Fort Holland in August 1757: 22 years old, 5 feet 4 inches tall [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 463]. He, Amos Newsom, John Muns, and Samuel Santee were paid by the Sussex County court on 21 June 1757 for 2 to 6 days diet as county soldiers and guards [Court Papers, 1757, frame 747, LVA microfilm no. 39].

John Rolls/ Rawls was residing in Caroline County when he was drafted into the Revolution from Culpeper County on 17 March 1781 for 18 months. He was sized on 4 May 1782: age 48, 5'3-1/4" high, black complexion [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.75)]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Culpeper County from 1786 to 1802 [PPTL 1782-1802, frames 157, 194, 336, 418, 435, 529, 567, 609, 693, 743, 867]. He was called John Rawls when he appeared in Shenandoah County court to apply for a pension, stating stated that he enlisted at Culpeper court house and served in the regiment of Captain Reuben Fields [NARA, S.39056, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/15532577].

Robert Randall, "a free black man," applied for a pension in Hanover, Grafton County, New Hampshire, on 2 May 1818 for service in the Revolutionary War. He stated that he enlisted in Fairfax County, Virginia, under Lieutenant Rogers who brought him to Rhode Island where he joined the regiment under Colonel Patterson. His widow Hannah Randall applied for benefits on 13 May 1820, stating that she had sons James (15) and Edward (12) at home and two children who lived at a distance from her [NARA, S.45165, M804-0443].

Joseph Ranger was a 72-year-old "man of Colour" and resident of St. John's Parish, Elizabeth City County, when he appeared in court on 25 October 1832 to make a declaration to obtain a pension for his service in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted as a seaman in Northumberland County on board the galley Hero and then the ship Dragon for a total of four years. He was issued 100 acres of bounty land [NARA S.7352, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/27992134]. He was a seaman aboard the Dragon according to an affidavit by a fellow seaman aboard the ship, John Davise, who testified for the bounty land claim of James Jennings on 7 February 1834 and named five of the officers and fifty-two members of the crew [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Jennings, James (p.8), Digital Collection, LVA]. He was taxable in Elizabeth City County from 1809 to 1815: taxable on slave in 1809 and 1810, in a list of "free negroes & mulattoes" in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1820, frames 258, 271, 283, 295, 315, 334, 342].

Daniel Redcross left a Lunenburg County, Virginia will, proved 10 June 1779 by which he left half his estate to his brother Charles Evans and the remainder to John Epps [WB 3:26]. He was in the muster roll of the 14th Virginia Regiment in the Revolution from 1777 to 1778 [NARA, M246, https://www.fold3.com/image/9639177].

John Redcross was in the list of men in the service of the Amherst County Militia in 1781 [William & Mary Digital Archives, Swem Library's Special Collections, Cabell Papers Box 2, Folder11.pdf; https://digitalarchive.wm.edu/handle/10288/16244].

John Redcross was listed as a deserter from Captain Lang's 2nd Virginia Regiment in the Revolutionary War [NARA, M246, https://www.fold3.com/image/10082925]. He apparently returned, completed his service, was discharged, and received bounty land warrant no. 4748 for three years service in the State Line which he assigned to Jones Allen on 15 July 1783 [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Digital Collections, LVA]. He was head of a York County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:882].

William Redman was head of Spartansburg, South Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [SC:33 (microfilm of original)], a Lincoln County, North Carolina household of 11 "other free" in 1800 [NC:900], and 4 "other free" and a white woman in Rutherford County in 1810 [NC:431]. He enlisted in the Revolution in South Carolina in 1775 [NARA, R.8645, M805-679, frame 0652].

Richard Redman enlisted in the Revolution from Fauquier County for 18 months on 20 September 1780 and was sized about the same time: age 21, 5'4-1/2" high, a planter, born in Fauquier County, yellow complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.54)]. He was taxable in the western district of Hardy County in a "list of Free Negroes & Mulattoes" from 1809 to 1816 [PPTL 1786-1806, frames 471; 1807-1850, frames 57, 104, 166, 183, 266, 328, 343]. He enlisted about 1780 at Fauquier courthouse [NARA, W.5691, M805-679, frame 0630]. He was head of a Hardy County household of 2 "free colored" in 1830.

John Redman was taxable in the western district of Hardy County, counted in the "list of Free Negroes & Molattoes" from 1801 to 1813 [PPTL 1786-1806, frames 348, 357, 396-7, 459-60; 1807-1850, frame 183, 256]. He made a declaration in Hardy County court to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution, stating that he enlisted in Winchester, Virginia [NARA, W.5691, M805-679, frame 0611].

Raymond Reed was a "mullatto" child bound out by the Southampton County court on 11 May 1758 [Orders 1754-9, 434]. He enlisted in the Revolution for 3 years and was on the pay roll of Captain Thomas Edmunds' Company of the 15th Virginia Battalion from June 1777 to March 1778 [NARA, M246, roll 113, frames 212, 224, 226, 237, 243 of 752].

Clement Reed was the "mullatoe" son of Jane Reed who was bound out by the Southampton County court on 13 December 1759 [Orders 1759-63, 11]. He enlisted in the Revolution for 3 years on 9 January 1777 and was in the muster of Captain Peter Jones' Company of the 14th Virginia Regiment, sick at Lancaster in February 1778, and in the muster of the 5th and 11th Regiment in July 1779 [NARA, M246, roll 102, frame 683 of 774; roll 112, frames 350, 403 of 826].

Amos Reed was a 75-year-old "free man of Colour by birth" who applied for a pension in Nansemond County on 13 May 1833 for his service in the Revolution [NARA, R.8628, M805-678, frame 0166].

Ameriah Reed applied for a pension for his service in the Revolution, stating the he enlisted in 1778 and had always lived in Nansemond County [NARA, R.8627, M805-678, frame 0154].

Abram Reed was a "free man of Colour by birth" who had always lived in Nansemond County and was about seventy-nine years old on 13 May 1833 when he applied for a pension for his service in the militia digging embankments at Portsmouth during the Revolution [NARA, S.7364, M805-678, frame 0148].

William Rich received bounty land based on his discharge on 1 March 1780 from Major Charles Magill for serving three years [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Rich, William, Digital Collections, LVA]. He was head of a Lancaster County household of 5 "Blacks" in 1783 [VA:55].

Godfrey Richardson enlisted in the Revolution from Stafford County for 18 months on 1 August 1780: age 39, 5'6" high, a blacksmith, born in Essex County [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.30)].

Charles Riley was a "free Negro" taxable in Middlesex County, Virginia, from 1801 to 1819 [PPTL 1782-1819, frames 197, 217, 225, 272, 282, 313, 322, 343]. He was a "coloured man," aged about eighty-five, who applied for a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he was a resident of Middlesex County when he enlisted, served from January 1780 to 1 November 1781, was sometimes sent on express between the troops in Middlesex, Gloucester, and Caroline counties, sometimes sent out upon foraging service and once helped guard a captured British vessel [National Archives Pension file no. R.8824, https://www.fold3.com/image/1/16183885].

Hezekiah Roberts was head of a St. George Parish, Accomack County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 (called Kiah) [Virginia Genealogist 2:160]. He received bounty land in 1784 based on his service of three years and discharge from Colonel W. Brent in May 1780 [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Roberts, Hezekiah, Digital Collections, LVA].

John Roberts was drafted from Accomack county on 25 January 1782 to serve in the Revolution for 18 months and sized on 4 May 1782: age 30, 5'3" high, black complexion, born in Accomack County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.75)].

Godfrey Roberts was deceased on 21 September 1833 when Anselm Bailey of Henrico County testified that Godfrey enlisted in the Revolution under Colonel Diggs for three years and served under Thomas Meriwether [Revolutionary War Rejected Claims, Roberts, Godfrey, Digital Collections, LVA]. Godfrey was listed as a landsman on Captain Elliott's pay roll for the galley Safeguard from 1 March 1777 to 16 June 1777 and as a seaman entitled to bounty land for three years service [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, Virginia, 28, 71].

David Robertson enlisted for 18 months on 22 September 1780: age 19, 5'7-1/2" high, a planter, born in Dosset (Dorchester County), Maryland, residence: Middlesex County, yellow complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.54)].

Peter Rouse, a "free man of colour," was about fifty seven years old on 4 November 1818 when he applied (signing) for a pension in Bedford County, Pennsylvania. He stated that he enlisted in the 2nd Virginia Regiment under Captain William Campbell in Dinwiddie County, Virginia, in 1778. His application for a pension included two passes dated 27 April 1807: Peter Rouse is a free man, that his parents & relations resided in this County. That I knew him in the capacity of a soldier in the regiment commanded by Colo George Gibson. J Nicholas and one from William Campbell of Orange County, Virginia on 15 September 1807: he and his parents also were born free. He was described as a "yellow man" [NARA, S.23880, M805-706, frame 0545; https://www.fold3.com/image/246/15535547]. He was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [NC:473].

John Rowe, a "free man of Colour," made a declaration in Botetourt County court to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted in 1778 with Colonel Fabeger in the 2nd Regiment in New Jersey [NARA, S.39045, M804-2072, frame 0209]. He was head of a Fluvanna County, Virginia household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:478]. He registered in Nottoway County on 5 November 1818 and again in Botetourt County on 13 March 1820: 58 years, Black Colour, 5 feet 8 inches [Free Negroes Registered in the Clerks Office of Botetourt County, no.29].

Samuel Russell enlisted in the Revolution for 18 months from Loudoun County on 23 September 1780: age 19, 5'2-1/2" high, a planter, born in Berkeley County, hair dark brown, eyes gray, complexion black, Deserted. Reg. 8 [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p54)]. He produced an affidavit in Rockbridge County on 6 July 1818 that he enlisted in the Revolution on 1 September 1780 and served 18 months, and he appeared in Rockbridge County court to make a second deposition, stating that he served under Captains Peyton, Scott & Anderson, Colonel Davis and General Baron Steuben for 18 months in the 3rd Virginia Regiment in 1780 and 1781. [NARA, W.26423, M804, roll 2101, frame 271 https://www.fold3.com/image/1/14068041]. A Samuel Russell was listed in the pay roll of Captain Thomas Snead's Company for the months of November and December 1776 [NARA, M246, https://www.fold3.com/image/9682250].

George Russell he appeared in Smith County, Tennessee, on 15 August 1820 to apply for a pension for his services in the Revolution. He served in the 15th Virginia Regiment for a year and nine months. He was a "colored man" who was born in Brunswick County, Virginia and returned there after in Spring 1779 [NARA, S.39059, M804]. He was head of a Wake County household of 11 "other free" in 1790 [NC:103] and 4 in 1800 [NC:791].

George Sampson enlisted in the 15th Virginia Regiment for three years about December 1775 and died in the service after June 1777 according to an affidavit from Lieutenant Giles Raines. On 29 June 1789 his widow Nanny Sampson of King William County certified that Reuben Sampson was his legal representative. Reuben assigned his right to the bounty land to William Bigger with Robert Mush as witness [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants; Sampson, George, Digital Collections, LVA]. Nanney Sampson was his widow who was allowed payment to widows and orphans of soldiers in the Revolution from King William County on 23 June 1779 and 6 November 1779 [Quarles, John: Petition, 1779-11-06 and 1779-11-23, Legislative Petitions of the General Assembly, 1776-1865, Accession Number 36121, Box 134, Folders 4 & 6, Digital Collections, LVA]. Reuben was taxable on 2 horses in the Pamunkey Indian Town in King William County in 1799 [PPTL, 1782-1832].

William Sampson was living in King William County when he and Gideon Langston enlisted and served three years in the Revolution under Captain Holt Richeson in the 7th Virginia Regiment. They received bounty land in 1818 [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Froman, Temple, 1818, Digital Collection, LVA].

John Saunders enlisted in the Revolution for 18 months as a substitute while resident in Henrico county on 16 April 1781 and was sized eleven days later on 27 April: age 16, 5'1-1/2" high, black complexion, a farmer, born in Hanover County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf]. He was head of a Henrico County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:980].

Drury Scott, "mulattoe" son of Nanny Scott, was bound as an apprentice blacksmith on 27 April 1767 in Southam Parish, Cumberland County (which became Powhatan County in 1777) [Orders 1764-7, 459]. He was taxable in the southern district of Bedford County from 1800 to 1809: called a "free N" in 1807 [PPTL 1782-1805, frames 463, 479, 496, 531, 658; 1806-16, frames 30, 100, 153, 219, 288, 402, 469]. He was a "free man of colour" who appeared in Clarke County, Kentucky court to make a declaration to obtain a pension for service in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted in Powhatan County for three years in the 10th Regiment. He was a rough carpenter with no one in his family but his wife who was a slave [NARA, S.35644, https://www.fold3.com/image/1/14186355].

Nicholas Scott was a "free Mulatto man" living in Halifax County, Virginia, on 6 May 1758 when he was tried for having shot and killed John Herring with Jacob Cogar as his accomplice. He was sent to Williamsburg for further trial where he was reprieved by the Governor but ordered to leave Virginia [Pleas 2:330, 336, 452, 471]. He may have been the Nicholas Scott who enlisted in the Revolution while resident in Charles City County for 18 months on 22 September 1780: age 52, 5'4-1/2" high, a sailor, born in Henrico County, yellow complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.38)].

William Scott enlisted in the Revolution for the length of the war while resident in Dinwiddie County, Virginia, probably in September 1780 (no date but dates on either side of him are in September 1780) and was sized on 1 March 1781: age 28, 5'6-1/2" high, a carpenter, born in Charlestown [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.60)]. He registered in Petersburg on 16 August 1794: a light Mulatto man five feet six inches high, about forty one years old, who served in the American Army during the Revolution [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 10].

Jesse Scott registered in Petersburg on 16 August 1794: a light Mulatto man five feet six & 1/2 inches high who served as a Soldier & a free man during the American Revolution about thirty four years old [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 9].

John Scott, born say 1760, a "person of color," or "a free black man," received bounty land for his service in the Revolution in the 10th Virginia Regiment commanded by Captain Thomas Posey which he sold to Charles Jones of Prince Edward County, Virginia. He was in Clement County, Ohio, on 2 November 1809 when appointed an attorney to receive his warrant. He was in Hamilton Township, Warwick County, Ohio, when he made a declaration to obtain a pension [NARA, S.46522, roll 2137, frames 805 of 1207 and https://www.fold3.com/image/16237261].

John Scott, the "mulattoe" son of Nanny Scott, was bound as an apprentice blacksmith to Robert Moore in Cumberland County, Virginia court on 27 April 1767 [Orders 1764-7, 459]. He may have been the John Scott who was a soldier that died in the service of the state according to testimony of (his mother?) Nanny Scott and (brother?) Andrew Scott in Henrico County court on 4 February 1788 [Orders 1787-9, 169]. Drury Scott and Nanny Scott testified in Henrico County court on 4 February 1788 that Axom Scott was the legal representative of John Scott, a soldier who died in the service of the state [Orders 1787-9, 169; 1789-91, 184, 417, 430].

Littleberry Scott enlisted as a substitute in the Revolution for the length of the war while resident in Henrico County on 28 March 1781 and was sized on 27 April the same year: age 18, 5-2-1/2" high, yellow complexion, a farmer, born in Charles City County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.45)]. He registered in Petersburg on 2 June 1801: a light brown Mulatto man, five feet four inches high, forty years old, born free & raised in Charles City County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 256].

Thomas Shaw enlisted for 18 months as a substitute in Culpeper County in September 1780: age 40, 5'4-3/4" high, complexion all Blk, a planter, residence Culpeper County, born in Stafford County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.29].

John Simmons enlisted in the Revolution for 18 months while resident in Caroline County on 20 September 1780: age 45, 6'2-1/2" high, a carpenter, born in Essex County, yellow complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.77)].

Randolph Sly, enlisted for 18 months on 23 September 1780: age 25, 5'6-3/4" high, a planter, born in Caroline County, Black complexion. Enlisted for the war, but received no bounty. Deserted [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.60)]. He was apparently identical to Randall Shly who enlisted in the 2nd Maryland Regiment on 22 April 1782 (though his height is quite different): residence: Virginia, age 24, 5'10" height, complexion: Negro, paid 8 pounds bounty [NARA, M246, roll 34, frame 434 of 587; http://www.ancestry.com].

Elijah Smith enlisted as a substitute in the Revolution for 18 months from Norfolk County on 15 August 1780 and was sized on 5 April 1781: age 55, 5'4-1/4" high, black complexion, Indian features, a farmer, born in Norfolk County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.29)]. He was a "Free Black" head of a household of 8 "other free" Princess Anne County in 1810 [VA:475].

James Smith enlisted as a substitute in the Revolution from Bedford County in February 1778 and was sized on 5 April 1781: age 35, 5'9" high, black complexion, right eye out, blacksmith, born in Prince George County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.29)].

Joseph Smith enlisted in the Revolution from Dinwiddie County on 6 June 1782 and was sized on 26 June: age 25, 5'7-3/4" high, yellow complexion, born in Prince George County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.113)].

Lewis Smith enlisted as a substitute from Dinwiddie County for 18 months on 6 June 1782 and was sized on 26 June: age 22, 5'6-3/4" high, black complexion, a planter, born in Prince George County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.113)]. He was a "free man of Colour" who was living in Dinwiddie County when he made a declaration in court to obtain a pension for service in the Revolution. He stated that he was born in Prince George County and removed to Dinwiddie County just before the war and resided there ever since. He enlisted in 1779 as a bowman for Captain Covington [NARA, S.6112, M804, roll 2226, frame 169 https://www.fold3.com/image/246/16878961]. He was a "free Black" taxable in Petersburg in 1813 [PPTL 1800-1833, frame 413].

William Smothers enlisted in the Revolution while residing in Powhatan County for the length of the war and was sized on 8 March 1782: age 19, 5'3-1/2" high, black hair, yellow eyes, black complexion, born in Albemarle County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.73)]. He was taxable in Powhatan County from 1793 to 1804, called a "Mo" in 1793 and 1803 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frames 98, 123, 111, 138, 170, 193, 230, 266, 282]. He appeared in Cumberland County, Virginia court to apply for a pension for his services in the Revolution, stating that he enlisted in 1781 in Captain Stephen Southall's Virginia Regiment commanded by Colonel Charles Harrison and served until the close of the war [NARA, S.38375, M804, roll 2238, frame 588; https://www.fold3.com/image/246/17371111].

James Sorrell was head of a Northumberland County household of 6 "Black" persons in 1782 [VA:37]. In 1833 his heirs applied for bounty land for his services in the Navy and included his discharge papers from Captain John Thomas who certified that James enlisted in the Navy on 10 January 1777 as a gunner's mate for three years, discharged his duty faithfully, and was discharged on 10 January 1780 [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Sorrell, James, 1783, Digital Collections, LVA]. (His brother?) Edward Sorrell was eighty years old on 17 May 1833 when he testified that James had enlisted in the galley Hero under Captain John Thomas in 1776 and later transferred to the ship Tartar. The claim was rejected [Revolutionary War Rejected Claims, Sorrell, James, 1834, Digital Collections, LVA].

Edward Sorrell was 79 years old when he applied for a Revolutionary War pension in Northumberland County court on 14 August 1832. He resided in Westmoreland County when he enlisted [NARA, W.26493, M804-2246, frame 0911]. He was a "free mulatto" head of a Northumberland County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:996].

Thomas Sorrell was listed among the "Free Molattoes" living on Thomas Rowand's land in Westmoreland County in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:41]. He enlisted in the Revolution in 1780 under Captain Thomas Downing of Northumberland County, was marched to Hillsborough, then to South Carolina, marched to Richmond 18 months later to complete his service, and then returned to Northumberland County [NARA, S.6137, M804-2246, frame 0992].

Richard Spinner, a "Coloured man," appeared in Albemarle County court on 2 October 1832 at the age of ninety and stated that he was born a slave in Amelia County. He moved to Mecklenburg County with his master Joel Bevel who set him free in that county. After his emancipation he enlisted for three years under Captain William Green and Captain Lewis Burwell. He was engaged in fatigue duty such as cutting wood and later in driving wagons [NARA, S.6140, M804, roll 2259, frame 605 of 1119]. He was a dark skinned man taxable in Louisa County on 2 horses in 1793 [PPTL, 1782-1814], and head of an Albemarle County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820.

Simon Stephens was a resident of Accomack County who was a cook and seaman aboard the Accomac during the Revolution according to the application of his and Stephen Stephens' heirs for bounty land. Their application included the certificates for their final pay on 27 April 1785. Simon's name also appears as a cook on board the Accomac in the state navy records. Simon's heir Simon Stephens received bounty land warrant no. 7376 in 1833 [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 376; Revolutionary War Bounty Land Warrants; Stevens, Simon; Powell, Solomon; Digital Collections, LVA].

Stephen Stephens was a seaman in the state navy during the Revolution. His heir Stephen Stephens received bounty land warrant no. 7376-7 [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Record, 313, 376; Revolutionary War Bounty Land Warrants, Stevens, Simon, Digital Collections, LVA].

Barnett Stewart was head of a Chatham County, North Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:200] and head of a Sumner County household of 10 "free colored" in 1820. He was "a free man of Colour" who was drafted in 1776 from Brunswick County, Virginia, where he was born and raised. He served as a cook [NARA, S.1727, 804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/18359714].

Jack Stewart, a "mulatto," was listed among 7 deserters drafted out of Prince George County, for whom a reward was offered by Ensign Benjamin Grey in the 28 November 1777 issue of the Virginia Gazette [Virginia Gazette (Purdie edition), p. 3, col. 3; also on http://www.accessible.com]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Chesterfield County on a tithe and three horses from 1788 to 1807 [PPTL, 1786-1811, frames 73, 91, 148, 166, 206, 253, 286, 360, 508, 545, 585, 622, 717].

John Stewart enlisted as a substitute in the Revolution from Dinwiddie County for 18 months on 6 June 1782 and was sized on 26 June: age 24, 5'11-1/4" high, yellow complexion, a planter, born in Prince George County [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.68)]. He was a "Mulo" taxable in Powhatan County from 1787 to 1810 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frames 10, 38, 68, 97, 124, 151, 193, 245, 283, 351, 370, 386] and a "Free Black" head of a Powhatan County household of 26 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1810 [VA:2].

Edward Stewart enlisted as a substitute in the Revolution Dinwiddie County for 18 months on 6 June 1782 and was sized on 26 June: age 23, 5'11-1/4" high, yellow complexion, a planter, born in Chesterfield County [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.68)]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 11 June 1810: forty eight years old, yellow complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 131].

Edward Stewart enlisted in the Revolution in Amelia County for 18 months on 11 September 1780: age 15, 5'3-1/2" high, a planter, born in Chesterfield County, yellow complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.68)].

Jordan Stewart, born about 1765 in Dinwiddie County, was taxable in his father William Stewart's Mecklenburg County household in 1790 [PPTL, 1782-1805, frame 329], head of a Chatham County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [NC:193]. He appeared in Wake County, North Carolina court and applied for a pension for his services in the Revolution, stating that he was born in Dinwiddie County, moved to Mecklenburg County, Virginia, where he joined the militia at the age of 26 years on 4 February 1780 and served for seven months. He was marched to within 20 or 30 miles of Guilford Court House where he met his father William Stewart, a soldier who was returning with a great many others after the Battle of Guilford Court House. He lived Wake County since the war [NARA, R.10160, M804, roll 2291, frame 715 of 945].

Nathan Stewart enlisted in the Revolution in Caroline County on 20 March 1781 and was sized on 18 May: age 34, 5'8-1/2" high, black complexion, Black, born in Jamaica [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.45)].

Samuel Stewart was taxable in Surry County from 1783 to 1816: called a "FN" in 1809, listed with 2 "free Negroes & Mulattoes above the age of 16" in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-90, frames 368, 398; 1791-1816, 17, 169, 271, 384, 462, 574, 616, 657, 757, 866] and head of a Surry County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830. He was a "Free Negroe" who appeared in Surry County court to apply for a pension for his services in the Revolution, stating that he enlisted in Brunswick County, Virginia, in the 4th Virginia Regiment from February 1777 to February 1779 [NARA, W.7220, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/1/18485949].

Thomas Stewart, born about 1742 in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, enlisted in Captain Dawson's Company in Lunenburg County under General Gibson and was at Valley Forge and Guilford Courthouse [NARA, W.4594, M805-772, frame 69]. He was called "Thomas Stewart a Dark Man" by the 17 September 1792 Person County court when the court exempted him from payment of poll tax [Minutes 1792-6]. He was head of a Person County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [NC:598] and 11 in 1810 [NARA, W.4594, M805-772, frame 69].

Thomas Tann and his wife Sarah Tan were "free mulattos" who recorded the birth of their son Thomas in Bruton Parish, James City County, in 1766 [Bruton Parish Register, 28]. He was listed as deceased in the 1 July 1777 muster of Captain Thomas Edmunds' Company in the 15th Virginia battalion [NARA, M246, roll 113, frame 189; https://www.fold3.com/image/9639784].

Jesse Tate entered the service on the galley Dragon on 10 September 1777 and was paid on 20 January 1779. He was listed as one of the crew of the Dragon which was waiting for provisions on 2 September 1779, listed as entitled to bounty land, but had not received it by 23 November 1834 [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 8, 13, 71, 217]. He was head of a Richmond County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:395].The

Jacob Teague was head of an Accomack County household of 7 "other free" in St. George's Parish in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:164] and 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:65]. He was a "man of color" who appeared in Accomack County court to apply for a pension for his service in the Revolution on 2 August 1820. He enlisted in the 11th Virginia Regiment under Captain Thomas Parker [NARA, S.41235, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/18334061].

James Thomas, a "Colored man," enlisted in Norfolk County and served for 3 years as a boatswain aboard the brig Northampton in the Revolution. James Barron described him as: a fellow of daring and though a man of color was respected by all the officers who served with him. In 1840 Nancy Bell, his sole heir, received two land warrants of 1,333 acres each for his services [Thomas, James, 1840, Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Digital Collection, LVA].

John Thomas was drafted into the Revolution for the length of the war from Caroline County on 26 March 1781 and was sized on 14 May 1781: age 30, 5'11-1/2" high, yellow complexion, a shoemaker, born in Prince George County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.51)].

Buckner Thomas was a "man of Colour" who resided in Nottoway County when he appeared there in court to make a declaration to obtain a pension for his service in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted in Dinwiddie County in September 1777 and served for 3 years [NARA, S.41248, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/18729500]. He was a "Black" tithable in Nottoway County from 1791 to 1812 (called Buck Thomas) [PPTL 1789-1822].

William Thomas enlisted in the Revolution for 18 months while resident in Charles City County on 22 September 1780: age 21, 5'7" high, a planter, yellow complexion, born in Charles City County [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.39)]. He was taxable in Upper Westover Precinct of Charles City County in 1784, taxable on 2 horses from 1788 to 1793, a "Mulattoe" taxable in 1813 and 1814 [PPTL, 1788-1814] and head of a household of 3 "free colored" in 1820. He appeared in Charles City County court to apply for a pension for his service in the Revolution, stating that he enlisted at Charles City court house in 1777 and was at Valley Forge under the company commanded by Lieutenant Carrol Minnis of the 1st Virginia Regiment. He was discharged in 1779 and reenlisted for 18 months in Charles City County just prior to the siege of York and marched to Chesterfield Court House where he entered the company commanded by Captain Joseph Scott for about 3 weeks when he was taken into the family of General Peter Mulhlenburg and discharged in Shenandoah County [NARA, S.38435, M804, roll 2372, frame 540 https://www.fold3.com/image/246/18338890].

Peter Toyer enlisted in the Revolution as a substitute for 18 months while resident in Gloucester County in August 1780 and was sized in 1781: age 19, 5'2" high, black complexion, a farmer, born in Gloucester County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.31)]. He received pay for his service in the Revolution on 26 June 1783 [NARA, M881, https://www.fold3.com/image/23326818].

George Tyler enlisted in the in the Revolution as a substitute in Goochland County for 18 months on 13 September 1780: age 23, 5'6-1/2" high, black complexion, some of his fingers off, a planter or waiter (in another list), born in Louisa County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.31) and http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.39)]. He was taxable in the upper district of Goochland County from 1787 to 1815: a "Mulatto" planter near Charles Watkins' Shop in 1804, living on Joseph Woodson's land in 1811, exempt in 1815 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 157, 184, 227, 349, 367, 626, 698; 1810-32, frames 87, 270]. He was head of a Goochland County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:717]. He registered as a free Negro in Goochland County on 16 December 1814: a free man of color about Sixty years old, about five feet six inches high, yellow complexion, short curled hair intermixed with grey...free born [Register of Free Negroes, p.84, no.159]. He applied for a pension in Goochland County for 18 months service in 1781 [NARA, S.41,276, M804-2432, frame 0669].

Joseph Tyler was a slave called "Indian Joe" when he sued for his freedom from Charles Hutcherson, executor of John Thomson, in Louisa County court on 13 July 1767. He was described as a "Mulatto, or Indian Man" in Gabriel Jones' company of marines in Culpeper County on 2 September 1776 when Jones advertised in the Virginia Gazette that he had recovered a silver spoon which Joseph "had (stolen) from a Negro Boy belonging to Major Carr of Louisa County" [Virginia Gazette, Dixon's edition, p. 3, col. 2].

William Underwood, alias Wedgebare, enlisted in Culpeper County for the length of the war in the Revolution on 19 March 1781 and was sized about a month later: William Wegbare, age 19, 5'2-3/4" high, yellow complexion, born in Loudoun County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.35)]. William Underwood was head of a Wilkes County, North Carolina household of and 9 "other free" in 1800 [NC:66]. He was head of a Haywood County household of 3 "free colored" and 1 white male aged 30-40, including an 80-year-old Revolutionary War pensioner in 1840 [NC:111]. He was called William Wedgebare alias William Underwood when he testified that he enlisted for the duration of the war on 19 March 1780 in Culpeper County, Virginia [NARA, W.2292, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/29311044].

Edward Valentine enlisted in the Revolution from Dinwiddie County as a substitute on 6 June 1782 and was sized on 26 June: age 21, 5'6-1/4" high, black complexion, a planter, born in Dinwiddie County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.33)].

?J__(?) Valentine enlisted in the Revolution from Dinwiddie County as a substitute on 6 June 1782 and was sized on 26 June: age 16, 5'9" high, black complexion [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.33)].

Anthony Valentine enlisted in the Revolution from Charles City County for 18 months on 22 September 1780: age 33, 5'8" high, planter, born in Charles City County, black complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.22)].

Isham Valentine was listed in the payroll of Captain Peter Jones' Company in the 14th Virginia Regiment commanded by Colonel William Davis in White Plains in 1778. Hy Williams received his final pay for three years of service [NARA, M881, https://www.fold3.com/image/22609320]. He applied for bounty land and received a certificate from Colonel William Davis on 15 December 1784 that he had been a soldier in his regiment to the Northward, was at Middlebrook in 1779, and was captured at Charlestown. And Colonel William Epes, an officer in Davis' regiment certified that Isham was inducted on 12 September 1777 for three years and was discharged. Isham assigned his bounty land to Henry Watkins on 11 December 1784 [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Digital Collection, LVA]. He and his wife Caty were the parents of Nancy Valentine who registered in Surry County on 25 May 1818: daughter of Isham Valentine & Caty his wife of Surry County free people of Colour the said Nancy Valentine is about 37 years old of a bright Complexion tolerable straight made...is 5'3-1/2" high [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 68].

Charles3 Valentine was listed in a 13 March 1779 offer of a reward in the Virginia Gazette for deserters from the infantry of the Virginia State Garrison Regiment stationed near Williamsburg. The advertisement described him as: a mulatto, born in Surry County, Virginia, 28 years old, 5 feet 9 inches high, well made [Dixon's edition, p. 2, col. 2]. He was sized at the Chesterfield County court house sometime after 1 September 1780: residence: Sussex County, deserted (no age, size or complexion shown) [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.)]. He was head of a Brunswick County, Virginia household of a "free colored" man over forty-five years of age in 1820 [VA:672].

Luke1 Valentine, a "free man of Colour," made a declaration in Campbell County in order to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution [NARA, S.6299, M804-2438]. He was head of a Campbell County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:848] and 2 "free colored" in 1830.n Surry County, Virginia in January 1709/10 when Mary, the "Mulatto" servant of William Thomas, swore that he was the father of her illegitimate child. He posted bond for the maintenance of the child in July 1710 [Haun, Surry County Records VI:124, 129, 139]. They may have been the ancestors of

Benjamin Viers was a "F. Negro" taxable in Augusta County in 1797, 1798 and 1805 [PPTL 1796-1810, frames 56, 92, 421] and a "F.N." taxable in Botetourt County from 1809 to 1820 [PPTL 1787-1810, frames 620, 653; 1811-1822, frames 13, 48, 90, 92, 269, 310, 356, 391, 443]. He was a "free coloured man" who enlisted in Revolutionary War service in Henry County, Virginia, in October 1775 [NARA, S.6313, M804-2459, frame 2].

Robert Walden enlisted for four years as a substitute in the Revolution from Dinwiddie County on 29 June 1782 and was sized the same day: age 28, 4'11" high, yellow complexion, a farmer, born in Dinwiddie County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.91)]. He was called Robert Chavis when he was listed as a tithable in Dinwiddie County with Batt and Isham Chavis in 1788, called Robert Walden in 1789 [PPTL, 1782-90 (1788 B, p.5), (1789 A, p.21)], apparently identical to Robert W. Chavers who received bounty land for his service in the Revolution, enlisted for 3 years on 3 June 1782 according to his discharge on 2 November 1784 [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Chavers, Robert W., Digital Collection, LVA].

Joseph Wallace, a "free man of color," appeared in Charles City County on 25 April 1835 at the age of eighty and stated that he was engaged by the army under Lord Dunmore in James City County to subdue the Indians before the Revolution, early in the Revolution enlisted in Bedford County for three years under Captain John Bard, then under Captain Alexander Cummings and served until the end of the war [NARA, R.11068, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/20354572; Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Digital Collections, LVA].

James Wallace was living in Williamsburg on 11 July 1780 when he enlisted in the Revolution for the duration of the war: age 28, 5'3-1/4" high, a planter, born in New Kent County, black complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.43)]. He was about seventy five years old on 13 August 1832 when he made a declaration in James City County to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution. "Being a Coloured man," he acted as a cook for Colonel Porterfield and guarded prisoners. He enlisted in James City County and returned there after the war [NARA, S.7834, M804-2479, frame 0558]. He was taxable in James City County from 1786 to 1813: listed as a "Mulatto" in 1805 and 1806, taxable on 2 tithables in 1806, 3 in 1809, 2 in 1810, taxable on 2 tithables and a "free person of colour" (probably his wife) in 1813 [PPTL 1782-99; 1800-15].

Abraham Warren/ Warrick was living in Frederick County when he enlisted in the Revolution and was sized about July 1782: age 39 5'4-1/2" high, blk complexion, residing Frederick County, born Loudoun county, enlisted for the war [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.91-2)].

Edward Watson enlisted in the Revolution from Caroline County on 23 September 1780: age 18, 5'3" high, a farmer, born in Caroline County, yellow complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p66)].

John Weaver petitioned the Lancaster County court on 19 October 1786 for his freedom from Susannah Leland who was holding him in servitude until the age of thirty-one [Orders 1786-9, 32]. He registered as a "free Negro" in Lancaster County on 19 September 1808: Age 48, Color yellow, Height 5'3-1/4 [Burkett, Lancaster County Register of Free Negroes, 1]. He was a Revolutionary war veteran who died before 19 May 1834 when his only heir Betty Weaver was named in Lancaster County court [Orders 1834-41, 7]. Dorcas left a 23 July 1820 Lancaster County will, proved 21 August the same year, naming her son Spencer Bell and grandchildren John Weaver Bell, James Bell, and Nancy Bell [WB 28:208].

John Weaver was residing in Richmond City when he enlisted in the Revolution in Northumberland County for two years on 16 June 1782 and was sized the same day: age 25, 5'4" high, black complexion, Negro, a planter, born in Lancaster County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.91)]. He was taxable in Portsmouth and Elizabeth River Parishes in Norfolk County, Virginia, in 1788 and 1789 and from 1796 to 1806: called a "Mulatto" in 1798, 1800 and 1804; a labourer in Western Branch Precinct in a "List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes" in 1801 [PPTL, 1782-1791, frames 633, 652; 1791-1812, frames 180, 235, 261, 306, 364, 384, 569, 584]. He was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:750], 5 "free colored" in Hertford County in 1820 [NC:206] and 3 "free colored" in Hertford County in 1830. On 13 October 1828 he made a declaration in Hertford County court, stating that he served in the Virginia Line in a regiment that was commanded by colonels Davis, then Cambell, then Quebeck but lost his discharge in a sea wreck soon after the war. He received bounty land [NARA, B.LWt.1391-100, M805-845, frame 272]. He may have been identical to the John Weaver who received bounty land by virtue of a voucher by Lieutenant Colonel Ed. Carrington in 1783 that John Weaver the bearer belonged to the Fifth Troop in the 1st Regiment of Light Dragoons commanded by Colonel George Baylor and had leave of absence. He served for 3 years [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Weaver, John, Digital Collection, LVA].

Elijah Weaver was a "Mulatto" bound out by his "Mulatto" mother Ann Kelly on 24 May 1755 to serve Benjamin Waddy of Lancaster County for three years [LVA, chancery suit 1765-001, digitized]. John Keys received his final pay of 81 pounds on 11 July 1783 for his service in the Revolution [NARA, M881, https://www.fold3.com/image/23329624]. He registered as a "free Negro" in Lancaster County on 18 July 1803: Age 66, Color dark...born free [Burkett, Lancaster County Register of Free Negroes, 1]. He was a Revolutionary War veteran who died intestate in Lancaster County before 15 September 1834 when his heirs Spencer Weaver, Elijah Weaver, Mary Pinn, Agatha Bell, Betsy Weaver, and Polly the wife of Armstead Nicken were named in court [Orders 1834-41, p.37]. The application for his bounty warrant for Revolutionary War service included a Lancaster County affidavit by Richard Nicken, a near-neighbor of Elijah, that Elijah served on board the Dragon or Tartar for 3 years as a seaman. And it included a note that he had received 58 pounds as the balance of his full pay as a seaman on 27 October 1783 [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Weaver, Elijah, Digital Collection, LVA].

Aaron Weaver was head of a Lancaster County household of 3 free persons and a slave in 1783, a "F.B." taxable on a horse in the Eastern Branch Precinct of Princess Anne County from 1784 to 1815 [PPTL, 1782-89, frames 600, 682, 719; 1790-1822, frames 21, 40, 47, 69, 104, 112, 141, 179, 186, 206, 244, 252, 290, 299, 335, 347, 397, 419, 431, 479, 534]. He registered in Princess Anne County on 27 September 1800: Aaron Weaver & Martha Nicken were married in the county of Northumberland the 7th February 1766. The above Aaron Weaver & Martha Nicken were born free [Weaver, Aaron (M): Free Negro Affidavit, 1800, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA]. He was a "F.B." head of a Princess Anne County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:479]. He petitioned the legislature for a pension for his services in the Revolution, stating that he served as a seaman for 3 years aboard the galley Protector and ship Tartar and was wounded. William Cassady of Northumberland County, aged 56, deposed that he served with him and witnessed Aaron being wounded. He received state pension no. 442 and bounty land warrant VA 1477 [Legislative Petitions of the General Assembly, 1776-1865, Accession no. 36121, Box 309, folder 62; Virginia Revolutionary War Pension Applications, LVA, digitized].

Henry Welch enlisted in the Revolution from Culpeper County for 18 months on 19 March 1781 and was sized about a month later: age 19, 5'3-3/4" high, yellow complexion, born in King George County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.35)].

James West was head of a Fredericksburg household of 9 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:111a]. He may have been the James West who was listed as one of the seamen aboard the galley Dragon during the Revolution, received pay on 20 January 1779, was entitled to bounty land for three years service, but had not received the land by 7 January 1835 [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 7, 13, 72, 277, 608].

Alexander/ Sawney Whistler enlisted as a substitute for a year in the Revolution from Middlesex County on 11 February 1782 and was sized the same day: age 20, 5'4-1/2" high, black complexion, a farmer, born in Middlesex County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.91)]. He received a warrant for 200 acres in 1784 which he assigned to Richard Smith on 30 July 179_ [NARA, BlWt. 12683, M804-2549, frame 0028; Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Whistler, Sawny, Digital Collection, LVA]. He was a "Black" taxable in the lower district of King and Queen County in 1801 [PPTL, 1782-1803]. He registered in Middlesex County on 26 June 1805: born free; 40 years of age; Black complexion [Register of Free Negroes 1800-60, p.15].

Benjamin Whitmore enlisted in the Revolution in Fairfax County on 22 December 1782 and was sized on 8 April 1783: aged 19, 5'5-1/2" high, dark complexion, Mulatto, baker in Alexandria, born in Fairfax County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.117)].

Charles Whitson enlisted for the war on 22 December 1782 and was sized on 8 April 1783: age 14, 5'9-1/2" high, black complexion Mulatto, born in Fairfax County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.117)].

Charles Wiggins enlisted in the Revolution from Isle of Wight County, Virginia, for 18 months on 1 October 1780: age 40, 5'7-1/2" high, a farmer, born in Isle of Wight [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.66)].

William Williams was a 33-year-old, 5'6" Virginia "Negro" planter who was listed in the 13 July 1756 roll of Captain Henry Harrison's Company, drafted in Surry County, Virginia [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 390].

Matthew Williams was a "Mulatto" bound to Servant Jones by the Warwick County court on 3 July 1760 [Minutes 1748-62, 322, 325, 334, 337]. He was a "Free Man of colour" who appeared in Southampton County court to make a declaration to obtain a pension. He stated that he was living in Southampton County when he enlisted at Cabin Point for eighteen months [NARA, S.6414, roll 2592, frame 857 of 967; https://www.fold3.com]. He registered in Southampton County on 12 July 1810: age 55, Blk, 5 feet 7-1/2 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 589].

George Williams was a soldier from Richmond County in the French and Indian War, age 26, a mulatto, 6'1", when he was listed as a deserter on 2 September 1757 [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy 31:95].

Daniel Williams, a "Colourd" man, appeared in Philadelphia County court to apply for a pension, stating that he was born in Accomack County, Virginia, where he was drafted into the army as a wagoner and had charge of a wagon and two horses until the end of the war. He returned home to Accomack County after the war and remained there for several years, then moved to Maryland for 13 years and came to Philadelphia where he had resided for 27 years. On 28 April 1835 John Blake, a "Colourd man" who was about 76, testified that he was born in Accomack County and lived near and was well acquainted with Daniel Williams, a "Colourd" man, who was drafted into the army to drive teams, that he was a free-born man and was gone for four or five years. He had resided in Philadelphia about 15 years past, where he again met Williams and has frequently seen him engaged in driving the team [NARA, R.11569, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/28467470].

"Indian" Robin Loyd, a "person of color," was residing in Jennings County, Indiana, about the age of eighty on 12 February 1838 when he made a declaration to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted at Dinwiddie County courthouse and had resided in Dinwiddie for many years after the war, went to North Carolina for a few years, and had been living in Indiana for more than 20 years. John Grimes of Ripley County, Indiana, testified for him that Indian Robin, "a negro man," had served as a footman and also as a soldier in the light horse service. Bartholomew Turner of Jennings County testified that he had seen a "Negro man" named Indian Robin as a soldier on horseback and armed for battle [NARA, R.6501, M804-1596, frame 0594].

Peter Wilson was a "Mo" taxable in Halifax County, Virginia from 1792 to 1799 [PPTL, 1782-1799, frames 7, 58, 79, 202, 427, 614, 686, 711, 931] and a "F.B." head of a Giles County household of 10 "other free" and a white woman in 1810 [VA:643, 1021]. His widow Dicey Cumbo applied received a pension for his service in the Revolution [NARA, M804-2609].

William Wynn was a taxable "Mulatto" in King William County in 1813 and was included in the list of "Free Negro and Mulattoes" for 1833 [LVA, Auditor of Public Accounts inventory entry no. 757, Reports of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, 1833; transcribed by Selma Stewart]. He was about 75 years old on 23 December 1833 when he appeared in King William County court and applied for a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated (signing) that he was born in King William County and enlisted under Captain John Catlett and joined the regiment under Colonel Holt Richardson [https://www.fold3.com/image/283262798],

Jesse Wood enlisted in the Revolution from King William County on 8 September 1780: age 16, 4'10" high, a planter, born in Hanover County, yellow complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.23)]. He was a "free man of color" living in Fluvanna County, Virginia, when he applied for a pension, stating that he enlisted in King William County in 1778 and was discharged in Fluvanna County in 1782 [NARA, S.7962, M804; https://www.fold3.com/image/246/28480466]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in the upper district of Goochland County from 1804 to 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 698; 1810-32, frames 20, 88, 112, 177] and head of a Goochland County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:722].

Robert Wood, a man of Colour, enlisted in the 3rd Virginia Regiment in the early part of the war, then enlisted in the State Artillery Regiment commanded by Colonel Marshall and served during the war according to an affidavit by J. Marshall, former captain of the 11th Regiment. He enlisted in Fauquier County and applied for a pension in Washington, D.C., on 6 August 1818 [NARA, S.39909, M804, roll 2629, frame 1281 of 1290].

Thomas Wood and Abel Spriggs were "mulattoes" listed among the deserters from the ship Dragon who were allowed until 20 July 1779 to return without punishment according to the 3 July 1779 issue of the Virginia Gazette [Dixon's edition, p. 3, col. 2]. They apparently returned since Abm Sprigg and Thomas Wood were seaman aboard the Dragon according to an affidavit by a fellow seaman aboard the ship, John Davis, who testified for the bounty land claim of James Jennings on 7 February 1834 and named five of the officers and fifty-two members of the crew who served faithfully for three years and were discharged at the Chickahominy Ship Yard [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Jennings, James (p.8), Digital Collection, LVA]. He was paid for serving on the Dragon between 21 April 1778 and 20 January 1779, was listed as a seaman aboard the Dragon on 2 September 1779, and qualified for bounty land by serving three years [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 8, 13, 72, 218]. He was a "free Negro" taxable Lancaster County in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1815, frame 385].

Jonathan Wood, "a Free negroe," applied for a pension in Isle of Wight County on 6 January 1835. He stated that he was drafted into the militia from Surry County, Virginia, in 1776 and served several tours of six weeks each. James Johnson, a captain in the militia during the war, certified that Jonathan had served at least two tours of six weeks each [NARA, R.11793, M804, roll 2628, frame 1018 of 1371]. He was head of an Isle of Wight County household of 7 "free colored" in 1830.

Lewis Hinton was one of only a relatively few slaves that received his freedom by serving in the Revolution. He enlisted for his master William Hinton who served on board the Dragon. Hinton's health became so bad that he was permitted to leave the service, and Lewis took his place. He served under captains Callender, Hamilton and Chamberlayne [NARA, S.10831, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/23384208].

Jack Knight and William Boush were two "negro slaves" belonging to the Commonwealth who had faithfully served on board armed vessels which were no longer in service. On 30 October 1789 the legislature passed a law manumitting them, but "saving all legal or equitable rights of all claimants" [Hening, The Statutes at Large, XIII:103].

Caesar, the slave of Mary Tarrant of Elizabeth City, entered very early into the service of his country as a pilot of the armed vessels. The assembly enacted a law on 14 November 1789 that the executive should contact Mary Tarrant for the purchase of Caesar, and if she should agree, pay for his freedom [Hening, The Statutes at Large, XIII:102].

Pluto, a "negroe belonging to Mr. William Brough of Elizabeth City County," served on board the boat Patrick for three years according to an affidavit by Richard Barron on 19 January 1781 [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Pluto, Digital Collections, LVA].

"Negro" Seamen Abram, Bachus, Boston, Charles, Daniel, Emanuel, George, Jack, James, Kingston, Peter, Tom, and Will were entitled to bounty land for service in the Virginia Navy [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, Virginia, 70, 214-8].

"Mulatto" Frank served as a seaman in the Virginia Navy and received bounty land [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Frank, Mulatto, Digital Collections, LVA].

Saul, the property of George Kelly of Norfolk County performed many essential services to the Commonwealth during the war, was set free by the legislature by law passed on 13 November 1792 which directed that a person be appointed to jointly ascertain with his master what value should be paid for him from public funds [Hening, The Statutes at Large, XIII:619].

James, a slave the property of Wm Armistead, Gentleman, of New Kent County in 1781 entered the service of Marquis Lafayette, and at the peril of his life frequented the British Camp and executed important commissions entrusted to him by the marquis. He applied to the legislature which passed an act in October 1786 granting him full freedom and appointed someone to value him so that his master could be compensated by the state [Hening, The Statutes at Large, VII:380-1]. James Lafayette was a free Negro taxable in New Kent County on a slave and 3 horses in 1805 [PPTL, 1791-1828, frames 442, 487].

Aaron Brister enlisted in the town of Dumfries in Prince William County, Virginia, in the company commanded by Thomas Helms in the 3rd Virgiia Regiment commanded by Colonel Weadon for two years in 1776. He was discharged in Philadelphia. He was head of a Palmyra, Ontario County, New York household of 5 "free colored" in 1820. He appeared in the town of Palmyra on 27 April 1818 to apply for a pension. His widow Betsy Tolliver applied in 1836. They married about 1777 or 1778 when they were both slaves [NARA, W.17341, M804, roll 342, frame 527 of 764].

Thomas Camel/ Campbell, "a black man," was the slave of Colonel Martin Picket of Virginia. He was in Madison County, New York on 7 June 1832 when he applied for a pension. He stated that he entered the service in September 1776 under Captain Wilson in Culpeper County, Virginia, where he was then resident and was marched to join the main army under George Washington [NARA, R.1609, M804, roll 453, frame 80 of 866]. He was head of a household of 9 "free colored" in Oneida, Augusta County, New York, in 1820.

Peter McAnelly applied for a pension in Knox County, Indiana, on 7 September 1832. He was born in Louisa County, Virginia, and resided there until 1790. He served in the militia as a substitute for Anthony Thompson and served for a total of nine months. Daniel Strother testified that he was acquainted with Peter at Little York during the Revolution [NARA, S.16467, M804, roll 1662, frame 734 of 1107]. Peter was head of a Knox County, Indiana housheold of 2 "free colored" in 1840.

Daniel Strother was born in South Carolina and rasied in Anson County, North Carolina. He entered the service in Charlotte County, Virginia, and served as a waggoner under General Greene. Andrew Ferguson and Peter McNelly/ McNally testified for him. His application was rejected because he did not serve in a military capacity [NARA, R.10275, M804, roll 2316, frame 164 of 1050]. He was head of a Polk County, Missouri household of 4 "free colored" in 1840.

William Canonbrig was drafted for 18 months while resident in Bedford County on 6 April 1781 and was sized in 1782: age 20, 5'11-1/4" high, black complexion, born in Fluvanna County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.97)].

David Fargus enlisted for the war in Chesterfield County in 1781: age 15, 4'9-3/4" high, yellow complexion, a weaver [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.9)].

Andrew Ferguson was probably another former slave who served. He appeared in Monroe County, Indiana, on 16 August 1838 to apply for a pension for his services, stating that he was born in Dinwiddie County, Virginia, and was drafted there in January 1780 at the age of fifteen by General Green. Two weeks previous to being drafted in company with his father (Andrew Peeleg as he was called), he was taken prisoner by the British. They ran away from them because they whipped them with cat o' nine tails, and they fell in with the American soldiers under Green. He was wounded in the head at Guilford and stayed about a month in the iron works in North Carolina. He was tended by Doctor Harris and Doctor Sidney. Mr. Ferguson sent one of his sons for him, and he got home in November 1781. He appeared in court again on 8 January 1851 to apply for a full pension in place of the half pension he was then receiving. He stated that he was pressed into service in Dinwiddie County with his father Andrew Ferguson. He was born free, his father being a free man and his mother a free woman [NARA, S.32243, M804, https://www.fold3.com/246/17570714]. He was head of a Monroe County, Indiana household of 2 "free colored" in 1830.

Ned Streater, "a free man of color, appeared in Nansemond County court on 2 November 1833 to apply for a pension for his service in the Revolution. He entered the service in 1780 under Captain Ellington Knott in the Nansemond County Militia as a substitute for his master Willis Streater and served for twelve months. His master died in 1814, and he recovered his freedom by suit in Nansemond County court in April 1824 [NARA, S.7645, M804, roll 2313, frame 470 of 1266].

 

Others whose possible service requires more research:

John Cowage, born say 1746, was a "Mollatto Boy" valued at 24 pounds currency in the 24 June 1752 Goochland County estate of Henry Miller [DB 6:352-4]. He was called John Cowigg when he served in the Revolution from Goochland County as a wagoner or in the service of supply [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 32]. He was taxable in Goochland County from 1787 to 1807: called a "Mulatto" in 1793, a "freed Negroe" in 1794, a "Mulatto" in 1803 and 1807. His wife was probably "Clarissa Cowig free negroe" who was taxable on her son John Cowig in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 163, 190, 311, 376, 405, 568, 650, 803; 1810-32, 139].

Moses Credit, born say 1760, was a soldier in the Revolution from Northumberland County [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 33]. However, Jackson did not cite his source for this statement.

John DeBaptist was said to have served in the Revolution as a seaman aboard the Dragon [http://www.waymarking.com]. He was born in St. Kitts in the West Indies and moved to Fredericksburg, Virginia. His widow Franky Baptist was head of a Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania County household of 6 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1810 [VA:113b].

John Debrix, a "Negro" taxable in James City County in 1786 [PPTL 1782-1791], served in the Revolution [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers], but Jackson did not cite his sources.

Samuel Monoggon was a soldier in the Revolution from Gloucester County [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 29]. He was head of a Gloucester County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:409a] and 3 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:192].

Reuben Ross was said to have been a soldier from Culpeper County who served in the Revolutionary War [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 42], but Jackson did not cite his source for this.

Isaac Stephens was bound apprentice to William Gascoigne in Northampton County on 15 February 1770 [Minutes 1765-71, 365]. He was said to have served as a soldier in the Revolution [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 43]. He registered "free Negro" in Northampton County on 12 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 358] and was taxable in Northampton County from 1794 to 1800 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 176, 216].

Edward Wilkerson was said to have been a soldier from Chesterfield County in the Revolution [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 64].

 

LOYALISTS

Talbot/Talbert Thompson entered into an agreement with Benjamin Waller to purchase his freedom after his master Alexander McKensie moved to England. He paid Waller 60 pounds and then petitioned the governor and Council of Virginia for his freedom in November 1761. Eight years later he purchased his wife Jenny from the estate of Robert Tucker of Norfolk County and then successfully petitioned for her freedom [McIlwaine, Executive Journals, VI:200; VI:320]. He was a taxable "free negro" on the east side of the borough of Norfolk in 1767 with his slave Joseph, and in 1774 he was taxable on "negroes" Peter, Murray and Joe [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables 1766-80, 39, 243]. On 18 May 1762 the Princess Anne County court bound Joseph and Peter Anderson to him to be sailmakers [Minutes 1753-62, 488]. He and his wife Jenny defected to Lord Dunmore after his property and sailmaking business was destroyed by the Virginia military in January 1776. He died in New York in April 1782 just before his family relocated to Nova Scotia. Jenny submitted a claim to the Loyalist Claims Commission for the loss of their house and sail loft burnt by Patriot forces as well as land and livestock confiscated and a slave killed while working for the British at Great Bridge. She included a copy of the original deed for the land and buildings Talbot purchased from Samuel Boush [Loyalist Claims Commission file A.O. 13/25/479, Archives of United Kingdom, Kew, London, cited by Professor Cassandra Pybus, University of Sydney, Australia].

Peter Anderson defected to the British in January 1776. He was captured at Great Bridge but escaped and hid out in the woods until 1777 when he joined the British fleet on its way to the siege of Charleston. He was taken to England where he submitted a claim to the Loyalist Claims Commission in which he said that he still had a wife and three children who were enslaved in Norfolk and had lost four chests of clothes, 20 hogs and four beds and furniture [Loyalist Claims Commission, file AO 12/99/354 and AO 13/27/230, cited by Professor Cassandra Pybus, University of Sydney, Australia].

James Ashcroft (head of a Opelousas, Louisiana household of 11"other free"), Thomas Hathcock, Edmund Revells (head of a Robeson County, North Carolina household of 9 "other free" in 1790), Jeremiah Revells, Jacob Locklear (head of a Robeson County household of 6 "other free" in 1790), Joseph Locklear (6 "other free in Robeson in 1790), and Robert Locklear (9 "other free" in Robeson in 1790) received pay from 1 September 1780 to 6 October 1782 for serving in Captain Peter Tyler's Company of South Carolina Loyal Militia [Clark, Loyalists in the Southern Campaign of the Revolutionary War, 1:153, 189]. Joseph Locklear may have served on both sides of the conflict, or there may have been two by that name.

 

SOUTH CAROLINA

John Biddie was head of a Union District household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [SC:230]. He made a declaration in Union District court on 30 October 1832 to obtain a pension for his service in the Revolution. He stated that he was born in Lunenburg County, Virginia, on 17 July 1762 and lived in Union District when he volunteered. He moved to Marshall County, Alabama, by 26 December 1837 when he applied to have his pension paid there [NARA, S.10374, M805-85, frame 0372].

Spencer Bolton was head of a Georgetown District, Prince George's Parish, South Carolina household of 8 "other free" in 1790. He was about 70-80 years of age and living in Laurens District, South Carolina, when he appeared in court on 17 October 1832 to apply for a pension for his service in the Revolution. He stated that he was born on the Pee Dee River in South Carolina, was drafted into the militia while resident in Marion District in 1776, moved to Rafting Creek in Sumter District, then to Spartanburg, and had been living in Henderson County, North Carolina, about a year on 3 October 1845 when he renewed his pension application [NARA, M804, R.995, https://www.fold3.com/image/10984504].

Randal Bowser was in the pay roll of the 3rd South Carolina Regiment in July and August 1779 [NARA, M246, roll 89, frame 171], head of a Hertford County household of 6 "other free" in Moore's District in 1800 [NC:133].

John Bunch was listed in the Pay Roll of the 3rd South Carolina commanded by Colonel William Thomson and the Pay Roll of the 7th South Carolina Regiment from the 17 March to 1 July 1779 and for March 1780 [NARA, M246, roll 89, frames 119, 176].

Jeremiah Bunch purchased land from John Bunch by deed recorded in Charleston District between 1800 and 1801 [Lucas, Index to Deeds of South Carolina, D-7:224]. He was about 72 years old on and residing in St. George's Dorchester on 13 February 1832 when he appeared in the District Court in Charleston to apply for a pension. He stated that he entered the war at the age of 16 in Orangeburg. A minister and two men named John Bunch (signing) made an affidavit stating that he had been a member of the Methodist Church for 35 or 40 years [NARA, M804, roll 405, S.17867, M804, frame 162].

John Busby was head of a Barnwell District household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [SC:62] and 2 "free colored" in 1820 [SC:3a]. He enlisted in the 3rd South Carolina Regiment on 18 July 1778 and was discharged on 1 July 1781 [NARA, M246, roll 89, frame 379]. He was nearly eighty years old on 23 October 1829 when he applied for a pension for his services in the Revolution while resident in Barnwell District, South Carolina. He stated that he entered the service in 1779 on the Savannah River under Captain Daniel Green until the end of the war, "being a colored man, the duty assigned him was to remain with and protect the baggage and provisions of the company." He received a pension on 5 June 1830 [S.C. Archives, series S108092, reel 17, frames 157, 166].

Elisha Chavers was paid for serving in Captain Felix Warley's 3rd South Carolina Regiment commanded by Colonel William Thompson [NARA, M246, roll 89, frames 234, 237, 241 of 389].

John Chavis recorded a memorial for 100 acres on Neds Branch and Steel Creek near the Savannah River in Granville County, South Carolina, on 3 January 1771 [South Carolina Archives series S111001, 10:294]. He was called John Chavis, "a free black" when he petitioned the South Carolina Legislature for a pension in 1823 based on the wounds he had received in the Revolutionary War [South Carolina Archives series S108092, reel 22, frames 125, 128]. He was listed in the payroll of the 7th Company, 3rd South Carolina Regiment in March 1780 [NARA, M246, roll 89, frame 119].

Lazarus Chavis enlisted with Captain Moon in South Carolina for fourteen months in 1778 under General Andrew Williamson. He was in the battles of Stono and Savannah [NARA, S.9316, M805, reel 180, frame 153]. He was head of an Orangeburg District household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [SC:100].

William Chavis was listed in the payroll of the 7th Company, 3rd South Carolina Regiment in August 1779 and March 1780 [NARA, M246, roll 89, frames 119, 149]. He was a soldier entitled to military bounty land in 1835 [Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records, 228].

Josiah Combess was a fifer listed in the Pay Roll of the 6th South Carolina Regiment commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Henderson from 1 august to 1 December 1779 [NARA, M246, roll 89, frame 268].

Nathaniel Cumbo was listed in the roll of Captain Henry Hampton's Company of the 6th South Carolina Regiment commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Henderson from 1 August 1779 to January 1780 and in the 1st South Carolina Regiment for February 1780 [NARA, M246, roll 89, frames 44, 286, 289]. He was head of a Robeson County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:50].

Devorix Driggers enlisted in the Revolution in South Carolina on 15 June 1778 [NARA, M853, https://www.fold3.com/image/291771387].

Daniel Gibson was listed in the payroll of the 7th Company in the 3rd South Carolina Regiment commanded by Colonel William Thomason in August 1779 and March 1780 [NARA, M246, roll 89, frames 119, 149]. He was head of a Georgetown District, Prince Fredericks Parish, household of 6 "other free" in 1790.

Morgan Griffin was head of a Richland District household of 4 "free colored" in 1830. On 25 November 1819 he petitioned the South Carolina Legislature (signing) while in Richland County for compensation for his service in the Revolution [S.C. Archives S213190, vol. 14:250; series S108092, reel 61, frame 104 and NARA, S.18844, M804, https://fold3.com/image/21672823].

Gideon1 Griffin was head of a Richland District household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [SC:175a] and 6 "free colored" in 1830 [SC:409]. He was living in Richland District on 29 November 1826 when he petitioned the legislature for a pension for his services in the Revolution [S.C. Archives S108092, reel 61, frame 18 and National Archives Pension file W8877 on https://www.fold3.com/image/1/21834694].

Drury Harris was listed in the pay roll of the 3rd South Carolina Regiment of Colonel William Thomson in August 1779, in the same list as Benjamin Holly, Berry Jeffers, Gideon Griffin, Osborn Jeffers, Allen Jeffers and John Busby, and in the payroll for March 1780 [NARA, M246, roll 89, frames 119, 120, 124, 196]. He was head of a Abbeville District, South Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [SC:82], an over-forty-five-year-old head of a Rutherford County, Tennessee household of 6 "free colored" in 1820, listed near John Rouse who was also in Abbeville in 1810 [SC:82].

Edward Harris was head of a Richland District, South Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [SC:175a]. His son Rowland Harris appeared in Richland County court in 1850 to make a declaration to obtain a survivor's pension for Edward's service in the Revolution. He stated that his father's comrades in the service from the same neighborhood were Gideon Griffin, Morgan Griffin, Berry Jeffers, Allen Jeffers, Osborne Jeffers, and Edward's cousin Drury Harris. James Rawlinson testified for him [NARA, R.4649, M804, https://www.fold3.com].

Benjamin Holley was listed in the Pay Roll of the 3rd South Carolina Regiment commanded by Colonel William Thomson for the month of August 1779 and 1 November 1779, in the same list with Berry, Osborn and Allen Jeffers, Gideon and Morgan Griffin, and Drury Harris [NARA, M246, roll 89, frame 194, 196, 198]. He was a taxable "free negro" in the district between the Broad and Catawba rivers in South Carolina in 1784 [South Carolina Tax List, 1783-1800, frame 37]. He entered the war in what was then Orangeburg District near the homestead of Colonel William Thomson and enlisted until the end of the war with his comrades: Allen Jeffers, Osborne Jeffers, Benjamin Jeffers, Drury Harris, Morgan Griffin, Gideon Griffin, Arthur Jackson, and Benjamin Carter, many of whom lived not far from her father. His wife Priscilla Holley's application for a widow's pension included a book with the birth dates of her family that was said to have been in the handwriting of Colonel Thomson [NARA, W.8941, M804, roll 1312, frame 54]. Priscilla was head of a St. Matthews Parish, Orangeburg household of 8 "free colored" in 1820.

Adam Ivey was head of a Sumter District, South Carolina household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [SC:605] and 10 "free colored" in 1820 [SC:211], counted as white in Sumter District, South Carolina census in 1830. He appeared in Montgomery County, Alabama court to apply for a pension for services in the Revolution, stating that he was born in Lumberton, on Drowning Creek, in Robeson County, North Carolina, and moved to Marion District, South Carolina, near Marrs Bluff at the age of nine or ten. At the age of fifteen he entered the service as a volunteer [NARA, R.5507, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/24167357].

Allen Jeffers enlisted in the Revolution in South Carolina on 13 August 1782 and was listed in the muster of the 1st Company of South Carolina Troops on 11 December 1782, on the payroll of the 3rd South Carolina Regiment in March 1780 and reenlisted on 13 August 1782, listed in the muster of March 1783 [NARA, M246, roll 89, frames 339, 341; https://www.footnote.com/image/967938 viewed on 2 January 2008]. He was head of a household of 4 "free colored" in the town of Columbia in 1820 [SC:16]. He made a declaration in Richland County court, stating that he was born in North Carolina and brought to South Carolina as a child to the fork of the Congaree and Wateree Rivers where he had lived ever since, and that he enlisted in the 3rd Regiment of Rangers in 1778. Gideon and Morgan Griffin appeared in Richland County court to attest to his service [NARA, S1770, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/1/24147530].

George Jeffers enlisted in the Revolution in South Carolina on 8 August 1782, 5 days before Allen Jeffers, and was in the muster of the 5th Regiment of the 1st Company of South Carolina Troops on 11 December 1782 and was listed in the muster of March 1783 [NARA, M246, roll 89, frames 339, 341].

Osborne Jeffers enlisted in the Revolution in South Carolina on 25 May 1778 and served until 1 July 1781. He was listed in the pay roll of the 3rd South Carolina Regiment in August 1779 and March 1780 [NARA, M246, roll 89, frames 120, 196, 379].

Berry Jeffers, born 25 March 1750, was listed in the payroll of the 3rd South Carolina Regiment in March 1780 [M246, Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783, www.footnote.com/image/967938 viewed on 2 January 2008]. He was head of Richland District household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [SC:176]. He served for three years with fellow soldiers Morgan and Gideon Griffin and Allen and Osborne Jeffers. His brother Osborne Jeffers died in battle in Charleston [NARA, W.10145, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/1/24147596].

Benjamin Knight was listed in the muster roll of Colonel Richard Richardson's Battalion of South Carolina Militia in the 1759 Cherokee Expedition from 18 October 1759 to 10 January 1760 [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 898]. He was called Ben Night, "Mulatto," head of a 96 District, South Carolina household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

Moses Knight was head of a Frederick County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1800 (Moses Night) [MD:788] and 10 in 1810 (M. Knight) [MD:635]. He was about seventy six years old on 26 March 1831 when he appeared in Davis County, Indiana court and petitioned (signing) for a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted in 1779 in South Carolina in the regiment commanded by Colonel Jack McIntosh. He was sometimes called Moses Sharper and Moses McIntosh because he was raised by Colonel Alexander McIntosh [NARA, W.10182, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/24655780].

Robert Locklear enlisted in the 6th South Carolina Regiment on 20 May 1776 [NARA, M853, https://www.fold3.com/image/291771927]. He was head of a Fairfield County, South Carolina household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [SC:226].

Joseph Locklear enlisted in the 6th South Carolina Regiment in the Revolution on 20 May 1776 [NARA, M853, https://www.fold3.com/image/291771927]. He was head of a Robeson County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:48], 9 in 1800 [NC:389], 7 in 1810 [NC:230], and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:294].

George Perkins was born in Liberty County (present-day Marion County), South Carolina, according to his pension application. He applied for a pension while living in Lawrence County, Kentucky, on 15 March 1834. He was living in South Carolina when he entered the service in Charleston. He served four tours of ten days each in the militia under Lieutenant Richard Whittington in 1780 [NARA, R.8113, M804, roll 1911, frame 53 of 1034].

Uriah Portee was the son of John Portee, Sr., who was taxable on the female members of his household in Granville County, Granville County, North Carolina in the list of Phil. Pryor in 1762 [N.C. Archives CR 44.701.19]. He was listed in the payroll of Captain John Hennington's Company commanded by Colonel William Thompson in the 3rd South Carolina Regiment in the Revolution from 1 August to 1 November 1779 [NARA, M246, roll 89, frames 128, 131, https://www.fold3.com/image/22768213 and 9679392.

Willis Reed was head of a South Orangeburg District household of one "other free" in 1790 [SC:99], paid a little over 35 pounds for militia duty as a horseman from 15 April 1781 to 15 February 1782 [South Carolina Archives, Accounts Audited for Revolutionary War Service, AA 6309].

Peter Rouse was listed in the muster of Captain Paul Demere's Company of Independent Foot on duty in South Carolina and Georgia, "stationed on the spot," from 25 August 1756 to 24 October 1756 [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 989]. He was head of a South Orangeburgh, South Carolina household of 11 "other free" in 1790 [SC:99].

Cornelius Rouse was a "Molato" taxable in Bladen County, North Carolina, in 1771 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:61]. He was a "Negroe" head of a Cheraw District, South Carolina household of 2 "other free" males above the age of 16, 2 "other free" males under 16, and 7 "other free" females in 1790 [SC:358], 15 "other free" in Barnwell District in 1800 [SC:62], and 9 in Abbeville District in 1810 [SC:84]. He was called Neale Rous when he received pay for thirty days duty in the militia in 1782, perhaps identical to Cornelius Rose who was listed in the payroll of the 4th Company of the 3rd South Carolina Regiment commanded by Colonel William Thomson in July 1779 and March 1780, listed as waiting on Colonel Thomson in 1779 [NARA, M246, roll 89, frames 121, 246, 249; S.C. Archives Accounts Audited For Revolutionary War Services, AA6636, frame 466, roll #128].

Abraham Scott was head of a South Orangeburg District household of 9 "other free" in 1790. He was a man of color who served in the Revolution [Moss, Roster of South Carolina Patriots, 1849].

Thomas Sweat was listed in the Muster Roll of Captain Alexander McKintosh's Company of Colonel Gabriel Powell's Battalion in the expedition against the Cherokees from 11 October 1759 to 15 January 1760, in the same list as Winslow Driggers [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 929]. He was a "Mulato" taxable in Bladen County, North Carolina, in 1768 and 1769 and taxable in the household of Ann Perkins in 1771 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:8, 17, 60]. He was in the list of Captain Robert Lide's Company of Volunteer Militia who signed a petition to the Council of Safety of South Carolina on 9 October 1775.

Anthony Sweat was listed in the Muster Roll of Captain John McCant's Company of Colonel Gabriel Powell's Battalion of South Carolina Militia from 11 October 1759 to 15 January 1760 in the Cherokee Expedition [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 895, 925].

James Sweat was counted as white in 1790, head of a Beaufort District, South Carolina household of four males over 16, three under 16, three females, and a slave [SC:11]. He was listed in the payrolls of Captain Uriah Goodwyn's company of the 3rd South Carolina Regiment from March 1779 to March 1780 [M246, roll 89, frames 121, 138, 142, 147; www.footnote.com/image/967940, /967941 viewed on 2 January 2008].

William Sweat was listed in Captain Robert Lide's Company of Volunteer Militia who signed a petition to the Council of Safety of South Carolina on 9 October 1775. He was counted as white in 1790, head of a Beaufort District, South Carolina household of one male over 16, three under 16, and two females [SC:11].

Nathan Sweat was listed in Captain Robert Lide's Company of Volunteer Militia who signed a petition to the Council of Safety of South Carolina on 9 October 1775. He was counted as white in 1790, head of a Beaufort District, South Carolina household of one male over 16, one under 16, and 4 females [SC:11].

John Tann was listed in the Pay Roll of Captain Uriah Goodwyn's Company of the 3rd South Carolina Regiment commanded by Colonel William Thomson from March 1779 to March 1780, listed with James Sweat [NARA, M246, roll 89, frames 119, 141, 144, 147 of 389; www.footnote.com/image/967385, /967940, /967941 viewed on 2 January 2008].

Jim Capers, a man of Color, aged 107 years, appeared in Pike County, Alabama, on 2 July 1849 to apply for a pension for his service in the Revolution. He enlisted in Christ Church Parish opposite Bull's Island in June 1775 in the 4th South Carolina Regiment under General Marion and Colonel John Browry in Captain John White's Company and also served under Colonel William Capers as a drum major. He served until October 1782. He was the freed slave of a Mr. Capers. His widow Milly was a slave, so her application for a pension was denied [NARA, R.1669, M804, roll 465, frame 513 of 607].

 

NORTH CAROLINA

Joseph Allen was a "Mullatto" taxable in William Allen's household in 1767, a twenty-two-year-old "mullatto" planter listed in the 25 May 1778 Granville County Militia Returns [N.C. Archives Mil. TR 4-40 by The North Carolinian VI:726 and NCDAR, Roster of Soldiers in the American Revolution, 600].

William Allen was one of the "Black" members of the undated colonial muster roll of Captain James Fason's Northampton County, North Carolina Company [N.C. Archives Troop Returns, 1-3].

Lewis Anderson was number 87 in the 8 October 1754 Muster Roll of the regiment of Colonel William Eaton, Granville County, Captain John Sallis's Company [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 723].

Armstrong Archer was listed in his own Bertie County household in the 1756 constable's list of Edward Williams and an insolvent taxpayer in 1757. He mustered with Captain Benjamin Lane's Edgecombe County Militia in the 1750's [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 674]. He was head of a Hertford County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:25], 3 "other free" and a white woman in 1800, 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:105], and 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:186].

Caleb Archer was head of a Hertford County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:26] and 9 "other free" in 1800. He was allowed 26 pounds pay for service in the Revolution from 10 November 1777 to 10 August 1778 [Haun, Revolutionary Army Accounts, vol.II, Book 2, 280]. On 7 June 1792 he appointed James Carraway of Cumberland County his attorney to receive his payment for services in the Continental line in 1778 and 1779 [NCGSJ VIII:98].

Demcey Archer was a private who enlisted in Ely's Company of the 7th North Carolina Regiment in the Revolution for three years in November 1777 and died on 14 February 1778 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1005]. His heir Baker Archer (son of "Free Mulatto" Thomas Archer) received 640 acres of bounty land for his service [N.C. Archives, S.S. file no. 984a, call no. S.108.385 http://mars.archives.ncdcr.gov; also abstracted by Haun, North Carolina Revolutionary Army accounts, pt. 15].

Jesse Archer was a private who served and died in the Revolution [NSDAR, Roster of Soldiers from North Carolina in the American Revolution, 184]. His heir Baker Archer received 640 acres of bounty land for his service [N.C. Archives, S.S. file no. 225, call no. S.108.351 http://mars.archives.ncdcr.gov; also abstracted by Haun, North Carolina Revolutionary Army accounts, pt. 15].

Evans Archer was a soldier born in Hertford County and living in Norfolk County on 23 September 1780 when he enlisted in the Revolution for 1-1/2 years: age 25, yellow complexion, 5'4-1/4" high, marched to join Colonel Green [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.70)]. He was taxable in Norfolk County, Virginia, in 1786 and 1787 [PPTL, 1782-91, frames 525, 558] and head of a Hertford County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:25], 3 in 1800, and 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:186]. He applied for a Revolutionary War pension in Hertford County court, stating that he enlisted in Portsmouth, Virginia, for 18 months until January 1782 [NARA, S.41415, M805-25, frames 0113-8].

Thomas Archer was head of an Orange County, North Carolina household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:352]. He was identified as a Revolutionary War soldier and father of Nancy, wife of Elias Roberts, in Elias' Chatham County free papers. The papers stated that Thomas Archie had resided in Chatham County for twenty-three years but was living in Orange County, North Carolina, when the papers were issued on 10 February 1823 [Orange County, Indiana DB D:432].

Lewis Artist was a "Black" man listed in the undated colonial Northampton County, North Carolina Muster Roll of Captain James Fason's Company [Mil. T.R. 1-3].

Edward Griffith, deceased, received a land warrant of 1,000 acres for service in the North Carolina Line Elizabeth Artis was his only heir [N. C. Genealogy XVI:2582]. He may have been identical to Edward Griffin, a "Mulatto" head of a Edgecombe County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 and 1800 [NC:202] who served in the Revolution.

John Artis enlisted in 1781 in Colonel Hall's Company of Abraham Shepard's 10th North Carolina Regiment. He and John Godwin were imprisoned for robbery in Halifax on 15 August 1781. He left the service on 1 November 1782. Benjamin McCulloch drew his final pay [Clark, State Records of North Carolina, 17:190, 16:1007, 15:609; N.C. Historical & Genealogical Register, II:128]. He appeared in Cumberland County, North Carolina court to apply for a pension and claim twelve months pay as a private in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted in May 1781 and joined Captain Clem Hall's Company of the 2nd Regiment [NARA, S.41416, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/10951920]. He was head of an Orange County, North Carolina household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:354].

Archibald Artis was paid for serving in the militia in Newbern District, North Carolina, during the Revolution [NCDAR, Roster of Soldiers from North Carolina in the American Revolution, 415]. He died before November 1782 when Stephen Powell was granted administration of his estate in Johnston County on a bond of 200 pounds. The account of sales of the estate totalled a little over 43 pounds [Haun, Johnston County Court Minutes, III:232]. He was mentioned in the Revolutionary War pension application of Holiday Haithcock which had a testimonial by William Bryan, a Justice of the Peace: ..This affiant remembers that one mulatto was in his company as a common soldier whose name Archibald Artis [NARA, R.4812, M804, roll 1263, frame 437; https://www.fold3.com/image/1/22996357].

Joseph Artis was paid for service in the militia in Wilmington District during the Revolution [NCDAR, Roster of Soldiers from North Carolina in the American Revolution, 415].Joseph Artis was paid for service in the militia in Wilmington District during the Revolution [NCDAR, Roster of Soldiers from North Carolina in the American Revolution, 415].

Stephen Arters enlisted for 12 months in Hall's Company of the North Carolina Line in 1781 and was discharged on 21 November 1782 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1007].

William Barber, born on 17 May 1745 in Dinwiddie County, was living in Surry County, North Carolina, on 2 January 1833 when he made a declaration in court to obtain a Revolutionary War pension. He stated that he was living in Halifax County, Virginia, when called into the service and moved to Surry County about 1805 [NARA, S.6572, M805-48; https://www.fold3.com/image/246/12783624]. He was taxable in the southern district of Halifax County, Virginia, from 1782 to 1803: called a "Mulatto" starting in 1792 [PPTL, 1782-1799, frames 5, 127, 185, 259, 412, 434, 533, 598, 671, 808; 1800-12, 49, 175, 304]. He was head of a Surry County, North Carolina household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [NC:697] and 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:670].

Council Bass enlisted as a musician for 9 months on 20 July 1778 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1018] and was listed as a fifer in the roll of Lieutenant Colonel William L. Davidson's Company on 23 April 1779 [NARA, M246, roll 79, frame 142 of 323]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 7 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1790 [NC:74].

Elijah Bass, great grandson of John Bass and an Indian woman named Keziah Elizabeth Tucker, enlisted in the 10th Regiment of the North Carolina Line as a substitute for Ebenezar Riggan on 10 February 1781 and was killed in the battle of Eutaw Springs on 8 September 1781. His widow married Benjamin Richardson with Philip Pettiford as bondsman [NARA, W.4061, M804-2038, frames 533, 528].

Hardy Bass enlisted for 12 months in Donoho's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 14 June 1781 and left the service on 14 June 1782 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1020]. He received pay voucher no. 188 in Halifax in 1782 as well as no. 120 for 4 pounds, endorsed on back, "Hardy Bass, Volunteer, Granville County" [Bell, Bass Families of the South, Roster of Bass Revolutionary Soliders and Patriots]. He was head of a Granville County household of 4 "other free" in 1800.

Samuel Bell was born in Surry County, Virginia, in May 1749. He was living in Sampson County, North Carolina, in February 1782 when he volunteered in Captain Coleman's Company under Major Griffith McRae and Colonel Lytle. He marched to Wilmington, to Georgetown, and to Charleston, but was never in any engagement. After the war, he lived in Sampson County until about 1807 when he moved to Robeson County where he applied for and was granted a pension on 31 August 1832 [NARA, S.6598, M804-0207, frame 0489]. He was head of a Sampson County household of 10 "other free" in 1790, 15 in 1800 [NC:509], 5 in Robeson County in 1810 [NC:234], and 2 "free colored" in Robeson County in 1820 [NC:309].

Edward Bibby was a "Malatoe Child" bound apprentice to Colonel Thomas Armstrong in Cumberland County, North Carolina, on 21 January 1758 [Minutes 1755-9, 33]. He may have been identical to Edward Bubby who enlisted in Raiford's Company in the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 2 June 1781 and completed his service on 3 June 1782 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1020]. He was head of a Cumberland County household of 1 "other free" in 1810, called Ned Beebe [NC:565].

Edmund Bibby was ordered bound to John Pinnion in Bute County in November 1771 [Minutes 1767-76, 194; WB A:218]. He was listed among the Continental soldiers from Bute County who enlisted for nine months on 3 September 1778: Edmon Bibby, Place of Abode Bute County, born N.C., 5'4", 20 years old, Dark Fair, Dark Eyes [NCAr:Troop Returns, Box 4, by NCGSJ XV:109]. His heirs received military land warrant no. 3928 for 640 acres, entered on 22 July 1795 and issued 7 March 1796 [N.C. Archives S.S. 1096, call no. S.108.385, http://mars.archives.ncdcr.gov].

Solomon Bibby was 7 years old in November 1771 when the Bute County court ordered him bound an apprentice planter to Peter Goodwin [WB A:233]. He received a pension for his Revolutionary War service as a private in the Tenth Regiment, Yarborough's Company, of the North Carolina Continental Line in 1781. He was living near Sandy Creek in the part of Franklin County which was formed from Bute County when he volunteered. He was called a "free person of Color" on 18 June 1841 when he applied for a pension while living in Franklin County. He stated that he served in the 10th North Carolina Regiment and also as a waiter for General Jethro Sumner. He cared for the horses and guarded the baggage wagons during the battles of Camden, Guilford Court House and Eutaw Springs [NARA, S.6644, M805-85, frame 0047].

Absolem Bibby was 7 years old in November 1771 when the Bute County court ordered him bound an apprentice planter to John Pinnion [WB A:227]. He enlisted in the Tenth Regiment, Dixon's Company, of the N.C. Continental Line on 18 May 1781 for one year and was discharged on 21 May 1782 [Clark The State Records of North Carolina XVI:1021]. He was head of a Franklin County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:58] and 1 "other free" in 1810 [NC:825].

Enos Bizle/ Bizzel enlisted on 10 September 1777 for three years and was in the muster of Colonel John Patton's Company of 2nd North Carolina Battalion at White Plains on 9 September 1778 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XIII:516]. He apparently died in service since his heir David Bizzell received a military warrant of 640 acres for his service [North Carolina and Tennessee, Revolutionary War Land Warrants, 1783-1843, Roll 1, Revolutionary Warrants, 1783-1799 (Nos. 22-387), 120 (http://www.ancestry.com)]. David was head of a Hertford County household of 3 "other free" in 1800.

James Black was a " free Negro" in the muster roll of Abner Neale's Craven County Company in 1754 and 1755 [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 708].

Martin Black enlisted in New Bern for three years in Stevenson's Company of the North Carolina Continental Line on 16 May 1777. He was in Valley Forge and West Point and reenlisted for eighteen months in Evans Company in 1782. Isaac Perkins testified that he enlisted on the same day as Martin and served with him [NARA, S.41441, M805-92, frame 0147]. He was head of a Carteret County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:128] and an Onslow County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:143].

Thomas2 Blango was a "free Negro" head of a Beaufort County household in 1755 [N.C. Archives S.S. 837] and  one of the superannuated and invalid members of the Beaufort County Militia under the command of Colonel William Brown prior to 1765.

Thomas3 Blango was paid for service in the Newbern District Militia during the Revolution [NCDAR, Roster of Soldiers from North Carolina in the American Revolution, 404] and head of a Beaufort County household of 10 "other free" in 1790 [NC:125].

Benjamin Blango enlisted in Hogg's Company for 9 months on 20 July 1778 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1018. He was a deceased soldier of Beaufort County whose estate was administered before June 1792 by Sarah Blango [NCGSJ XVIII:72].

Moses Blango enlisted in Hogg's Company on 20 July 1778 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1018]. He was a deceased soldier of Beaufort County whose estate was administered before June 1792 by Sarah Blango [NCGSJ XVIII:72].

Lewis Boon, "bastard Mulatto of Patt Boon," was bound apprentice in Bertie County, North Carolina, in 1774. He enlisted in the Revolution for 9 months in Baker's Company on 20 July 1778 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1018]. He was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [NC:429], 5 in Halifax County in 1810 [NC:5], and 5 "free colored" in Halifax in 1820 [NC:142]. He appeared in Halifax County court to apply for a pension for his service in the Revolution, stating that he enlisted in Bertie County for nine months in July 1778 in Captain Blount's Company. He was born in 1757 in Bertie County, moved to Northampton County and had been living in Halifax County for the last forty years [NARA, S.6683, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/14483482].

David Boon enlisted in Ballard's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment for 9 months on 20 July 1778 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1019]. H. Murfree received his final pay [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVII:193]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [NC:714] and 10 "free colored" in Hertford County in 1820 [NC:182].

Elisha Boon enlisted in Baker's Company in the 10th North Carolina Regiment for nine months on 20 July 1778 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1018]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:218]. He was about sixty one when appeared in Wake County court on 13 June 1818 to apply for a pension for his service in the Revolution, stating that he enlisted early in the war as a volunteer in Nash County under the command of Captain Isaac Horn who marched his company to Halifax where he was put under the command of Captain John Baker of the 10th Regiment for 9 months about July 1778. He moved to Lexington, Kentucky, by 7 June 1824 [NARA, S.35196, M804, roll 288, frame 14 of 842].

James Boon was a "Mixt. Blood" taxable in Hertford County in 1770 [Fouts, Tax Receipt Book, 31] and head of a Gates County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 [NC:23]. He may have been the James Boon who enlisted for nine months in Bradley's 10th North Carolina Regiment on 20 July 1778. John Sheppard received his final pay of 23 pounds in Halifax [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1019; XVII:193]. And he may have been the James Boon whose heirs received warrant no. 1493 of 640 acres for service in the Revolution [N.C. Archives, S.S. no. 1498, call no. S.108.357, http://mars.archives.ncdcr.gov]. In February 1790 the Gates County court ordered his twelve-year-old orphan son Thomas Boon bound an apprentice shoemaker to Thomas Marshall. The inventory of his estate was recorded in Gates County court on 20 February 1794 [Fouts, Minutes of County Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions 1787-93, 8, 14].

Willis Boon enlisted in William's Company of the 5th North Carolina Regiment for 2-1/2 years in 1777 and was omitted in February 1778 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1013]. He was about seventy when he appeared in Chowan County court on 11 October 1820 to apply for a pension for his services in the Revolution, stating that he enlisted for 2-1/2 years in Captain John Pugh William's Company and served until the Battle of Germantown when he was transferred to Polk's Regiment and served until the ene of the war. He had no one in his family but his elderly wife. His application included a certificate from Colonel Nicholas Long [NARA, S.41455, M804, roll 288, frame 409 of 842]. He was head of a Chowan County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 (man and a woman over 45) [NC:118].

Randal Bowser was listed in the pay roll of Captain William Caldwell's Company of the 3rd South Carolina Regiment commanded by Colonel William Thompson in July and August 1779 [NARA, M246, roll 89, frame 171]. He was head of a Hertford County household of 6 "other free" in Moore's District in 1800 [NC:133].

Randall Branch was listed among the "Black" members of the undated colonial muster of Captain James Fason's Northampton County, North Carolina Militia [Mil. T.R. 1-3]. In 1769 he was taxable in Dobbs County [SS 837 by NCGSJ XV:74], and in 1790 he was head of a Robeson County household of 11 "other free" [NC:49].

John Braveboy was a "Black" tithable in Tyrrell County in 1755 [T.O. 105, box 1], head of a Beaufort County household of 1 "other free" and 6 slaves in 1790 [NC:127], 1 "other free" in 1800 [NC:4], and 1 in 1810 [NC:116]. He was called John Brayboy when he volunteered as a soldier in Carteret County in 1778 [The North Carolinian VI:728]. He enlisted on 27 August 1778 for three years in Captain Ballard's Company in the North Carolina Continental Line but was listed as a deserter a little over a year later on 29 October 1779 [Clark, State Records, XVI:1020].

Jacob Braveboy, a "bastard Mulattoe, was about 15 when the May 1774 Bertie County court bound out as an apprentice bricklayer [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, IV:74]. He enlisted for 2-1/2 years as a private in Williams' Company of the 2nd North Carolina Battalion on 9 May 1776 and was discharged on 10 November 1778 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1013]. He was listed in Benjamin Williams' Company of the 2nd North Carolina Battalion commanded by Colonel John Patten for January 1778 and was listed in Hardy Murfree's Company of the 2nd North Carolina Battalion on 9 September 1778 at White Plains, in the same list as William Sweat [NARA, M246, roll 79, frames 115, 122 of 323]. He was head of a Martin County household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [NC:387].

Joshua Brewington was head of a New Hanover County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:311] and 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:225]. He was seventy-seven years old on 19 September 1836 when he appeared in New Hanover County court to make a declaration to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he was born in 1759 or 1760 in the part of Duplin County that became Sampson County, served in a Company of 9 months raised in Duplin County in February or March 1779, lived ten to twelve years in Sampson County after the war and then moved to New Hanover County. There was a record of his enlistment but no record of service. He was a "person of Colour" who died on 22 November 1836 [National Archives Pension file S8091, https://www.fold3.com/image/10990898].

Benjamin Brewington enlisted in Quinn's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment for nine months on 20 July 1778. He received 23 pounds pay for service in the Revolution [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVII:193, 1018]. His rights to military land warrant no. 1515 of 640 acres were assigned to Alexander Ewing on 17 January 1789 [N.C. Archives S.S. file 893, call no. S.108.354, http://mars.archives.ncdcr.gov].

John Brooks was a Revolutionary War pensioner in North Carolina [Clark, State Records of North Carolina, XXII:571], head of a Robeson County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:367] and 7 in 1810 [NC:147]. He claimed to be ninety-five or ninety-six years old on 30 May 1853 when he applied for a pension for service in the Revolution and was still living in Robeson County on 22 March 1858 when he applied for (and received) bounty land. In May 1853 Nancy Locklier (nearly 100 years of age) had known him for about 85 years. Mrs. Rachel Locklier (about 90 years old) stated that she had known him for the last 85 years. Mrs. Rhody Locklier (nearly 100 years of age) had known him for the last 90 years [Pension File S-6732; https://www.fold3.com/image/13939742].

Kedar Bryan(t) enlisted for 12 months in Captain Hall's 10th North Carolina Regiment on 1 February 1782 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1022]. He was head of a Fayetteville household of 4 "other free" in 1790 (Kedar Bryant) [NC:42], 4 in New Hanover County in 1800 (Cato Bryan) [NC:311], and 7 "free colored" in Fayetteville in 1820 (Cader Briant) [NC:189].

Clement Bunch enlisted in Lytle's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment in 1782 for 18 months [DAR, Roster of Soldiers from North Carolina in the American Revolution, 112]. The Bunch family of North Carolina descended from an African slave and a white woman in colonial Virginia http://c.mfcreative.com/offer/us/obama_bunch/PDF/descendancy_final.pdf

William Burnett was head of a Dobbs County, North Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:137]. He was twenty-three years old in 1778 when he was listed in the Militia Returns for Dobbs County [The North Carolinian VI:730]. He was a "Mulatto" who enlisted with the 10th Regiment in 1780 and was said to have died without heirs [Crow, Black Experience in Revolutionary North Carolina, 98].

John Butler was a taxable "Mollato" in William Butler's household in the 1774 Bertie County list of Humphrey Nichols. He was living in Bertie County on 17 November 1820 when he applied for a pension for his services in the Revolution, stating that he enlisted in May 1776 at Windsor, Bertie County, in the North Carolina Line [NARA, S.41463, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/12035260]. He was head of a white Bertie County household in 1820.

Philip Byrd was listed among the "Black" members of the undated colonial muster roll of Captain James Fason's Company [Mil. T.R. 1-3]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 2 free males and 2 free females in Captain Winborne's District for the 1786 North Carolina State Census, 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:76], and 7 in 1800 [NC:425].

Moses Byrd enlisted as a musician in Lewis' Company of the North Carolina Continental Line in Halifax County, North Carolina, in 1776 and was omitted in January 1778. He mustered again in Taylor's Company for 2-1/2 years in January 1779. H. Montfort received his final pay [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1012, 1024, XVII: 192]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Southampton County in 1802 [PPTL 1792-1806, frames 156, 183, 261, 311, 373, 407, 509, 546, 615].

Isaac Carter was number 61 in the 25 October 1754 Muster Roll of Lewis Bryan's Craven County Company (not identified by race) [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 703].

Isaac Carter enlisted for 3 years and was in the Roll of Captain Clement Hall's Company in the 2nd North Carolina Battalion commanded by Colonel John Patten at White Plains on 9 September 1778 with Isaac Perkins, Martin Black, Cader/ Cato Copeland and Sesar Santee [NARA, M246, roll 79, frame 106 of 323]. He was head of a Craven County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:131].

John Carter was a "free Negro," listed in the 4 October 1754 and 4 October 1755 Muster Roll of Craven County, North Carolina, for the district between the head of Slocumb's Creek and the head of Turnagain Bay. This is near the Craven - Carteret County line. Listed in this same muster roll were "free Negro" Peter George, and Jacob Copes who were also from Northampton County, Virginia [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 708, 683].

Moses Carter was about three years old on 18 April 1758 when the Cumberland County court ordered him bound to James Wright. He was a "man of color" who enlisted as a private in Captain Joseph Rhodes' 1st North Carolina Regiment on 19 July 1782 until 1 July 1783. He made a declaration to obtain a pension in Sampson County on 25 October 1820 [NARA, S.41470, M805-167, frame 0077]. He was head of a Sampson County household of 9 "other free" in 1790 [NC:52] and 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:278].

John Edward Carter was a "man of color" living in Duplin County during the Revolution when a company of troops hired him to serve for a year. He went to Charleston, was taken prisoner by the British and never heard from again [NARA, S.21911, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/17127338].

Abel Carter was "a Molatto" accused by the March 1750 Session of the Craven County court of concealing his taxables [Haun, Craven County Court Minutes, IV:31]. He was listed as a "free Negro" with John Carter in Abner Neale's 1754 and 1755 Craven Muster Roll [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 708].

John Carter enlisted in Captain Quinn's 10th Regiment commanded by Colonel Davidson for 9 months on 20 July 1778. He was engaged in skirmishes near West Point and Kings Ferry. He made a declaration in September Term 1820 Craven County court to obtain a pension. Asa Spelman testified that they served in the same regiment. He died before 30 July 1821 [NARA, R.1749, M805-166, frame 497]. He was identical to John Caster who enlisted in Quinn's Company on 20 July 1778 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1034]. He may have been one of two John Carters, heads of "other free" Carteret County households in 1790 [NC:128, 129].

Joshua Carter was head of a Craven County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:130]. He received 4 pounds pay for forty days service in the Craven County Militia under Major John Tillman in an expedition to Wilmington [Haun, Revolutionary Army Accounts, Journal A, 141].

Jonathan Case was on the payroll of Captain Alexander Whitehall's Company of North Carolina Militia commanded by Colonel Samuel Jarvis on 2 June 1780 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina XVII:1054]. He enlisted in Bailey's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 17 May 1781 and left the service on 17 May 1782. Isles Simmons received his final pay of 32 pounds [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina XVI:1036; XVII:202]. He was living in Currituck County on 2 June 1791 when he applied for a pension for eighteen months service as a Continental soldier [NCGSJ VIII:213]. He was head of a Currituck County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:21] and 10 in 1800 [NC:138].

Joseph Case was head of a Currituck County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:138]. He made a declaration in Currituck County court on 10 May 1820 to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolutionary War [NARA, S.41472, M805-168].

Bartholomew Chavers received pay of $70 as a private in the Continental Line in the Revolution from 1 August 1782 to 15 November 1783, approved by Captain Bradley and Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Hogg [NARA, U.S. Revolutionary War Miscellaneous Records (Manuscript File), 1775-1790s, Records Pertaining to Troops of particular States, 14395-6, frames 7-11 of 397; http://www.ancestry.com]. He was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 6 "other free" and 2 slaves in1800 .

Caesar Chavis enlisted in Carter's Company of the 10h Regiment of the North Carolina Line on 19 May 1782. H. Murfree received his final pay of 23 pounds [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1037; XVII:99]. He was head of a Bertie County household of 7 "other free" in 1790 (Cezar Chevat) [NC:12].

Drury Chavers enlisted as a soldier in Bailey's Company of the 10th Regiment of the North Carolina Line in Edenton on 25 May 1781 and left the service on 25 May 1782. Thomas Person received his final pay of 20 pounds [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1035; XVII:199].

Henry Chavis was taxable on 170 acres and one poll in Hertford County in Nathan Harrel's List for 1784 [LP 64.1]. He was a soldier who served in the Revolution from November 1778 to August 1779. His widow Peggy made a deposition in Hertford County on 14 July 1792 to obtain his pay. William Manly attested to her statement [NCGSJ VIII:214].

Ishmael Chavis was paid for service in the Wilmington District Militia during the Revolution [NCDAR, Roster of Soldiers from North Carolina in the American Revolution, 325].

William Chavis died while serving from North Carolina in the Revolutionary War. His unnamed heirs received a warrant for 640 acres which they assigned to William Phillips before 6 December 1797 [North Carolina and Tennessee, Revolutionary War Land Warrants, 1783-1843, Survey Orders (Nos. 1-3992), no. 5058. (http://www.ancestry.com)].

Joseph Cheavers was listed in the undated 1750's Edgecombe County muster of Captain William Haywood, the last person on the list after Cannon Cumber (Cumbo) and John Sweet (Sweat) [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 677].

Sherwood Chavis, son of Beck Chavis, was bound by the churchwardens in Amelia County on 24 March 1763 [Orders 1763, 30]. He, Isaac Malone, alias Rouse, and Joseph and Elijah Locklear were in the Salisbury, Rowan County, North Carolina jail on suspicion of robbery on 2 April 1779. They were released when no evidence appeared against them, and they were willing to enlist in the Revolution [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XIV:287].

Solomon Chavis was head of a Halifax County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:13]. Jer. Nelms received his final pay of 28 pounds for service in the North Carolina Continental Line [Clark, State Records of North Carolina, XVII:198].

"William Chavers, Negro," was in the 8 October 1754 Muster Roll of the Granville County Regiment of Colonel William Eaton [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 716]. His sons "William Chavers, jun., Mulatto," and "Gilbert Chavers, Mulatto," were also listed.

William Chavers enlisted for 12 months in Brevard's Company of the 3rd North Carolina Regiment in 1781 and left the service on 12 April 1782 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1036]. He was head of a Wake County household of 6 "other free" in 1800.

Francis Coley/ Cooley, born in Charles City County, Virginia, enlisted there in the militia in 1777, moved to Halifax County, North Carolina, in 1779. He volunteered for six months in Halifax County and then settled in Brunswick County, Virginia, as an overseer for one Othen (Owen?) Myrick. He moved to Smith County, Tennessee, from where he petitioned for a pension on 28 November 1833 [NARA, S.3197, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/12745128]. He was listed in the state census for North Carolina in the 6th District in 1786.

James Coley born in Charles City County, Virginia, served in the Revolution in Virginia and then enlisted in Halifax County, North Carolina. He lived in Montgomery County, Tennessee, about twelve years and then moved to Humphreys County, Tennessee, where he appeared in court to apply for a pension on 18 September 1833 [NARA, S.3188, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/1/13181021]. He was head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 7 whites in 1790 [NC:62].

Robin Cooley was head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 6 "free colored" in 1830. He was called Robin Coley when he appeared in Halifax County court on 17 February 1844 and testified that his sister Sally Coley, widow of Jeffrey Coley a Revolutionary War pensioner, died in Halifax County on 26 December 1843 and he was her heir [NARA, W.4160, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/12743960]. Jeffrey Coley was head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 5 whites in 1790 [NC:62].

Jeffrey Cooley enlisted in Montfort's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 20 July 1778, deserted the next day and then mustered in the 5th Regiment in January 1779 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1034].

Cato Copeland was head of a Craven County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 [NC:134] and 2 in Halifax County in 1810 [NC:12]. While a resident of Halifax County he applied for and was granted a pension for three years service in the 2nd North Carolina Regiment [NARA, W.17665, M805-219, frame 0072].

Jacob Copes was a "free Negro" listed in the muster roll of Abner Neale's Craven County, North Carolina Company between the head of Slocomb's Creek and Turnagain Bay on 4 October 1754 and 1755 [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 708].

Robert Corn was living in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on 8 May 1780 when he applied for bounty land in court stating on oath that he was recruited as a soldier in the French and Indian War before 7 October 1763 [Orders 1779-84, 36]. He was head of a Wake County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:106] and one in 1800 [NC:756].

Byrd Cornet enlisted in the 10th Regiment of the North Carolina Continental Line for nine months on 20 July 1778 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1034]. He was listed in the roll of Lieutenant William Davidson's North Carolina Company on 23 April 1779 [NARA M246, Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783, https://www.fold3.com/image/10200387]. H. Montfort received his final pay of 27 pounds [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVII:198]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 8 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1790 [NC:75] and was counted as "other free" in the Chatham County census in 1800, called "Hew Bird Cornet" [NC:196].

Jack Cotance, born say 1726, was a "Mullatto" who brought an unsuccessful suit for his freedom from Simon Whitehurst in Princess Anne County, Virginia court on 21 July 1747 [Minutes 1744-53, 98, 105]. He was probably the John Cotanch who was listed in Child's Company of soldiers in the North Carolina Continental Line on 20 July 1778, listed as dead in Lytle's Company in 1782 [Hathaway's Register 1:582].

Robert Davis was listed as a "Mulatto" in the muster of Colonel William Eaton on 8 October 1754 [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 718].

Richard Davis was head of a Brunswick County, North Carolina household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [NC:13] and 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:236]. On 14 December 1791 he and Grace Davis petitioned the North Carolina General Assembly asking that her children, born after her emancipation be officially emancipated. Richard had served as an artilleryman in the Revolution [N.C. Archives, GASR Dec. 1791-Jan. 1792, Box 3, cited by Schweninger, Race, Slavery, and Free Blacks, Series 1, 63; petition no. 11279109].

John Day enlisted in Armstrong's Company of the 2nd North Carolina Regiment in 1777 and died at Valley Forge on 14 January 1778 [NARA, M246, https://www.fold3.com/image/10199665; Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1040]. His unnamed heirs were issued a warrant for 640 acres on 11 January 1822, assigned to Tignal Jones [North Carolina and Tennessee, Revolutionary War Land Warrants, 1783-1843, Roll 14: William Hill Warrants, 1811-1837 (Nos. 676-1131), 1064 (http://www.ancestry.com)]. Reuben, James and Henderson Day, heirs of Jesse Day, sued Tignal and Westwood Jones, alleging that Jesse Day was cheated out of the bounty land due him through the service of John Day because his attorney failed to file his claim. The counties involved in the suit were Orange, Granville and Wake. Jesse Day was head of a Granville county household of 10 "other free" in 1800, and his heirs were "Mulatto" heads of Granville County and Orange County households in 1850 [N.C. Archives, Estates Records: Day, Jesse]. His sons Reuben Day (administrator of his estate), James Day and Henderson Day sued Tignal and Westwood A. Jones in November 1837 in Granville County court, alleging that their father was cheated out of the bounty land due him through the service of John Day through the fault of his attorney. The case included papers in a March 1836 case where Jesse Day sued Westwood and Tignal Jones for his brother John's warrant, called himself a "man of Colour," and included a 22 February 1822 power of attorney from Jesse Day to Tignal Jones to receive the lands for him. Reuben Day was awarded $650 and court costs [North Carolina, Wills and Probate Records, 1665-1998; Day, Jesse, 1838].

John Demery was one of the "Black" members of the undated colonial muster of Captain James Fason's Northampton County militia [Mil. T.R. 1-3]. He sold his Northampton County land on 15 February 1778 [DB 6:227]. He received military land warrant no. 3901 for his service in the Revolution [North Carolina and Tennessee, Revolutionary War Land Warrants, Survey Orders (Nos. 1-3992), 3901 (http://www.ancestry.com)]. He was head of a Bladen County household of 9 "other free" in 1790 [NC:188].

Allen Demery was a taxable "Black Male" in Matthew Moore's Bladen County household in 1770 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:50; II:174] and head of an Anson County household of 7 "other free" in 1790 [NC:35] and 5 in 1800 [NC:203]. He enlisted in Brevard's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 25 May 1781 and left the service on 25 May 1782 [Clark, Colonial and State Records, 16:1047].

David Dennum/ Denham was head of a Claiborne County, Tennessee household of 9 "free colored" in 1830. He was about 80 years old on 1 December 1834 when he appeared in Hawkins County, Tennessee court to apply for a pension for services in the Revolution. He stated that he was born in Louisa County, Virginia, and enlisted in Guilford County, North Carolina [NARA, W.27540, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/1/20148333].

Harden Dennum/ Denham was head of a Harrison County, Indiana household of 10 "free colored" in 1830. He was about seventy three when he appeared in Jackson County, Tennessee court on 11 November 1833 to apply for a pension for his service in the Revolution. He entered the service in Guilford and Washington counties, North Carolina, for several terms of 2-6 months and served as a substitute for his brother David Denham. He stated that he was born in Hanover County, Virginia, and was living in North Carolina when he entered the service [NARA, S.30985, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/20148444].

William Dove received 4 pounds pay for 40 days service in the Craven County Militia under Major John Tillman in an expedition to Wilmington [Haun, Revolutionary Army Accounts, Journal "A", 141]. He enlisted for 3 years in Stevenson's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 14 Jun 1777 and was at White Plains on 9 September 1778 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1045; XIII:516]. He assigned his rights to military land warrant no. 3202, issued 26 November 1789 for 264 acres, to John Craddock [N.C. Archives S.S. file 1526, call no. S.108.357; http://mars.archives.ncdcr.gov]. He was head of a Craven County household of 9 "other free" in 1790 [NC:131].

Percival Dring was head of a Currituck County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:20]. He may have been the father of Thomas Dring who enlisted in Allen's Company of the 2nd North Carolina Regiment in the Revolutionary War and died 11 September 1777 [Clark, Colonial and State Records, XVI:1040].

William Dunstan was one of the "Molatto Children of Patience Dunstan," bound apprentice to John Howell by the April 1757 Lunenburg County, Virginia court [Orders 1755-57, 278]. According to the militia returns for Bute County, he was born in Virginia about 1755, about 5'9" high, one of the Continental Soldiers from Bute County who volunteered for nine months [Militia Returns, NCGSJ XV:109].

John Ellis was a "man of Colour" who made a declaration for a pension in Wake County court on 27 July 1820 [NARA, S.32233, M804-916, frame 0427]. He was head of a Wake County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:103].

John Epps was counted in the "List of Free Negroes & Mulattoes in the Lower District of Lunenburg County" in March 1802 [Lunenburg County, Free Negro, Slave Records, 1802-1803, p.1, LVA] and head of a Wilkes County, North Carolina household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:519]. He stated that he was born in Lunenburg County, enlisted there for 12 months, then drafted there in the militia in 1781. He was granted a pension while residing in Person County, North Carolina, on 8 February 1836 [NARA, S.8423, M805-306].

Burwell Evans enlisted in Montfort's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 20 July 1778 for nine months [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1053]. He married Mary Mitchell, 22 July 1779 Granville County bond with William Roberson bondsman. He was head of a Nash County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 [NC:70] and 2 "other free" in Halifax County in 1810 [NC:18].

John Evans died in the Revolutionary War after serving three years. Testimony in Wake County court on 10 August 1820 proved that his immediate heirs and brothers Morris, Gilbert and William Evans (all Sr.) who lived in Wake County, were entitled to 640 acres for John Evans's service, and warrant no. 507 was issued to his heirs on 29 August 1820 [North Carolina Archives SS Military papers, folio 355 cited by Martha Evans in email correspondence].

Morris Evans enlisted in Armstrong's Company of the North Carolina Line in 1781 and served until 1 October 1782. He assigned his final pay of 32 pounds to Dan Hunter in Warrenton in 1786, called Maurice Evans in Pierce's Register, no. 89808 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1054, XVII:209; NCDAR, Roster of Soldiers from North Carolina in the American Revolution, 8, 206]. He was counted as white in the Wake County census, 7 "other free" in 1800 [NC:761] and 7 "free colored" in 1830.

Reuben Evans enlisted in Captain Dixon's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment for 12 months and served from 12 May 1781 to 26 May 1782. He applied for a pension while resident in Wake County on 7 April 1831 at the age of seventy eight [NARA, S.41524, M804, roll 941, frame 401 of 798]. He was counted as white in the 1790 census for Wake County, listed near Morris Evans who was also counted as white, and was listed as white in the 1830 census. He was listed in the tax lists for Wake County in 1799 and 1802 [CR 099.701.1] but not listed in the census for 1800, perhaps living with Morris Evans who was head of an "other free" household in 1800.

Jesse Flood was head of a Halifax County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:308] and 6 in 1810 [NC:19]. He may have been the Jesse Flood whose final pay of 41 pounds for serving in the North Carolina Continental Line was paid to J. Marshall for C. Dixon [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVII:212].

Benjamin Flood was living in Halifax County on 4 August 1789 when he deposed that he had served as an eighteen months soldier in the North Carolina Continental line and assigned all that was due to him for the service to John Eaton [NCGSJ IX:153]. He sold 640 acres in Davidson County, Tennessee, on the south side of the Cumberland River, a grant for his services in the Revolution, by Halifax County deed on 31 August 1801 [DB 18:806 & Franklin County DB 6:89]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [NC:308], 6 in 1810 [NC:19], and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:148]. He married Lackey Underdue, 1790 Halifax County bond [CR 047.928.2].

Dempsy Underdew/ Underdue was counted as white in 1790, head of a Halifax County household of 1 male over 16, two under 16, and four females [NC:63]. He was a private in the Continental Line who assigned his right to 640 acres in Tennessee to Nicholas Long in Halifax County on 25 July 1795 [DB 17:810]. His widow may have been Polly Underdew, head of a Halifax County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:346].

Charles and Ambrose Franklin, sons of Martha Walden, wife of Micajah Walden of Northampton County, North Carolina, died while serving in the Revolutionary War. According to the testimony of Micajah Walden, administrator of their estate, their heirs were granted land warrants for 228 acres. They were also granted an additional 412 acres to be released when there was additional proof of their death. The additional land was released on 13 December 1805 when Micajah Walden presented the testimony of Samuel Parker, Henry Parker, and James Bradley, Captain of the North Carolina Regiment of Halifax [NCGSJ III]. Martha was counted as one of 5 "other free" persons in Micajah Waldens's Northampton County household in 1790 and 8 "other free" and a slave in 1800, but in her 1807 Northampton County will she named her son Noah Franklin who was counted as white in the 1800 census for Northampton County. Sarah Boon was listed as the heir of Charles Franklin on 4 December 1806 when she assigned her right to his warrant for 412 acres of land to Darrell Young [North Carolina and Tennessee, Revolutionary War Land Warrants, 1783-1843, Roll 11: William White Warrants, (1800-1811), no. 128. (http://www.ancestry.com)].

William Freeman was a "Black" taxable in Bladen County, called "free Will" in 1771 and called William Freeman when he was a "Mixt Blood" taxable on one male and one female in 1774. He enlisted as a substitute from Bladen County in Lieutenant Wilkinson's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment of Colonel Abraham Sheppard on 19 February 1782 [NARA, M246, roll 79, frame 165 of 323 http://www.ancestry.com]. He was head of a New Hoveanr County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:194].

Roger Freeman was a "Negro" man taxable in Bladen County in 1768 and 1770. He was head of a Bladen County household of two Blacks from 12 to 50 years old and six Blacks over 50 or under 12 years in 1786 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:12, 40, 51; II:169; 1784 Bladen County Tax List, 13]. He enlisted as a substitute from Bladen County in Lieutenant Wilkinson's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment of Colonel Abraham Sheppard on 19 February 1782 [NARA, M246, roll 79, frame 165 of 323; http://www.ancestry.com]. He was head of an Onslow County household of 7 "other free" in 1790 [NC:197], and 8 in 1800 [NC:14].

Jeffrey Garnes was a six-year-old bound by the Lunenburg County court to William Cocke to be a planter on 8 May 1765. In the 1778 Militia Returns for Captain Richard Taylor's Company of Granville County, North Carolina, he was listed as "a black man," twenty years old, (serving) in place of William Edwards Cock [Mil. T.R. 4-40 by Granville County Genealogical Society, Granville Connections, vol.1, no.1, 10]. He enlisted in Ely's Company of the 7th North Carolina Regiment in November 1777 and died on 22 January 1778 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1066].

Anthony Garnes enlisted in the Revolution for 3 years on 14 January 1777 and was listed in the 1st North Carolina Regiment in the roll of Captain Tilman Dixon's Company on 8 September 1778 [NARA M246, Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783, https://www.fold3.com/image/10198780]. He was head of a Hertford County, North Carolina household of 2 "other free" in 1790 (called Anthony Garner) [NC:26]. He was a "free man of coler" who applied for a pension at the age of fifty-nine while residing in Wilson County, Tennessee, on 27 October 1820 [NARA, S.38723, M804-1050, frame 940]. He was one of the heirs of Jeffrey Garnes who received military land warrant no. 737 which was issued for 640 acres on 15 September 1787 [N.C. Archives S.S. file no. 375, call no. S.108.352; http://mars.archives.ncdcr.gov].

Gabriel/ Gaby Garnes, son of Lucy Garnes, was bound out as an apprentice in Mecklenburg County in 1766 [Orders 1765-8, 173, 380]. Lucy was head of a Mecklenburg County, Virginia household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:153b]. Gaby enlisted in Dixon's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 25 May 1781 and was omitted in 1781 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1069]. A warrant for 640 acres was issued to the trustees of the University of North Carolina on 17 February 1824 for Gabriel's service in the Revolution [North Carolina and Tennessee, Revolutionary War Land Warrants, 1783-1843, Roll 15: William Hill Warrants, 1811-1837 (Nos. 1132-4409, 1144 (http://www.ancestry.com)].

Peter George was listed in the 4 October 1754 muster of Abner Neale's Craven County, North Carolina Company between the head of Slocomb's Creek and the head of Turnagain Bay. In Neale's 4 October 1755 muster he was among five "free Negroes" including John and Abel Carter [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 708].

Charles Gibson was "a Molata" taxable in Orange County, North Carolina in 1755 [N.C. Archives, T&C Box 1, p.19]. He was living in Wayne County, North Carolina, in August 1818 when he made a declaration to obtain a pension for Revolutionary War service. He claimed that he enlisted for nine months in the Tenth Regiment at the courthouse in Northampton County, North Carolina. However, there was no record of his discharge or service. He applied for a pension from Hawkins County, Tennessee, stating that he was born in Louisa County, Virginia, on 19 January 1739 and entered into the service in Salisbury, North Carolina [NARA, R.3995, M805-355, frames 55, 62]. He was head of a Hawkins County Household of 6 "free colored" in 1830.

John Gibson was born in Orange County, North Carolina, on 16 September 1760 according to his father's family bible. He grew up in Guilford County, North Carolina, where he entered the service. He moved to Tennessee in 1805, and was living there on 16 July 1833 when he made his pension application. He was a horseman employed in collecting cattle for the use of the army [NARA, S.3395, M805-355, frame 0197].

Thomas Gibson was born in Randolph County, North Carolina, on 15 November 1763. When he was eighteen years old, he volunteered in Guilford County and served for two years. He was allowed a pension while a resident of Randolph County [NARA, S.8560, M805-355, frame 0409].

Wilbourne Gibson was born in Guilford County in 1763 and was drafted into the service in Randolph County in 1781. He applied for a pension while residing in Ripley County, Indiana [NARA, S.4000, M805-355, frame 0411].

Joel Gibson was head of an Ashe County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [NC:78]. He applied for a pension in Henderson County, Kentucky, stating that he served in the 1st North Carolina Regiment [NARA, S.35968, M805-355, frame 0162].

John Godett enlisted in Sharp's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 5 April 1781 and left the service on 5 April 1782 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1069]. He was head of a Craven County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:130].

William Gowen was in the 8 October 1754 muster of Captain John Sallis' Company in the Granville County Regiment of Colonel William Eaton [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 722].

Michael Gowen, Thomas and Edward Gowen were "Mulattos" in the 8 October 1754 Muster Roll of the Granville County Regiment of Colonel William Eaton, Captain Osborne Jeffrey's Company [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 718].

Edward Gowen was listed among the continental soldiers from Bute County who served for nine months: Edward Going private, born Virginia, 5'7", 35 years old Black Fair; black eyes [NCGSJ XV:109]. He was head of a Person County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:599]. He and Jenkins Goins sold their claims for Revolutionary War pay to John Hall of Hyco, Caswell County, on 27 April 1791 [NCGSJ IX:224]. He gave his age as 90-100 years in August 1832 and on 30 January 1833 when he appeared in Granville County court and applied for a pension for his service in the Revolution [NARA, S.6899, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/22780909].

Reeps Gowen was taxable in his father Edward Gowen's Granville County household in the 1761 list of Robert Harris. He was called Rapes Going when he enlisted in the Second South Carolina Regiment under Captain Thomas Hall on 1 July 1779 [Moss, Roster of S.C. Patriots in the American Revolution, 367].

Jenkins Gowen was a seventeen-year-old "mullato" in 1778 when he enlisted in Captain John Rust's Company of Granville County militia [The North Carolinian VI:726 (Mil. TR 4-40)]. C. Dixon received his final pay of 41 pounds for service in the North Carolina Line [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVII:214].

Jacob Going was head of a Stokes County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:495]. He was about seventy years of age and living in Vermillion County, Illinois, on 7 June 1832 when applied for a Revolutionary War pension, stating that he was born in Henry County, Virginia, that he lived in Kentucky for about thirty years, then lived for seven years in Vincennes, Indiana [NARA, S.32273, M805, reel 368, frame 0115].

Ezekiel Graves was taxable on a horse in Greensville County, Virginia, in 1787 [PPTL, 1782-1830] and head of a Northampton County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 (called Ezekiel Groves) [NC:72] and 3 in 1800 (called Ezekiel Graves) [NC:447]. On 22 November 1787 he applied for compensation for twelve months service as a soldier in Captain Troughton's North Carolina Company [NCGSJ V:161].

John Gregory was head of a Craven County, North Carolina household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:130] and 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:65]. He was seventy-four years old on 15 August 1832 when he made a declaration in Craven County court to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he was living in Brunswick County, North Carolina, when he was drafted, and had two severe cuts from a sword which extended from his eyelid to the crown of his head [NCGSJ XII:186 (CR 28.301.29)].

Edward Griffin, a man of "mixed blood," was promised his freedom when he was sold to William Kitchen to serve in his place in the Revolution. The North Carolina General Assembly passed a bill to give him his freedom on 15 May 1784 [NC Archives GASR Apr-June 1784, Box 3, location 3A-464]. He was a "Mulatto" head of an Edgecombe County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 and 1800 [NC:202].

Edward Griffith served in the Revolution. Elizabeth Artis, his only heir, was living in Edgecombe County on 18 August 1820 when she assigned her right to a land warrant of 1,000 acres for his service in the North Carolina Line [North Carolina and Tennessee, Revolutionary War Land Warrants, 1783-1843, Roll 13: William Hill Warrants, 1811-1837 (Nos. 364-675, 536 (http://www.ancestry.com)].

William Guy was head of a Granville County, North Carolina household of 7 "other free," one white woman over forty-five years of age, and one white woman 16-26 years old in 1810 [NC:890]. He called himself "a free man of Color" on 5 February 1833 when he made a declaration in Granville County court in order to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution. He testified that he was about seventy years old, was born in Brunswick County, Virginia, and lived in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, when he enlisted as a substitute for Jack Goode at Mecklenburg courthouse [NARA, W.17969, M804-1149; M805-384, frame 0381].

James Hathcock was counted as white in the 1830 Chatham County census. He was about ninety years old on 7 June 1833 when he applied for a pension while resident in Chatham County. He stated that he was drafted into the militia under Captain Peterson in Northampton County [NARA, S.2613, M804, reel 1245].

John Hathcock was living in Southampton County on 5 October 1771 when he and his mother Sarah agreed to his indenture to Arthur Byrd for twelve years [Judgment Papers, 1773, frames 44-5]. On 11 March 1773 the court ordered the churchwardens of St. Luke's Parish to bind him and Aaron Heathcock, "poor children," and on 11 June 1773 the court ordered the churchwardens to bind him to Arthur Byrd (head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1790) [Orders 1772-7, 134, 213]. He petitioned the Virginia Legislature on 9 October 1792, stating that he enlisted as a solider in the state in September 1779, served until January 1782 and received a discharge at Portsmouth from his commanding officer Captain Browne [Hathcock, John: Petition, Southampton County, 1792-10-09, Legislative Petitions Digital Collection, LVA]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:27] and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:151].

Aaron Hathcock enlisted in Quinn's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment for two years on 22 June 1779 and was allowed pay until 5 June 1781 for his services in the Revolution [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1080; Haun, Revolutionary Army Accounts, vol. II, Book 1, 273]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:449] and 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:728].

William Hathcock, Jr., was on the roll of Lieutenant William Davidson's North Carolina Company on 23 April 1779 [NARA M246, Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783, https://www.fold3.com/image/10200387]. He was called William Hethcock in 1790, head of a Halifax County household of 5 "other free" [NC:61] and 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:26].

Isham Hathcock enlisted in Montfort's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment for nine months on 20 July 1778. He received final pay of 27 pounds for serving in the North Carolina Continental Line [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1079; XVII:217].  He was head of a Halifax County household of 5 "other free" and a white woman in 1790 [NC:61].

Amos Hathcock apparently died in the service as his heirs recieved bounty land warrant no. 2654 of 640 acres for his service as a private in the Continental Line. Ishum Hathcock was his heir [N.C. Archives S.S. 112, call no. S.108.388, http://mars.archives.ncdcr.gov].

Holiday Haithcock served in the Revolution from North Carolina. His final pay of 25 pounds for service in the North Carolina Continental Line was paid to John Sheppard [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVII:219]. He was head of a Johnston County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:142] and 6 in Orange County in 1800 [NC:569]. He applied for a pension in 1836 [NARA, R.4812, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/1/22996357].

Frederick Haithcock enlisted in the Revolution for two and a half years on 20 April 1776 and was listed in the Roll of Lieutenant Colonel Harney's Company of the 2d North Carolina Battalion commanded by Colonel John Patten on 9 September 1778, in the same list as Zachariah Hathcock who enlisted in 1777 [NARA, M246, https://www.fold3.com/image/10199832]. Ab. Thomas drew his final pay of 49 pounds [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XIII: 518; XVII:216]. He head of a Halifax county household of 7 "other free" in 1790 [NC:61] and 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:151].

Nathaniel Hall enlisted in the Revolution on 5 August 1779 in Blount's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment and died on 24 August the same year [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1081]. Micajah Reed, head of a Gates County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:24], 8 in 1800 [NC:277], 10 in 1810 [NC:853], and 11 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:155], proved to the Gates County court that he was the lawful heir of Nathaniel Hall, who died in Revolutionary War service. Nathaniel was apparently related to Nathaniel Hall, a "Molatto Boy," born about 1786, bound an apprentice cooper in Gates County in May 1806 [Fouts, Minutes of Gates County, IV:1001; III:499].

Joshua Hall was a "free man of color" living in Greene County, Tennessee, in 1817 when white residents of the county petitioned the legislature to allow him to prove his accounts in court by his own oath, he having paid taxes, performed military duty, and participated in the war with Britain [Schweninger, Race, Slavery, and Free Blacks, Series 1, 180].

Isaac Hammond, "a man of color," was a fifer in the 10th North Carolina Regiment for twelve months [NARA, W.7654, M805, reel 393]. He was head of a Fayetteville, Cumberland County, household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:42].

John Hammond was head of a Cumberland County household of 5 "other free" in 1800. He stated that he was about 98 years old on 24 May 1852 when he appeared in Robeson County court to petition for a pension for service in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted in Cheraw District, South Carolina, and resided in Anson County after the war until 1807 and then moved to Robeson County. Levi Locklier and Elias Paul testified for him [NARA, S.8654, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/22603188].

Solomon Harden/ Harding enlisted as a substitute from Duplin County in Lieutenant Wilkinson's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment of Colonel Abraham Sheppard but was listed as a deserter on 19 February 1782 [NARA, M246, roll 79, frame 165 of 323; http://www.ancestry.com]. He was head of a Robeson County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:49], 10 in 1800 [NC:383] and 10 in 1810 [NC:239]. He was called a "yeoman of Richmond County, North Carolina, Husband of Delaney Order (alias Harden), wife of Peter Order, Deceased," on 25 October 1791 when he and his wife gave power of attorney to Robert Webb to receive the final settlement for Revolutionary War service of his wife's deceased husband [NCGSJ XIV:114].

David Harden/ Harding enlisted as a substitute from Duplin County in Lieutenant Wilkinson's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment of Colonel Abraham Sheppard but was listed as a deserter on 19 February 1782 [NARA, M246, roll 79, frame 165 of 323; http://www.ancestry.com]. He was head of a Sampson County household of 12 "other free" in 1800 [NC:501].

Edward Harris was a "negro" in the 8 October 1754 Muster Roll of the Granville County Regiment of Colonel William Eaton [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 716].

Edward Harris died before 14 July 1792 when his brother Gibson, as "Eldest Brother & heir at law to Edward Harris decd.," gave power of attorney to Philemon Hodges to receive his pay for service in the Revolution. His brothers, Sherwood and Solomon Harris, made a similar deposition confirming Gibson's statement on 22 July 1792 [NCGSJ X:111].

Gibson Harris was listed in the 1778 Granville County Militia Returns for Captain Abraham Potter's Company: a seventeen-year-old "black man," occupation: planter [The North Carolinian VI:726 (Mil. TR 4-40)]. J. Craven received his final pay of 41 pounds for his service in the army [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVII:216]. He was head of a Surry County, North Carolina household of 12 "other free" in 1810 [NC:684].

Sherwood Harris was head of a Wake County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:770] and 10 in Granville County in 1810 [NC:864]. George Pettiford testified for the pension application of his widow Patty Harris that he was acquainted with Sherwood when they both served in the Revolutionary War. Both settled in Granville County, and Sherwood died there. On 23 November 1797 a warrant for 228 acres was issued for Sherwood's 2-1/2 years of service [NARA, W.3984, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/21853402].

Jesse Harris was head of a Granville County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 and 4 in 1810 [NC:864]. He made a declaration in Wake County court to obtain a pension for service in the Revolution, stating that he enlisted for 18 months at Hillsborough in the 10th Regiment commanded by Captain William Lytle and was transferred to Captain Hadley's Company and served until the end of the war [NARA, W.1277, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/22991228].

David Hatcher was a sixteen-year-old "half Indian" planter who enlisted in Captain Samuel Walker's Granville County, North Carolina Militia on 25 May 1778 [The North Carolinian, 726 (N.C. Archives Troop Returns File TR 4-40)]. He was listed as dead in the September 1779 Muster of the 10th Regiment [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1085].

Henry Hawkins enlisted in Ballard's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment for nine months on 20 July 1778 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1080]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:61], 7 in 1800 [NC:318], 8 in 1810 [NC:23], and 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:151]. He made a deposition on 23 November 1812 that he was in the service with Nathan Scott and that Scott died in the hospital in Philadelphia [N.C. Archives, LP 262, by NCGSJ VI:15].

Joseph Hawley was in the 8 October 1754 Granville County colonial muster of Colonel Eaton, called Joseph Halley, next to Lawrence Pettiford [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 728]. On 25 May 1791 he gave Thomas Bevan his power of attorney to receive the wages due him for three years service as a Continental soldier [NCGSJ X:112].

Joseph Hawley enlisted for 3 years as a private in Sharp's Company of the 1st North Carolina Regiment on 9 January 1777 and died on 1 September 1778 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1072]. His heir Joseph Hawley received military bounty land of 640 acres, entered 1 November 1784 and issued 18 March 1794 [N.C. Archives, S.S. file no. 408, call no. S.108.389, http://mars.archives.ncdcr.gov].

Benjamin Hawley was underage when he enlisted for nine months in the Continental Line according to the deposition of his father Joseph Hawley who was living in Granville County on 7 June 1791 when he gave Thomas Beavan his power of attorney to collect wages due to Benjamin for service in the Revolution [NCGSJ X:112]. He mustered for the war in Lytle's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment in January 1782 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1082].

Jacob Hawley was listed in his father Joseph Hawley's Granville county household in 1764 in the list of Samuel Benton. He enlisted as a private in Captain Lytle's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment in 1781 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1082]. He was the heir of Benjamin Hawley who received military bounty land warrant no. 1389, 640 acres entered 12 November 1784 and issued 20 December 1791, for Benjamin's service in the Continental Line [N.C. Archives S.S. file 96, call no. S.108.388; http://mars.archives.ncdcr.gov]. He was head of a Granville County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [NC:893]. He was a private in Captain Little's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment [NARA, W.21388, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/29344152].

Peter Hedgepeth enlisted in Yarboro's Company in the 10th North Carolina Regiment as a musician in 1781 for 12 months and was discharged on 7 May 1782 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1083]. He was head of a Wake County, North Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1790. He was living in Wake County on 21 March when he gave William Fearel power of attorney to collect his final settlement for his service in the Revolution [NCGSJ X:235].

Micajah Hicks was head of a Chatham County household of 4 "other free" in 1800. He was about seventy years old on 29 October 1831 when he appeared in Guilford County court to apply for a pension for his service in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted in Lewisburg, Franklin County, for three years, was placed in the 1st Regiment, sent to South Carolina and taken prisoner. He enlisted again when he returned to North Carolina [NARA, W.7738, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/22772692].

William Hood was a "remarkably smart" sixteen-year-old "Mulatto boy" who had been on two voyages to sea, ran away from Henry Minson of Charles City County on 23 September 1769 and was taken up in Halifax County, North Carolina, according to the 21 December 1769 issue of the Virginia Gazette [Windley, Runaway Slave Advertisements, 1:301; Headley, 18th Century Newspapers, 169]. He was a "Mulatto" counted in the 1786 North Carolina State Census for the Caswell District of Caswell County, listed adjacent to "Mulattoes" Arthur Toney and John Wright and head of a Rockingham County, North Carolina household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [NC:491]. He was about sixty-five years old in 1818 and living in Jennings County, Indiana, when he applied for a pension [NARA, W.25781, M804-1320, frames 644-672].

Charles Hood, a "Man of Colour," enlisted in Caswell County in Captain Thomas Donoho's 6th Regiment in 1780 and served until the close of the war according to an affidavit from Donoho included in the Charles' pension application in Orange County on 27 May 1820 [NARA, S.41659, M804-1320, frames 70-78]. He was head of an Orange County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820.

Thomas Huelin was listed among the "Black" members of the undated colonial muster roll of Captain James Fason's Northampton County Militia [Mil. T.R. 1-3].

Edward Huelin/ Huling was listed as a "Black" member of Fason's Muster [Mil. T.R. 1-3].

Jackson Hull enlisted for 3 years in the 3rd North Carolina Regiment in 1777 and was deceased by January 1778 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1073]. He may have married a member of the Chavis family because Bartholomew Chavis was one of the heirs of Jackson Hull, a Continental soldier who died at Valley Forge [NCGSJ I:160].

David Hunt, "a black man," was listed in the Militia Returns of Captain Samuel Walker of Granville County in 1778 [The North Carolinian VI:726 (Mil. TR 4-40)]. He enlisted for nine months under Captain John Baker and was discharged at Halifax [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1080].

Elisha Hunt was listed in Darnal's Company of the 5th North Carolina Regiment in 1777, a "Coloured Man" who lost his right arm at the siege of Charleston and was awarded a pension of $5 on 4 March 1789 while a resident of Lenoir County, North Carolina. On 5 October 1821 he applied for a pension in Cumberland County, North Carolina [NARA, S.13486, M804-1370, frame 0091; https://www.fold3.com/image/1/24189015; https://www.fold3.com/image/10200866].

Adam Ivey, a "melottoe," was listed in the Edgecombe County, North Carolina militia in the 1750s [Onslow County Minutes 1732-43, 25; Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 672].

David Ivey was a "man of color," a musician and waggoner, enlisted for a 3-year term in 1777 in the company commanded by Captain James Wilson in Abraham Sheppard's 10th North Carolina Regiment and was transferred to the 1st Regiment at Valley Forge. He died in Davidson County, Tennessee, on 27 November 1828 [NARA, W.26156, M804-1396, frame 0486].

Peter Jacobs enlisted in Hogg's Company of the 1st North Carolina Regiment for 3 years on 1 January 1777. T. Dixon received his final pay of 131 pounds for service in the Revolution [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1088; XVII:222]. Tilman Dixon was assigned Peter's right to military land warrant no. 1405 for his service in the Continental Line: 640 acres entered 16 November 1784 [N.C. Archives, S.S. 2051, call no. S.108.359, http://mars.archives.ncdcr.gov]. He was not counted in the 1790 census, deceased by 21 May 1792 when John Jacobs proved to the New Hanover County court that Zachariah Jacobs was his heir [Minutes 1792-98, 8].

Zachariah Jacobs was a "Black" taxable in Brunswick County in 1772 [GA 11.1] and head of a New Hanover County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:194], 10 in 1800 [NC:313], and 5 in Richland District, South Carolina, in 1810 [SC:175a] and 7 "free colored" in Richland District in 1830. He enlisted in October 1781 with Captain James Mills in the 8th Regiment from Brunswick County, North Carolina, and left the service about a year later. He was in a skirmish near Dorchester, South Carolina, and was wounded in the leg at Guilford Courthouse [NARA, W.5304, BlWt.17037-160-55, M805-466, frame 0444]. He assigned his right to his final pay for twelve months service in the Continental Line to Isaac Cole in New Hanover County on 6 December 1791 [NCGSJ XI:114].

Ezekiah Jacobs enlisted as a private in Mill's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 18 December 1781 for 1 year [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1094]. He was head of a Brunswick County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:13], and 8 in 1810 [NC:236]. He recorded a certificate of his discharge from his service as a soldier in the North Carolina Line on 18 February 1788 in New Hanover County [NCGSJ XI:114].

Primus Jacobs was head of a New Hanover County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:194]. He enlisted in the Revolution in New Hanover County in August 1782 [NARA, S.41688, M804-1403, frame 0193].

Benjamin James enlisted in Hall's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment in 1781 and left the service on 16 August 1782 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1093]. He and his brother Jeremiah gave Seth Peebles of Northampton County power of attorney to obtain settlement of their Revolutionary War service pay [NCGSJ XI:114]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:68], 7 in 1800 [NC:322], 7 in 1810 [NC:29], and 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:153].

Jeremiah James was a "free Mulatto" taxable in John Norwood's household in the undated (1772?) Bertie County tax list of Humphrey Nichols [CR 10.702.1, box 13]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:73] and 6 in 1800 [NC:453]. He entered the service in Bertie County in Captain Blount's Company of the 10th Regiment for nine months on 20 July 1778 and again as a private in Captain Raiford's Company from 17 May 1781 to 15 April 1782 [NARA, M804, roll 1404, frame 605 of 781].

Thomas James was the six-year-old son of Betty James, a "Free Mulatoe," bound out by the Bertie County court in May 1763. Humphrey Hardy was granted administration on his estate on 6 August 1792 with 500 pounds security [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, VI:957]. The administrator had a certificate from the Board of Army Accounts that wages due were settled at Halifax in the amount of 69 pounds [Bertie Estate Papers]. He enlisted in Blount's Company on 20 July 1778, the same day as Jeremiah and David James [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1092].

Elisha James was bound by the Bertie County court to Samuel Moore to be a cordwainer on 29 July 1757 [CR 10.101]. He was listed among the militiamen from Northampton County who were paroled by Lord Cornwallis in Halifax in 1781, probably captured during the events surrounding the Battle of Guilford Courthouse on 15 March 1781 [NCGSJ IV:149]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:65], 7 in 1800 [NC:320], 4 in 1810 [NC:29], 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:152], and 9 "free colored" in 1830. He made a declaration in Halifax County court to obtain a Revolutionary War pension on 16 November 1824

Frederick James was bound by the Bertie County court to John Norwood on 26 September 1768 [CR 10.101.7 by NCGSJ XIV:33]. He was listed among the Militiamen from Bertie County who were paroled by Lord Cornwallis in 1781 in Halifax, probably captured during the events surrounding the Battle of Guilford Courthouse on 15 March 1781 [NCGSJ IV:150]. John Marshall received his final pay of 27 pounds for service in the North Carolina Continental Line in 1786 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVII:223]. He was head of a Bertie County household of 9 "other free" in 1790 [NC:13], 5 in 1800 [NC:54], and 3 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1810 [NC:148].

David James was ordered bound as an apprentice to Arthur Williams by the Bertie County court on 2 June 1763. Sampson Hays received 27 pounds as David's final pay for service in the North Carolina Continental Line [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVII:222]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 3 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1790 [NC:73].

Solomon James, Jr., was a "Molato" head of household in Bladen County in 1776 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:81; II:67, 183]. He served in the Revolution from Wilmington District [NCDAR, Roster of Soldiers from North Carolina in the American Revolution, 221]. He was head of a Robeson County household of 9 "other free" and a white woman in 1790 [NC:49].

Jacob Jeffries enlisted in Donoho's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 25 May 1781 and left the service a year later. His final pay of 21 pounds was received by William King [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1093; XVII:222]. He was head of an Orange County household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [NC:514]. He recorded a certificate in Orange County on 24 July 1791 that he was the "Mulatto Jacob" who received a discharge for twelve months service as a soldier in the Revolution [NCGSJ XI:115]. His 14 July 1818 Orange County will left his wife Jane a bounty ticket worth $3,000 due from Major Thomas Donoho (apparently for Revolutionary War service) [North Carolina original will, D:543]. Jinncy was head of an Orange County, North Carolina household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:344].

John Jeffries was taxable in Meherrin Parish, Brunswick County, Virginia, from 1782 to 1787. His son Thomas appeared in Orange County, North Carolina court on 26 May 1837 to obtain a pension for his father's services in the Revolution. He stated that his father was born in Halifax County, Virginia, in 1733 (perhaps date in error and place meant to be Halifax County, North Carolina), was drafted in the fall of the years 1780 and 1781, that his father was very infirm and blind in December 1832 when he moved him to Orange County, and that his father died 4 December 1834 leaving no widow [NARA, S.8754, M804-1409, frames 350-1]. His son Thomas was head of an Orange County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [NC:817] and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:406].

John Jeffries was head of an Orange County, North Carolina household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:342]. He enlisted in Brunswick County, Virginia, in 1780 and resided there until 1808 when he moved to Orange County. He served in the place of his father Andrew Jeffreys [NARA, W.26158, M804-1409, frame 0363].

Brutus Johnston enlisted as a musician in Major's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment, was mustered in January 1778 and died 15 February 1778 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1092]. He was a drummer enlisted for 2-1/2 years in Benjamin Williams' Company of the 2nd North Carolina Battalion in January 1778 who died on 15 February 1778 [NARA, M246, roll 79, frames 122 of 323]. He was described by Charles Wood as a man of colour who died at Valley Forge while serving as a soldier in the North Carolina Line [N.C. Genealogy XVI:2580]. His estate descended to his brother David Johnson [NCGSJ IV:173].

Francis Jones was a "Black" member of Captain James Fason's colonial Northampton County, North Carolina Militia [N.C. Archives Troop Returns, 1-3].

Francis Jones enlisted in Sharp's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 1 August 1782 and was transferred on 27 December 1782 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1094]. He was about 50-60 years old when he appeared in Wake County court on 13 May 1818 to apply for a pension for his service in the Revolution. He stated that he volunteered for 18 months under Captain Sharp in the 10th North Carolina Regiment until the end of the war [NARA, S.36653, M804-1438, https://www.fold3.com/246/24155584]. He was head of a Wake County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:103] and 8 "free colored" in Caswell County in 1820 [NC:66] and a 75-year-old veteran in the household of Lemuel Reed, head of a household of 6 "free colored".

Abraham Jones was head of a household of one Black male and one Black female in the 1767 Granville County tax list of John Pope adjacent to Richard Jones. In 1768 he was listed in Pope's list with his wife Charity. In the 1778 Militia Returns for Granville County he was listed in Captain John Rust's Company as a "mulatto," about forty-four years old [The North Carolinian VI:726 (Mil TR 4-40) also NCDAR, Roster of Soldiers from North Carolina in the American Revolution, 600].

Hardy Jones was head of a Jones County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:144], 7 "other free" and a white woman over the age of 45 in Lenoir County in 1810 [NC:300] and 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:295]. He   was residing in Lenoir County in 1818 when he appeared in the county court to apply for a pension. He stated that he enlisted in Jones County in 1778 in Captain John Taylor's Company of the 3rd North Carolina Regiment and served until 1783. He was in the Battle of Stono Creek and was taken prisoner in the Siege of Charleston. The records of the War Department confirmed that he had served five years [NARA, S.41699, M804, roll 1439, frame 351 of 1122].

James Jones was head of a Halifax County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:65], 12 in 1810 [NC:29] and 10 "free colored" in 1820. He appeared in Halifax County court on 22 November 1821 to apply for a pension for his service in the Revolution. He enlisted in 1781 for a year in Captain Yarborough's Company of Colonel Blount's North Carolina Regiment and was in the Battle of Eutaw Springs. Isham Scott testified that they were both under the command of Colonel Hardy Murfree for a part of their time in the service [NARA, S.41701, M804, roll 1440, frame 314 of 991]. On 19 May 1823 he testified for Isham Scott in Halifax County court that he was in the service with him in Colonel Ashe's regiment.

Jonathan Jones was a seventeen-year-old "mulatto" listed in Captain Rust's Granville County Militia Returns adjacent to Abraham Jones [The North Carolinian VI:726]. His final pay of 94 pounds was received by Selby Harney [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVII:222]. He was head of a Person County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [NC:597] and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:498].

Philip Jones was head of a Halifax County household of 7 "other free" in 1790 [NC:5] and 2 in 1800 (called Philip, Senr.) [NC:322]. He made a deposition in Northampton County court on 26 March 1791 that he enlisted and served as a soldier in the Continental Army [NCGSJ XI:118]. He may have been the Philip Jones who sometime before 7 September 1787 sold bounty land in Davidson County, Tennessee, which he received for his services in the War [Franklin County DB 6:89].

Thomas Kersey was in Captain Hardy Cone's Edgecombe County militia in the 1750's [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 667]. He was a "Molato" taxable in Bladen County in 1768 and taxable on 2 "Molatoes" (himself and William Horn) and two slaves (Dick and Quash) in 1776 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:9, 71, 83, 124, 135; II:66, 76].

George Kersey was head of a Robeson County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:310]. He was born in Bladen County where he enlisted under Captain Baker and Colonel Culp for 11 months in August 1777. His colonel was killed by the Tories commanded by Mike Gowen and Thomas Gibson. They found Mike Gowen in Robeson County. He lived for about five years in Marion District, South Carolina, the balance in Robeson County and Cumberland County where he then lived. James Kersey testified in Robeson County court on 24 November 1834 that both he and George served under General Francis Marion. James Hunt testified in Cumberland County court on 13 March 1834 that George served under General Marion [NARA, M804, R.5801 https://www.fold3.com/image/1/24631742].

James Kersey was listed in the Militia Returns for Bladen County in 1782 [The North Carolinian VI:751]. He was living alone in Robeson County, counted as "other free" in 1800 [NC:388]. He made a declaration in Robeson County court to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he volunteered in a company of militia on 1 August 1782 in what was then Bladen County in the town of Elizabeth. He marched to Charleston, South Carolina, to James Island, and received his discharge in Wilmington on 1 August 1783. He was never in any engagement "but once which was with a body of negroes above Charleston at a place called as he thinks the Quarter House." He was inscribed in the Roll of North Carolina on 4 March 1831 [NARA, S.8788, M804-1477].

William Kersey was head of a Warren County household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [NC:814], 11 in 1810 [NC:765], and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:798]. He was called William Carsey in his pension application in which he stated that he was born in Southampton County in 1761, lived there and in Bute County, North Carolina, during the war [NARA, W.29906-1/2, M804-481].

Lemon /Lamentation Land was a waiter in the roll of Lieutenant William Davidson's North Carolina Company in the Revolution on 23 April 1779 [NARA M246, Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783, https://www.fold3.com/image/10200387], head of Northampton County, North Carolina household of 6 "other free" and 1 white woman [NC:72] in 1790, called Lamentation Land in 1800 when he was head of a Northampton County household of 8 "other free" [NC:459], called Lemuel Land in 1810, head of a Halifax County household of 6 "other free" [NC:32] and called Lemon Lamb in 1820, head of a Halifax County household of 5 "free colored" [NC:156].

Morgan Lewis made a declaration in Halifax County court to obtain a pension for his services as a private in the 10th North Carolina Regiment in the infantry commanded by Colonel Hogan in Captain G. Bradly's Company [NARA, S. 41766, M804-1558; https://www.fold3.com/image/1/24789911]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:62], 3 in 1800 [NC:324], and 4 in 1810 [NC:33].

Randolph/ Randall Locklear was taxable in Lunenburg County, Virginia, in the list of Edmund Taylor for St. James Parish in 1751 [Tax List 1748-52]. He was in the Muster Roll of Captain Smith's Company of the Edgecombe County Militia in the 1750's [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 672]. In 1765 he and wife Sarah were "Black" tithables in Granville County, North Carolina, and in 1766 they were tithable on 3 persons [CR 44.701.20]. In 1790 he was head of a Robeson County household of 10 "other free" [NC:48].

Thomas Locus, born about 1748, "base born son of ____ Locus "a free Negro woman," was bound an apprentice shoemaker in Granville County, North Carolina [CR 44.101.2]. On 30 September 1785 the heirs of Thomas Locust received warrant no. 2670 of 640 acres for his service in the Revolution [N.C. Archives S.S. file 1137, call no. S.108.385, http://www.mars.archives.ncdcr.gov; DAR, Roster of Soldiers From North Carolina in the American Revolution, 287]. All nine Locus(t) households counted in the 1790 North Carolina census were "other free" persons.

Billing Lucas, "man of color," enlisted for 9 months in Blount's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment and died 5 September 1779 [Crow, Black Experience in Revolutionary North Carolina, 101; [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1106].

Valentine Locus married Rachel Pettiford, 1780 Granville County bond. Rachel received a pension for his services in the Revolutionary War. He was taxable on 100 acres and 2 free polls in Oxford District of Granville County in 1788 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XXVI:1268]. He was head of a Wake County household of 8 "other free" in 1790 [NC:106] and 9 "other free" in 1800 [NC:778] [NARA, W.20497, M805-533, frame 766].

William Lomack enlisted in Blount's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment in 1779, was omitted in November 1779, enlisted in McRae's Company on 9 May 1781 and left the service a year later [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1106]. He stated that he enlisted with Captain James Curry as a private in the 2nd North Carolina Regiment in 1777 for five years. He was taken prisoner at the battle of Charleston, made his escape from the British, and rejoined his regiment at Deep Run under General Gates. He received two wounds at the Battle of Eutaw Springs [NARA, S.41783, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/24697431]. He was head of a Robeson County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [NC:240] and counted in the 1850 census for Fayetteville as a 95-year-old Black cooper, born in New Jersey.

William Lowry was head of a Bladen County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:9] and 9 "free colored" in Robeson County in 1820 [NC:304]. His widow Susan Loughry applied in Robeson County court for a pension for his services in the Revolution. She stated that her husband died at about 92 years of age on 26 May 1847, that her maiden name was Susan Locklear, that they were married in May 1803, and that she was 70 years old in 1853 [NARA, W.8263, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/27290621-27290714, accessed October 1, 2015].

Wilmore Male enlisted in the Continental Line for three years in January 1777 and served his time [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Mail, Welmore, Digital Collections, LVA]. He enlisted from the part of Berkeley County, Virginia, that became Jefferson County, moved to Hampshire County in 1790 and applied for a pension from Hampshire County on 27 May 1818 at the age of sixty [National Archives pension file no. S. 38171, https://www.fold3.com/image/1/23395021]. He was head of a Hampshire County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:826].

Gabriel Manly, Jr., was taxable in his "Mulatto" father Gabriel Manly's Bertie County household in 1751. John Marshall received his final pay of 41 pounds for service in the North Carolina Continental Line [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVII:234]. He was head of a Hertford County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:25].

Littleton Manly was head of a Northampton of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:75]. He enlisted for 18 months in Captain Lytle's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment in 1782 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1122].

Solomon Manly was a taxable in Bertie County in 1751, in the same list with "Mulattos" Moses, Abel and Gabriel Manley [CCR 190], taxable in 1759 in the constable's list of William Witherington for Captain Benjamin Wynn's District, and taxable in Hertford County on two persons in 1768 and 1770 Fouts, Tax Receipt Book, 55]. His final pay of 28 pounds for service in the Revolution was received by H. Murfree [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVII:233]. His relict Anna Manley received 640 acres for his service which she assigned to Hardy Murfree [N.C. Archives, S.S. file 113, call no. S.108.350, http://mars.archives.ncdcr.gov].

Southerland Manly was taxable in Hertford County on one person in 1768, two in 1769 and 1770 [Fouts, Tax Receipt Book, 54]. He enlisted as Southey Manley in the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 20 July 1778 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1117], listed in the roll of Lieutenant William Davidson's North Carolina Company on 23 April 1779 [NARA, M246, Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783, https://www.fold3.com/image/10200387]. H. Murfree received his final pay (and Moses Manley's) [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVII:233]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [NC:461].

Moses Manly enlisted with Colonel Lytle in the 10th North Carolina Regiment for nine months in August 1781. He made a declaration in Hertford County court for a pension on 17 August 1819 [NARA, S.41796, M805, reel 549, frame 703]. He was head of a Bertie County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:14] and a Halifax County household of 5 in 1800 [NC:328], 7 in 1810 [NC:36], and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:157].

Mark Manly served in the Revolution [NCDAR, Roster of Soldiers from North Carolina in the American Revolution, 192, 677]. In 1786 his heir Letitia Archer, called Libba Archer in the warrant, received military bounty land warrant no. 215 for his service [N.C. Archives S.S. file no. 254, call no. S.108.351; http://mars.archives.ncdcr.gov]. Letisha Manley was head of a Hertford County household of 4 "other free" in 1790.

Ephraim Emanuel was listed in the muster roll of Captain Elisha Williams' Edgecombe County Militia in the 1750's [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 675]. He was head of a Sampson County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:51].

Jesse Manuel received his final settlement certificate as a twelve months soldier in the Revolution on 25 December 1787 [NCGSJ XIII:93]. He was head of a Sampson County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:51]. He enlisted in Bladen County in April 1782 and served in the 2nd North Carolina Regiment. Henry and Moses Carter testified for him. Henry stated that he had been acquainted with him since they were boys, that they were near-neighbors in Duplin County, that they met while both were in the service, and that he could not be mistaken about Jesse because he was such a remarkably tall man [NARA, S.41808, M804-1627].

Christopher Manuel was head of a Northampton County household of 8 "other free" in 1790 [NC:75], 11 in Sampson County in 1800 [NC:517] and 6 "free colored" in Sampson County in 1820 [NC:308]. He stated that he was born in Halifax County, North Carolina, and moved to the part of Duplin County which became Sampson County before the war [NARA, S.7182, M804-1627].

Nicholas Manuel was head of a Sampson County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:51] and 9 in 1800. He served in the Revolution [NARA, S.6887, M804-1627].

Absalom Martin enlisted in the town of Beaufort, North Carolina, for 12 months in Captain William Dennis' Company in the 1st North Carolina Regiment in April 1781. He made a declaration in Carteret County court to obtain a pension on 22 August 1820 [NARA, S.41800, M805, reel 0555, frame 20]. He was head of a Carteret County household of 9 "other free" in 1790 [NC:128], 12 in 1800, 16 in 1810 [NC:443], and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:121].

John Martin was head of a New Hanover County, North Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:194] and 11 in 1800 [NC:310]. He gave power of attorney to Thomas Nuse to receive his final settlement for service in the Continental Line on 9 September 1791. John Williams, a justice of the peace for New Hanover County, attested that he served in 1782 [NCGSJ XIII:94].

Jesse Martin enlisted for nine months in 1780 in Captain Arthur Gatling's regiment of the North Carolina Line commanded by Colonel Armstrong. He was discharged in Stono, South Carolina, in 1781 [NARA, R.6949, M805, reel 883, frame 836]. He was head of a Gates County household of 8 "other free" in 1790 [NC:23], 9 in 1800 [NC:273], 7 in 1810 [NC:842], and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:162].

Patrick Mason was head of a Person County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:613] and 10 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:498]. He enlisted for twelve months on 1 April 1780 [National Archives Pension file no. S41810, https://www.fold3.com/image/23478388; NCGSJ XIV:172].

Thomas Mason was head of a Louisa County household of 6 "other free" persons in 1800 [Louisa County Historical Society (June 1972)] and was listed as a "Mulatto" shoemaker in a "List of free Negroes and Mulattoes" in Louisa County about 1801-3 [Abercrombie, Free Blacks of Louisa County, 20]. He enlisted in 1777 in Caswell County, North Carolina, served six months in a horse corps, enlisted again in 1780 and 1781 [NARA, M804, file no. R6993, https://www.fold3.com/image/23478607]. Thomas was the father of

Isham Mitchel received a total of about 50 pounds in pay for his service in the Revolution. He married Mary Holly (Hawley) in Granville County about 1768 and had nine children. His children Josiah, Joab, Joel, Jo, and Isham Mitchell were listed as "other free" or "free colored" in the census [NARA, W.18510, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/24781248].

Paul Mitcham enlisted in Montfort's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 20 July 1778 for nine months [Clark, [The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1117]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:38] and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:156].

Joseph Moore was "a free born Negroe Boy Aged Sixteen Years," bound an apprentice house carpenter by the 17 June 1774 Craven County court [Minutes 1772-84, 18d]. He may have been the Joseph Moore who mustered in Fenner's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment as a musician in January 1778 and died on 16 March 1778 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1116].

Kuffie Moore, "free Negro," was a "Black" taxable in his own Beaufort County household in 1769 [S.S. 837]. He enlisted for nine months in Captain Blount's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 1 July 1779 and died on 17 August 1779 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1118].

Lemuel Moore was a fourteen-year-old "Free Negroe Boy" ordered bound apprentice to John Davis to be a house carpenter by the Craven County court on 14 December 1771 [Minutes 1767-75, 189b]. He enlisted in Alderson's Company as a private in November 1777, served as a musician in January and February 1778 and died on 26 April 1778 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1112].

Simon Moore was living in Beaufort County when he and (his brother?) Abram, called "free Negroes," purchased 300 acres on the south side of Terts Swamp and Durham's Creek on 28 March 1758 [DB 3:383]. He  was head of a Craven County household of 1 "Black" male and 2 "Black" females in 1769 and head of a Craven County household of 11 "other free" in 1790 [NC:134]. On 13 September 1782 he and Benajah Bogey were charged in Craven County court with having joined the British. They were released when they consented to join the Continental Army [Minutes 1779-84, 47b]. He enlisted for 18 months in Evans' Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1122]. He was head of a Jones County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:270]. He was about 78 years old on 12 June 1818 when he applied for a pension in Craven County, stating that he enlisted sometime in 1779 and served until Colonel Archibald Lytle's Company was disbanded near Charleston [NARA, S.41960, M804, roll 1759].

Joseph Moore, "a free born Negroe Boy Aged Sixteen Years," was bound an apprentice house carpenter to Nathaniel Scarbrough by the 17 June 1774 Craven County court [Minutes 1772-84, 18d]. He mustered in Fenner's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment as a musician in January 1778 and died on 16 March 1778 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1116].

John Punch Moore was head of a Beaufort County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 (called John P. Moore) [NC:126] and 9 in 1800 (called John Moore) [NC:9]. He may have been the John Moore who gave Thomas Armstrong his power of attorney to collect his pay due for nine months service as a soldier in the Continental Line in Beaufort County on 5 June 1792 [NCGSJ XIII:236].

Isaac Morgan was 16 years old in 1782 when he was a "Mulatto" listed among the Drafts & Substitutes from Edgecombe County in the Revolutionary War [The North Carolinian VI:752]. He was a "Mulatto" head of an Edgecombe County household of 6 "other free" and a white woman in 1800 [NC:223].

Mark Murray was head of Halifax County household of 9 "other free" in 1790 [NC:64]. On 23 October 1832 he testified in Halifax County court to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution, stating that he was born and raised in Caroline County, Virginia, moved from there to Hanover County and from there to Halifax County, North Carolina, about 1792. He applied for a pension while living in Wilson County, Tennessee, stating that he enlisted in 1780 and that "his Great Grandmother came from Ireland and after serving out her passage had children by a Negro which accounts for his being mixed blooded" [NARA, R.7523, M804-1796, frames 1-57].

James Newsom was a "Black" member of the undated Colonial Muster of Captain James Fason's Northampton County militia [Mil. T.R. 1-3]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 11 "other free" in 1790 [NC:74] and 10 in 1800 [NC:463].

John Newsom was a "Black" member of Captain Fason's Northampton County militia [Mil. T.R. 1-3].

Moses Newsom was listed among the "Black" members of the undated Colonial Muster Roll of Captain Fason's Northampton County Militia [Mil. T.R. 1-3]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 14 "other free" in 1790 [NC:74], and 10 in 1800 [NC:463].

Booth Newsom, born before 1760, was listed in the Colonial Muster Roll of Captain James Fason's Northampton County Militia [Mil. T.R. 1-3]. He enlisted for nine months in Lieutenant Col's Company in the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 20 July 1778 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1126]. He was listed as a "pioneer" in the roll of Lieutenant William Davidson's Company in the Revolution on 23 April 1779 [NARA M246, Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783, https://www.fold3.com/image/10200387]. Between 1 September 1784 and 1 February 1785 he received the final pay for his own and Robert Newsom's service in the North Carolina Continental Line [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVII:235]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:74] and 8 in 1800 [NC:463].

Robert Newsom enlisted in Quinn's Company in the North Carolina Line on 31 May 1779 for three years. Booth Newsom (his brother?) received his final pay [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVII:235; DAR, Roster of Soldiers from North Carolina in the American Revolution, 150, 546].

Ethelred Newsom enlisted in Quinn's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 24 June 1779 [Clark, State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1126], called "Netheneldred Newsom of Robeson County" on 18 April 1792 when he appointed Jacob Rhodes his attorney to receive his final settlement for serving in the war [NCGSJ XIV:111]. He was head of a Robeson County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:50], 3 in 1800 [NC:408], and 4 in 1810 [NC:241].

Carter Nickens was paid for services to the Revolution [Haun, Revolutionary Army Accounts, vol. I, Book 4:232].

Edward Nickens enlisted in the 10th North Carolina Regiment for 3 years and was mustered in January 1779 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1127]. He received pay for service in the 6th and 10th Regiments of $239 from 5 August 1777 to 1 August 1780 [NARA, U.S. Revolutionary War Miscellaneous Records (Manuscript File), 1775-1790s, Records Pertaining to Troops of particular States, 14403, frames 30-32 of 397; http://www.ancestry.com].

Malachi Nickens was living in Hertford County on 19 May 1781 when he enlisted Carter's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment for a year and was discharged on 19 May 1782 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1127]. He was about fifty-six years old on 13 November 1821 when he testified in Hertford County court for his pension. James Smith testified on his behalf [NARA, S.41925, M805, frame 0198]. Malachi was head of a Hertford County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:26], 3 in 1800, and 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:190].

Richard Nickens was number 37 in the Muster Roll of Major William Shergold's Regiment of Currituck County, North Carolina Militia in the 1750's, in the same list as Simon Shewcraft, a witness to Edward1 Nicken's 1735 Lancaster County will [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 657-8].

Edward Nickens was a soldier from North Carolina in the Revolutionary War who was deceased by 5 December 1792 when a petition by his son and heir Richard Nickens was placed before the North Carolina General Assembly [LP 117 by NCGSJ IV:174]. A warrant for 640 acres was issued to the heirs of Edward Nicken on 14 December 1797 for his services as a private in the Revolution [North Carolina and Tennessee, Revolutionary War Land Warrants, 1783-1843, Survey Orders (Nos. 1-3992), 4317 (http://www.ancestry.com)].

Jacob Norton enlisted in Hogg's Company of the 1st North Carolina Regiment as a musician in 1777 and died 28 July 1778 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1123]. He was a "man of colour" who died in Revolutionary War service and left no heirs according to a deposition by Charles Wood in Orange County, North Carolina, in 1820 [The North Carolinian, p. 2578]. Jacob, born say 1760, enlisted in Hogg's Company of the 1st North Carolina Regiment as a musician in 1777 and died 28 July 1778 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1123]. His warrant for 640 acres for his service was given to the president and trustees of the University of North Carolina on 21 August 1820 [North Carolina and Tennessee, Revolutionary War Land Warrants, 1783-1843, Survey Orders (Nos. 1-3992), no. 460 (http://www.ancestry.com)].

William Norton enlisted as a musician in Bowman's Company of the 1st North Carolina Regiment in 1777 and died before September 1778 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1123]. On 1 July 1801 his widow Winnie Norton received 640 acres for his service [N.C. Archives, S.S. file 1876, warrant 3062, call no. S.108358; http://www.mars.archives.ncdcr.gov; North Carolina and Tennessee, Revolutionary War Land Warrants, 1783-1843, Survey Orders (Nos. 1-3992), no. 41 (http://www.ancestry.com)].

Theophilus/ Foy Norwood was a six-year-old "Molato" boy of Nan Norwood, a "Molato" woman, ordered bound out by the Carteret County court on 6 September 1759 [Minutes 1747-64, 251; 1764-77, 388]. He was twenty-seven years old in 1778 when he was listed in the Carteret County Militia Returns. He enlisted from Carteret County for three years [The North Carolinian VI:728; NCDAR, Roster of Soldiers from North Carolina, 217].

Obed Norwood was a "Molato" boy of Nan Norwood, ordered bound out in Carteret County on 6 September 1759 [Minutes 1747-64, 259]. He was called Obid Norward in the 1778 Carteret County Militia Returns [The North Carolinian VI:728].

Titus Overton was taxable with his wife in Bladen County in 1763, was taxable on 2 "Mulatto" tithes in Cumberland County in 1767, was taxable with his wife ("Mulatoes") in Bladen County from 1770 to 1776 [SS 837; N.C. Genealogy XXI:3136; Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:32, 89, 123; II:90, 146]. He received 2 pounds, 2 shillings for twenty-one days service in the Bladen County Militia between 1775 and 1776 under Captain James Council [Haun, Revolutionary Army Accounts, Journal "A", 22]. He was head of a Cumberland County household of 11 "other free" in 1790 [NC:31], 7 in 1800, and 1 in 1810 [NC:600].

Caleb Overton enlisted in Moore's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 30 June 1777 and was discharged on 6 June 1778 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XV:724; XVI:1130]. He was deceased by 10 July 1820 when his heirs received a 274 acre land warrant for his service as a private in Captain Moore's Company of the 10th North Carolina Line in the Revolution. They were Samuel, Lemuel, Rachel and Elizabeth Overton who assigned their rights to the land to James Freeman in Pasquotank County [North Carolina and Tennessee, Revolutionary War Land Warrants, 1783-1843, Roll 13: William Hill Warrants, 1811-1837, no. 408 (http://www.ancestry.com)].

Daniel Overton enlisted for three years as a private in Raiford's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 20 June 1779 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1131]. His heirs Samuel, Lemuel, Rachel and Elizabeth Overton of Pasquotank County received 274 acres for his service in the Revolution [North Carolina and Tennessee, Revolutionary War Land Warrants, 1783-1843, Roll 13: William Hill Warrants, 1811-1837, no. 405 (http://www.ancestry.com)].

John Overton enlisted as a private in Mills' Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 7 January 1782 and died on 9 September the same year [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1131]. His heirs Samuel, Lemuel, Rachel and Elizabeth Overton of Pasquotank County received 640 acres for his service in the Revolution [North Carolina and Tennessee, Revolutionary War Land Warrants, 1783-1843, Roll 13: William Hill Warrants, 1811-1837, no. 409 (http://www.ancestry.com)].

Samuel Overton was a "Molatto" Perquimans County taxable in 1771 [CR 77.701.1], head of a Pasquotank County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:31], 4 in 1800 [NC:634], and 13 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:277]. He was called a "free man of Colour" on 8 March 1825 when he made a declaration in Pasquotank County court to obtain a Revolutionary War pension [NARA, S.41928, M804-1854, frame 0826].

Jonathan Overton, born about 1754 in Perquimans County, enlisted in Jones' Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 17 November 1781 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina XVI:1131]. He was the apprentice of John Bateman of Chowan County when he entered the service as a substitute for him under Colonel Lytle. He was at sea for a while and then returned to Edenton. He was about 79 years old on 19 December 1832 when he made a declaration in Chowan County court to obtain a pension for three years service [NARA, S.8915, M804-1854, frame 0788]. He was head of a Chowan County household of 5 "other free" in Edenton in 1790, 9 "other free" in 1810 [NC:535] and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:129]. He was described in a 1849 newspaper account as: a colored man, a soldier in the Revolution...at the advanced age of 101 years [Crow, Black Experience in Revolutionary North Carolina, 101].

Lemuel1 Overton, born say 1762, was head of Perquimans County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:31], 4 in Pasquotank County in 1800, entry blank in Pasquotank County in 1810, and 13 "free colored" in 1820. He was the husband of a slave named Rose and children John and Burdock who were emancipated by order of the North Carolina General Assembly [Byrd, In Full Force and Virtue, 298]. He enlisted in Moore's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 30 June 1777 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1130]. He was living in Pasquotank County on 10 July 1820 when he appointed James Freeman his attorney to obtain a land warrant of 274 acres for his services as a soldier in the 10th Regiment of the North Carolina Line [NCGSJ VII:93; North Carolina and Tennessee, Revolutionary War Land Warrants, 1783-1843, Roll 13: William Hill Warrants, 1811-1837, no. 413 (http://www.ancestry.com)].

Elisha Parker, a "man of color," made a declaration in Gates County, North Carolina, to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he was born in Nansemond County, Virginia, near the North Carolina line about 1752. He enlisted in Gates County about 1779 for nine months under Captain Arthur Gatling, then enlisted as a substitute for Francis Speight and had been a resident of Nansemond County for the previous forty-five years [NARA, S.11211, M804-1871, frame 0787]. He was head of a Gates County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:23] and 3 "free colored" in Nansemond County in 1820 [VA:79].

Joshua Pavey was listed in the 27 November 1752 muster of the Wilmington Company commanded by Captain George Merrick [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 683]. He was called "Pavey" in the 1755 New Hanover List of Taxables in which he was taxable on 4 "Negro Males" [N.C. Archives File T.O. 105]. He was called a "Mulatto" and Daniel Webb was called a "free Negro" when their deed was proved in New Hanover County on 2 September 1766 [Minutes 1738-69, 274].

Thomas Peavey enlisted in Dixon's Company in the 1st North Carolina Regiment in 1777 for the war, was omitted in January 1778, enlisted in Montfort's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 24 June 1779 for the war [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1132, 1138; NARA, M246, https://www.fold3.com/image/10201106], head of a New Hanover County household of 1 "Molatto" 21-60 years old with 3 "Molatto" females for the state census in 1787, probably the T. Peavy who was head of a Brunswick County, North Carolina household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:234].

Abraham Pavey served in the Revolution in North Carolina according to the pension application of his children in Alabama [NARA, W.10880, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/25980528].

Nehemiah Peavy was head of a Brunswick County, North Carolina household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:236], 15 "free colored" in 1830 and 7 "free colored" in 1840. He enlisted as a musician in Mill's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 6 February 1782 and completed his service in September 1782 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1140]. On 12 October 1795 he received a military land warrant for 640 acres for 84 months service as a fifer [N.C. Archives, S.S. 2240, call no. S.108.360].

Samuel Pevy enlisted as a musician for 18 months in Lytle's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 10 September 1782 and was destaged on 16 March 1783 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1140].

Richard Pendergrass was called "Negro Richd Pendegrass" on 17 March 1781 when he was listed as one of General Cornwallis' prisoners at his Guilford Courthouse headquarters [NCGSJ V:81]. He was taxable in St. Lawrence District of Caswell County in 1790 [NC:83].

Isaac Perkins was head of a Craven County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:131] and 2 "free colored" in Craven County in 1820 [NC:67]. He made a declaration in Craven County court to obtain a Revolutionary War pension on 13 May 1829. He testified that he enlisted for three years in May 1778 and was granted pension certificate no. 4666 on 30 November 1818. His lawyer, Samuel Gerock, called him a "Negroe Man, and Old Soldier of the Revolutionary Army" when he appealed for the restoration of his pension [NARA, S.41.953, M804, roll 1911, frame 174 of 1034].

Jacob2 Perkins served in the Revolution under General Marion according to testimony of his son Jacob3 Perkins who testified that Jacob also served several tours against the Indians after coming to Carter County (then Washington County, North Carolina) [NARA, R.8105].

Lawrence Pettiford was in the 8 October 1754 Granville County muster of Colonel Eaton [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 728]. He was head of a Wake County household of 8 "other free" in 1790 [NC:104].

George Pettiford was about 63 years old on 10 February 1821 when he made a declaration in Granville County court in order to obtain a Revolutionary War pension, stating that he had enlisted in the company of Captain Goodwin in the 4th North Carolina Regiment. Jesse Bass and Poledore Johnson testified that they were well acquainted with George and that he was in reduced circumstances. Richard Glasgow of Granville County and Abram Gregory of Person County testified on 12 June 1827 that they served with George Pettiford, a "free man of Color" [NARA, W.9223, M805-648].

Elias Pettiford was listed in the payroll of Captain Dudley's 2nd Virginia State Regiment commanded by Colonel Gregory Smith from August to December 1778 [NARA, M246, https://www.fold3.com/image/10081826, 10081833, 10081847, 10081873]. He enlisted in Donoho's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 14 June 1781 and left the service in 1782 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1138]. On 4 October 1832 William Whicker appeared in Fayette County, Ohio court and testified that "he got one Elias Pettiford, a Colored, to take his place in the Revolution [NARA, S.17194, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/28017843].

George Pettiford was a "Black" taxable in the 1754 Granville County tax list of Robert Harris, and he was listed in the Muster Roll of Colonel William Eaton's Granville County Militia [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 723]. He and his wife Lucy were "Black" taxables in the 1755 summary list for Granville and the 1757 list of Richard Harris.

Philip Pettiford was head of an Oxford District, Granville County household of 5 male and 3 female "Blacks" and one white male in 1786 for the state census and head of a Cumberland County household of 9 "other free" [NC:40]. He enlisted and served in Colonel Shephard's 10th North Carolina Regiment from 14 June 1781 to 14 June 1782 [NARA, S.41952, roll 1920, frame 152 of 1326; https://www.fold3.com].

William Pettiford was listed in Captain William Gill's Company as a seventeen-year-old "black man" [The North Carolinian VI:726 citing N.C. Archives Mil. TR 4-40]. He was head of an Orange County household of 14 "other free" in 1810 [NC:863] and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:312]. He was about fifty-eight years old on 19 February 1819 when he made a deposition before one of the justices of Orange County to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution. He served as a musician in Colonel Shepard's 10th North Carolina Regiment from 14 June 1781 to 14 June 1782 [NARA, S.41948, M804, frame 169 of 1326; https://www.fold3.com].

Drury Pettiford was head of a Stokes County household of 11 "other free" in 1810 [NC:607]. He was listed in the payroll of Captain Dudley's 2nd Virginia State Regiment commanded by Colonel Gregory Smith from July to December 1778 (with Elias Pettiford) [NARA, M246, https://www.fold3.com/image/10081826, 10081833, 10081847, 10081873] and served for 3 years [NARA, S.41954, M804, roll 1920, frame 59 of 1326].

Edward Pettiford, son of Lewis Pettiford, was ordered bound apprentice in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on 9 March 1778 [Orders 1773-9, 395], perhaps the Edward Pediford who enlisted in the 5th Virginia Regiment in 1778 and served for the length of the war according to the affidavit of Captain Mayo Carrington [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Pediford, Edward, Digital Collections, LVA].

Thomas Pierce was a "free colored" head of a Tyrrell County household of 4 free males and 4 free females in 1790 [NC:34]. On 13 June 1795 he was called "Thomas Pierce of Tyrrell County, administrator of William Pierce," when he gave power of attorney to Samuel Warren, an attorney, to receive the final settlement due to (his son?) William Pierce for his service in the North Carolina Continental Line [NCGSJ XIV:230].

Israel Pierce was a "free colored" head of a Tyrrell County household of 3 free males and 3 free females in 1790 [NC:34], 7 "other free" in Hyde County in 1800 [NC:374], 11 in Hyde County in 1810 [NC:119] and 8 "free colored" in Beaufort County in 1820 [NC:32]. He was in Tyrrell County on 21 June 1791 when he gave power of attorney to Samuel Warren, an attorney, to receive his final settlement due him as a soldier in the North Carolina Continental Line [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVII:241; NCGSJ XIV:230]. He appeared in Beaufort County court and applied for a pension for his service in the Revolution, stating that he was born in Tyrell County and enlisted there for 12 months in the naval service on board the ship Caswell and then enlisted in the army under the command of Colonel Mebane [NARA, S.3660, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/25879880].

Stephen Powell was granted administration on the Johnston County estate of Archibald Artis on a bond of 200 pounds [Haun, Johnston County Court Minutes, III:232] and was taxable on 150 acres and one poll in Johnston County in 1784 [GA 64.1]. He was about fifty-two years old on 29 February 1792 when he made a deposition in Johnston County court that his son Stephen, aged about eighteen or nineteen years old, enlisted for eighteen months and died in the service in 1783 [NCGSJ XIV:234]. He was granted administration on his son's Johnston County estate in November 1792 [Haun, Johnston County Court Minutes, IV:234]. He was head of a Johnston County household of 11 "other free" in 1790 [NC:142], 11 in 1800, and 4 in Chatham County in 1810 [NC:197].

Hardimon Poythress/ Portiss enlisted in Lieutenant Colonel William L. Davidson's Company on 20 July 1778 and was listed as "Left at the Hospital" in the 23 April 1779 muster. H. Montfort received his final pay [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1137, XVII:238; NARA, M246, roll 79, frame 142 of 323]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:72].

John Poythress/ Portress enlisted in Eaton's Company of the 3rd North Carolina Regiment in 1777 and died on 1 May 1778 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1133]. Administration on his estate was granted to Hardimon Poythress in Northampton County court on 4 June 1792 on a bond of 50 pounds [Minutes 1792-6, 18, 36].

Joseph Proctor was taxable in Luke Going's Loudoun County household in 1774 [Tithables 1758-99, 768] and a "F.N." taxable on a horse in Loudoun County in 1800 and 1803 [PPTL 1798-1812]. He was head of a Abrams Plains, Granville County, North Carolina household of 2 "free colored" men in 1820 [NC:24]. He was drafted from St. Mary's County, Maryland, where he was born and resident. Two of his older brothers died in the service quite young, under the age of twenty. He was placed in Pendergass's Company but spent most of his time in the hospital on account of the ague and fever. He was sent to Frederickstown sometime in the Winter and guarded the Hessian troops and the magazines. His claim was rejected because there was a record of a Joseph and James Proctor listed next to each other on a list of arrears paid, but there was no way to tell which of the two had been paid [NARA, R.8497, M804, roll 1980, frame 430 of 1041 and https://www.fold3.com/image/25933404].

Arthur Pugh, a Mulatto bastard of Sarah Pugh, was bound as an apprentice cooper in Bertie County on 30 March 1767 [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, III:765]. He enlisted in Captain Tatum's 1st North Carolina Regiment from 20 February 1778 for 3 years [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1132] and was listed in Captain Howell Tatum's Company of the 1st North Carolina Regiment on 8 September 1778 [NARA, M246, roll 79, frame 68 of 323].

Dempsey Reed was listed in the Revolutionary War accounts, hired as a substitute by Nathaniel Harris in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina [Crow, Black Experience in Revolutionary North Carolina, 101; DAR, Roster of Soldiers from North Carolina in the American Revolution, 180, 689]. He was head of a Warren County household of 8 "other free" in 1790 [NC:78], 13 in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, in 1800 [NC:534], and 12 "free colored" in Cabarrus County in 1820 [NC:160].

Jacob Reed was 8 years old in April 1763 when the Chowan County court bound him to James Bond until the age of twenty-one. He served in the Revolutionary War and died before 23 May 1792 when the Gates County court appointed (his mother) Rachel Reid, administratrix of his estate. On 4 August 1792 in Gates County she gave her son Benjamin power of attorney to settle the balance of his army wages from 20 November 1778 to June 1779 [NCGSJ XV:103].

Benjamin Reed enlisted with Colonel Murfree for the term of the war. He made a declaration in Gates County court to obtain a pension on 19 November 1821, saying he had a stiff arm from a wound [NARA, S.41976, M805, reel 680, frame 89]. He was head of a Gates County household of 3 "other free" in 1790, 3 in 1810 [NC:842], and 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:154].

Jacob Reid was the son of Isaac Reed, a "Negro man" taxable with his wife Margaret from 1756 to 1769 in the part of Chowan County which became Gates County in 1779 [N.C. Archives file CR 24.701.2]. Isaac was head of a Gates County of 4 "other free," a white man and a white woman in 1790 and 2 "other free" and 3 white women in 1800. The Gates County court appointed him administrator of the estate of Jacob Reid on 22 May 1792 [Fouts, Minutes of County Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions 1787-93, 110]. As administrator of the estate he appointed Samuel Smith attorney to settle the Continental Army Accounts of (his son?) Jacob Reid, Jr., from 10 December 1778 to 10 April 1779. On 5 June 1792 Captain Arthur Gatling testified in Northampton County, North Carolina court that Jacob was a soldier in a company of new levies on the Continental Establishment which he marched from Hertford to South Carolina from November 1778 to March 1779, and Jacob died in the service in South Carolina [NCGSJ XV:102].

Nathaniel Revell enlisted in Quinn's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 24 June 1779 for 18 months and deserted in September 1779 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1149], listed as a substitute from Bladen County in Lieutenant Wilkinson's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment of Colonel Abraham Sheppard on 19 February 1782 as a deserter [NARA, M246, roll 79, frame 165 of 323; http://www.ancestry.com]. He was head of a Sampson County household of 13 "other free" in 1790 and 10 "other free'" in 1800.

Benjamin Richardson "went out of Halifax and Warren Counties" and served as a militia soldier in the year 1780 and part of 1781 [NARA, W.4061, M804-2038, frame 0533]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [NC:338].

James Roberts was in the roll of Major Hardy Murfree's Company in the 2nd North Carolina Battalion commanded by Colonel John Patton at White Plains on 9 September 1778. William Faircloth received his final pay of 25 pounds [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XIII:521; XVII:244].

Ishmael Roberts served in Shepherd's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment, enlisted on 3 June 1777 and omitted as a casualty in June 1778 [NARA, M881, https://www.fold3.com/image/21163844]. He received pay for Revolutionary War service from 3 June 1777 to 3 June 1778 as a private in Colonel Abraham Shepherd's Company. Colonel Shepherd gave him a certificate which stated that he was furloughed at Head Quarters Valley Forge to come home with me who was Inlisted in my Regement for the Term of three years - and Returned Home with me [NCGSJ XV:105]. He was head of a Robeson County household of 10 "other free" in 1790 [NC:50], 15 in 1800 [NC:415], and 14 in Chatham County in 1810 [NC:195].

Kinchen Roberts enlisted in Brinkley's Company of the 3rd North Carolina Regiment in 1777 for 2-1/2 years and died on 10 March 1778. H. Montfort received his final pay of 31 pounds [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1143; XVII:242]. On 29 September 1784 his heir Ishmael Roberts received 640 acres of military bounty land for his 84 months service in the Revolution [N.C. Archives, S.S. file no. 01, call no. S.108.378; http://mars.archives.ncdcr.gov; also abstracted in Haun, North Carolina Revolutionary Army accounts, pt. 15].

John Roberts served in the Revolution. John, H. Murfree received his final pay of 145 pounds [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVII:244]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 8 "other free" in 1790 [NC:73].

Richard Roberts was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:743] and 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:256], perhaps the Richard Roberts who enlisted in Hall's Company of the 2nd North Carolina Regiment in the Revolution for three years on 10 July 1777. He was a wagoner in the roll of Major Hardy Murfree's Company in the 2nd North Carolina Battalion commanded by Colonel John Patton at White Plains on 9 September 1778 and was a prisoner on 1 June 1779 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XIII:522; XVI:1142].

Jonathan Roberts received 18 shillings, 8 pence pay for 7 days service in the Northampton County, North Carolina Militia under Colonel Allen Jones in 1775-1776 [Haun, Revolutionary Army Accounts, Journal "A", 20]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:73], 10 in 1800 [NC:473], and 8 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [NC:743].

Charles Randolph Rowe was one of the Continental soldiers who volunteered in Bute County in 1779 (abstracted as Charles Kons[?] in NCGSJ): 5'8" tall, dark hair and dark eyes [NCGSJ XV:109 & The North Carolinian VI:727]. He was called "Charles Roe a poor boy" on 24 November 1763 when the Amelia County court ordered the churchwardens of Nottoway Parish to bind him out [Orders 1763, 237]. He enlisted in Ballard's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment in 1779 and was discharged on 9 December 1779. William Sanders received his final pay of 41 pounds for his service in the North Carolina Continental Line between 1 September 1784 and 1 February 1785 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1148; XVII:242]. He was head of a Wake County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [NC:793], 5 in Chatham County in 1810 (called Randolf Roe) [NC:201], and 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:209]. He was a "man of Colour" who appeared in Chatham County court to apply for a pension, stating that he entered the service in Bute County [NARA, S.7416, M804-2072; https://www.fold3.com/image/1/14130819].

John Santee was head of a Northampton County, Pennsylvania household of 4 "other free" in 1790 and 3 "other free" and a white woman aged 26-45 in 1800, counted as white in 1820 and 1830. He was living in Lower Nazareth Township on 25 August 1835 when he appeared in Northampton County, Pennsylvania court and applied for a pension for his service in the Revolution. He stated that he was drafted into the militia in Lower Nazareth a number of times to protect the inhabitants of his neighborhood [NARA, W.3462, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/14665154]. His white son John gave his father's birthplace as North Carolina and his mother's as Ireland in the 1880 census for Liberty, Licking County, Ohio [Census p.112, entry 4281].

Caesar Santee enlisted in the 3rd North Carolina Regiment in Eaton's Company on 22 February 1777, was at White Plains on 9 September 1778 [NARA, M246, https://www.fold3.com/image/10199799], reenlisted in Paramus on 12 March 1779, was in prison on 1 June 1779, and mustered for the war in 1781 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XIII:528; XVI:1154]. He was issued a warrant for 640 acres for his service on 19 May 1784 and assigned his rights to the warrant to William Hill in November 1818 [North Carolina and Tennessee, Revolutionary War Land Warrants, 1783-1843, Roll 2: Revolutionary Warrants, 1783-1799 (Nos. 399-1034), 904].

Sterling Scott was a waiter listed in the roll of Lieutenant William Davidson's North Carolina Company in the Revolution on 23 April 1779 [NARA M246, Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783, https://www.fold3.com/image/10200387], head of a Northampton County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:72].

Emanuel Scott enlisted for 12 months in Raiford's Company in the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 25 April 1781 and left the service on 25 April 1782 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1162]. He made a deposition in Halifax County court on 22 August 1789 that he was a twelve months soldier in the Continental Line [NCGSJ XV:232]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 7 "other free" in 1790, 2 in 1800 [NC:342], and 6 in Cumberland County in 1810 [NC:599].

Isham Scott was head of a Halifax County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [NC:342] and 8 in 1810 [NC:49]. He was a servant to Major Hogg and was at the skirmish at Halifax [NARA, S.42004, M804-2136, frame 0433].

Israel Scott was a "Mixt Blood/ Free Negro" taxable in Bladen County in 1776 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, II:94]. He enlisted in the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 20 July 1778 for nine months [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1160]. He was head of an Edgecombe County household of 7 "other free" in 1790 [NC:55], 6 in 1800 (called "Free Negro"), 5 in 1810 [NC:776], and 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:94].

David Scott was head of a Sumter District household of 15 "other free" in 1810 and 8 "free colored" and 2 female slaves in 1820. He appeared in Sumter District court on 12 June 1818 to apply for a pension, stating that he enlisted in Murfreesboro (Hertford County), North Carolina, on 25 September 1775 in Captain Hardy Murfree's Company of the 2nd North Carolina Regiment, served for a year, and then enlisted in the 5th South Carolina Regiment and served for three years [NARA, S.9473, M804, roll 2135, frame 897 of 1004]. The inhabitants of Sumter District petitioned to release his descendants from paying the tax on free Blacks [S.C. Archives series S.108092, reel 131, frame 330].

James Scott was head of a Sumter County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 and 5 "free colored" in 1820. He was residing in Claremont County when he appeared in Sumter District court on 12 June 1818 to apply for a pension for services in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted in Northampton County, North Carolina, in 1776 and served in Captain William Barrett's 3rd Regiment commanded by Colonel Sumner for 2-1/2 years and was discharged at Halifax by Colonel Lockyer. After his discharge he moved to South Carolina, and served in the militia [NARA, S.39064, M804, roll 2136, frame 626 of 850].

Exum Scott was head of a Halifax county household of 9 "other free" in 1790 [NC:63], and in 1800 he was called "Axiom" in Cumberland County, head of a household of 9 "other free" in 1810. He served 18 months in the Revolution under Colonel Nicholas Long and was paid 9 pounds on 30 August 1783 and 23 pounds in 1783 or 1784 [NARA, W.5994, M804, roll 2136, frame 172 of 850; https://www.fold3.com/image/1/14643308].

Nathaniel Scott enlisted in Ballard's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 20 July 1778 for nine months [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1161]. Henry Hawkins enlisted the same day and made a deposition on 23 November 1812 that he was in the service with Nathan and that Nathan died in the hospital in Philadelphia [N.C. Archives L.P. 262, by NCGSJ VI:15].

Simon Shoecraft was in North Carolina in the 1750s when he and Richard Nickens were listed in the Muster Roll of Captain Thomas Davis' Company in the Currituck County Militia [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 657-8]. Members of the Shoecraft family were counted as "other free" persons near the Nickens and Weaver families in Hertford County from 1790 to 1810.

Abraham Shoecraft was head of a Hertford County household of 6 "other free" in 1800. His heirs received 640 acres of bounty land for his service in the Revolution [N.C. Archives, S.S. file no. 172, call no. S.108.388, http://mars.archives.ncdcr.gov].

James Shoemaker and his wife Mary were "Black" taxables in Fishing Creek District, Granville County, North Carolina, in 1762 [CR 044.701.19]. He was a "Black" member of the undated colonial muster roll of Captain James Fason's Northampton County militia [Mil. T.R. 1-3] and was head of a Georgetown District, Prince George's Parish, South Carolina household of 7 "other free" in 1790.

Lewis Sims was a "black man" listed in the militia returns for Granville County, North Carolina, in 1778 [N.C. Archives Troop Returns 4-40; The North Carolinian, 1960, p.727].

James Smith was head of a Hertford County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:25], 4 in Captain Moore's District in 1800, and 11 "free colored" in 1820. He may have been the James Smith who enlisted in the 10th North Carolina Regiment for three years on 17 June 1777 and reenlisted for twelve more months on 1 January 1782 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1159, 1165]. He testified for Malachi Nickens and John Weaver in Hertford County court saying he was a soldier with them.

Asa Spelman was 11 years old when he was bound an apprentice in the April 1762 Craven County court. He was head of a Craven County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:134] and 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:72]. He was called Asa Spelmore alias Spelman on 13 September 1820 when he made a declaration in Craven County court to obtain a pension for service with Captain Quinn in the tenth North Carolina Regiment. He stated that during his 9 months service he was engaged in a skirmish at West Point and at Kings Ferry in Jersey. Isaac Perkins testified that he had seen Asa while they were both on duty in White Plains, New York. John Carter testified that Asa and he were in the same regiment [NARA, S.42022, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/13712646; Craven County Minutes, September 1820, 136-8; 1821, 185; and May 1822, 16 by NCGSJ XVII:33].

Jacob Spelman, the 4-year-old son of Sarah Spelman, was bound out by the October 1760 Craven County court [Minutes 1758-61, 85a]. He enlisted in Carter's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 5 May and left the service on 5 May 1782. His final pay for service in the North Carolina Continental Line was received by F. Dixon [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1163; XVII:247]. A 5 May 1800 Fayetteville newspaper warned that a runaway slave might have changed his name to Jacob Spelman in order to pass as free [Fouts, Newspapers of Edenton, Fayetteville, & Hillsborough, 10].

Simon Spelman was a "free Negro" bound apprentice to Christopher Dawson in Craven County, North Carolina, on 13 March 1770 [Minutes 1766-75, 137]. He enlisted for the war in Bradley's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 28 June 1779 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1161].

Aaron Spelman was head of Craven County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:134]. He was called Aaron Spelmore when he enlisted in Sharp's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 5 May 1781 and served until 5 May 1782 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1163]. On 18 January 1791 when he assigned his right to his final settlement for services in the "Twelve Months Draftees" in the Revolution [T&C, Box 22, by NCGSJ XVI:234]. He was called Aaron Spelmore on 12 September 1820 when he made a declaration in Craven County court to obtain a pension for his service under Captain Sharpe in the Tenth North Carolina Regiment [NARA, S.42023, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/13712617; Court Minutes 1820 and 1821, 125-6, 262-3, by NCGSJ XV:33].

Dempsey Stewart enlisted in Evans' Company in the 10th North Carolina Regiment for eighteen months while residing in Northampton County, North Carolina and was transferred in December 1782 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1166]. He registered in Petersburg on 9 November 1805: a brown Free Negro man, five feet ten inches high, thin made, about forty one years old, Born free p. register from the Clk of Brunswick County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 368]. He was head of a Free Town, Brunswick County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:770], 2 "free colored" over forty-five years old in 1820 [VA:670], and 5 in 1830 [VA:249]. He made a declaration in Brunswick County court, stating that he had entered the service in 1782 [NARA, W.3734, M804-2290, frame 0162].

William Stewart was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [NC:479]. He was "a Colored man...free born" about 1759 in Brunswick County, Virginia, according to his Revolutionary War pension file. He enlisted in 1777 under Major Hardy Murphy (Murfree) in Northampton County, North Carolina, and marched to West Point and Valley Forge. After the war he returned to Northampton County and then moved with his family to Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, where he had been living from 1814 until 19 May 1835 when he made his pension application [NARA, R.10173, M805-773, frame 400].

Hezekiah Stringer enlisted for 12 months in Sharp's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 5 May 1781, left the service on 5 April 1782 and enlisted again in Coleman's Company for 18 months in 1782 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1163]. He was in Craven County on 20 March 1787 when he registered his furlough papers before the Justice of the Peace. His papers, dated 26 May 1783, granted him a leave of absence from the 1st North Carolina Regiment until his final discharge [NCGSJ XVI:238]. He was called Kiah Stringer in 1800, head of a New Hanover County household of 5 "other free" [NC:316].

Mingo Stringer served in Sharp's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment between 5 May 1781 and 5 April 1782 [Clark, State Records, XVI:1166]. He was head of a Craven County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:131].

David Sweat enlisted in Shepard's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 12 July 1777 for three years [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1159; NARA, M246, https://www.fold3.com/image/10201146]. He was about 60 years old on 27 September 1820 when he appeared in Robeson County court and applied for a pension for his service in the Revolution. He testified that he enlisted for three years on 12 July 1777 in the company commanded by Captain Abraham Shepherd in the 10th Regiment and served his time [NARA, S.42031, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/18487125, accessed 20 October 2015].

Barnet Sweat was listed in the 8 October 1759 to 10 January 1760 muster roll of Captain James McGirrt's Company in the South Carolina Regiment in the Cherokee Expedition [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 883]. He was listed among the "Black" members of the undated colonial muster roll of Captain James Fason's Company of Northampton County, North Carolina [N.C. Archives Troop Returns, 1-3].

Anthony Sweat was in the roll of Captain Bynum's Company of North Carolina Militia taken on 7 April 1781 [NARA, M246, https://www.fold3.com/image/10202465].

Abraham Sweat served in Raiford's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment between 25 April 1781 and 25 April 1782 [Clark, State Records, XVI:1162]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:62], 6 in 1800 [NC:344], and 4 in 1810 [NC:50].

William Sweat enlisted in Eaton's Company of the 3rd North Carolina Regiment on 20 April 1776 and was discharged on 20 October 1778. He was in the roll of Major Hardy Murfree's Company in the 2nd North Carolina Battalion commanded by Colonel John Patton at White Plains on 9 September 1778 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XIII:522; XVI:1154; NARA, M246, https://www.fold3.com/10199976]. He was head of a household of 1 free male and 3 females in District 8 of Halifax County for the 1786 state census. He received a 640 acre grant for his services in the Revolution [mentioned in Franklin County DB 6:89].

George Sweat received 27 pounds as his final pay for serving in the North Carolina Continental Line in the Revolution [Clark, State Records, XVII:250]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:62].

Allen Sweat was head of a household of a free male and 2 free females in the state census in District 10 of Halifax County, North Carolina, in 1786. He married Nancy Evans, 7 January 1792 Wake County bond, Reuben Evans bondsman. He was taxable in Henry King's list for Wake County on 100 acres in 1794 and taxable on 1 poll in 1799 and 1802 [MFCR 099.701.1, frames 151, 228, 254]. He made a declaration in Wake County court to obtain a pension, stating that he enlisted in Halifax County about 1782. Exum Scott testified that he had known him since his infancy when he lived on Exum's plantation in Roanoke. Francis Jones testified that "he was well acquainted with Allen Swett, knows he served in the 15th Regiment...left the said Swett in the said service, who this deponent left the army in the capacity of Servant to an Officer." Allen later moved to McNairy County, Tennessee, where his wife received a survivor's pension [NARA, W.16, M804-2332]. He was counted as white in the 1840 Mcnairy County, Tennessee census.

Joel Taborn was living in Nash County, North Carolina, in 1776 when he enlisted in the company of Captain Tarrent under Colonel Lytle. "Being a very young person of color" he was first employed as a servant to the officers before being placed in the ranks a short time after his arrival in Charleston. He was a resident of Wake County when he made his declaration in Granville County court in order to obtain a pension [NARA, S.42037, M804-2335, frame 0772]. He was taxable in Meherrin Parish, Greensville County, Virginia, in 1788 [PPTL 1782-1807; 1809-50, frame 68] and taxable in St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County, from 1790 to 1805: a "M"(ullato) taxable in 1805 [PPTL 1782-92, frames 756, 826, 870, 885; 1792-1806, frames 51, 74, 155, 181, 280, 330, 392].

Burrell Taborn was a resident of Nash County in 1781 when he enlisted in Captain Lytle's Company for twelve months. He was head of a Nash County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [NC:122], 10 in 1810 [NC:668], and 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:445]. His children were mentioned in the survivor's pension application of his son Hardimon [NARA, S.7694, M804-2335, frame 744].

William Taborn was living in Granville County in 1778 when Colonel William Taylor and Captain James Saunders requisitioned his wagon and team of horses for use as a baggage wagon for the soldiers. He made an agreement with John Davis to look after his crop in exchange for Davis looking after his wagon. He was later drafted as a soldier and received a pension. He served in South Carolina under Colonel Lytle, who placed him under guard for getting drunk and cursing him. One of the witnesses for his pension application, testified that William served for a while as cook to General Butler. Another testified that he was a "Brother Soldier" with him in the expedition to the Savannah River. Jacob Anderson testified that he lived near him in Granville County when his wagon was requisitioned [NARA, W.18115, M804-2335, frame 0798]. He was listed in Captain Satterwhite's Company in the Granville County Militia Returns for 1778: 19 years old, 5 feet 8 inches high, Darkish coloured hair & complexion, planter [Mil. TR 4-40 by Granville County Genealogical Society, Granville Connections, vol.1, no.1, 15]. He was head of a Granville County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [NC:898].

Allen Taborn enlisted in Baker's Company in the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 20 July 1778 but deserted three days later. John Bonds received his final pay of 27 pounds for his service in the North Carolina Continental Line [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1173, XVII:252]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 7 "other free" in 1790 [NC:73] and 8 in 1810 [NC:748].

Benjamin Tann was listed among the "Black" members of the undated colonial muster roll of Captain James Fason [N.C. Archives Mil. T.R. 1-3]. He received 9 pounds payment on certificate number 1859 from the North Carolina Army Accounts on 10 June 1783 and a further 14 pounds, 18 shillings on undated certificate no. 238 [N.C. Archives T&C, Rev. War Accounts, Vol I:45 folio 2; XI:48, folio 2]. He was head of a Nash County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:71] and 8 in 1800 [NC:122].

Ephraim Tann was a private in Baker's Company who enlisted on 20 July 1778 for nine months. He was deceased before 8 March 1785 when his heirs received 640 acres for 84 months service in the North Carolina Continental Line [Clark, State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1173; T&C Rev. War Army Accts. Vol III:73, folio 3 & VII:108, folio 3; https://www.fold3.com/image/291770905].

James Tann was a soldier who died in the service in Philadelphia during the Revolutionary War. He enlisted on 20 July 1778 in Quinn's North Carolina Company but omitted in 1779 [Clark, State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1173; https://www.fold3.com/image/291770905]. Jesse Boothe, executor of Benjamin Tann's Nash County will, deposed on 20 June 1821 that James' rightful heir was Hannah Tann, daughter of his brother Jesse Tann [S.S. 460.1]. She received a land warrant for 640 acres for her uncle's service [S.S. 460.1, 460.2, 460.3, 460.12].

Joseph Tann died before 1792 when his heirs received 640 acres for his 84 months service in the Revolution [N.C. Archives, S.S. file 117, call no. S.108.388, http://mars.archives.ncdcr.gov].

Drury Tann enlisted for 14 months as a private in Hadley's Company of the 2nd Regiment of the North Carolina Continental Line on 1 August 1782 according to the muster of 1 September 1782 [NARA, M256, https://www.fold3.com/image/10200698 accessed on 2 January 2008; Clark, State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1175]. He was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:74], 3 in Hertford County in 1800 [NC:722], and 2 "free colored" in Southampton County, Virginia, in 1820: a man and woman over 45 years of age. He made an application for a Revolutionary War pension in Southampton County court in which he stated that he was stolen from his parents as a small boy by persons who were going to sell him into slavery [NARA, S.19484, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/19565717].

Arthur Toney was born about 1764 in Dinwiddie County, Virginia. He lived there until he was ten years old when he moved to Halifax County, North Carolina. He took the place of his brother John Toney in the Revolutionary War in Warren County and marched to Bacon's Bridge in South Carolina where he reenlisted. He was not involved in any battles since he was assigned to the baggage wagon. When he returned in 1782, he moved to Caswell County and made his declaration to obtain a pension in Caswell County court fifty years later on 9 October 1832 [NARA, W.4835, M805-807, frame 582]. He was a "Mulatto" counted in the 1786 State Census for the Caswell District of Caswell County and head of a Caswell County household of 10 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:90].

John Toney was a "Free Mulatto" added to Wood Jones' list of tithables for Amelia County on 27 November 1766 [Orders 1766-9, 24]. He enlisted in the 10th Regiment of the North Carolina Continental Line. He fought at the battle of Guilford Curthouse and "ran home and was taken and made to serve to the end of the war" [NARA, W.9859, M805, reel 807, frame 623]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 7 "other free" in 1790 [NC:62], 16 in 1800 [NC:344], 11 in 1810 [NC:51], and 11 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:167].

Charles Turner made a declaration in Pasquotank County court on 4 March 1834 to obtain a pension for his service in the North Carolina Continental Line [NCGSJ XVII:160]. He was head of a Pasquotank County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:29] and 9 in 1810 [NC:933].

Bartlet Tyler complained to the Granville County court on 5 August 1778 that he was forced into Revolutionary War service on the pretence that he was a vagrant [Owen, Granville County Notes, vol. V]. He was head of a Warren County household of 5 "other free" a white woman 26-45 years, and a white boy under ten years of age in 1800 [NC:836] and 5 "other free" and a white woman over forty-five years old in 1810 [NC:738].

Asa Tyner, husband of Keziah Chavis, was brought into Granville County court as a vagrant and "delivered to a Continental Officer and to serve as the Law directs" on 10 November 1778 [Minutes 1773-83, 142]. He was listed among the volunteers for nine months service as a Continental soldier from Bute County on 3 September 1778: Asea Tyner, Place of Abode Bute County, born N.C., 5'8", 34 years of Age, Dark Fair, Dark Eyes [NCGSJ XV:109 (N.C. Archives Troop Returns, Box 4)].

Peter Valentine enlisted in the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 20 July 1778 for nine months, but died at Philadelphia Hospital according to the 23 April muster roll of Lieutenant Colonel Wm L. Davidson's Company [NARA, M246, roll 79, frames 143 of 323]. A military warrant was issued to his heirs for 640 acres of bounty land by a field officer according to the application for a survivor's pension which his nephews Daniel and Sarah made while living in Halifax County, North Carolina [NARA, R.10,820, M805-820, frame 0119]. Between 1 September 1784 and 1 February 1785 C. Dixon received Peter's final pay of 41 pounds for service in the North Carolina Continental Line [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1179; XVII:255].

Daniel Valentine was the brother of Peter Valentine according to the declaration of Polly's children on 21 May 1835 in Halifax County, North Carolina court. He enlisted in Captain Bradley's Company in the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 7 June 1779 for 18 months, but nothing more was said of him on the rolls [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1179]. A military land warrant was issued by a field officer to his heirs for 640 acres [NARA, R.10,820, M805-820, frame 0119].

John Walden was a taxable "Molato" in John Hutson's Bladen County household in 1770 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:34]. H. Montfort received his final pay of 20 pounds for his service in the North Carolina Continental Line [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVII:256]. He was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 7 "other free" and a slave in 1790 [NC:73].

Drury Walden was a Revolutionary War pensioner [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XXII:91]. He was a private and musician [NCDAR, Roster of Soldiers from North Carolina in the American Revolution, 588]. He made a declaration (signing) in Northampton County court to obtain pension, stating that he was born in Surry County, Virginia, in 1762 and was living in Bute County in 1779 when he was called into the service. He served 5 months in Captain Allen's Company of the 4th North Carolina Regiment commanded by Colonel Eaton, then 3 months in the Commissary General's Department and then as a private in Captain Kidd's North Carolina Militia as a substitute for Edward Jackson. He marched to Augusta on his first tour and on his second tour made gun carriages for the cannon and canteens for the soldiers [NARA, R.11014, M804, roll 2471, frame 456 of 1334]. He was in the Third Company detached from the Northampton County Regiment in the War of 1812 [N.C. Adjutant General, Muster Rolls of the War of 1812, 20]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 8 other free in 1790 [NC:73], 9 in 1800 [NC:483], 12 in 1810 [NC:752], 11 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:266], and 4 "free colored" in 1830.

Abraham Warwick (abstracted as Abraham Warren) enlisted for the length of the war in 1782: age 39, 5'4-1/2" high, black complexion, residence: Frederick County, born in Loudoun County [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.91)].

Moses Warwick was listed as a "Black" member of the undated colonial muster of Captain James Fason's Company of Northampton County militia [Mil. T.R. 1-3]. He may have been the Moses Warwick who was counted as white in Robeson County in 1790, head of a household of 3 males and one female [NC:49].

Jacob Warwick/ Warrick was listed among the soldiers in King George's War who failed to report to their camp at Williamsburg in July 1746: a whitish mulatto, age 25, 5'10" [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy 31:92]. He, Job, and Moses Warrick were "Black" members of the undated colonial muster of Captain James Fason's Company of Northampton County Militia [Mil. T.R. 1-3].

Edward Weaver was head of a Hertford County, North Carolina household of 7 "other free" in 1790 [NC:25] and 7 in Captain Moore's District in 1800. He was in Hertford County when he appointed an attorney to receive his final settlement for service in the Revolution on 29 March 1791 [NCGSJ XVIII:92-3].

Charles Whitmore was head of an Orange County, North Carolina household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:A:412]. He appeared in Orange County court on 25 May 1836 to apply for a pension for his service in the Revolution. He stated that he entered the service in the militia of Greensville County, Virginia. He was at the time bound to one Parr and substituted for his son Thomas Parr when he was drafted. He served in Captain Andrew Jeter's Company and Colonel James Moore's Regiment and helped guard Norfolk [NARA, S.11739, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/28017759].

Arthur Wiggins enlisted for 18 months in Bailey's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 10 September 1782 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1192]. He appeared in Bertie County court to make a declaration for a pension for his service in the Revolution, stating that he was living in Bertie County in 1779 when he was drafted in the town of Winton, Hertford County. He had served six months when he enlisted for 18 months under Captain Bailey and served until the end of the war. He marched to Charleston, South Carolina, where he was taken prisoner along with Captain Bailey. He had a brother Matthew Wiggins who was also in Charleston, but was then deceased [NARA, S.7952, M804-2572, frame 0377]. He was head of a Bertie household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:86], 4 in 1810 [NC:163], and 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:114].

Matthew Wiggins was a "free Mulatto" taxable in the Bertie County list of Cullen Pollock in 1769 and taxable as Matthias in the 1774 list of Samuel Granberry. He enlisted in Bailey's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment for 18 months on 10 September 1782 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1191]. He was called Mathias Wiggins (a Mulatto) when he married Prissey Tabert (Taborn?), 3 January 1786 Bertie County bond. Matthew was head of an Edgecombe County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:55].

Benjamin Wilkins, a "free man of colour," appeared in Edgecombe County, North Carolina court to apply for a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted with Colonel Branch in the town of Halifax in the 2nd Regiment and served in a company commanded by Captain Levi Lane. His application was rejected [NARA, R.11545, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/28318965].

John Wilkinson was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:485] and 6 "free colored" in Halifax County in 1820 [NC:169]. He was in Northampton County when he gave Presly Prichard his power of attorney to receive his final settlement certificate for his services in the Revolution [NCGSJ XVIII:99].

John Womble was a carpenter who enlisted in the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 1 June 1779 in Halifax County. He was captured in the siege of Charleston and remained on parole for the remainder of the war. He married his wife Catherine in Edgecombe County in 1798 [NARA, S.42083, M805, reel 883, frame 836]. He was head of an Edgecombe County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 and 11 "free colored" in 1820.

Cubet enlisted as a drummer in Brown's Company of the 1st North Carolina Regiment in 1777. Mingo enlisted on 10 June 1776 and was an assistant armourer in Dixon's Company. Negro Benjamin enlisted as a musician in Armstrong's Company of the 2nd Regiment in 1777 and was discharged in December 1777 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1025, 1108, 1123].

Others whose possible service requires more research:

Arthur Allen enlisted in Lytle's Company of the 9th North Carolina Regiment on 12 April 1781 and was discharged on 7 July 1782 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1007]. He may have been the Arthur Allen who was head of a household of 2 "Black" persons 12-50 years old and 4 "Black" persons less than 12 or over 50 years old in Captain Dupree's District of Northampton County in 1786 for the North Carolina state census, 9 "other free" in Northampton County for the federal census for 1790 [NC:74] and 10 in 1810 [NC:710].was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 9 "other free" in 1790 and 10 in 1810.

Isaac Carter was called a "Mulatto" in his Revolutionary War pension application. He enlisted in the 8th North Carolina Regiment on 1 September 1777, was taken prisoner, and was discharged on 20 February 1780 [Crow, Black Experience in Revolutionary North Carolina, 98]. The record of his service is confirmed in Clark, State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1031], but there is no record of his pension application.

 

MARYLAND

Negro Absolom was drafted from Prince George's County in 1781 [Archives of Maryland, 18:382].

Adam Adams, a "free black citizen of Charles County," enlisted May 1777 in Captain Henry Gaither's Company of the 1st Maryland Regiment commanded by General William Smallwood. He received his discharge in November 1783. He was head of a Charles County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 and 2 in 1800 [MD:551] and 8 "free colored" in 1830. He received a pension and 50 acres of bounty land for his service [NARA, S.34623, M804, https://www.fold3.com].

John Adams was a "free Negro" head of a Prince George County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [MD:268] and 8 in 1810 (called J.B. Adams) [MD:22]. He may have been one of four "Black Persons being Soldiers (of the Maryland Line), VIZT. Thomas Thompson, Leonard Turner, Valentine Murrin, and John Adams," who were arrested by the local authorities in Orange County, North Carolina, in December 1780 for breaking into someone's house. They were forcibly rescued by the Continental Army [Orange County Court Minutes 1777-8, Part I, Dec. 19 and 23, 1780, cited by Crow, The Black Experience in Revolutionary North Carolina, 68]. John Adams was listed in the muster of Captain Henry Gaither's Company in August and September 1778, the same company as Charles Proctor, Adam Adams and John Butler of Charles County [NARA, M246, roll 33, frames 153, 159, 162 of 526].

John Allsop was in Captain Bayley's Maryland Regiment commanded by Colonel John Gumby at White Plains on 9 September 1778 [NARA, M246, roll 34, frames 240, 397 of 587]. He enlisted from Frederick County until 10 December 1781 [Archives of Maryland, 18:653]. John Allstep was head of an Anne Arundel County household of 4 "other free" in 1810.

William Anderson appeared in Lebanon, Ohio court, to apply for a pension. He stated that he enlisted in the 6th Maryland Regiment under CaptainCarberry. His name did not appear on any roster, but Jeremiah Collins, a captain of horse of the French troops, testified that he knew William Anderson, a "black man," who was a servant to Captain West and served part of the time with the French troops and part with the Americans. He received a severe wound to his thigh [NARA, R.203, M804, roll 59, frame 104 of 693].

Thomas Batterson (Negro) enlisted in the Revolution as a substitute in Anne Arundel County [Archives of Maryland, 18:369].

Jacob Blake applied for a pension in Worcester County court on 20 June 1818 and 28 February 1821 for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted at Snowhill in 1780 and was discharged at Annapolis [NARA, S.34654, M804, https://www.fold3.com]. He was head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 7 "free colored" in 1820.

Edward Blake, born say 1760, was a "molatto" who enlisted in the Revolutionary War [Archives of Maryland 47:460].

Thomas Bowser, was head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 3 "other free" and 4 slaves in 1810 [MD:878]. He was deceased on 10 March 1846 when his only heir William Bowser provided testimony to the Anne Arundel County court that Thomas had served as a private in the Maryland Line during the Revolution [NARA, BlWt. 2385-100, M804-306, frame 0134].

Abram Brissington was a "Free Negro" who enlisted as a substitute in the Revolution in Maryland for 3 years on 18 May 1778, listed as dead or deserted in 1780 [Archives of Maryland, 18:82, 317].

Bristol (a free Negro) and Spindilow (a free Negro) were drafted in Talbot County on 30 August 1781 to serve until 10 December 1781 [Archives of Maryland, 18:387].

Major Brown was a "Negro" who was drafted in the Revolution from Cecil County in May 1781 but listed among those who absconded [NARA, M246, roll 34, frame 447 of 587].

Job Buley enlisted in the 3d Maryland Regiment on 8 April 1782: residence Cambridge, age 27 years, 5'7-1/2" high, stout, black complexion, form of hair: wool [NARA, M881, https://www.fold3.com/image/17229501; M246, roll 34, frame 433 of 587].

George Buley, a "Mulatto" soldier who enlisted in the Revolution in Dorchester County, appeared in Dorchester County court at the age of 72 years on 9 April 1833 and applied for a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he was born in Prince George's County about 1761 and was living in Dorchester County when he entered the service at East New Market for 9 months on 10 March 1781 [NARA, W.27576, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/12028637].

Henry Butler was head of a Charles County household of 8 "other free" and 4 slaves in 1800 [MD:530] and 9 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [MD:342]. He was one of the drafts and substitutes from Charles County who were discharged from service in the Revolutionary War on 3 December 1781 [Archives of Maryland 48:10].

Ignatius/ Nace Butler died on 6 August 1809 according to testimony on 30 July 1840 by his widow Mary Butler, aged seventy-six, who was residing in the 1st Election District of Anne Arundel County when she appeared in court to apply for a pension for his services as a musician in the Revolution. He was listed at the Land Office in Annapolis in an "Alphabetical list of the 2nd Regiment in 1782: Butler, Nace Fifer, entered 1776 for the War, dischd in 1783 [NARA, R.1549, M804, https://www.fold3.com].

Thomas Carney, Jr., a man of color, was about sixty years old on 24 February 1818 when he appeared in Caroline County court to apply for a pension for his services in the Revolution. He enlisted in the 5th Maryland Regiment in June 1781 and served for three years [NARA, S.35203, M804, roll 473, frame 552, https://www.fold3.com]. He was head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 6 "free colored" in 1820.

Isaac Carr enlisted in the 2nd Maryland Regiment on 6 April 1782: residence: Montgomery County, age 24, 5'7" height, complexion: yellow Molato [NARA, M246, roll 34, frame 430 of 587; http://www.ancestry.com].

Edward Chambers, "a man of color," received arrears of pay for his service in the Revolution from 1 August 1780 to 15 November 1783. He appeared in Anne Arundel County court on 20 June 1818 and 21 April 1820 to make a declaration to obtain a pension for his service. He stated that he enlisted in the 3rd Regiment about July 1777 in New Town, Chester [National Archives pension file S.34684, M804, roll 509, frame 322; https://www.fold3.com]. He was head of a Anne Arundel County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

John Chubb enlisted in the Revolution in Loudoun County, Virginia, on 19 March 1781 and was sized on 28 May: age 23, 5'5-1/2" high, black complexion, planter, born in and residing in Montgomery County, Maryland. He was listed in the 1st Company of the 1st Virginia Battalion from 1 December 1782 to 1 May 1783 [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.67); NARA, M246, roll 113, frame 712].

Pompey Colless enlisted from Frederick County until 10 December 1781 [Archives of Maryland, 18:653].

Charles Cornish was listed as one of the recruits from Caroline County in the Revolution "to the 10th December on 14 August 1781 [Archives of Maryland, 18:385]. He was head of a Talbot County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 and 6 in Baltimore City in 1800 [MD:169].

Henry Dalton, the "mulatto" son of white woman, was bound to Samuel Pruitt until the age of thirty-one years in Frederick County, Maryland court in August 1750 [Rice, Frederick County, Maryland Judgment Records 1748-65, 49]. He was head of a Monongalia County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:169] and 8 "free colored" in 1830 [VA:344]. He was granted a pension for his service in the Revolution, stating in his application on 31 November 1832 that he was born in Bladensburg, Maryland, in 1748, enlisted in 1777 at Redstone settlement near Brownsville, Pennsylvania, resided in Prince George's County for nine years after the Revolution and then moved to Monongalia County [NARA, S.5362, M804; https://www.fold3.com].

Charles Davis enlisted in the 2nd Maryland Regiment on 23 April 1782: residence: Baltimore, age 19, 5'4-1/2" height, complexion: Negro [NARA, M246, roll 34, frame 434 of 587; http://www.ancestry.com].

Massam/ Marsham Dean enrolled in the first militia company organized for the Revolutionary War in the Elizabeth Town District of Frederick County on 6 January 1776 [Peden, Revolutionary Patriots of Washington County, Maryland]. He was head of an Allegany County, Maryland household of 9 "other free" in 1800 (called Marsham Dean) [MD:3]

James Dean enrolled in the first militia company organized for the Revolutionary War in the Elizabeth Town District of Frederick County on 6 January 1776 [Peden, Revolutionary Patriots of Washington County, Maryland]. He was head of a Washington County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1790 and 5 in 1800 [MD:641].

George Dias/ Dice was a "man of Colour" residing in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, on 5 May 1818 when he appeared in court to apply for a pension for his services in the Revolution (called George Dias). He stated that he enlisted in Queen Anne's County, Maryland, and served until 1783. He received a land warrant and pension [NARA, S.42,161, M804, Bounty Land Warrant no. 618-100, https://www.fold3.com]. He was head of a Queen Anne's County household of 8 "other free" in 1790 (called George Dice) [MD:509] and 2 "free colored" males in the Middle Ward of Philadelphia in 1820 (called George Dies).

James Due was head of a Caroline County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1790, 6 "other free," a white boy 10-15, and a white woman 26-44 in 1810 [MD:195]. He appeared in Caroline County court and stated that he enlisted in 1778 under Captain John Hawkins of Queen Anne's County in the 5th Virginia Regiment for nine months and at the expiration of the term enlisted for the war. He was kept prisoner in Elizabethtown for eleven months. He received pension no. 5876 in November 1818. On 9 April 1821 he had a woman living with him named Elizabeth Cevil, a house keeper aged forty years, a son Enoch aged 26 years, a son John aged 17 years, a daughter Rachel, seventeen, and a daughter Surrena who was 12 [NARA, S.34771, M804, roll 859, frame 35 of 775].

Charles Fenton enlisted in the Revolution on 20 July 1776 [Archives of Maryland, 18:41]. He was head of a Patapsco Hundred, Baltimore County household of 5 whites in 1790 and head of a Soldiers Delight Hundred, Baltimore County household of 4 "other free," a white woman 16-26 and 2 slaves in 1810. He was the son of a white woman named Margaret Fenton who was sold by the Anne Arundel County court for 21 years for having three "Molatto" children [Court Record, 1748-1751, 65; 1751-54, 85].

Francis Freeman, a "person of colour," was a resident of White Clay Creek when he appeared in New Castle County, Delaware court on 1 July 1818 to apply for a pension for his service in the Revolution. He enlisted in the 2nd Maryland Regiment on 25 May 1778 and was discharged on 1 November 1780 [NARA, S.35951, M804, frame of 738], perhaps the Fracis Freeman who was head of a Montgomery County, Maryland housheold of 4 "other free" in 1810.

Ephraim Game was taxable in George Scott's Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County household in 1759. He was a recruit from Dorchester County in the Revolutionary War on 25 July 1780 [Archives of Maryland 18:339].

William Grace may have been the William Grace who enlisted for 9 months in Lieutenant Hardman's Company of the 2nd Maryland Regiment on 25 May 1778 and was listed in the roll of December 1778 [NARA, M246, roll 33, frames 501, 504, 507, 510 of 526]. He was head of a Caroline County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:219].

Benjamin Grinnage served in the Revolution as a substitute from Queen Anne's County, and was described as "a poor man with children but never applied for his discharge" [Archives of Maryland 48:11; [NARA, M246, roll 34, frame 446 of 587; http://www.ancestry.com].

James Grinnage enlisted for 3 years and was in the roll of Captain Josias Johnson's Company in the 5th Maryland Regiment on 8 September 1778 [NARA, M246, roll 34, frame 183 of 587; http://www.ancestry.com].

Frederick Hall was head of a Montgomery County household of 1 "Free Negro or Mulatto" over 16, 3 under 16 and 2 female "Free Negroes or Mulattos" in 1790 [MD:235] and 4 "free colored," including a man and woman over 45, and a female slave over the age of 45 years in Fairfax Township, Fairfax County, Virginia, in 1820. He was born in Port Tobacco, Charles County. His name appeared on the muster rolls on 11 May 1777 but was listed as a deserter on 10 January 1778; enlisted again on 25 March 1779 and was on the rolls to April 1780, so his application was denied [NARA, R.7569, M804, roll 1160, frame 686 of 1020 and http://www.fold3.com].

Lazarous Harmon served in the 6th Company of the 1st Maryland Regiment from 1 August 1780 to 15 November 1783 [Archives of Maryland 18:356, 539]. He was head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [MD:124], 9 in 1800 [MD:745] and 7 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [MD:623]. He made a declaration in Worcester County court on 10 April 1818 to obtain a pension for his service in the Revolution [NARA, S.34911, M805-399].

Solomon Haycock served in the Revolution from Queen Anne's County and was discharged on 3 December 1781 [Archives of Maryland 48:11]. He was head of a Queen Anne's County household of 6 "other free" in 1790, 6 in 1800 [MD:349] and 6 "free colored" in Harford County in 1830.

Peter Jackson enlisted in the 5th Maryland Regiment on 2 April 1782: residence: Cecil County, age 23, 5'6" height, complexion: black. He was due $59 pay by the end of the year [NARA, M246, roll 34, frames 400, 433 of 587; http://www.ancestry.com].

Bazabel Norman was in a list of "free Negroes" in Frederick County, Virginia, in 1802 frame [PPTL 1782-1802, frame 856] and head of a Frederick County, Virginia household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:569]. He gave his age as fifty-seven the 12th July last on 14 May 1818 in Washington County, Ohio court when he made a declaration to obtain a pension, stating that he enlisted in Maryland in 1777 [NARA, W.5429, M804, https://www.fold3.com].

Matthew Oliver was a "Mulatto" drafted from Kent County, Maryland, on 10 December 1781 but had not reported for service [NARA, M246, roll 34, frame 444 of 587; http://www.ancestry.com]. He was a "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1790.

Richard Pettigrew served on board the galley Accomac commanded by Captain Underhill from the time the galley was ready until she was laid up. A certificate was issued in the name of the seaman on 26 April 1785 for 47 pounds which was given to Colonel Cropper for services prior to 1 January 1782. He remained in Accomack County for a few years after the war ended, then moved to Delaware and died a few months befor 1 December 1835. He had no widow living, so Leah Collins, his child, was his only heir at law according to testimony by several witnesses in Kent County, Delaware. Leah, about 40 years of age, appeared in Accomack County court on 29 November 1836 to apply for his pension, stating that she had received a warrant for his three years of service [NARA, S.46639, roll 1920, frame 323 of 1326]. Richard was a "free Negro" taxable in Kent County in 1797 [Delaware Archives film RG 3535, roll 4, 1785-1798, frame 184], head of a Mispillion, Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 and 9 "other free" in 1810 [DE:93]. Leah was head of a Kent County household of 1 "free colored" in 1840.

Cupid Plummer enlisted as a private in Captain Lilburn Williams' Company of the 2nd Maryland Regiment on 27 April 1778 and was listed in the muster of September 1778 to March 1780 [NARA, M246, roll 33, frames 475, 478, 481, 483 of 526]. He was head of a Prince George's County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1790 and 6 in 1800 [MD:281].

Obediah Plummer enlisted as a private in Captain Lilburn Williams' Company of the 2nd Maryland Regiment on 27 April 1778 and was listed in the muster of September and December 1778, then transferred on 1 March 1780 [NARA, M246, roll 33, frames 475, 478 of 526]. He was head of an Erie County, Pennsylvania household of 1 "free colored" man over 45 years of age in 1820.

Charles Proctor died while serving in the Revolutionary War [Archives of Maryland 18:150]. He enlisted in the Revolution for 9 months and was listed in the muster of Captain Henry Gaither's Company in August and September 1778, the same company as John and Adam Adams and John Butler of Charles County [NARA, M246, roll 33, frames 153, 159, 162 of 526].

Henry Proctor was counted in the Constable's Census for Charles County in 1778 and was a "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 and 11 in 1810 [MD:315]. He served in the Revolutionary War and was discharged on 3 December 1781 [Archives of Maryland 48:10].

Philip Savoy, a "Man of Colour," appeared in Anne Arundel County on 2 April 1818 and stated that he enlisted in Annapolis in the 1st Maryland Regiment in 1778 and served his time. He had a wife and ten children who were all slaves [NARA, S.35057, M804, roll 2125, frame 302; M246, roll 34, frame 177 of 526].

Salady Stanley was probably identical to the "Negro Boy named Salady" who still had seven years to serve when he was listed in the 7 June 1770 Dorchester County estate of Edward Smith [Prerogative Inventories 105:144]. He was a "coloured man" who enlisted in the 4th Maryland Regiment on 4 September 1781 and was discharged at Frederickstown at the end of the war. He appeared in Dorchester County court on 4 April 1821 to apply for a pension, stating that he was about sixty-seven and had served for three years [NARA, R.10057, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/16260520]. He was head of a Dorchester County household of 1 "Free Negro or Mulatto" over 16 and 5 slaves in 1790 [MD:439] and 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:657].

William Taylor was a "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 5 "other free" in 1790, perhaps identical to William Taylor who was head of a Queen Anne's County household of 2 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1800 [MD:381]. He was described as "yellow (Mulatto) complexioned, aged 29, 5'7-3/4" high, born in Maryland, from Montgomery County, enlisted April 2, 1782," when he was listed in the Revolutionary War Maryland roll [NARA, M246, roll 34, frame 436 of 586, https://www.fold3.com/image/12007265].

Thomas Thompson was one of four "Black Persons being Soldiers" of the Maryland Line who were arrested by the local authorities in Orange County, North Carolina, for breaking into someone's house. They were forcibly rescued by the Continental Army [Orange County Court Minutes 1777-8, Part I, Dec. 19 and 23, 1780, cited by Crow, The Black Experience in Revolutionary North Carolina, 68].

Negroe Tower was drafted in Harford County in 1781 but was discharged because he had a wife and children [Archives of Maryland, 18:400].

Leonard Turner was one of four "Black Persons being Soldiers (of the Maryland Line), VIZT. Thomas Thompson, Leonard Turner, Valentine Murrin, and John Adams," who were arrested by the local authorities in Orange County, North Carolina, in December 1780 for breaking into someone's house. They were forcibly rescued by the Continental Army [Orange County Court Minutes 1777-8, Part I, Dec. 19 and 23, 1780, cited by Crow, The Black Experience in Revolutionary North Carolina, 68].

York Waters, "a negroe," was in the 2nd Maryland Regiment on 10 February 1780 when the Maryland Council ordered the commissary to deliver him cloth sufficient for a pair of breeches [Archives of Maryland, 43:82].

Henry Williams was a "man of color" from Anne Arundel County who enlisted in the Revolution in Annapolis about 1777 and died in Baltimore on 5 January 1850 [NARA, W.3638, Bounty land warrant 6767F-160-55, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/28347880].

Daniel Williams was head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1790, and a "Negro" head of 10 "other free" in 1800 [MD:791]. He was seventy-eight years old on 4 May 1835 when he appeared in Philadelphia County court to make a declaration to obtain a pension for his service in the Revolution. He stated that he was born in Accomack County where he enlisted. He served for five years and was in charge of a wagon and two horses. He returned to Accomack County after the war, then removed to Maryland where he resided for thirteen years, and moved to Philadelphia where he resided for twenty-seven years [NARA, R.11,569, M804, https://www.fold3.com].

David Wilson, "a man of Colour," was about sixty-four years old when he appeared in Washington County, Maryland court on 1 August 1820 to apply for a pension for his service in the Revolution. He enlisted in June 1778 under Captain Josiah Johnson in the 5th Maryland Regiment in the 1st Brigade under General Smallwood, served until the end of the war and was discharged in Annapolis [NARA, S.35119, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/2835736].

 

DELAWARE

Peter Beckett, was a "Negro" about 25 years and seven months old on 27 January 1770 when Samuel Hanson of Kent County set him free [Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Duck Creek Monthly Meeting, Deed of Manumission of Slaves, 1774-1792, 21]. He served in the First Company of the Delaware Regiment in the Revolutionary War and received pay from 1 August 1780 to 4 November 1783 [DHS, MS Delaware Regiment Pay Records, 1778-1783, certificates 54,483; 54,830; 54,938; 55,184; Public Archives Commission, Delaware Archives, 196, 607; https://www.fold3.com/image/16725573]

William Butcher, Sr., enlisted in the Revolution on 24 April 1777 and was listed in the Muster of the Independent Company of Foot raised for the safe guard of the...persons...residing near the Town of Lewis and the Coast of Delaware Bay, commanded by Captain William Pary [NARA, M246, roll 31, frame 322 of 658]. He was a "Mulattoe taxable on 2 horses in Kent County in 1797.

Thomas Clark married Elizabeth Morris ("Mustees, free"), on 1 July 1773 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 286]. He was a soldier in the Revolution from Sussex County who died before 13 August 1833 when his children Whittington Clark, Nathaniel Clark, John Clark and Comfort Miller applied for bounty land for his service [NARA, B.L.Wt. 2047-100, M804, roll 566, frame 463 of 782]. Whittington and Nathaniel were "free colored" heads of Sussex County, Delaware households in 1820.

James Driggers was listed in the pay roll of Captain Matthew Manlove's Company in the Revolutionary War on 1 October 1776, having served a month and seventeen days and paid 3 pounds, 16 shillings [Public Archives Commission, Delaware Archives, 70-1].

Henry Game was listed in Colonel Thomas Couch's 2nd Battalion of Delaware Militia in 1776 [NARA, M246, roll 29, frame 199 of 694]. He was head of a St. Mary's County, Maryland household of 3 "other free' in 1800 [MD:340].

David Handzer was listed in the account of the Sussex County estate of Thomas Waples on 2 September 1766 [Orphans Court 1761-72, 138]. He served in the First Company of the Delaware Regiment and died before the February 1780 muster. His administrator received his pay from 1 August 1780 to 1 November 1782 [DHS, MS Delaware Regiment Pay Records, 1778-1783, certificates 54,358, 54,816, 54,479, 55,180; Public Archives Commission, Delaware Archives, 196; also M246, roll 31, frame 496]. The Hanzer family descended from Aminadab, a slave in Accomack County, Virginia, who had a child by a white woman [Deeds, Wills, 1663-66, fol. 91; 1664-71, fol. 20]. His son Aminadab Hanzer, moved to Sussex County, Delaware, by September 1688 when "Aminidab Hanger Negro" testified in court about moving cattle from Accomack County to Sussex County, Delaware [Sussex County Court Records 1680-99, 262]. He purchased land in Sussex County in 1696 [DB A-198]. On 2 February 1773 Thomas and William Handzer, "Mallatos," made a quit claim deed for 350 acres in Sussex County, Delaware, which had been granted to "Aminadab Handzer Malatto Deceasd" [DB D-4:225-7; F-6:220-2; H-1, 329-30; L-11, 314-5].

Edward Harman received pay from 1 August 1780 to 4 November 1783 for service in the Delaware Regiment in the Revolution [DHS, MS Delaware Regiment Pay Records, 1778-1783, certificates 54,359; 54,480; 54,860; 54,935; 55,181; Public Archives Commission, Delaware Archives, 196, 607]. He was head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:438], 8 in 1810 [DE:437] and 5 "free colored" in Lewis and Rehoboth Hundred in 1820 [DE:308]. He was about sixty years old on 20 April 1818 when he appeared in Sussex County court to make a declcaration to apply for a pension for his service in the Revolutionary War [National Archives Pension file S36000, microfilm M805-399 and https://www.fold3.com/image/246/22756535].

Major Hitchens was listed in the Muster Roll of Recruits to the Delaware Regiment at the Port of Christiana Bridge on 20 June 1781 with Caleb Hitchens, Peter Beckett, Levin Magee, Presley/ Preston Hutt, George Lehea (a slave) and David Hanser in an undated list of the 1st Delaware Company. Major and Caleb were paid for their services [NARA, M246, roll 30, frame 283 of 532, roll 31, frame 495 of 658; Delaware Archives, I:135]. Major was the son of Major Hitchens of Northampton County, Virginia, who was a "mulatoe man" indicted by the court on 12 May 1747 for intermarrying with a "mulatoe" woman [Orders 1742-8, 402-3, 422, 429, 445, 457]. He left a Worcester County, Maryland will, proved 18 June 1766, naming his sons Edward, Major, Edmond and Jard [Jones, Worcester County Wills, JW-3, 1759-1769, 36]. Major was counted as white in the 1800 Delaware census.

Joseph Hughes enlisted in the Revolution in Culpeper County, Virginia, before December 1781 when he was sized: age 31, 5'9-1/4" high, black comlexion, a planter, born in Newcastle, Pennsylvania [The Chesterfield Supplement or Size Roll of Troops at Chesterfield Court House, LVA accession no. 23816, by http://revwarapps.org/b81.pdf (p.79)].

Presley Hutt received pay for service in the Delaware Regiment in the Revolutionary War from 1 August 1780 to 4 November 1783 [DHS, MS Delaware Regiment Pay Records, 1778-1783, certificates 54,361; 54,861; 55,018; 55,273], a delinquent "Negroe" taxable in Duck Creek Hundred in 1780, 1781, 1788, delinquent in 1789, a "Negro" taxable on a cow and a calf in 1797 [Levy List 1768-84, frame 425, 491; 1785-98, frames 104, 128, 174, 516], head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:13].

John Hutt enlisted in the Revolution in Delaware on 17 March 1781 and died in June 1781 [NARA, M246, roll 31, frame 502]. He was the grandson of Hannah Hutt whose son John Hutt was sold by the Kent County, Delaware court for 31 years [Delaware State Archives, Record Group, 3815.031, 1722-1732, frames 65, 153, 206; Record Group, 3535, Levy Assessments 1743-67, frames 140, 169, 184, 198, 212, 228, 244, 264, 269, 305, 315, 383; Brewer, Kent County Guardian Accounts, Houston to McBride, 30; Record Group, 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1743-67, frame 529; 1768-84, frame 6].

Abednego Jackson was living in St. Mary's County on 25 May 1778 when he enlisted for nine months in the 2nd Maryland Regiment and was discharged on 3 April 1779. After the war he moved to Georgetown where he was employed by and lived at the Catholic College. He applied for a pension in the District of Columbia court [NARA, S.10909, M804, roll 1397, frame 662 of 1069]. He was a "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 4 "other free" in 1790.

George Lahea enlisted in Quenoult's Company of the Delaware Militia on 9 March 1781 and was discharged on 14 February 1782, "being a slave for a life and being claimed" [Delaware Archives, III:1150].

James Magee, born 28 July 1750, "otherwise James Game son of mullato Sue other wise Sue Magee or Game" [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, Book 2:126; 3:42]. He enlisted in the 2nd Delaware Regiment on 9 March 1781, in the same list as Edward Harmon [NARA, M246, roll 31, frames 498, 504].

Levin Magee was taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1777 to 1791. Levin McGee enlisted in the 1st Company of the 2nd Battalion of Colonel Williams' Delaware Regiment and was listed in the muster for July and August 1780, transferred in September, delivered a coat at Lewis Town in March 1780, delivered clothing in Dover on 13 June 1780 [NARA, M246, roll 29, frames 312, 393, 402, 495].

Stephen Puckham, born say 1758, enlisted in Colonel David Hall's Company in the Delaware Regiment on 3 February 1776 and was listed in the muster in the barracks at Lewes Town on 11 April 1776 [Public Archives Commission, Delaware, 43-5]. The Puckhams desecend from an Indian named John Puckham and Joan Johnson, the African American granddaughter of Anthony Johnson [Terrence, Old Somerset, 142-3]. George, Levin and John Puckham were "other free" heads of Somerset County, Maryland households.

James Songo, born about 1757, was in the Muster Roll of Captain McLane's Delaware Company for March to June 1779 [Delaware Archives, Military I:539]. He enlisted again on 25 December 1781 and was sized in a Delaware muster roll on 28 January 1782; age 25 years, 5'7", born in Delaware, a resident of Kent County, black hair, yellow complexion. He was listed as a deserter who was taken up and deserted again on 28 July 1782 [NARA, M246, roll 30, frames 347 & 405 of 532]. He was advertised as a deserter in an ad placed in the Pennsylvania Journal and the Weekly Advertiser on 14 September 1782: James Songo, a mulatto, born in Kent County, Delaware State, 25 years of age, 5 feet six inches high, has lost some of his toes [Boyle, Joseph L, He Loves a good deal of rum...Military Desertions during the American Revolution, 1775-1783, Vol. 2, June 1777-1783, 249, 298-9]. He was head of a Worcester County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:786].

John Wilson, born about 1760, enlisted in the Revolution in Delaware and was sized on 25 June 1782: age 22, 5'5" high, a weaver, born in Maryland, residence: Sussex County, Delaware, hair black, complexion yellow, enlisted as a substitute for James Messix. He deserted the following month [NARA, M246, roll 30, frames 347, 406].